24 Burst results for "Cormac"

"cormac" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:36 min | 3 weeks ago

"cormac" Discussed on WTVN

"Comaneci. Cormac Promenade. Cold murder. Knotty Cammaert. A well, I guess we'll figure out how they're going to pronounce that calmer, naughty, calmer Noddy. Is the name And your and I know what you're thinking. I know exactly what you're thinking, because it's what I was thinking. Wait a minute. How long did it take them to come up with that? Either they wanted to figure this out before lunch break, or they were tired of looking at each other, either on zoom or in person. And they're like, OK, let's let's just call it calmer Daddy and get it done with. So that's the new official name. Also yesterday, it was announced to Columbus City schools back at it tomorrow largest school district in Ohio. Unfortunately, 20 of the Columbus City school buildings will be starting the year remotely. Due to the hot weather don't have to tell you how to spend this week so far, probably one of the hottest states of the year we're going to have today. Tomorrow probably won't be much different. So until a cool down happens, Unfortunately, they're going to monitor everything. Uh, Tomorrow and Friday just to see if that might change a little bit. But as far as we know right now, and it looks like migrants are staying put in Mexico while waiting to find out if they will be granted asylum. President Biden ended that policy from the former administration with Trump. But yesterday, really last night, the Supreme Court reinstated it. The justices giving them one week to bring that back. Also in a quick update, you know we're six days away from this deadline, Biden doubling down on that. We mentioned that earlier and he's not kidding. All troops in Afghanistan are expected to be gone by then. Uh, they've already started to pull out some of these troops. Meanwhile, you have the Taliban who is no longer allowing, um, anyone from Afghanistan, uh, to go to the airport. At this point, you have to be a foreigner to be able to get into the airport. While foreigners are also having trouble. This point we played you the Audio a little bit earlier, the American mom Pleading with President Biden. Hey, you know, wait till you can get us all out. And I'm really interested to see what our guest has coming up at 8 35. We're just going to call him Jeremy to protect him. But he's a part of the special Ops unit with the U. S Air Force. He's in the reserves, but he has trained his unit trains with the Navy seals the recon units for the Marines. Uh And if you think of all the special ops units, the Green Berets Rangers They're all together on this, and they're doing some extraordinary things behind the scenes that we're not hearing about. So excited to hear from Jeremy coming up at a 35 right now, there's an opportunity to see James.

Jeremy Biden Trump Ohio Friday Afghanistan Tomorrow U. S Air Force 20 James Mexico last night tomorrow yesterday today Taliban Green Berets Rangers 35 six days one week
Sadie Hoagland Discusses Her New Book, "Strange Children"

Read Between the Lines

02:05 min | 4 months ago

Sadie Hoagland Discusses Her New Book, "Strange Children"

"There. How are you today. I'm excited to be here. Thank you so much for having me. I'll thank you for coming autumn so excited to talk with you. So can you tell me about your writing. Sure so i think of my rating as a bit dark a bit funny at times. I think i'm very interested in voice. So i tend to use a lot of first person though i've definitely expanded in the last couple of years to use more third person i am very interested in language in sentence level writings. So that's actually for me. One of the primary reasons i write and story is sort of secondary. So i'm interested in story and structure and all that but i love just like reading a good sentence in that so that i think translates into my rating. I really like spending some time. Crafting sentences that that maybe kind of mixed up poetry and prose. Yeah very much. So and i just finished reading her book strange shoulder and it was just so incredible. I act- i was mentioning it to her before the interview to and i can totally see the influences from like putting some poetry throughout it. So what not the idea to put poetry in the book in that way. I think i really am drawn to poetic writers like cormac mccarthy who has an epigraph in the book from him on tony morrison falconer hugest tend to have turns of phrases or ways of describing things that are just so original so i think that's. That's a huge kind of drivers. I like reading that kind of book about the kind of language based but also on their time in the book win. I just not very often. But i do kinda break. The lion at one point in usually. It's when i'm trying to describe something pretty dramatic Felt like i needed the page needed space in between sort of the steps of what was happening so You know when characters being victimized when she gets up to leave and so that kinda breaks the

Tony Morrison Falconer Cormac Mccarthy
"cormac" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:31 min | 8 months ago

"cormac" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Responsibly. Biagio beer company, New York, New York This is Notre Dame men's basketball on the Notre Dame radio network. Well, Mike Brey, trying to shake things up a bit started. Cormac Ryan, Tony Sanders Jr. Nick Jogo match. Don't analyze your Morgan because they played so hard in harder apparently than the starters and practice on Friday, and those guys brought that effort onto the floor. I got seven shots away. They only made one. It was a big three by Joe go, but they got four rebounds to five for Miami. One assist there. They held their own. Now they're out. Let's see what the Normal starters will do. Cormac Ryan has started every game with the B C game. So far this year, so it is less Chesky. Durham, Ryan Hub and Goodwin and it will be Notre Dame basketball when we resume play. The Irish are going from famine to feast eight days between their last game in this game seven full days off the third time this year, they have had seven full days off between games are getting pretty used to it. But this week, it's three games in seven days. Ah, home game with Virginia Tech on Wednesday. Then they're on the road against a very good Pittsburgh team. On Saturday, so they would very much like to get This game tonight in Miami. But it ain't playing. And the watch Go center. In front of no fans. No fans allowed. At sporting events down.

Cormac Ryan Miami New York Mike Brey Go center Nick Jogo Ryan Hub Joe go Tony Sanders Jr Chesky Morgan Virginia Tech Durham Pittsburgh Goodwin
"cormac" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

01:51 min | 8 months ago

"cormac" Discussed on The Big Story

"How much won't where can biden us. And where could his hands herkus and will it be enough for some canadians for biden to just be nice jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Cormac mcsweeney is the parliament hill reporter for city news rogers and often for us. Hello cormac hi. how's it going. I'm doing very well. And i hope that everybody up in ottawa is a little more relaxed. These days i'm sure there was a huge sigh of relief coming from the prime minister's office. The.

ottawa Cormac mcsweeney cormac canadians prime minister
"cormac" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:24 min | 10 months ago

"cormac" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"26, Michigan State leading by 33 58 remaining first half of play. Cormac Ryan between the circles between his legs. Ryan now left side it goes to Joe. Go, Joe, go up top Hub Hub Bounce pass to Durham gets it back to hobble throws it off the glass. But can't get the drop gets its own rebound. His shot is blocked, and Hauser pulls it down. Hauser. Now, quick out. Now it goes to watch cross court pass to Brown Brown Open three in and out, but the rebound kept alive by house. Hurry, bats it out to watch and Watts. All for traveling. Where the ball goes back to Notre Dame. Six fouls on Michigan State. So the Irish here in the one and one Notre Dame has committed just four files. Irish trail Now 29 26. They've led by as many as four. States led by as many as five. Cormac Ryan, now three point attempt top of the key block by Brown Watch, now bringing the ball over the mid court strike for the Spartans. It's not over the Langford Langford Left elbow Brown, Otto Howser, Howser. Spinning. His jump hook in the lane is around the rim. No good rebound. Duram Duram off toe hub. Will bring the ball over the mid court stripe with 2 57 remaining in the first half of play in Michigan State leading Notre Dame 29 26 good one with the basketball now to the left of the top of that, he gets it off to Cormac Ryan. Ryan between the circles Ryan Doubling to is right. Dumps it on over to Joe Go up top hub hub between the circles hub to Durham. His passes deflected into the hands of Howser, Howser racing down the floor. Hauser's runner is blocked by Joe Go, but the foul called on Joe go. But that's a good indication, Joey Hauser's 69 225 pounder to transfer from Marquette. But don't matter who you are. Michigan State. You get the ball. You're gonna push it. You're going to race down the floor. As quickly as you can. So, Hauser. Go on back to the line. We're used to for three tonight, but here's where he's get his work done. Joy House already has 12 rebounds in the game to go with six points. Make it seven is he makes the first free throw So that makes it Michigan State 30. 126 with 2 34 remaining in the first half of play Quick.

Cormac Ryan Joe Go Joey Hauser Michigan State Otto Howser Notre Dame Brown Brown Open Michigan Brown Watch Durham Langford Langford Spartans Joy House Watts basketball Brown Marquette
Publishers sue Internet Archive over scanning of books

America's Morning News

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Publishers sue Internet Archive over scanning of books

"Call for the country's biggest publishers of student digital library for copyright infringement alleging at the internet archive is illegally offered more than a million scanned works to the public including favorites such as a twenty Morrison's song of Solomon welcome glad was playing in Cormac McCarthy's the road in March the internet archive announce it established a national emergency library in response to the outbreak in had shut down most of the country schools and libraries according to the archive the emergency library would support quote remote teaching research activities independent scholarship and intellectual stimulation with free digital

Internet Archive Morrison Cormac Mccarthy Solomon
Aid programs, partisan politics and the path forward: A dispatch from Ottawa

The Big Story

07:06 min | 1 year ago

Aid programs, partisan politics and the path forward: A dispatch from Ottawa

"To Parliament Hill to get a sense of how the aid packages for Canadians have evolved. Since they were first announced. What's available now? What might or might not become available in the future and of course to see if our MP's have figured out the mute button yet. I though I will mute Claire so that she can give you everything. You need to be up to date today. Canada's Chief Public Health Officer Dr Teresa. Tam says the spread of Cova. Nineteen is slowing in Canada. But the number of deaths is on the rise and she says that's because of outbreaks at long term care homes more than three quarters of the deaths are linked to those facilities. She also talked about testing capacity two weeks ago. She said she believes the country could do sixty thousand tests a day but lately Canada's been averaging twenty eight thousand tests a day she says provinces can help by extending the criteria for who can get tested British Columbia's laid out some plans for easing restrictions around Kovic nineteen starting next weekend. The province is allowing group gatherings of more than six people as long as no one is showing any symptoms of the virus. Also this month. Some businesses in BC will be allowed to reopen including hair salons retail stores museums libraries and some restaurants Dr Bonnie Henry the Provinces Health Officer says BC has put the brakes on the outbreak. But they're not through it yet and Antero Premier Doug Ford says the provinces moving with cautious optimism in the reopening of garden centres nurseries and hardware stores. Ontario's still not technically in its first phase of restarting the economy which was outlined a few weeks ago and the emergency orders have been extended until may nineteenth as of Wednesday evening sixty three thousand four hundred and ninety six cases of Cova Nineteen in Canada with four thousand three hundred and fifty seven deaths and I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Cormac McSweeney is the Parliament Hill reporter for city news for Rogers Radio and every once in a while for us and he's working from home and so am I so Forgive the toddler noises. But how are YOU DOING CORMAC? I'm doing all right surviving like everyone else's in isolation well and we're not the only ones doing this now so my first question is just tell me how virtual parliament for the first time ever is going. Well it's been interesting. I mean as you know there have been some troubles some growing pains as MP's and the House of Commons tries to switch to this Basically a really large zoom meeting and they're actually using a version of the zoom platform to host all of this So there have been a lot of troubles as people. Try to figure it out. There were connectivity issues where people were losing their connection and that's unfortunately just a fact of life with a lot of Mp's living in rural areas of the country and not having the same Same sort of connection as you would have. Let's say in Toronto or Ottawa? A lot of 'em. Ps You know figuring out the mute button figuring out the translation button as well because every time somebody doesn't hit the right button it seems to have to pause proceedings to try and deal with it but overall. I think it's been working out all right Aside from the technical hiccups that they've had I it seems to be rolling along smoothly in terms of having MP's MP's question The Prime Minister and different cabinet ministers and I will note as well that this is not technically a sitting of the House of Commons. It's technically a sitting of this special Cova Nineteen Committee that involves every MP and the reason why point that out is because there's there's a difference of procedure so we don't have the normal question period where Thirty SECONDS OF FOUR QUESTION. Thirty seconds for an answer instead because it's a committee. Mp's get about five minutes to question. Whatever minister or the Prime Minister And they can ask as many questions within that time period and the rule of thumb. Is You answer? Just as long as the question has gone on for and so it really does allow for a lot more of a substantial debate and a substantial questioning of the cabinet. Because if you WANNA get a lot of information out of a cabinet minister keep your question short and just squeeze as as many as you can with a five minute period. So what is the tone of those questions and this sitting been lake because to an observer it does seem Less like the. We're all in this together tone That we had six weeks ago. You know when all the aid packages were coming together. Yeah you hit it right there You know at the start of all of this. It seemed like there was going to be no criticism for the Trudeau government right away because this was an unprecedented time and unprecedented measures had to be taken but slowly over the last number of weeks. We've seen The Conservative Party. Start this off where they started questioning the programs being put forward by the government and in a very public fashion. I would say that for the virtual sitting themselves. The tone is actually quite different than what we've seen from the news conference as being held by the individual parties the tone on these Virtual sittings in and these. Qna's that are happening is actually quite different. From the grandstanding and showmanship you normally expect out of question period. In fact everyone's a little bit more toned down and there's I it's much more substantial questioning There's a lot more information coming out. And I think that's a great thing It really shows that without the theatrics that we normally get in question period There can be a good conversation to be had between opposing sides in the House of Commons. But outside of the virtual sittings exactly as we were discussing You know there's been more criticism for the Trudeau. Government people are exposing the gaps in some of the programs that have been announced. And we're really seeing the ideological differences for how we should be dealing with this pandemic at this time and the Conservatives have started raising more and more of opposition to the conservatives add to the true liberals rather as every week has gone on. So it'll be interesting to see where we go from here because up until may twenty fifth were working on a system of Just having one weekly in person a in the House of Commons and then to virtual sittings But the Conservatives for awhile now have been pushing for as many as four in-person sittings each week And so as we approach may twenty fifth Towards the end of this month there'll be more conversations between the opposition parties and the government about how we proceed from here because there's still a lot to do and You know June is when normally parliament would break towards the end of June For the summer break but With this pandemic ongoing and with it being such a fluid situation. I imagine we might see some more unprecedented changes to the procedures of parliament as we move forward and continue to deal with with this pandemic.

MP Cova Canada House Of Commons Prime Minister Trudeau Parliament Hill Cormac Mcsweeney Claire Doug Ford BC Provinces Health Officer Chief Public Health Officer TAM Rogers Radio Dr Teresa
Lawrence Wright on Researching a (Fictional) Pandemic

The Book Review

08:58 min | 1 year ago

Lawrence Wright on Researching a (Fictional) Pandemic

"Last book was God Save Texas Nonfiction. I believe there was a play in between and now this just curious how you go from one project to the next and and forgive me if I skipped a project that may have been in between as well years ago. I made a resolution that I would only do things that were important or fun. Was you know the state of confusion about what I wanted to do with my life and I thought I as a journalist I like to be on the important stories of the day but I also realized that it didn't want to give up things that really joyful and so those are the polls stars of my career and I think is sort of understandable that I would now be working on a musical but you know if you take those as your pulse stars in. I think you can have a pretty interesting career. Are they ever important and fun? Yes this book was. I know it sounds you know is is is a rather bleak book but I really had a wonderful time researching it and going into the world of of public health in all these swashbuckling intellectuals I just admire them so much so I I really had a good time working on this book. All right I'm going to cut to the chase and let everyone know who doesn't know already that the end of October is a fictional story of a pandemic so before we get into more about it and want to go back again to the origin stories. You've said that the director Ridley Scott Asks you a question after Reading Cormac. Mccarthy's the road and that that was your inspiration. What was the question? And when did he ask this? When were you sitting around with Ridley Scott talking about this? This was a decade ago and he is questioned was what happened because Cormac didn't say anything. About what event or of nature had brought civilization to heal? So I started thinking about what could do that and of course I thought about nuclear war but I was a young reporter covering diseases out of the Center for Disease Control in one thousand nine hundred ninety six. There's a swine flu outbreak in the legionnaires disease and I had become enchanted with that world and the courage and ingenuity of the people that I found there and so I thought it'd be an interesting place to find a hero because I felt that those people that I met were really heroic and that disease had been underestimated as a problem for our society in modern times. So Ridley Scott ask you this question about a decade ago and you had been thinking about it because you had reported on disease over the years. When did you actually start working on? This novel really never made the movie. So like Mr Destiny of so many projects in Hollywood and about in two thousand seventeen. I've been thinking about this story. Still is in my mind so I decided I would go back and work on work on. It is a knock and this time I would dive into the research even more deeply and let the story emerged more naturally rather than cinematic -ly so that's that's how the novel got started. You are such a master your master of many forms but I love your nonfiction so much. There's so much research material in this. Did you think maybe there should be nonfiction? I DID CONSIDER WRITING ABOUT MORE DISEASES. But you know it already had an imaginary character and a world which it was said. I got attracted to the idea of tempting it as a novel. It seemed a challenge for me and I wanted to see if I could do it. Who WAS THAT IMAGINARY CHARACTER? Will the name of my heroes? Henry Parsons in the late. Nineteenth Century in England. There was another influence of outbreak and a young epidemiologist named Henry. Parsons was the first to prove that it was caused by contagion and not by my asthma's in the environment you know. He's totally forgotten figure. But I decided to tip my hat to him and name my character. Henry Parsons he is a man whose life has been touched rather savagely by disease and works out of the Center for Disease. Control where I had done by early reporting. And he's an epidemiologist who's confronted many diseases in the past but has always known that there was one awaiting him. There was going to be the big challenge so the CDC is in Atlanta Georgia and the United States. But this novel the breakout begins elsewhere. You have it really kind of take hold in Mecca. Why did you choose to do that? We'll after nine eleven when I was working on my book looming tower. The Saudis wouldn't let me in as a reporter so I got a job. I was mentoring young reporters at the Saudi Gazette in Jeddah which had bin Laden's hometown and one of my very first jobs was to supervise their coverage of the Hodge and I was was not allowed to go to Mecca myself but I was in communication every day with my reporters and I was very struck at the time about the hazard of gathering of people in one place from all over the world and having every year some disease arises sometimes more than one and there's an epidemic in Mecca and then people get on airplanes and they fly home. Well you know what if it was something really dangerous suppose it was like the nineteen eighteen flu. That was in my gosh even when I was living in Saudi Arabia enter the CA-. Golly flew right. This is her fictional virus. Tell us about that sickness. And how did you come to describe what this flu would be like? Why a flu even influence is unconquered. It's the great killer it every year. We lose maybe you know fifty thousand people to influence a very dangerous disease. Clever in a way in that has always mutating. And you never know what's going to show up the next year. I mean the the fluid self that comes every year is sort of a descendant of that nineteen eighteen original Spanish flu right. That's correct Pamela. We're right now. The seasonal flu is H. One IN ONE. Which is the strain that killed between fifty and one hundred million people in nineteen eighteen? And I said as a young reporter I had done stories out of the Center for Disease Control but one of them in nineteen seventy six was a sudden outbreak of h one in one which is what public health officials had been dreading their entire careers. And it was a young man of recruit in Army Base Fort Dix in New Jersey. David Lewis suddenly after a Long March. Came back to the barracks in died. They examined the tissues discovered. It was h one n one Tremendous panic took place in. I win all over talking to people in Fort Dix and enter the members of David Lewis is family and so on the big mystery was he was the only one who died and yet you know there was this in national vaccine program and it became kind of catastrophe for Gerald Ford because people got sick from the vaccine. It was just a total mess but hanging over this was peculiar FAC fifty. Two hundred million people died you know a century ago and then only one and then in two thousand nine to the H. One in one came back as a pandemic and it was more like seasonal flu in his still with us but the the question I had was what would happen if something like the nineteen eighteen flu brand new novel virus came into our culture. How would we handle? It will be better prepared than our ancestors were in one thousand nine hundred eighteen and so the the flu that I create Congolese is really modeled on that. Old Virus one that came out in nineteen eighteen. It was also a hemorrhagic fever. You know there was no resistance to it in the population. I actually created a template that is based on the progress of the flu in Nineteen Eighteen. So in the novel the fluid advances across the globe. It pretty much mirrors. What was going on in nineteen eighteen?

FLU Reporter Henry Parsons Ridley Scott Center For Disease Control Mecca David Lewis Cormac Center For Disease Saudi Arabia Army Base Fort Dix Saudi Gazette Mccarthy Hemorrhagic Fever Mr Destiny Director Bin Laden Golly Fort Dix
Leslie Jamison on Jenny Offill's Book 'Weather'

The Book Review

11:15 min | 1 year ago

Leslie Jamison on Jenny Offill's Book 'Weather'

"Leslie Jamison is here in the studio. Her most recent book is make it screen and make it burn essays which was reviewed in the book review last fall all but she's here now to talk about another book. She reviewed this week on our cover. Jennie O. Foles Weather Leslie. Thanks for being here. It's so wonderful to be here so you. Let's first talk about Jenny full. Who she is? Pearl Siegel staff critic for the Times. Were a profile of Jennie O.. Full in this this week's issue of the New York Times magazine but give us a sense of who this writer is. When I think about Daniel's work and why it matters and why I think it's really created aided the sense of excitement around so many readers I think part of it you know she writes about motherhood and marriage and things that can get lumped under the general neural umbrella term domesticity but she brings them to life in these incredibly razor-sharp ways and there shouldn't even be a but conjunction to that sentence right like wire wire those states of being not razor-sharp somehow but but sometimes they can get seen as softer sentimental and she brings both very different form and a very different tone to how how she writes about them and how she does justice to their emotional extremity? Now I'm thinking that we have to make a challenge to ourselves not to use the word but for the rest of this partnership. I think there we go that we're are GONNA fail so we'll just we'll we'll put that aside. This book weather is her third novel her. I was last things and then it took her fifteen years to write. Her neck spoke department of speculation which came out in two thousand fourteen and was one of our ten best books of the year. And I feel like that book really brought her to you. A wider attention perhaps not bestseller list attention but it was hugely critically acclaimed and beloved by readers. Let's start talk a little a bit about that book and why it struck such a chord and I think it's no accident when you said it was like fifteen years until the next book which actually sort of part of the plot of Department of speculation too. It's like there's a writer who is taking a long time to put her second novel. Part of I think you know my understanding from interviews. She's done. The story of that book has that it started as a much more conventionally structured novel and it sort of took her a long time to whittle it down to its really searing form which is a very a fragmented form where you feel like you're getting these absolutely essential bursts of exerience. I think her agent described at once as more like an x Ray than a body which I thought was such such an amazing evocation of how it works and so part of why it caught. Hold I think is that it wasn't it wasn't just very smart about feeling and it had this strong long hard and it's about a infidelity and marriage sort of preparing itself but it also it seemed to find a new language for feeling a new structure for feeling the guy I want to go back to that the fragments Manson the structure for people who've not Reggiani Oval. We should say this. Her books are really short. They're really really short but they are packed and yet they don't feel dense and part of that is due to structure and you use the word fragments. People use the word fragments or fragmentary or cones. Let's talk about a house. She structures these books because it is especially when department speculation came out in two thousand fourteen. It felt very different from what was being written and it felt very very different from the way in which a domestic novel was being written. You know it makes me think a little bit about the way that like Virginia Woolf would describe moments of being you know that somehow we have these moments where it feels like something about experience is intensified or crystallized on. I think Jenny has a real knack for like putting her finger on the pulse of those moment. So maybe it's just an ordinary moment like in this latest novel. where she comes home from the her narrator comes home from feeling this intense panic about climate aamot change and her sons playing minecraft noon? SORTA get like putty off of his fingers. Like it's not in a dramatic sense like it's that's not a huge plot point happening in that moment but she manages manages to find these ways that seemingly insignificant moments if you if you describe them so precisely and locate some kind of feeling what's happening in them quivering inside them. She does justice to it and the way that her books are structured. I don't think there are like us in this weather. There are parts. I can't remember if in Department of Speculation Stephen divided into chapters but it's these single paragraphs are a few paragraphs spaced apart on the page. So not not only. Is it a small book but it actually. I mean you could theoretically sit down and read it in a couple of hours I did. You did theory. You could sit down down and read it very quickly and one of the things that I think people then mistakenly assume is that. Oh you know sort of hastily written you get the cents though once you are reading it that not at all does feel something. That is very much labored over almost like poetry in terms of the precision of the ways in which the things that she's putting into those little sections as you pointed out it's often about the contrast in a given moment between something very granular and domestic and personal and then some larger thought. That's going on or something happening in the greater world. Do you think that was what was is so striking about department of speculation. The fact that she was doing not that she was taking something like a domestic novel. That was you know. Just as you said kind of a story of a Brooklyn Glenn Mother and infidelity and work life balance and these things that so many books are about but infusing in it these larger the issues. I think that's a really good point that so often. What makes these like short bursts? CLO- fuel incandescent our field. Charged is is that they're very granular. But they're also holding some kind of emotional intensity and I think when you're writing about something like infidelity where there's both the danger of somehow telling a story that people feel like they've heard before story that feels intrinsically melodramatic. It can really bring out the humanity of the story to pay attention to the granularity of of like a one scene. That's rising to mind from that novel is like the narrator after a conflict with her husband going to stay at a hotel overnight and and like preying on the carpet of the hotel floor. But it's like it's like that hotel carpeting that holds so much feeling rather than just like the larger obstruction of of infidelity per se. Or something and so I think it is that scale shifting that can happen in a space of a paragraph. Can that happen across the course the whole book. That's also really operative in this latest book. where the skills or even bigger because among other things about climate change is like one of the biggest skills yes yes yeah? Let's talk about weather and let's start start with what it's about even though you know as we think people are probably sensing when you talk about Jenny ovals work. It really isn't about plot. Yeah but what is whether yeah so the narrator of weather is a mother who years ago dropped out of a PhD program and it's working as university librarian and she takes a job job working for her former mentor. Who does a podcast about climate change? where she's answering all the letters that are coming in response to this podcast so there are a few different? There's the kind of plot of her I went to the overhauls narrator to answer my letters to this cast. I'm just kidding. I love answering your letters I would be. I thought you were GonNa even save answer my letters I was like I have a few letters. Live right Yeah I mean you know you have this narrators mother you have her as a wife wife you have her as a a worker and maybe a worker who feels a bit lost in the world. There's also for me. One of the most compelling plot lines in the book is about the narrators relationship with her brother. WHO's a recovering addict? He gets married and then has a a baby and her role in his life and her sort of desperate hope that he can put his life together. Other was a really moving strand among strands for me as well presumably. That's very deliberate. Bringing new life into a world that is in crisis crisis and feels like it's ending and I think that's one of the abiding emotional. Tensions in the book is like the the world is always beginning and ending at once. And maybe maybe there's something about that truism that has felt universal through time but it has a particular acuity now or the world is is it's ending he's send away by these factors that are at work but that dynamic of like yes the world is ending but also you wake up in the morning and you're touching base with your brother overtaxed to make sure he and the baby are doing okay that both of those are real on. Both of those are happening. I think we're seeing a wave of climate fiction and it's taking all of these different forms. Probably a most noticeably post apocalyptic and dystopia although there are also books like Richard powerhouses over story sometimes metaphorical Oracle sometimes very reality based feels different. Though I mean how does this differ from other fiction looking at climate and climate. Change for starters. You don't have that kind of like emotional. Buffer of the post apocalyptic landscape that emotional buffer mailing a strange way to describe a postal puck landscape. But it's like if the apocalypse is happening thing in Brooklyn Public School like that's the stage set for the book it feels more disquieting in certain ways because it's closer to home. It's not like Cormac McCarthy novel where a father and Zahn are like traveling the chart landscape like it's more immediate in that way and I think one of the challenges of writing about climate change is how to take this thing that is essentially on a larger scale than our minds can hold and how to make it a narrative we can hold. There's this moment early on in weather where the narrator is thinking about her son allies elementary school and she says the problem with the school is that it's not a bill on a human scale feels too large for these little children who are going into it and I I think in a way that lays out one of the aesthetic challenges the book right. It's like climate. Change isn't quite on a human scale but narrative is on a human scale. So how do you translate. How does she do it? Part of it has to do with what we're talking about a little bit earlier these questions of sort of scale shifting and simultaneity where you had these big questions of like the end of the world coming up either through the letters that are coming into this podcast or you know this narrator is doing what I think. We all do obsessive googling about lots of things where she's sort. I'm trying to see like how hot is it going to be in New York City and you know when her son is sixty years old or something like that and getting so freaked out by these numbers so you sort of have those larger questions that are always coming up against the interpersonal. TRAUMAS the books. So either it's like the obstruction of like how hot is the World GonNA get comes up up against the body of her actual son. She's imagining at age. Sixty or thinking about like the horsemen of the apocalypse. Coming in comes up against you know coming home ends ends giving the dog. His Lover Frog Toy. You know so the becomes on a human scale because we see a particular human with a particular life a particular brother who's giving bringing new life into the world that all of those abstract questions are hitting all of those granular

Jenny Writer The Times Leslie Jamison Jennie O Jennie O. Foles The New York Times Pearl Siegel Virginia Woolf New York City Daniel Reggiani Oval RAY Manson Cormac Mccarthy Brooklyn Glenn Mother Brooklyn Public School Allies Elementary School
"cormac" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

09:46 min | 1 year ago

"cormac" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Passion and performance there on site test track is their practice court and they got a play book that includes precisely what you need get your ties right at tire rack dot com the way tire buying should be so coach here is Brandon lysis question even though Cormac is sitting out this year because of transfer rules what have you seen from him in practice that has you excited to see him play next year well you know I've been talking a lot about basketball like you wouldn't feel for the game and he has got a fabulous feel for the game and skillset he's just a heck of a guard that knows how to play and our fans are going to be very excited when he gets eligible I wish I had a male you know we I actually explore try to get a waiver would carbody went down to get him eligible he he didn't really know what I did it on but notes to him he would have been jumping out there in a heartbeat but we couldn't get it but you know three years of eligibility the timing form is great in our program and and you know I think that's when the reasons he ended up here Pflueger gives you know leave the building how bout a perimeter next year of good when Cormac and print a subject that is it is it is pretty good that's pretty good primer and you know we don't we just kinda we we we really kind of state experience level with those three guys on the court so our fans you know and and I mean this is a guy you know when people think what will who's the like well he's got a lot of Chris Quentin amidst the best story who were great players for us but he's his own unique style when but a but a really really good feel and immoral let him play we're not going over coach you because he's got a great feel Cormac was a key player for Stanford last year you started seventeen games including your first one it's always impressive when a friend yeah starts the first game of the year average just under nine point two forty nine three east to leave the car it'll grab three and a half rebounds per game dished out just under to assist the game eight seventy four percent of his free throws like Notre Dame numbers you were heavily recruited coming out of high school heavily recruited when you decided you needed to transfer just some of the schools that looked at you Butler can Sagot Villanova Virginia or you looked at them northwestern mark cat why'd you pick noted I think that can you know considering Notre Dame and coming here was honestly a no brainer I think that kind of the way that so it's kind of like use just describing lets the guards play on the offense and kind of the the culture really that has been built you know over there you know the twenty or so years that coaches been here's been unbelievable and you can feel it from day one seven in the door and so I think that really stuck out to me as a you know kind of a place where I wanted to be at you know in terms of on the court off the court type of culture and just fit honestly and I thought I I felt that I would be able to fit in and you know I think so far yeah I've I've absolutely felt that way there's a tremendous feature online on the internet wired segment with you on the side like just on the bench during the UCLA game you stood in front of me in the personnel practices I set my radio spot you stood in front of ME one practice and basically coached you coached your I mean especially got it just got here with both in curbing you sounded like a member of the coaching staff do you think some day when you're playing covers or want to coach no yeah I would I don't know I mean I I I don't I obviously love to keep playing the game for as long as I can and you know who knows where I end up in in twenty or so years but you know I love the game of basketball you know I've I've always loved to kind of the thinking aspect of it and and there's a lot more to it than kind of what you see on the on the court and and being that a player so I I you know I would put it out of the question but as of now I'm not totally sure for your team's communication is so very important and this group in particular times has been a little quiet I don't think that's gonna be a problem now the the the the the I've talked about his game but what I'm looking forward to having I have it on a daily basis but only in practice a is his personality and his communication and in and what will be quickly his leadership you know he is god certainly a great feel he so encouraging to his teammates he's still in with both feet you know he's making an unbelievable impact even though we can't playing games but you know turning him loose out there and he's the kind of guy where you come to a time out next year to go what do you think we should do Cormac I mean I would value him he's got that kind of feeling a bit in our system and you know but he's getting a man does it agreed Coleman coaching yeah let him go play pro for awhile and and and and now now professionally the sky's the limit for him now this he's got the whole package and he can dream big dreams professionally after watching him now for up close it's it's a really bright future in and I think we can help him with that how much did spoke style of play but if you talk to the guys knowing that this is not a dictatorship those titles are democracies where everyone has a voice how important was that to you when you decided where you were going to play next it was it was extremely poor I think that kind of the trust and sense of family really that is within our program is unbelievable and I think that you know that's a huge part of basketball is belief and believing in yourself and having others believe in you because you know no matter how good of a player you are if you're kind of trapped inside your own head are you kind of have a fence put around you you know you you're not gonna be able to you know live up to your potential or or or play the type of bass player cable flying and so I think that that's a big part of why you know we're so successful as a group and also as individuals you know people are just feel free they feel you know loose and I feel confident in themselves no matter what's going on good or bad it's just the next play you know move on and I think that's a really powerful thing to have as a group I guess you could say small world for probably more it's a program that turns out great players but like Pat Connaughton you played for the Middlesex magic Middlesex magic eight you project because I played in the middle six lead many many many years ago because I grew up in Winchester Massachusetts before there was a middle sex magic with talk about the AAU circuit and what that team under the crises does for players I think so the nose like magic is pretty much you know the reason why I began to kind of get exposed to the schools that ended up recruiting me they played a very similar style basketball as Notre Dame it's a it's a free style it's a sharing the ball you know and unselfish culture with a lot of guys who love the game and play hard and so you know like you mentioned pack on a ten was a prime example Middlesex matter to Notre Dame seamless transition and obviously beyond you know he's had a a great you know continues at a great career in the NBA but pretty much you know playing for the middle six magic as a sophomore you know that really turned the corner on my recruiting process just because it was a system that really fit the kind of player and person I am and you know it allowed me to showcase what I could do and also you know go out and we didn't look the tallest of the strongest of them we're doing through the legs and landline but we've got we beat teams you know be teams who were at the five stars had the the highlights in the Instagram and all that and we would we just basically go out and get it done I think you know kind of taking that from a young age and kind of continuing on with that kind of mindset and that philosophy of you know just going out and take care of business night in night out is is one that is kind of stuck with me and I think a lot of players in that program as well as a lot of players in our program here no you're the first Cormac that I have met I thought it was a very unusual name I went on Twitter reported one back today and lots of Cormac's there are yeah lots of not you you don't need to be on social I I'm not on Twitter now smart yeah I have Instagram but I don't have Twitter I kind of stayed off that that's probably a good thing because they often and I refuse to get on Instagram marked out so explain to me you did your parents ever tell you why they named you Cormac do you have a history of that I know what's I wish it is Irish so fitting for being you know home at Notre Dame but it was kind of a last minute deal they were very undecided up until I was physically in the world in their hold me and I've been told that they saw it you know somewhere and name book in it they looked it up in it it does have Irish origins you know some I think some Irish king or somewhere back in the day it's not really you know after any particular person I think they just kinda like that last onto it well I looked it up today on one of the Irish websites and they say it means cherry a tear have you ever seen that before I have not you're running your driving the cherry it's fitting which all right free is able to roll he's a lead guard that's very cherry it's here good not the one thing he may not be aware about their name being a radio TV shows you get to run the fast break you may not know about and all that if you have a chance to this quite sometimes we'll explain you'll be good at this Cormac what the fast rate is right after this time out of my free radio show live from rocks public house presented by the experts at tire rack dot com during the holidays we offer more than we received at winter us we believe your bank should too that's.

Cormac
"cormac" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"cormac" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"I could see you being my girlfriend. Yeah Weird move. He's like Oh yeah I can really see it and she's like okay so he really fumbled over that one and then we got also a funny little thing where Elizabeth's Elizabeth like what's one thing. I don't know about a procrastinator. It's like oh well really just saw that action of one minute ago. I actually really liked to how she was like. Oh is that what happened with the kiss was cute. I also like to the start of the conversation when he she's like so like how do you feel about being in a couple of me and he's like Oh. You know there's just no one else here that I can actua- so I feel really trapped we see the true humor stylings of Zach and Elizabeth coming out. They are funny. That's what it was actually funny but I also think that maybe neither of them have met a a funny person before so they think that is fair. That's that's my personal theory. Then we get my least favorite love island trope of all time fast food. I'M GONNA need to take this on because I can't even talk about it yeah so the couples are transferring food items from like one table to another and this time they're sitting down like at a table that slides on a track and they can only transfer them I <hes> the first person puts it in their mouth and they transferred to the other person's mouth and then onto the second table and mice and who's transfers the most food the fastest wins. I legitimately almost puked watching this like I was literally gagging with. I'm Caroline Cormac in the milkshake. Take I was like Oh yeah see. I did laugh very very hard. When cormack like projectile spout the MIC shade over this won't doesn't usually bother <music> as much as other people like it's definitely gross? It's disgusting but like I can watch it except for that once again that giant plate of French fries with catchup all over them and I would've taken the L.. I'm not playing yeah. I wouldn't be playing for other the reasons but yeah and that's gross like as someone who I don't even dislike edge on top of the fries. It's not okay. That's what if you're someone who doesn't like catch up and then you've ruined the fires for them. It's rude and the announcer says oh they're gonNA play my second favorite milkshake theme song and then play milkshake Buckley's. What's your favorite milkshake theme Song Yeah? I literally can't think of another milkshake theme song. Can you think of any not off. The top of my head is really the opening you had one prepared. Well sorry I'm not a professional. I didn't have a lot of time to prepare for this. We'll just air. If we were recording later I would have come up with something. The other thing too is that Western is just like absent for the majority of this episode sick. Maybe he called Caros Pinkai what's going on but he needs to leave the villa and so Winston is going to play with Katrina yeah and it was like imagine barely knowing someone like that. I'm GonNa spit in your mouth. It's not like a good situation to be in usually like airplane with established couples and this was just like okay. I met you four days ago and in some cases I literally met you this morning. Okay now. I'm going to spit a banana split down your throat. It's I can't I was so disgusted and like B._B.. Can seven when people were putting Danes like tooth retainer in their mouths and this is like so much worse than the <hes> this is definitely worse. It's any any listeners that are at time watching and now have to listen to fifteen minutes of US retelling the whole story. Thankfully we're not dedicating fifteen minutes to this. I'm so casual and Carrewyn and good for them. I mean I feel like cure is the most competitive and Cashel is the most calls himself a Slob at one point. He's he's definitely saw this coming yeah. I'm surprised by that. We also get where Winston wants to talk to Katrina. He felt a real connection with her but he can't get her alone. This did make me laugh..

US Elizabeth Winston milkshake Buckley Katrina Cashel Caroline Cormac Caros Pinkai cormack Zach Danes Carrewyn fifteen minutes one minute four days
A brawl for the climate change vote

The Big Story

13:26 min | 2 years ago

A brawl for the climate change vote

"A year ago when people wondered which fringe party could matter in the twenty nineteen election most analysts pointed to maxim burn, as newly created People's Party of Canada. Would that party grow? Could it eat into the conservative base, when it split the vote on the right a year later that seems a little silly? The People's Party is still at just a couple of points in the polls. But it turns out there is a little party that could decide the election, it was on the other side of the spectrum sitting right where it's been all along waiting for the rest of the country to reach these same conclusion about the key issue. They're most known for that they'd reached years ago, climate change is not now I repeat that not an environmental issue. It's a massive security threat, and it needs to be dealt with by government at all levels, a security threat that requires taking bold action, one of the clear things that we've seen from, from this, despite election. I want to congratulate all the candidates who who ran in. It is a Canadians are really preoccupied about climate change are Canadians really ready to meet the green party, where they've been living all these years sure every poll shows support for the party is rising, but luck rising is relative. When you were as low in the polls as the greens typically are in federal elections. So even if that general support is there will it translate to results. Will it translate to writings, one can it make a difference on election night? And if it does at whose expense, welcome to the fight for the climate vote. I'm Jordan heath Rollings. And this is the big story, Cormac mcsweeney is the parliament hill. Reporter for city news. And for the Rogers radio brands and also for us iconic. Hey, how's it going? It is going really well. I'm hoping that you can kind of parse this brewing fight on the left side of the political spectrum right now for us. It's a remarkable dynamic right now months to go before the election were seeing votes evaporate for both the liberals and the New Democrats, and they're all shifting green, you know, the old saying it ain't easy being green. Well, it's pretty easy right now, because things are looking up for Elizabeth may and her party. We've got the greens polling at probably the best that they've ever pulled that federally some polls have them up at around twelve percent, which is huge. Because back in two thousand fifteen the greens were, I think less than five percent of the vote. So they've more than doubled their voting base in the lead up to the. Twenty nine thousand nine fall election. So they're firing on all cylinders right now. And the liberals and New Democrats are wondering what the heck to do to make sure that they keep those voters on their sides. But also, not only that steel voters from the other progressive parties to try and make sure that they can secure some sort of victory, and try and stop the conservatives who are also firing on all cylinders right now. So it's a it's a heck of a fight on the left as the conservatives continue to gain momentum. And it's going to be interesting to see what happens is there. Anything concrete, you can point to we've talked a couple times on this podcast, most notably. When they had a chance in P of the sort of, general affection. The greens are seeing in the rise in the polls. But is there anything concrete, you can point to that might be driving people moving to consider the greens? Some of this is based on stats and polls. And others is based sort of anecdotally. But I think what we're seeing is a few. Different things here that is just creating this perfect scenario for the green party. One is the fact that climate change and the concerns around climate change on a broader national scale or finally, catching up with what the green party has been preaching for years and years. And that is, we need to take action to protect the environment and protect our earth, and Canadians are now really catching up to the point where this is becoming one of the biggest issues seen nationally among the voting public that action needs to be taken and serious action at that. That's one thing one aspect of it. Is that Canadians are catching up with the concerns for the greens? But the other aspect all of this is that we're seeing kind of a collapse and a failure, if you will from the liberals and NDP to take a look at the new democrat side of things. Jug, meet sing failing to gain traction is since taking over the party leadership. We've seen the end EP. Of fallen support. He's struggled to get the attention that he was hoping to get. There was a lot of excitement around. Jug. Meet sing in the hope that he would be this charismatic dynamic young leader that would really help vault the end EP back to the level that we saw with Jack Layton that has not happened at all. And he's, he's struggled in a number of interviews as well where he's been accused of being too vague on certain issues or possibly flip flopping on others. And so while they knew Democrats are struggling the liberals have had problems of their own Justin Trudeau back in two thousand fifteen was able to unite the progressives behind him. He stole from green supporters and end EP supporters, and some conservatives and, and really built up this, this perfect sort of momentum around him during that long campaign in two thousand fifteen that helped vault him from third him in the liberals from third party status to government, and it never happened before. But since taking office, a lot of the promises and a lot of the things that he was. Elected on have created problems for him, just looking at things like the promise to change the way, we elect, our MP's read. There was a lot of hope that, that, that would actually happen in never ended up happening. The liberals have had other scan whole such as SNC laflin and the, the more recent problems of the Mark Norman case, those are eating away at liberal support as well. And on top of all of that. I mean with environment with the environment being a big issue in the eyes of Canadians, some are pointing out, what people, some people see as a contradiction of the liberal position while they say, we need to take serious action on climate change. We'd need this carbon tax. Here's the government buying the trans mountain pipeline to make sure that the oil from our oil sands, is being sent off to other markets something a lot of people who are very passionate about the environment disagree with. And so you have a lot of troubles for the liberals and the MVP right now. And a lot of progressives who don't know where to turn because they're dissatisfied with what they see from what is traditionally been the two left or left of center parties. And now they're looking to the greens as a possible, viable option. And so you have this perfect scenario, as I said, where climate change is becoming more of an important issue in the eyes of Canadians, the traditional parties that Canadians have known for decades are not satisfying, a lot of these younger voters. And they're deciding you know what? Maybe whether it's a protest vote or legitimately giving the greens shot. They're definitely looking at the greens with a lot of serious consideration. When they look at them, especially for those people for whom climate is a major issue. What do they see exactly what gives the green party? The credibility on climate to. They have a specific plan. They do. And actually, it was just recently released. They entitled it mission possible. And I think the, the whole thing is that the greens for years have been branding themselves as. As the environmental party now that can work against them in certain ways, where they're sort of seen as only a one issue party. And it's, it's a it's an image that they've been trying to shake for some time now under Lisbeth may. But nonetheless, the greens are seen as a very credible party when it comes to the environment, you ask any Canadian like, who do you think is the party that would do the most to try and save the environment? I think the green party would likely be the number one answer. So they did release this ambitious plan for the environment. At a time when a lot of Canadians are paying attention to these issues. They are pitching to go well beyond what the liberal government has said, we'll be its targets in terms of dealing with greenhouse gas emissions. I mean, well, beyond the fact, they want to double the reduction target. So the liberals say they want to try and hit thirty percent to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from two thousand five levels by thirty percent by twenty thirty while the green party says we can do better than that. We'll do sixty percent of reduction from the two thousand and five levels of by twenty thirty. That's a dramatic shift and they're not just looking at, you know, pricing pollution as a way to deal with this. They're talking about some major projects such as retrofitting every building across the nation and eliminating our reliance on foreign oil making sure that from province to province. Renewable energy can be more easily shared something that even the conservatives are kind of pitching with their energy corridor option right now. So the, the greens have released released a very ambitious plan. And I guess now that it's out there. It hasn't had a lot of time to really set in for Canadians, whether they're paying attention to promises like this so far out from the election or not as another thing. But we'll see how they respond with these very ambitious targets that Elizabeth may and her green party have put forward two weeks ago. The greens actually one abaya election which. Which feels like something that doesn't happen. How did that come about? And what happened in auto afterwards? Because what I'm fascinated by, in this story is the number of people who have kind of seen a rise in the polls from the greens, but to your point written them off, as a one issue party, or while they can't climb that high can they and did this send a message are their people in auto Wah, talking about them? Now there are definitely people talking about the greens. And I think this by-election victory although I will say that by-election results are usually not reflective of where things go in general election ratified, it is a way and it's seen by some as a way to send a message to the government of the day. Prime minister Justin Trudeau said the day after the by election that he gets it. There's a message from Canadians they care about climate change, and they want to see action on climate change. And that's what his government is focused on through its carbon pricing system and. So I think there was a message sent to both the liberals and the end EP that they need to need to up their game. When it comes to environmental issues, the end EP as well as changed its tactics since that by-election result. And so, I think a lot of politicians while they were seeing some of this growth in this so-called green wave sweep across the nation and a lot of buzz and a lot of talk about the greens, it wasn't until we saw on federal scale of victory such as having the second elected, and p from the green party arrive at the house of Commons before they started to really, you know, publicly address this, because I'm sure that behind the scenes, both those parties were looking at the greens as, as a potential threat and trying to figure out what to do. But again, this is all come recently for the greens, where they've seen this rise over the last several months as we. Part of it to do with the focus on climate change part of it to do with distaste of the otherwise traditional parties that Canadians have been voting for for a while. But I think there was a message sent and, and people are adapting how do people see Elizabeth may who may be until recently, not many of them ever thought much about there's a bit of a joke around Ottawa that Elizabeth may is everyone's political aunt? You know, she's a likeable person, she has something to say about almost everything, but up until recently, I don't think a lot of people actually were considering her as, as potential prime ministerial material, and I think, more people are sort of giving her a bit of a shot. She's not distasteful in any way, you know, you haven't seen Elizabeth may be the subject of a lot of controversy. She has she's had her own problems within her own party. There has been pushed back, there have been allegations that she's been a bully as a leader. Things like that. But whether Canadians have been paying a lot of attention to that something else, she is seen as somebody who has integrity, who has a passion for what she does. And I would be hard pressed to find another MP in the house of Commons who spends as much time in the house of Commons, debating on almost every different subject, then Elizabeth may, so she's very committed to her work. There is broad support for Elizabeth may. But whether that translates into prime ministerial materials something else Nanos poll that just came out recently actually has her in terms of the preferred prime minister.

Greens Green Party People's Party Of Canada People's Party Elizabeth Justin Trudeau Rogers Jack Layton EP Jordan Heath Rollings Cormac Mcsweeney Reporter Prime Minister NDP Liberal Government Snc Laflin Parliament Hill
Dakota Johnson Not Pregnant Despite Reports, Rep Says

Ryan Seacrest

03:24 min | 3 years ago

Dakota Johnson Not Pregnant Despite Reports, Rep Says

"To chill. She said, I'm not going to go straight. It's making another record. I feel like I've done a lot. I feel like I've rung the bell of being a popstar very loudly. And I'm very grateful for that. Well, she's a shoo in for something. She's not a heel for the business. All right, Mary McCormack, aka Marcia Brady, she was one of the many celebrities who wanted to buy the Brady bunch house in studio City, California when it went up for sale, but marine figured that the other bidders like the eventual winner HDTV had deeper pockets than for marine were Cormac Walsh. Got a roller pennies underneath my pillow. They didn't take care of those guys. Very well. It was the seventy s now. But she thinks that HDTV will do a great job renovating it, I'm sure she wants a gig on one of the episodes. Yeah. No. That would be totally awesome. Her or you know, any of the cast of characters. Right. Any of the Brady bunch kids burnt? Yeah. Then finally Meg Ryan, son. Jack Wade always avoided the film when Harry met Sally because of the scene were his mom, fakes an orgasm. But he finally watched it, and apparently he loved it. He says quote afterwards. I cried for so long because I was so proud of her. That's weird is putting like orgasm. In tears and the. Crowd. Yup. Oh, no. So we're gonna leave it

Marcia Brady Sally Meg Ryan Mary Mccormack Cormac Walsh Jack Wade Studio City California Harry
"cormac" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

The Ross Bolen Podcast

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"cormac" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

"Renan's employer a lawyer named william cormac mary brennan was his maid and he had an affair with her then her dad moved to london to get away from his wife's family i guess you really fucking hated his wife he's sleeping with the maid and getting pregnant and run away and he began dressing an as a boy and calling her andy in a lot of the different things you might read it's it'll say like and bonnie was raised as a boy so i mean this comes into play more and more as we get down the rabbit hole of and bonnie but it's just an interesting thing for a little girl to just as a boy in her dad's calling her andy and raising her as a boy in england or in london to try to get away from his wife and it's just this chaotic upbringing it was recorded that bonnie had red hair in was considered a good catch but she had probably a fiery temper to match that hair as she supposedly stabbed a servant girl with a knife at the age thirteen which is not that's bad bitch behavior for thirteen year old stabbing people other other accounts will tell you she murdered that serving girl i believe that i don't know which ones true i believe it but she certainly stabbed her i don't know if she died but it just depends what you believe she also apparently beat to death or beat halfway to death a suitor who tried to raipur just to add to the bat assery we've got going here anyway how she got into pirating sometime between seventeen fourteen and seventeen eighteen she and her husband james bonnie who was like basically a half ass pirates niche he was making a career ratting out pirates which is kind of a bummer in explains why she eventually bailed on his jazz because that's violating every gcode ever invented there any period of time but he moved to nassau with her on new providence island known as a sanctuary at the time for english pirates called the republic of pirates and while they're in the bahamas she began mingling with pirates and local taverns and that is when she met john calico jack rackham who was a captain of the pirate sloop review.

Renan william cormac mary brennan andy england london providence island bahamas raipur james bonnie nassau john calico thirteen year
"cormac" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

59:13 min | 4 years ago

"cormac" Discussed on Overdue

"cormac" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"cormac" Discussed on Overdue

"Um andrew folks wanna know more if they've if the they've never heard about us before and they need to learn about us worship ago they should already podcast accounts are internet destination for all things overdue affair we've got links you i tunes google play an rss those are always you can subscribe to the show get new episodes when they come out uh we release every monday annan also bones episodes every couple of months we've got links to the social up pages that craig mentioned we've got amazon links to the books that we have read and are going to read that you can click and we get a cut of that sports to show a little bit we have our full january schedule up now through the end of the month including the bonus episode of craig do you wanna do you want should we just run through that uh shirt ideology buckled up real quick hold on i ask three next week next week i am reading the secret by rhonda burned and we're gonna tell we are going to crack the sing wide open i'm going to tell everybody to seek then on tackling the satanic verses by salman rushdie and i'm reading the dispossessed by ursula kayla gwynn and then our bonus episode is on the cranes dance by meg howery check it out more info on bones episodes at patron dotcoms overdue pa ah there you go uh something i think that's it right that's it no big show news right now but we might have a few things to share with you on patron at some other stuff in the next couple of weeks so keep an eye out for that i thank you so much for listening everybody we hope that this helps you get your it started off right until he actually travel.

craig rhonda salman rushdie ursula kayla gwynn andrew google amazon
"cormac" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"cormac" Discussed on Overdue

"Um the guy the german guys walking along and he's likes iin up the captives any eyes up this guy that billy later meets the german then did something very strange he smiled and licht the man spittle from about his mouth he was a very large man with enormous hands and he reached an sees the young captives head in both these hands and bent as if to kiss him but it was no kiss he seized in by the face and it may well have looked to others that he bent to kiss him on each cheek perhaps in the military manner of the french but what he did instead with a great caving of his cheeks was to suck each in turn the man's eyes from his head and spit them out again and leave them dangling by their cords wet and strange and wobbling on his cheeks i don't like it later the the mailbox refers to being able to see his own mouth no i don't wanna hear about how you can see your mouth oh my god is pretty rough that's oh no is brutal and it's it was surprising to me in that nothing that brutal happens to any of the like primary care in the book nothing that brutal happens in the present tense in the book even though like people do have like life altering injuries and some people die kind of just don't get their eyeballs stuck down there had like somebody china and it's like why does that happen i don't know that character then does go on to say some pretty like interesting stuff about what it is to move through the world as a blind person.

china billy
"cormac" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"cormac" Discussed on Overdue

"Because that would have been a bizarre turn for our first podcast 2018 recorded together to take um so yeah this is uh i have read the road um that's the only mccarthy that i have read and i really enjoyed it you red blood meridian i guess he got it wrong as you leave the tube of i did it bad and it's i think it's just not my cup of tea he which is okay we talked back our cups of tea before and i'm just i don't know maybe maybe it's the pro style navy it's that has just unrelentingly violent and and bleak we akane i can take definitely in my fiction but like adenauer did needs to there needs to be something out like i don't like watching that second batman movie with with oh a dark night because it's up oh it's up to pretty big plumber there's no light and hope left in the world in that movie and yeah these days specializes i need a little bit just lopit best a shaft of of light describes an up from the ashes um if you're interested in what the core mick mccarthy society is up to they recently shared a call for proposals from the area chair of the core mick mccarthy area of the west pc a aca conference for paper proposals on mccarthy in this is i think for an upcoming conference topics include andrew but are not limited to mccarthy in the west carthy end apocalypse narration historical imagine aries and mccarthy's work narrative theory approaches to mccarthy's writing gender and sexuality studies approaches to mccarthy's work mccarthy in hollywood issues and film adaptation nieto neoliberal discourse and in mccarthy wife southern gothic its meaning now and horror and mccarthy i was just struck by neoliberal discourse and slash in mccarthy.

adenauer mick mccarthy andrew hollywood
"cormac" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"cormac" Discussed on Overdue

"Um another interesting fact of his we talk about this on the previous episode his first and i think only tv interview was with oprah what is kinda neat he also used the same typewriter for almost fifty years ago at this from a article on shortlist dot com he used an olive eddie letter of thirty two shadow tell you typewriter fans out there to right all of his fictions blazing correspondence from 1960 to douse nine it was then auctioned off by christie's uh for over two hundred fifty thousand dollars and then he replaced it with the exact same model that he bought for eleven dollars in newark condition ha he uses to this day old writers are gonna old right i suppose uh and we as we said we talked a little bit outlet last time his real name was a charles mccarthy did did we talk about why he changed his name i believe according to the corner mccarthy society he renamed after an irish king he did do that but you don't why he change in the first place no i do not nova it's because apparently he did not would there's this guy name edgar bergen and he had a ventriloquist's dummy named charlie mccarthy and so all cormick did not want to be associated with this with this dummy i think the modernday equivalent is if you had a like if your name was also one of jeff dunham's ya aims schaerer would you a change her name so people would not be leafy had like you that on funny really offensive terrible request with all the bad dummy if he had like an andy cunningham or a grigg getting dummy like yeah greg getting we would change our names so that we were not one of his dumped the wicket he is says his styles been described as addressed down more'digestible version of don rickles with multiplepersonality disorder which is the worst sentence i have ever read i need you to clarify that you're talking about jeff dodoma not coric mccarthy now antigraft okay.

oprah christie corner mccarthy society edgar bergen jeff dunham andy cunningham grigg greg don rickles jeff dodoma newark charles mccarthy coric mccarthy two hundred fifty thousand dol eleven dollars fifty years
"cormac" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"cormac" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Yeah and some of them are better written than half the books i've read i i played the last of us which one way to eight billion game of the year awards in 2014 because it was britain lake a cormac mccarthy book was just so tough if you thinking okay i grew up in attack men era yes this really detailed lake oddly beautiful apocalyptic game yeah because it takes place twenty years after a kind of an apocalypse so you have these buildings like wildlife has grown over everything and it's like is is in some ways it was beautiful pacalypse at are receding you know the way they did it a but between that and the story it was just so it just pulled me away it was just so beautifully done a uh is one of the rare examples where something is like hype to the heavens that was actually probably deserved all hyped been some an interesting or if like that yeah an isn't it i don't know like interesting maybe it's better at a better word years how in many ways these really indepth video games have a lot of literary clout to them like i mean i hear the parallels you're talking about this like full alternate world that so deep and so immersive and of course that's really a big goal of yours in in your trilogy is to develop this alternate earth that's right it's very different it's very different than what we know and and in some ways uncomforably so it was the most fun i've had with this book was building that world a because it is this i didn't to start from scratch so this is earth where everything happened the same way until 1912.

britain lake cormac mccarthy twenty years
"cormac" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"cormac" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"The dominant evil group is these just to frighten guys the person who lives is just the one girl only one girl lives yeah everyone else dies in one way or another yeah it's it's the weird spoiler alert but here it the if weird because you don't know lake who caused the bomb you know it all the oil thought there is a drought above by cormac mccarthy called the road is a book it's not a move while they're actually there is a movie yet but the you don't know what happened there either just everything is different now in its different in grey and dark and everything's dead music nothing living no plants are living nothing's living in dc humans kinda wandering in and try to turn the survive great book but but yeah that's the the movie essentially they just kind of omit all these details like that doesn't make sense that's why the moves weird but when you think about it that's what the movies about whipple cormac mccarthy the road on the website for people to uh uh get fewer along with the diary of napoleonic footsoldier so people get this be hard when to get on us a rare book arnaud where i got it from chechnya y yes either somebody male it to me which i appreciate if it was you let me know or i've just had it i dunno on an order came from my books are out of control renault yeah good many of the little collection dea it's not too little anymore who'll well support.

cormac mccarthy arnaud chechnya renault
"cormac" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"cormac" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Are the are the gulf purist going to be upset about this phil after you know somebody gonna write the column or talk about that hey you know he threw his club or they threw a ray gird burger still had a putt to be made their like what is what is the proper decorum in a situation like that in your opinion i think the proper to cormac what happen you want to show emotion like that and uh they're they're they're jumped and their leap and and chest thumped together i certainly uh mv actions they they pull that off uh like they have been practicing at a maybe they have he's one so much but uh i think the i loved the celebration i think we all did but what was really impressive an inspiring to be dan was that he did not have his best stuff the final round certainly that back nine he wasn't hitting at the way normally does he was putting new putting away he normally does when he found a way to win and that's the that's what so impressive affect you even new a as a it looked like he was making a mistake you even knew that he was gonna find some way to kinda pull it out and he did i mean any did in spectacular fashion it's almost as though you're looking to see what he does to uh to pull it out and to find a way to win an epic that's exactly what he did i mean the great the better you are the luckier you get andy shots were not lucky in each author or uh you know he's just hit hit of hit them in practice i'm so much that that he's pulling him off under pressure is just fun to watch our let me let you're going to your plawgo about the a kmt g future leaders there the unum me report of.

dan cormac andy kmt
"cormac" Discussed on 30 For 30 Podcasts

30 For 30 Podcasts

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"cormac" Discussed on 30 For 30 Podcasts

"Two to get to the north pole each leg of the relay had to walk for ski usually both over miles and miles of ice they carried their supplies in big sleds or pokes as the british call them like little boats with red bottoms scraping along the ice the pope's that we had had a con a green light green strip around them but i became obsessed with with i wanted an apple a fresh green crunch she apple the pokes are supposed to float if they fall into the water but they can sink and your tied to them sue she had agreed name for it she called frozen bondage they should shift foot under frozen bondage every day march twenty six 1997 for the last few days the women have zigzagged back and forth to avoid a deep river of open water something called a lead but this morning the thick black lead that had stopped them the day before at just barely frozen over a thin skin of sparkling ice and the women of that first team claire fletcher sue fully love general cormac and and annuals set off i decided that it was okay to travel can belong the edge because somebody went through we could jump up on this jumbled up ice and it would be a good place to rescue somebody from rio skating alone on behind claire unlike could feel myself get in frightened they isis is until lighting sites bound saying unclear was in front of may and halffull broke through the ice online new i was guns killing.

apple cormac claire fletcher
"cormac" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"cormac" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Are the are the gulf purist going to be upset about this phil after you know somebody going write the column or talk about that hey you know he threw his club day through ray gird burger still had a putt to be made their like what is what is the proper decorum in a situation like that in your opinion i think the proper to cormac what happen you want to show emotion like that and uh they're they're they're yomp and they're leap and and chest bump together i certainly uh an mp at the back and they say pull it off uh like they've been practicing at a maybe they have he's one so mice but uh i i think the i loved the celebration i think we all did but was really impressive an inspiring to be dan was that he did not have his best stuff the final round certainly the back nine he wasn't hitting at the way normally does he was putting the putting away he normally does when he found a way to win and that's the that's what so impressive affect you even new a as it look like he was making a mistake you even knew that he was gonna find some way to kinda pull it out and any did i mean any did in spectacular fashion it's almost as though you're looking to see what he does to uh to pull it out and to find a way to win an editor of exactly what he did i mean the great got the better you are the luckier you get andy shots were not lucky shots or or uh you know he's just hit hit of hit them in practice i'm so much that that he's pulling him off under pressure is just fun to watch our let me let you going to your plawgo about the kmpg future leaders there the unum your report of.

dan editor cormac andy