21 Burst results for "Cormac Mccarthy"

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on ACG - The Best Gaming Podcast

ACG - The Best Gaming Podcast

05:12 min | 2 months ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on ACG - The Best Gaming Podcast

"Because unlike field from Metallica, who most people consider one of the best, like I didn't realize he's considered like as a pick guitar player is considered one of the best. Yeah. I mean, like, people who don't like Metallica were like, no, no, no, that guy's insane. But I invented the downstroke only technique. So he only plays like downstroke to get as much force or something. Or is it the most attack? So he has insane attacks and that Bentley his place. Oh, you're back would be so bad. But he's a machine. He's fast. That's 25 foot high. Yeah, dude, he's all bent over. I was watching them do a song a couple of weeks ago on a YouTube video. And I was like, his back has to hurt so far. But then you see a lot of guitarists doing that. You see new ones now I see who have a, but you see that crab body? And they're like, all hunched over. They're like, yeah. You're just like, dude, your neck must just be ruined. Do you guys get that way? Oh, go ahead. Great, silver. It's the same with literature where really one of the best things you can do as a writer if you want to grow. It's just breed as many different oh, for sure. Writing styles as possible and adopt like, oh, I can use syntax in this way. Oh, I can use grammar in this way. Oh, cormac McCarthy never really uses commas. Like you just use this period. That's a stylistic choice. He makes. There are all these different choices I can make for how I want to write and how I want to present what I'm writing. And the more you read yourself, the more you're going to pick that up and learn that stuff. Johnny, do you guys have to teach somebody your job? You don't, right? Because they have to have, yes, you do. You have juniors as well, that have to be taught how to, well, you test sometimes even how to program. Well, that's sort of what I'm getting at. But do you guys are you guys purposely not on that team of teachers? No, I usually. You don't seem like you'd be the incredibly forgiving teacher to me. I don't know why. I have the highest patience pretty much. Congratulations. What do you mean? No, dude, because he's got no patience for 80% of what's going on in gaming. So like I would and he's like, fuck it, I'm not playing this game because this button doesn't do what I want. Of course that's because he can buy a lot of games. But for whatever reason I've attributed that to your software. So you have to teach. Low, low level stuff. Interesting. I never knew that. Johnny, you were saying you also have to teach? Yeah, in my job, there is an expectation for someone at a higher level that you have to propagate your knowledge to new people, joining as well. So there's like internal courses on different technologies are also just internal stuff that you have to do. You ever had that POS worker, though, that you know somehow they got hired and they just don't know shit at their level. I don't know if you guys have that, but I've had that a couple. As a technical contact with a customer of ours. Oh. And they're running things, but in the argument of why we should implement it that way, you'd like to you're like, dude, I don't know how you got this job, man, but yeah. I've had that before or like we used to have a job where they believed everybody's, you know, say was worth it. And I was like, that's absolutely incorrect. You don't ask a baker to make a rowboat. Like, what the fuck are we doing?.

Metallica Bentley cormac McCarthy Johnny YouTube
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Because You Need to Know

Because You Need to Know

04:11 min | 7 months ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Because You Need to Know

"Was younger and fluky dot on the stock market led me to retire early. Which is always nice work in this field for a specifically its application in learning knowledge written a boot something. They i for learning by amazon. And give you a code for this. Can i was asking. The last buca was read. It was blood by cormac mccarthy which was an absolutely astounding read. I highly recommend. I think pope also be the best american novel. I've ever read a really amazing piece of literature there. We just finished a second. Boop lending experience design that we published in november. The things that i was.

cormac mccarthy amazon pope
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Seek Outside Podcast

Seek Outside Podcast

02:39 min | 7 months ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Seek Outside Podcast

"So we have you ever had something so crazy happened to you in the woods that you brought it back to camp. You try to tell people about and that just didn't believe you. They have a few times. It's hard like how do you make people believe something that is actually crazy and actually happened but sounds so ridiculous. Well i'll tell you. I got the perfect situation for you right here here. Seek outside on this podcast. We are going to be doing a blog and contest. We want you our listeners to write a blog post about the craziest outdoor experience that you have ever had. Yeah so we're going to be doing a podcast. On december first we will pick the top three in read them. And we're gonna be picking the winner on that podcast that you gotta listen to make sure that you've won. It's going to be live and guess what the best part is. The winner is going to have their story published on our website as well as they are going to win a seek outside silex ten. That's awesome pretty dope. Yeah so to win this. We're going to base it on three kind of judging criteria the craziness of the story itself is that life threatening. Did you have a close encounter with wildlife. Did you have a close encounter with aliens. was there. There's some sort of natural phenomenon that happened stuff like that also believability because we're asking for crazy stories. We wanna see photos now. These don't have to be professional photos that you've taken with a three thousand dollar camera. They can be scans from disposable camera for all we care we just wanna see something right some proof and then lastly writing finesse. So we're talking. You know full sentences the whole nines. They don't have to be super professional but readable for sure exactly. We're not asking for cormac mccarthy but just something that you know we'll grab a listener and be able to live on our website forever. Okay guys if you want to submit your crazy story make sure you send the story To an email address that email address is going to be podcast at seek outside dot com in that email make sure that the subject is believe it or not and then your name in parentheses after that and we will take peek at all you guys entries and again december first. We're going to be doing a semi live podcast announcing the winner given away a silex so make sure that you You write it and you write a good. I got enjoy. the podcast. Can't wait to the outside.

cormac mccarthy
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Seek Outside Podcast

Seek Outside Podcast

02:44 min | 7 months ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Seek Outside Podcast

"So. Have you ever had something so crazy happened to you in the woods that you brought it back to camp you try to tell people about. It just didn't believe you. I have yeah a few times and it's hard like how do you make people believe something. That is actually crazy and actually happened but sounds so ridiculous. Well i'll tell you got the perfect situation for you right here here at seek outside on this podcast. We are going to be doing a blog writing contest. We want you our listeners to write a blog post about the craziest outdoor experience that you have ever had. Yes so we're going to be doing a podcast on december first where we will pick top three in read them and we're gonna be picking the winner on podcast. You gotta listen to make sure that you've won. It's going to be live and guess what the best part is. The winner is going to have their story published on our website as well as they are going to win a seek outside silex ten. That's awesome pretty dope. Yeah so to win this. We're going to base it on three kind of judging criteria the craziness of the story itself is life threatening. Did you have a close encounter with wildlife. Did you have a close encounter with aliens. was there. There's some sort of natural phenomenon that happens stuff like that also believability because we're asking for crazy stories. We want to see photos now. These don't have to be professional photos that you've taken with a three thousand dollar camera. They can be scans from a disposable camera for all week air. We just wanna see something right some proof. And then lastly writing finesse. So we're talking full sentences the whole nines. They don't have to be super professional but readable for sure. We're not asking for cormac mccarthy but just something that you know we'll grab listener and be able to live on our website forever. Okay guys if you want submit your crazy story make sure you send the story To an email address that email address is going to be podcast at seek outside dot com in that email make sure that the subject is believe it or not and then your name in parentheses after that and we will take peek at all you guys as entries and again december first. We're going to be doing a semi live podcast announcing the winner given away a silex so make sure that you You write it and you write it good. I got enjoy..

cormac mccarthy
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Seek Outside Podcast

Seek Outside Podcast

02:42 min | 8 months ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Seek Outside Podcast

"So crazy. Happened to you in the woods that you brought it back to camp. You try to tell people about. And that just didn't believe i have yeah a few times and it's hard like how do you make people believe something that is actually crazy and actually happened but sounds so ridiculous. Well i'll tell you. I got the perfect situation for you right here here at seek. Outside on this podcast. We are going to be doing a blog and contest. We want you our listeners to write a blog post about the craziest outdoor experience that you have ever had. Yeah so we're going to be doing a podcast on december first. We'll pick the top three in read them and we're going to be picking the winner on that podcast that you gotta listen to make sure that you've won. It's going to be live and guess what the best part is. The winner is going to have their story published on our website as well as they are going to win a seek outside silex ten. That's pretty dope. Yeah so to win this. We're going to base it on three kind of judging criteria the craziness of the story itself is that life threatening. Did you have a close encounter with wildlife. Did you have a close encounter with aliens. was there. There's some sort of natural phenomenon that happened stuff like that also believability because we're asking for crazy stories. We wanna see photos now. These don't have to be professional photos that you've taken with a three thousand dollar camera. They can be scans from a disposable camera for all we care. We just wanna see something right some proof. And then lastly writing finesse. So we're talking. You know full sentences the whole nines. They don't have to be super professional but readable for sure exactly. We're not asking cormac mccarthy but just something that you know we'll grab a listener and be able to live on our website forever. Okay guys if you want to submit your crazy story make sure you send the story to an email address. That email address is going to be podcast at seek outside dot com. That email make sure that the subject is believe it or not and then your name in parentheses after that and we will take peek at all. You guys entries and again december first. We're gonna be doing a semi live podcast announcing the winner given away a silex so make sure that you You write it and you write good. I got draw. The podcast can't wait.

cormac mccarthy
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Unabridged

Unabridged

04:55 min | 10 months ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Unabridged

"You want opinions about books. We've got him everyone and welcome to unabridged. This is the latest book that you could not stop reading before we get started. I want to remind you that. If you'd like to help the podcast you can rate review and subscribe on apple podcasts. That helps us a lot. It helps promote our podcast in the feed and help other listeners to find our work so we really appreciate that reviews are great and if you write a review we would be happy to share that here on the podcast. All right what we are going to get started with our bookish check in ashley what are you reading so i just started this one. This is peter hellers the river. And i have wanted to read this since it came out. And it's just been patiently waiting on my kendall for quite a while. But i absolutely loved peter heller. Jen actually introduced me to him. Early on in our friendship and i read the dog stars of his and absolutely loved it. I think that he is such an impactful writer. And he also has traces of his writing that echo books that i loved for a long time hewlett cormac mccarthy is someone that really love and i think a lot about quarter mccarthy's work when i'm reading peter heller. Even though they're quite different and show. I absolutely love dogs stars and then read. The painter of has his while end. I think that with both of those part of what i enjoy is the sparseness of the language and the situations so good at setting up d. e. place in a sense of place and also putting people in complicated situations where they have to make really hard choices and i think in both of those books. You find yourself really rooting for these people. Who are doing things that objectively you know are bad quote you know quote unquote bad things to do. And i think that's what i love is just seeing that exploration of the shades of gray and the way that we can do the right thing even if it seems like it's the wrong thing or vice versa. There's a lot of that. So i've been wanting to get to this one for a long time and i've only read a little bit so far but this is the story of jack and win and they are in a out on a river and they are going on what they planned to be just a really relaxing vacation..

peter heller peter hellers kendall cormac mccarthy ashley apple Jen hewlett mccarthy jack
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

04:53 min | 11 months ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"Need come across this young woman and their traveling and seventy kind of get relationship whatever but then she gets kidnapped and she gets sold into slavery sexual slavery ring and so like has read. 'em David so that so the journey becomes but he but he he's trying to find her to save her and then take her overseas and then he meets other people and stuff. So i got about fifty pages and but what i was trying to do and because my writing style which i don't really use professionally. Much was very long winded. I'm like folk ner. I'm like a cormac mccarthy. Unlike like approved by like. I want like long sentences and lots of clauses and lots of metaphors and that's not really what people consume commercially these days. You know you want like stephen king. Clive hustler john grisham. Like i just want some. That's fun to read and got a good story so it's not really literary quote unquote in that sense. It's just good writing. I not saying. John grisham's not a good writer but my style was very different. Yeah like if you've ever read like isn't all that all the pretty horses by corner mccarthy or the road of his blood meridian stuff like that were and this is art. You know it gets incredible and in you as as more of a symphony jane you have. Yeah you have to think about it like you're reading because like mccarthy for example..

john grisham cormac mccarthy David stephen king Clive mccarthy
Sadie Hoagland Discusses Her New Book, "Strange Children"

Read Between the Lines

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Sadie Hoagland Discusses Her New Book, "Strange Children"

"There. How are you today. I'm excited to be here. Thank you so much for having me. I'll thank you for coming autumn so excited to talk with you. So can you tell me about your writing. Sure so i think of my rating as a bit dark a bit funny at times. I think i'm very interested in voice. So i tend to use a lot of first person though i've definitely expanded in the last couple of years to use more third person i am very interested in language in sentence level writings. So that's actually for me. One of the primary reasons i write and story is sort of secondary. So i'm interested in story and structure and all that but i love just like reading a good sentence in that so that i think translates into my rating. I really like spending some time. Crafting sentences that that maybe kind of mixed up poetry and prose. Yeah very much. So and i just finished reading her book strange shoulder and it was just so incredible. I act- i was mentioning it to her before the interview to and i can totally see the influences from like putting some poetry throughout it. So what not the idea to put poetry in the book in that way. I think i really am drawn to poetic writers like cormac mccarthy who has an epigraph in the book from him on tony morrison falconer hugest tend to have turns of phrases or ways of describing things that are just so original so i think that's. That's a huge kind of drivers. I like reading that kind of book about the kind of language based but also on their time in the book win. I just not very often. But i do kinda break. The lion at one point in usually. It's when i'm trying to describe something pretty dramatic Felt like i needed the page needed space in between sort of the steps of what was happening so You know when characters being victimized when she gets up to leave and so that kinda breaks the

Tony Morrison Falconer Cormac Mccarthy
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

"Because i'm very pleased and proud published this man because he has written something. That is exactly at the intersection from the other side of the country that i was talking about his short novel hard times we have put so much time in the same and we have put so much love and care behind the way we're going to roll it out. Folks are gonna see when my book and less his book out at the same time to stepping into black history month that a black guy white guy from different areas in different struggles can still share the same conversation. Who tell you to go together. Like peanut butter and jelly these books. I'm gonna package from different among get them out the bookstores different less edgerton a mad man. He's alliance still in his agency's shaming us all. I told him the spread the word about his book. Man and i got three hundred emails from all over the globe. Not lying. i'm like okay less. I thought you said jewish retire and bro is like nah. it's just a beautiful story. Man south of review right now got anybody wants one. Just hit me up for one. Male will send. You went out a really loved. He put his arm around me at the beginning of my career. When i was lost. I was inbetween. Book deals because my previous publisher for the first elliott caprices book ran aground at the last minute like i went to dog on compromise with full of books that wasn't going to be on sale. Like dads and man the put his arm around me man. I wouldn't black and he wasn't in all of a sudden. I had a career and so he gave me the first. Blurb of my career taught everyone to take me seriously and i made certain he got the first book deal in it before i even signed mine so i wouldn't do all that if that book. What flat flipping amazing. And it's exactly what. I want black people to eat right. Because as a publisher some dawn's i think about forty four million black folks reboots and people. Just don't write any further right so i to think about that. I'm telling you there's all white is going to be on the black folks shelves because he's great. It's like cormac mccarthy at the cookout district you did like just so make room for less. Go get that sean. cosby blacktop. Wasteland support black authors wherever you can cause you know somebody has to and then ebron kindy is the medicine and just read something that is written by somebody who ain't like you at all Just pick something by somebody who look like you sound like you think like you live like you will come from what you come. Just do it even. If you just go get a discount books teela book from one.

publisher cormac mccarthy edgerton sean. cosby elliott caprices
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on NICE WORK! A Super Nice Club Podcast

NICE WORK! A Super Nice Club Podcast

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on NICE WORK! A Super Nice Club Podcast

"Which was like cormac mccarthy wrote the script the script kind of man maybe he should stick with fiction novels. I don't know anyway. People are gonna hate me for saying that cormac mccarthy in the script but he's infamy theus x. men you roles a superhero doctor who scifis. That's something that you just are into yeah. I love sci-fi. I is my favorite genre premier theus. Did you see that i did. Yeah i did see the previous year. Yeah hate movie. Did you like yeah. It was cool cool I thought that it was. I had i just love Dot so anything. Can i enjoy. And i'm engaged in his performances. I'm i'm i'm onto. So yeah you know. I i thought it was a cool film by for he was great in it. And and yeah. I think that you know sifi is something for me which is huge. The reason being is because it's john reid in which we don't usually get to perform in you know it's something that it's a weld as an actor. Your imagination is your key. Asset and side is direct Pigmentation of imagination. Because these things don't even exist it's not even real we get You know i. I love being position. I can't see the munster in front of me. And i imagine that well so Director how how does this thing. What is it is it. Is it like okay description or pitch. We imagined not now you know i mean fight. Yeah sorry maybe. I'll delete that cute faintly book that still hasn't blown up into a movie. Is there anything out there. You're like man. What are they going to make this movie. I wanna do that or i just want to see it. Oh it was new mutants which they finally put out. But i heard it was not that great. I haven't seen it yet. But that was the one i always want to see made. I'm looking forward to stike shock. Yeah i think..

cormac mccarthy Dot munster john reid Director
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on The Sill - Perspectives on Art

The Sill - Perspectives on Art

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on The Sill - Perspectives on Art

"So in movies is you mentioned movies all those dead end of the world movies of the apocalyptic movies The Mad Max movie The Road Cormac McCarthy wrote a book called The Road a couple of recent ones too. Well Judgement Day or not that long with some big film and all about is at the end of the world zombie movies now, we're very preoccupied with our mortality. Well, that's it. I mean, I think it does come down to our dog. Visual awareness of birth and death were taught as children every story has a beginning a middle and an end right as a child. We're not aware of endings. We think we're going to live forever in a way at some point. We're taught it all has to come to an end Junior. There's a conclusion hate to be the bearer of bad news, but you're gonna die and that's Palm in US you were just quoting Shatner one year William Shatner. Yes from his a great CD of spoken word poetry called has been I recommend it to everyone people laugh at Shatner and some of the stuff they've done but this is a really good spoken word. We use in one of our previous podcast. I can't remember which episode we talked about death. Yeah, and we used that particular clip. He says I paid and he has this creature voice is Jose hate to be the bearer of bad news, but you're gonna die energy. It's brilliant. Anyway toys right on but we're talking about this is what colpitis really doing and it's really cool. Us in touch with our mortality. Oh, yeah big time and so much so that there's also a propensity for exaggeration in many cases because of it. You can be used this page spear that we have of dying. It can be accessed and extrapolated and used in many different ways by people who have this understanding of our psyche sure and we don't consult the cult leader anymore for the prophecy. We consult the predictive models. The statisticians are the new cult leaders because they provide the data that gets interpreted in becomes information wrote that gets disseminated through the internet for example television or what-have-you immediate. So the new Nostradamus is the media. Yeah, absolutely the predictive models in the beginning of the Pandemic those early predictive models were wildly inflated and poorly conceived. And we're off by a lot and we'll argue is still aren't yeah, and so people expect at the end of the world so to speak and it wasn't the end of the world and it isn't we know that it's a virus. I'm not going to take the planet away. It's not the Spanish Flu which did decimate the planet absolutely but you have to consider our psychological State..

William Shatner Cormac McCarthy US Jose
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Zero Credit(s)

Zero Credit(s)

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Zero Credit(s)

"Aren't they also testing the capability to stream video games to Android devices directly. I believe they are I think that sort of thing in some regards but I think that was heavily featured. I say heavily featured there's a passing scene of that happening in a little film called bloodshot. Oh bloodshot right starting Vin Diesel, maybe you've heard of it. But one of the the techy characters is playing some type of Call of Duty Black Ops game on his phone with a a PlayStation controller. Oh, I didn't realize that much like the Fast and Furious franchise blood shot was a Showcase of the world's newest Technologies, right? Of course anything Vin Diesel and he always insist get the latest technology in there. I won't I won't. Yep. What do you think about the latest technology? Yeah, and to be fair it makes sense because he is the oldest technology existing as long as man has bought two tons of American Muscle. Okay, kind of spoiled your punchline. I might edit my Outburst out because yes exactly. He is the oldest technology. He is a muscle man much like Cormac McCarthy said of War Vin Diesel was the perfect tool waiting for the perfect creature, which is man. Right, right. I remember when Cormac McCarthy wrote that and the road and other Places You'll Go. Yeah, and then it's sequel all the ugly horses right off. Have not read a lot of Cormac McCarthy, you know, you're not missing much. It's greed though could get through all that punctuation bull crap. Yeah. I read the road in my only thoughts were where were all the quotation marks. We're we're all the road. There's only one of those John's. Oh, that's why they're in the apocalypse. All the other roads died. Yep. Yep. Everyone reads. The road always has one question on their mind bull how what happened out of they get into GD apocalypse. You never answer that mister McCarthy. Trying to distract me with baby eating. The baby eating is not important. All we need is backstory speaking of a of a desperate need for backstory a good for Bethesda. I'm sure there will be a lot of old Scrolls games in the future or at least just one. I'm just I'm I was more surprised with the fact that the console Wars I guess I guess I missed this because I don't normally have a dog in the fight cuz I usually even a late adopter to whatever generation is happening and I get stuff really cheap on sale. But with all of this this new news about the PS5 and the next generation of Xbox if you just even just type in video games, everyone's fucking fighting instead of celebrating all the good video game news that's happening..

Cormac McCarthy Vin Diesel Bethesda John
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Zero Credit(s)

Zero Credit(s)

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Zero Credit(s)

"Yes, Tim Rogers Fan of the show. Not really show is a fan of he yes, show. Show is a fan shows fan. Show is a fan. Recently as recently as this morning finished a I believe four hour long, red, dead redemption, retrospective by a Noah Caldwell Jer vase, which was really good. People are putting a phenomenal amount of effort into these things which. I don't want to consider a massive waste of time because they are pretty adept literary critiques of Art Form That you and I both enjoy. But was my life enriched by that? I don't know that I would say that. It was any discussion about our is worth it in worthwhile if it makes you think about something. I did think about cowboys a lot. Will there you go. It's like it's so. It was the first read debt-reduction. That was the video essay. was a four hour long video. Say about Red Dead Revolver Red Dead Redemption. Red Dead Redemption to also. The shooter, a series of Cormac McCarthy novels the dark tower it will of in and out. Of a lot of different things in the genre of Western. and. Talked about gun that Weird xbox game! Did it. Make you feel any different about any of the things that discussed like. Did you see something in the New Light? Now. Really just..

Tim Rogers Cormac McCarthy Noah Caldwell cowboys
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"It's about cloning, and it's a very personal intimate book. How he took this utterly abstract concept, and made it completely small and intimate. And it's stunning. It's an incredible book. And he writes it in a female first person flawlessly just just on I mean it's just A. It's partly it just a display of of unbelievable talent, but it's just it's. Virtuosity, thank you. and. But, there's a lot of books like that that I really love. There's an a a book has been around for quite a long time. Don, delillo white noise, which is also not a one of his most famous books and is hilarious. And brilliant an incredible, and it's kind of about this small college town professor, and maybe a chemical spill on. You're not quite sure what it is, and it is absolutely hilarious and incredibly clever I have so many of these I'm not going to go through all of them, but the one more which is Cormac McCarthy's the road. Which I don't think anybody would look at as a science book. It's totally apocalyptic book and I think people are just see it as an apocalyptic dystopia, but there is to me. It's a science a conceptual book. The you know it has it has that core and it's unlike any book. He's ever written in a lot of ways because he can be a very kind of faulkner Ian floored writer, and this is Leanne as hell poodle. And there's nowhere what who went are how? No character has a name. You don't know where they are. Whatever the apocalyptic event is. It's not named. I mean it's just. Unbelievable I read that book literally in cabs by Streetlight I read it in less than twenty four hours was possessed by it. And my own book, the Turing. Machines Book was impressed at the same time that that that I was reading a book. It was at the press and we have the same editor from Knopf. Down Frank who's just an extraordinary editor and I call down, and he.

Cormac McCarthy Don editor Frank Knopf professor Leanne writer Ian
Publishers sue Internet Archive over scanning of books

America's Morning News

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Publishers sue Internet Archive over scanning of books

"Call for the country's biggest publishers of student digital library for copyright infringement alleging at the internet archive is illegally offered more than a million scanned works to the public including favorites such as a twenty Morrison's song of Solomon welcome glad was playing in Cormac McCarthy's the road in March the internet archive announce it established a national emergency library in response to the outbreak in had shut down most of the country schools and libraries according to the archive the emergency library would support quote remote teaching research activities independent scholarship and intellectual stimulation with free digital

Internet Archive Morrison Cormac Mccarthy Solomon
Lawrence Wright on Researching a (Fictional) Pandemic

The Book Review

08:58 min | 2 years ago

Lawrence Wright on Researching a (Fictional) Pandemic

"Last book was God Save Texas Nonfiction. I believe there was a play in between and now this just curious how you go from one project to the next and and forgive me if I skipped a project that may have been in between as well years ago. I made a resolution that I would only do things that were important or fun. Was you know the state of confusion about what I wanted to do with my life and I thought I as a journalist I like to be on the important stories of the day but I also realized that it didn't want to give up things that really joyful and so those are the polls stars of my career and I think is sort of understandable that I would now be working on a musical but you know if you take those as your pulse stars in. I think you can have a pretty interesting career. Are they ever important and fun? Yes this book was. I know it sounds you know is is is a rather bleak book but I really had a wonderful time researching it and going into the world of of public health in all these swashbuckling intellectuals I just admire them so much so I I really had a good time working on this book. All right I'm going to cut to the chase and let everyone know who doesn't know already that the end of October is a fictional story of a pandemic so before we get into more about it and want to go back again to the origin stories. You've said that the director Ridley Scott Asks you a question after Reading Cormac. Mccarthy's the road and that that was your inspiration. What was the question? And when did he ask this? When were you sitting around with Ridley Scott talking about this? This was a decade ago and he is questioned was what happened because Cormac didn't say anything. About what event or of nature had brought civilization to heal? So I started thinking about what could do that and of course I thought about nuclear war but I was a young reporter covering diseases out of the Center for Disease Control in one thousand nine hundred ninety six. There's a swine flu outbreak in the legionnaires disease and I had become enchanted with that world and the courage and ingenuity of the people that I found there and so I thought it'd be an interesting place to find a hero because I felt that those people that I met were really heroic and that disease had been underestimated as a problem for our society in modern times. So Ridley Scott ask you this question about a decade ago and you had been thinking about it because you had reported on disease over the years. When did you actually start working on? This novel really never made the movie. So like Mr Destiny of so many projects in Hollywood and about in two thousand seventeen. I've been thinking about this story. Still is in my mind so I decided I would go back and work on work on. It is a knock and this time I would dive into the research even more deeply and let the story emerged more naturally rather than cinematic -ly so that's that's how the novel got started. You are such a master your master of many forms but I love your nonfiction so much. There's so much research material in this. Did you think maybe there should be nonfiction? I DID CONSIDER WRITING ABOUT MORE DISEASES. But you know it already had an imaginary character and a world which it was said. I got attracted to the idea of tempting it as a novel. It seemed a challenge for me and I wanted to see if I could do it. Who WAS THAT IMAGINARY CHARACTER? Will the name of my heroes? Henry Parsons in the late. Nineteenth Century in England. There was another influence of outbreak and a young epidemiologist named Henry. Parsons was the first to prove that it was caused by contagion and not by my asthma's in the environment you know. He's totally forgotten figure. But I decided to tip my hat to him and name my character. Henry Parsons he is a man whose life has been touched rather savagely by disease and works out of the Center for Disease. Control where I had done by early reporting. And he's an epidemiologist who's confronted many diseases in the past but has always known that there was one awaiting him. There was going to be the big challenge so the CDC is in Atlanta Georgia and the United States. But this novel the breakout begins elsewhere. You have it really kind of take hold in Mecca. Why did you choose to do that? We'll after nine eleven when I was working on my book looming tower. The Saudis wouldn't let me in as a reporter so I got a job. I was mentoring young reporters at the Saudi Gazette in Jeddah which had bin Laden's hometown and one of my very first jobs was to supervise their coverage of the Hodge and I was was not allowed to go to Mecca myself but I was in communication every day with my reporters and I was very struck at the time about the hazard of gathering of people in one place from all over the world and having every year some disease arises sometimes more than one and there's an epidemic in Mecca and then people get on airplanes and they fly home. Well you know what if it was something really dangerous suppose it was like the nineteen eighteen flu. That was in my gosh even when I was living in Saudi Arabia enter the CA-. Golly flew right. This is her fictional virus. Tell us about that sickness. And how did you come to describe what this flu would be like? Why a flu even influence is unconquered. It's the great killer it every year. We lose maybe you know fifty thousand people to influence a very dangerous disease. Clever in a way in that has always mutating. And you never know what's going to show up the next year. I mean the the fluid self that comes every year is sort of a descendant of that nineteen eighteen original Spanish flu right. That's correct Pamela. We're right now. The seasonal flu is H. One IN ONE. Which is the strain that killed between fifty and one hundred million people in nineteen eighteen? And I said as a young reporter I had done stories out of the Center for Disease Control but one of them in nineteen seventy six was a sudden outbreak of h one in one which is what public health officials had been dreading their entire careers. And it was a young man of recruit in Army Base Fort Dix in New Jersey. David Lewis suddenly after a Long March. Came back to the barracks in died. They examined the tissues discovered. It was h one n one Tremendous panic took place in. I win all over talking to people in Fort Dix and enter the members of David Lewis is family and so on the big mystery was he was the only one who died and yet you know there was this in national vaccine program and it became kind of catastrophe for Gerald Ford because people got sick from the vaccine. It was just a total mess but hanging over this was peculiar FAC fifty. Two hundred million people died you know a century ago and then only one and then in two thousand nine to the H. One in one came back as a pandemic and it was more like seasonal flu in his still with us but the the question I had was what would happen if something like the nineteen eighteen flu brand new novel virus came into our culture. How would we handle? It will be better prepared than our ancestors were in one thousand nine hundred eighteen and so the the flu that I create Congolese is really modeled on that. Old Virus one that came out in nineteen eighteen. It was also a hemorrhagic fever. You know there was no resistance to it in the population. I actually created a template that is based on the progress of the flu in Nineteen Eighteen. So in the novel the fluid advances across the globe. It pretty much mirrors. What was going on in nineteen eighteen?

FLU Reporter Henry Parsons Ridley Scott Center For Disease Control Mecca David Lewis Cormac Center For Disease Saudi Arabia Army Base Fort Dix Saudi Gazette Mccarthy Hemorrhagic Fever Mr Destiny Director Bin Laden Golly Fort Dix
Leslie Jamison on Jenny Offill's Book 'Weather'

The Book Review

11:15 min | 2 years ago

Leslie Jamison on Jenny Offill's Book 'Weather'

"Leslie Jamison is here in the studio. Her most recent book is make it screen and make it burn essays which was reviewed in the book review last fall all but she's here now to talk about another book. She reviewed this week on our cover. Jennie O. Foles Weather Leslie. Thanks for being here. It's so wonderful to be here so you. Let's first talk about Jenny full. Who she is? Pearl Siegel staff critic for the Times. Were a profile of Jennie O.. Full in this this week's issue of the New York Times magazine but give us a sense of who this writer is. When I think about Daniel's work and why it matters and why I think it's really created aided the sense of excitement around so many readers I think part of it you know she writes about motherhood and marriage and things that can get lumped under the general neural umbrella term domesticity but she brings them to life in these incredibly razor-sharp ways and there shouldn't even be a but conjunction to that sentence right like wire wire those states of being not razor-sharp somehow but but sometimes they can get seen as softer sentimental and she brings both very different form and a very different tone to how how she writes about them and how she does justice to their emotional extremity? Now I'm thinking that we have to make a challenge to ourselves not to use the word but for the rest of this partnership. I think there we go that we're are GONNA fail so we'll just we'll we'll put that aside. This book weather is her third novel her. I was last things and then it took her fifteen years to write. Her neck spoke department of speculation which came out in two thousand fourteen and was one of our ten best books of the year. And I feel like that book really brought her to you. A wider attention perhaps not bestseller list attention but it was hugely critically acclaimed and beloved by readers. Let's start talk a little a bit about that book and why it struck such a chord and I think it's no accident when you said it was like fifteen years until the next book which actually sort of part of the plot of Department of speculation too. It's like there's a writer who is taking a long time to put her second novel. Part of I think you know my understanding from interviews. She's done. The story of that book has that it started as a much more conventionally structured novel and it sort of took her a long time to whittle it down to its really searing form which is a very a fragmented form where you feel like you're getting these absolutely essential bursts of exerience. I think her agent described at once as more like an x Ray than a body which I thought was such such an amazing evocation of how it works and so part of why it caught. Hold I think is that it wasn't it wasn't just very smart about feeling and it had this strong long hard and it's about a infidelity and marriage sort of preparing itself but it also it seemed to find a new language for feeling a new structure for feeling the guy I want to go back to that the fragments Manson the structure for people who've not Reggiani Oval. We should say this. Her books are really short. They're really really short but they are packed and yet they don't feel dense and part of that is due to structure and you use the word fragments. People use the word fragments or fragmentary or cones. Let's talk about a house. She structures these books because it is especially when department speculation came out in two thousand fourteen. It felt very different from what was being written and it felt very very different from the way in which a domestic novel was being written. You know it makes me think a little bit about the way that like Virginia Woolf would describe moments of being you know that somehow we have these moments where it feels like something about experience is intensified or crystallized on. I think Jenny has a real knack for like putting her finger on the pulse of those moment. So maybe it's just an ordinary moment like in this latest novel. where she comes home from the her narrator comes home from feeling this intense panic about climate aamot change and her sons playing minecraft noon? SORTA get like putty off of his fingers. Like it's not in a dramatic sense like it's that's not a huge plot point happening in that moment but she manages manages to find these ways that seemingly insignificant moments if you if you describe them so precisely and locate some kind of feeling what's happening in them quivering inside them. She does justice to it and the way that her books are structured. I don't think there are like us in this weather. There are parts. I can't remember if in Department of Speculation Stephen divided into chapters but it's these single paragraphs are a few paragraphs spaced apart on the page. So not not only. Is it a small book but it actually. I mean you could theoretically sit down and read it in a couple of hours I did. You did theory. You could sit down down and read it very quickly and one of the things that I think people then mistakenly assume is that. Oh you know sort of hastily written you get the cents though once you are reading it that not at all does feel something. That is very much labored over almost like poetry in terms of the precision of the ways in which the things that she's putting into those little sections as you pointed out it's often about the contrast in a given moment between something very granular and domestic and personal and then some larger thought. That's going on or something happening in the greater world. Do you think that was what was is so striking about department of speculation. The fact that she was doing not that she was taking something like a domestic novel. That was you know. Just as you said kind of a story of a Brooklyn Glenn Mother and infidelity and work life balance and these things that so many books are about but infusing in it these larger the issues. I think that's a really good point that so often. What makes these like short bursts? CLO- fuel incandescent our field. Charged is is that they're very granular. But they're also holding some kind of emotional intensity and I think when you're writing about something like infidelity where there's both the danger of somehow telling a story that people feel like they've heard before story that feels intrinsically melodramatic. It can really bring out the humanity of the story to pay attention to the granularity of of like a one scene. That's rising to mind from that novel is like the narrator after a conflict with her husband going to stay at a hotel overnight and and like preying on the carpet of the hotel floor. But it's like it's like that hotel carpeting that holds so much feeling rather than just like the larger obstruction of of infidelity per se. Or something and so I think it is that scale shifting that can happen in a space of a paragraph. Can that happen across the course the whole book. That's also really operative in this latest book. where the skills or even bigger because among other things about climate change is like one of the biggest skills yes yes yeah? Let's talk about weather and let's start start with what it's about even though you know as we think people are probably sensing when you talk about Jenny ovals work. It really isn't about plot. Yeah but what is whether yeah so the narrator of weather is a mother who years ago dropped out of a PhD program and it's working as university librarian and she takes a job job working for her former mentor. Who does a podcast about climate change? where she's answering all the letters that are coming in response to this podcast so there are a few different? There's the kind of plot of her I went to the overhauls narrator to answer my letters to this cast. I'm just kidding. I love answering your letters I would be. I thought you were GonNa even save answer my letters I was like I have a few letters. Live right Yeah I mean you know you have this narrators mother you have her as a wife wife you have her as a a worker and maybe a worker who feels a bit lost in the world. There's also for me. One of the most compelling plot lines in the book is about the narrators relationship with her brother. WHO's a recovering addict? He gets married and then has a a baby and her role in his life and her sort of desperate hope that he can put his life together. Other was a really moving strand among strands for me as well presumably. That's very deliberate. Bringing new life into a world that is in crisis crisis and feels like it's ending and I think that's one of the abiding emotional. Tensions in the book is like the the world is always beginning and ending at once. And maybe maybe there's something about that truism that has felt universal through time but it has a particular acuity now or the world is is it's ending he's send away by these factors that are at work but that dynamic of like yes the world is ending but also you wake up in the morning and you're touching base with your brother overtaxed to make sure he and the baby are doing okay that both of those are real on. Both of those are happening. I think we're seeing a wave of climate fiction and it's taking all of these different forms. Probably a most noticeably post apocalyptic and dystopia although there are also books like Richard powerhouses over story sometimes metaphorical Oracle sometimes very reality based feels different. Though I mean how does this differ from other fiction looking at climate and climate. Change for starters. You don't have that kind of like emotional. Buffer of the post apocalyptic landscape that emotional buffer mailing a strange way to describe a postal puck landscape. But it's like if the apocalypse is happening thing in Brooklyn Public School like that's the stage set for the book it feels more disquieting in certain ways because it's closer to home. It's not like Cormac McCarthy novel where a father and Zahn are like traveling the chart landscape like it's more immediate in that way and I think one of the challenges of writing about climate change is how to take this thing that is essentially on a larger scale than our minds can hold and how to make it a narrative we can hold. There's this moment early on in weather where the narrator is thinking about her son allies elementary school and she says the problem with the school is that it's not a bill on a human scale feels too large for these little children who are going into it and I I think in a way that lays out one of the aesthetic challenges the book right. It's like climate. Change isn't quite on a human scale but narrative is on a human scale. So how do you translate. How does she do it? Part of it has to do with what we're talking about a little bit earlier these questions of sort of scale shifting and simultaneity where you had these big questions of like the end of the world coming up either through the letters that are coming into this podcast or you know this narrator is doing what I think. We all do obsessive googling about lots of things where she's sort. I'm trying to see like how hot is it going to be in New York City and you know when her son is sixty years old or something like that and getting so freaked out by these numbers so you sort of have those larger questions that are always coming up against the interpersonal. TRAUMAS the books. So either it's like the obstruction of like how hot is the World GonNA get comes up up against the body of her actual son. She's imagining at age. Sixty or thinking about like the horsemen of the apocalypse. Coming in comes up against you know coming home ends ends giving the dog. His Lover Frog Toy. You know so the becomes on a human scale because we see a particular human with a particular life a particular brother who's giving bringing new life into the world that all of those abstract questions are hitting all of those granular

Jenny Writer The Times Leslie Jamison Jennie O Jennie O. Foles The New York Times Pearl Siegel Virginia Woolf New York City Daniel Reggiani Oval RAY Manson Cormac Mccarthy Brooklyn Glenn Mother Brooklyn Public School Allies Elementary School
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Movies of the Damned!!

Movies of the Damned!!

09:11 min | 2 years ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Movies of the Damned!!

"I guess I don't know if you did though. Oh because you knew there is nothing that matter but but then if it had ended there you wouldn't have got that great scene at the end where they're moving onto a new family. Yes but you you got that you knew that from the beginning. Yeah I guess I guess Ethan your thoughts on that It couldn't have done that. It'd been too ambiguous. I love ambigous endings. He's like I know a lot of people don't they're my ob. Salute favourite orban absolute favorite. But when it's EMBIID. US There has to be Kinda like it's something where it's leading leading somewhere you just don't know where everything the lobster no okay. Well it's one it's It has arguably my favorite ambiguous ending ever. I'm not gonNA spoil it. But what in this ending. There was a choice right. There was like three options. That could have happened right. You just don't know which one he picked. Oh right so I feel like that's the the key to an ambiguous ending. You can't just cut it off anyway. You have to say this you have to give an audience idea of what could happen. I just don't know what what did I would like you to find ambiguous. Why would that be ambiguous? That wouldn't be ambiguous rewind it and he changed changed. Our thing went so it's very clear right then that he's been breaking the fourth wall through the whole movie and they were winds a murder of his partner. And it's not to me that wasn't ambiguous to me that that Actually clarified the entire film in the fourth wall stuff. Yeah no no. I hear both arguments there. I'll tell. Are you want a couple of people. That didn't absolutely love it. The critics de remake here has a rotten tomatoes critic score of fifty two and I looked up the original and and it's not much higher. I think st five or something. Yeah something like within the same realm. I guess Audience Score for this remake fifty four. I was a little surprised prize without and maybe it is. Because it's so such like kind of Weird Quirky Phil. Maybe that's why it's a little bit lower it's I don't know I think it's because some people just never seen something like hit and they're never seen something is like unsettling or anything as kinda weird or just like what the hell's happening and immediate responses to not like it and and I guess a kid in a dog killed. That doesn't help. Some people's enjoyment will usually. That usually doesn't so I'd like to compare this to Just the attention part. Have you ever read A book by Cormac McCarthy called the road I I the road. What is that movie but a Moscow talking about the? I haven't read the book I think I've seen the movie though. Okay so I read the book. It's probably one of the one of the best books I've ever read the and it's amazing so awesome. It's one with the DAD and the son trying to make their way. We ended up with the PUCK Pakalitha Gerald but I will never ever read it again and I read books three to four five six seven eight times. Oh Oh wow so 'cause it was so so unsettling the whole time. I was reading that book. My stomach hurt Interesting easing mazing writing job to do that. Like Cormac McCarthy's amazing but so this movie has that kind of feel to it. Which is why I don't WanNa Watch it again but will not you would recommend it? Yes it's some I recommended the road to Ethan Right. Yeah so it's I I did that right So but also read somewhere Because I was looking at this book so looking at this movie funny games I also read. The director was designed the film to push the audience to the point whether or not they're going to walk out of the theater. Yeah I read something like he wanted to be a commentary on media and violence or something like that so for for me personally. We don't like people that that when when someone does that you don't need to do a commentary on. I don't know what that even means like I'm not your I guess we're all expert the people's experiences for her test experiments or whatever I like the idea of it like him trying to push the envelope of how. How far can I push the audience before they get up and leave like I like that idea? I think that's good. But the US to try to use a says or say were tests Guinea pigs in his weird experiment. I don't like that stuff I don't know I don't know if that's actually what he's trying to do. I have no idea I I do know that he was trying to make it very uncomfortable. Instable and dare the audience two walkout like that's how was designed. That's very interesting eaten. What are your thoughts on that point if you WANNA leave? The theater show dismayed Batman versus Superman. If Fair enough that was trash yeah I don't know like I read that. I'd rather it was like if you stayed for the whole movie. You he lost. That's what he said. That's Hilarious Yeah I I'm a loser. Yeah right I didn't even think about closing movie. There is no point where I was like. This is too much for me even if this why even close even if this wasn't for the podcast I would've watched straight through course I would've yeah like there is not no no point throughout the entire movie where I ever wanted to turn it off. Ever wanted to do something else right ever wanted to do anything except watch this movie so other. He failed in his his His experiment Emmett heavily or I messed up but like I dunno or maybe just because it was made twenty years ago or maybe it was just a marketing ploy. Yeah you never oh right you never know but you you're gonNA say something about the road I thought Oh right yeah I was just going to reiterate what he was talking about the robot so when I was reading that book like from the first word my stomach hurt and I k. Yeah and so the from the first word and so I've read I said let's say I read fifty pages okay. I was just grief the whole time. I'd close the book I'd Go and do something awesome. I go do something else. Let's say I had to say had the best time of my life. I went off and I wanNA do cans wonderland. It was awesome. I'd come back. Pick up that book. Open it again from the first word of reading my stomach. A matter how awesome my day was filled with grief again again. You have to read it. It was just fantastic. That's that's Pretty Lincoln Pulitzer Prize. I know one or two of his books. Have I don't know if that's the one that has so that was What's the one? He has a three part western Western series. And no that's not blood readings not part of it but there he hit a three part. I think it was all the pretty horses or something like that or that could be the wrong title and I'm sorry Cormac 'cause you're awesome But yeah so will he did win the Pulitzer that's for sure interesting. Well Fellas I can say that alturas light. This movie Go and check. Check it out on for anyone out there who has Amazon prime you can watch the The US version on Amazon prime. Ethan will probably tell you to watch the European version in that case as I think you ought to order the Blu ray online or something like that or the criterion channel if you have the criterion Johnny Watch that very cool well fellas anything else to add Yeah so Ethan. Just checked out. The road did win the Pulitzer Prize. All very cool very cool. Yeah but other than that I about this movie It will get you thinking being a long time after this one and It was very different unique. It's it's just it's excellent. It is excellent. It'll it'll stick with you. Definitely Ethan again loved having you here and final thoughts on this one It's awesome if you if you like this. Aviv WANNA watch more like them. Check it more European movies man check out movies like the Hanes the vanishing check obey French new wave right there. They're all not all like as good as this but they're all unique. They're all Interesting they're all crate right. And if you WANNA watch something different check more European movies because in my opinion they are better in general than American movies and they're really awesome right so very cool well folks. Please subscribe to our Youtube Youtube Channel. Check out our facebook page and falls on both twitter and Instagram at Dan Movies. We want to hear you thought. Today's podcast and any suggestions you have especially in terms of what movies you'd like us to discuss discuss next sent an email to move the damned at gmail.com. Please also check out. John's full length novels his first two novels. DOLLHOUSE and the tracker are Amazon. best-sellers sellers. You can also order his novella balance his book of short stories for shots of horror and his newest novel off the grid right now and Amazon as well for further details on John's other published works. Please visit his blog. John Hunt Fiction Dot wordpress dot com. Thanks for listening. And we'll see next time Yup and if let's get a chance please leave reading on whatever podcast platform happening. We listen to a really helps us out but other not. Please have a great week. Kind.

Ethan Cormac McCarthy Pulitzer Prize Amazon US orban John Hunt murder Moscow facebook Pakalitha Gerald Youtube Dan Movies Instable director Batman partner Emmett Amazon. twitter
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And this idea of these sort of mystic arts yet, and that's next one point because in that episode we mentioned that. In the modern age or what appears to be modern for us. We often have this harsh and bright divide between what we see is the realm of the Terek in the mystic and the realm of the rational in the scientific. But the truth of the matter is for most of human civilization. Those two things were not considered mutually exclusive believe we use the example of Isaac Newton who did some profoundly groundbreaking scientific work, but also believed in alchemy, and this, the, the presence of mysticism in early philosophy or the presence of these ritualistic beliefs does not mean that everything was automatically wrong. And if we look at it from an anthropological perspective, maybe they were making some psychological breakthrough similar to that episode. We had about the inherent mysticism in the by Carol mind theory. Right. You're hearing voice. That's right. Yeah. And that is driving your human train. And the voices. You. But that's going to be such a shovel on twist, you know. Who are you, right? Laura lee. We. Who? Discussed. That's what we're getting toward. Yeah. So from an anthropological perspective than does this sort of thing work, or do operations in here work, according to Runyon. It's a exploration of the underlying cognitive structure of the human mind, which sort of functions in terms of symbol before functions. In terms of language think we may have mentioned earlier episode, but the Kool-Aid problem with Cormac McCarthy wrote he wrote this article Nautilus about the relationship between language in the original function of the human mind. And the, the inspiration for this is. The common or not infrequent occurrence where some scientists or some great thinker is attempting to figure out a problem and they rack their brains and they picture gigantic chalkboard. And they just go crazy and throw everything everywhere, and then they fall asleep, and they get the answer in a dream, but it's never words. It's an assemble interesting. So the reason this is important is because with that, with an emphasis on symbols with that IMF asus on the visual aspects, these emotional states over what we call language Runyon traces a narrative starting from ancient mystery religions all the way to more modern theorists. Carl young who believed in the concept of the great unconsciousness and archetypes. And this means to run in that the magic is working because there's the inducement of trances and the use of ritual that takes..

Runyon Cormac McCarthy Isaac Newton Laura lee Carl young IMF Carol
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"I'm the one person following you. I actually I actually didn't know Cormac McCarthy, went to Tennessee. That is a sample. You got you. Thank you. I lived there for three years, and he was I didn't. Anything about him in seventy nine and he was probably walking around downtown without gets the bus and go with them. Tell them to the library. Have you ever read? Have you ever read the road, though? Read the road. All I read it. Oh, stay with me. Stay with me. This is one of his other novels for the imitation of the world was duly, playing to him that day and told an elementary, it must be for all those who no longer have called except themselves to send against it now that for the depths of despair, that's not the road. That's shoot. I can't think of which one it was the factor that trilogy that, quote, being read on the Paul finebaum show might be highlight of the day to me, the fact that you read skier Cormac McCarthy, quote on. To teach eleventh, grade northeast down the kids that go. Wow. I never heard anything like that for. But I realized it, thank you out there. I do. Like, hang onto Steven Steven. I can't just stay with you. This isn't the Stephen show. I. More seconds. Go. You can't have any more second. No. You cannot have ninety more seconds. I appreciate the call. Stephen, I can't give you not. I do. Like he said, though, when I was in eleventh grade substitute teacher in northeast Alabama. That would be the plot for a good movie things. The eleventh grade substitute teacher in northeast Alabama out. Absolutely watch that. And listen to a show he would want to. I like most people go can I have ten more seconds? He asked for ninety more seconds. Look, I've just got ninety more knows what he has to say got the timing down. I think to needs to humble himself, I think he did some bad things in the ballgame. Jimbo Fisher jimbo's becoming more and more likely as our callers champion I go back and look at that game though. Why don't you think they put people put way too much of that onto because didn't Clemson score like every time just got beat in every aspect of the game..

Cormac McCarthy Stephen Jimbo Fisher jimbo Steven Steven Paul finebaum Tennessee Clemson Alabama three years
"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"cormac mccarthy" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"Jeb debate. No. There is a it was just a commercial like, yeah, why a standard card when you could send to Jim Jabir. But your friends failure dads that around why send us standard card when you can bother people over Email. I don't you fuck off. Oh, man issues have commercials for suicide. Like, why don't you just kill you? Title property, the neighbor freak out. It's this big fight scene. A bunch of resumes. Dudes come to his apartment where he's sort of using. Some venom power Lubar is playing loud music. Yeah. Van goes over to complain which is maybe the first real vetting we see venoms screams at this guy to keep the volume down. That's a forty something minutes to get the clock is fucking ticking. Venom he starts use it because we were timing. This. He starts using these powers at the fifty one minute Marsh. She's cry and it's it's it's this big launch a chase scene through the streets of San Francisco rose a bunch of these guys around with his goop arm. I encountered in his apartment building massive apartment. Bris resigned. Men dispatches Bill bird to fucking catch him, dude. Kevin sky. Stephen dude looks like Bill Burs racist. Cousin? Get someone in this role. I just saw aquaman dolph London as the fourth tier villain. That's what you want you want to one grin type level. And that I'm sure that was debris expensive like whatever. This guy is like I don't know you can using the piece of shit James Franco child God movie. What the fuck are you talking of lead in that stupid fucking Cormac McCarthy move always the one where we seem take shit. Yup. Jeez. I sat through that. This guy you've seen him shit. Oh, that's the due to the share that. Wow. Of us have seen him. Guys. Didn't tell me you saw him. We've seen him shit. Same screening excrement. Come out of this man's behind. It's artist at the same time. You guys watch this. In turns one shitting Zine we stopped holding hands for that. But I mean, this guy is a lot of scenes kind of a heavy get somebody. It's a real get anybody situation. Get someone heavy. Yeah. I say get bigger, dude. But there is another. Oh, well, because you know, who he also sort of looks like and that dude was totally serviceable in a different Sony marvel movie. He looks kind of Boyd Holbrook and Boyd Holbrook in Logan. Yeah. Is this same kind of character exactly working for a different villain? And he's the heavy of the gang of Sasser, whatever you'd wolverine, I'm you'll biggish fame. It's fucking great do five to predator in a very forgetful. He's in. Get the fuck at a here for the predators. These the human lead. A bigger waste of his time. Appearing in venom or appearing in the predator. Yeah. Is the worst film? Venom was financial success. The predator is bad. It's fun enough. Short. This movie is per further predator, honestly. See this movie. So I can settle the score. But also note to the predator that movies full of people that you've seen before it's got fucking Keegan Michael key chain heart of its problem. Tom Jane is off terrible really bad accent. Or what just like bed performance?.

Boyd Holbrook Bill bird Tom Jane Jim Jabir Jeb Cormac McCarthy James Franco dolph London San Francisco Bris Keegan Michael Kevin sky Bill Burs venoms Stephen Van Sony Logan fifty one minute