29 Burst results for "Corey Turner"

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | Last week

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Three with overcast skies this morning but it's going to be hot on this Friday June 17th hottest and near 90 on the partly sunny skies that southwest wind will keep that heat held in forest there and then tonight we drop down to 64 under mostly clear skies Then tomorrow mostly sunny and still cool we stay cool 66 in breezy Saturday night cooled in the city cooler in the suburbs and then on Father's Day Juneteenth Sunday sunny with a high near 74 It's 8 21 Support for NPR comes from member stations and from crowd strike their cloud native platform is designed to protect businesses from cyberattacks ransomware and data theft at home at the office and everywhere in between More at CrowdStrike dot com slash NPR Zoom used by half a million businesses a platform for phone chat workspaces events apps and video enabling real-time collaboration for teams around the globe zoom how the world connects and focus features presenting Brian and Charles a story about a brilliant inventor whose greatest invention turned out to be his best friend in theaters today It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin And I'm a Martinez One of President Biden's campaign promises was student debt forgiveness Now facing the midterms with his approval numbers slumping the president is under more pressure to deliver on that promise A new NPR ipsus poll asks Americans which is more important Loan forgiveness or more affordable college in the future NPR's Corey Turner is here to walk us through the results Cory let's start with whether Americans support some kind of student loan forgiveness would you find.

NPR NPR news Rachel Martin Brian Charles Martinez Biden Corey Turner Cory
"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | Last week

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Affordable college in the future NPR's Corey Turner is here to walk us through the results Cory let's start with whether Americans support some kind of student loan forgiveness would you find Slightly more than half 55% of all respondents do support the path Biden is reportedly considering a which is forgiving up to $10,000 per person For more generous relief like $50,000 or even full cancellation support dips below a majority Biden has also floated the idea of excluding top earners presumably to broaden support for cancellation but the poll found that using income limits did essentially nothing to budge people's support for or against debt relief What about the borrower side of things What does the poll tell us specifically about how borrowers are feeling A couple of things Unlike non borrowers in the poll big majorities of borrowers support all three debt relief options We also know that student loan payments have been paused for more than two years and that most borrowers have not been repaying their loans during that time Now in the poll we found nearly half of borrowers said this payment pause had improved their mental health So ipso specifically asked borrowers how have they used the money that they haven't had to pay Borrowers mentioned three big buckets they spent it on essentials like food and gas They used it to pay down other debts like credit cards or a car payment And then they put it in savings Mallory Newell at ipsos says the pause gave borrowers a kind of freedom But that freedom is not really to make a big purchase like a house or a car or take a vacation It really is about reprieve a little bit of breathing room in your day to today life Now in the poll you ask should the government prioritize for giving some debt for those with existing student loans or making college more affordable for current and future students What do they say This for.

Corey Turner Biden NPR Cory Mallory Newell
"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:19 min | Last week

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All right one of President Biden's campaign promises was student debt forgiveness Now facing the midterms with his approval numbers slumping the president is under more pressure to deliver on that promise A new NPR ipsus poll asks Americans which is more important Loan forgiveness or more affordable college in the future NPR's Corey Turner is here to walk us through the results Cory let's start with whether Americans support some kind of student loan forgiveness what'd you find Slightly more than half 55% of all respondents do support the path Biden is reportedly considering a which is forgiving up to $10,000 per person For more generous relief like $50,000 or even full cancellation support dips below a majority Biden has also floated the idea of excluding top earners presumably to broaden support for cancellation but the poll found that using income limits did essentially nothing to budge people's support for or against debt relief What about the borrower side of things What does the poll tell us specifically about how borrowers are feeling A couple of things Unlike non borrowers in the poll big majorities of borrowers support all three debt relief options We also know that student loan payments have been paused for more than two years and that most borrowers have not been repaying their loans during that time Now in the poll we found nearly half of borrowers said this payment pause had improved their mental health So ipso specifically asked borrowers how have they used the money that they haven't had to pay Borrowers mentioned three big buckets they spent it on essentials like food and gas They used it to pay down other debts like credit cards or credit cards or a car payment And then they put it into savings Malorie Newell at ipsos says the pause gave borrowers a kind of freedom But that freedom is not really to make a big purchase like a house or a car or take a vacation It really is about a little bit of breathing room in your day to today life Now in the poll you ask should the government prioritize for giving some debt for those with existing student loans or making college more affordable for current and future students What do they say This for me it was maybe the most important result or most interesting result in the whole poll 82% of all respondents said the government should prioritize making college more affordable for future students over erasing student debts Even a majority of respondents with student loans a 59% said the government should prioritize helping future students I didn't expect that What do you make of that I'm not entirely sure It's no secret obviously college is not affordable for many Americans who take out huge loans because they see it as their only path into the middle class And forgiving some of those debts would obviously help tens of millions of people As we've said President Biden is under a lot of pressure to do something ahead of the midterm elections But it also tells us erasing debts without changing the system that created them is really fraught The problem is President Biden's plans to make college more affordable Up to this point I haven't gotten very far And so this fall we're going to see a whole new generation of students who will be taking out new loans with even higher interest rates than they were last year And in ten or 15 years they'll be the ones pointing back to this moment and asking what about me NPR's Corey Turner thanks a lot Corey Do you welcome me This is NPR news WNYC is supporters include city national bank whose new Manhattan west branch is now open in the Hudson yards city nationals relationship managers are still committed to getting to know each individual client personally.

President Biden Corey Turner NPR Biden Malorie Newell Cory government new Manhattan WNYC Corey Hudson
"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:45 min | Last month

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lot of them none of history children were at rob elementary but he says the entire community is grieving I'm Paul flav and you valdi There's strong discussion about how to prevent mass school shootings experts from sea advocacy groups to the Secret Service have proposals and beers Corey Turner says experts say some policy ideas are good but others won't work There is broad consensus that arming teachers which we've heard some about lately is not good policy School safety researchers also support tightening age limits for gun ownership from 18 to 21 The teenage brain is just too impulsive and irrational And it's worth remembering the gunman in uvalde Parkland Santa Fe newtown Columbine we're all under 21 And Pierre's Corey Turner reporting Oklahoma governor Kevin stead has signed a new law that bans nearly all abortions the procedure is outlawed from the moment of fertilization There are few exceptions The law is similar to one in Texas it will allow private citizens to sue anybody who helps anybody else terminate a pregnancy The law is already taken effect China's foreign minister is on a ten day tour of South Pacific nations Beijing is trying to deepen ties and influence NPR's John ruit reports the trip is raised alarm in Australia because it considers the South Pacific its backyard Wong Yi's first stop on his 8 nation trip was the Solomon Islands where he had meetings on Thursday That country has been to the center of controversy since last month when it signed a security pact with Beijing Some fear the agreement could pave the way for a Chinese naval outpost in the solomons The U.S. and Australian governments had tried to convince the Solomon Islands not to go ahead with the pact On this trip Wong is reportedly pushing a broad multilateral security and economic deal with countries across the South.

Corey Turner rob elementary Paul flav governor Kevin stead Secret Service uvalde John ruit South Pacific Columbine Parkland Wong Yi Pierre Oklahoma Beijing Santa Solomon Islands NPR Texas China Australia
"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | Last month

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With no credit checks no collateral and no co signers you're going to be looking out a lot more than 5% Delisle says the interest height could have an even bigger impact on graduate students and parents because they're allowed to borrow a lot more than undergrads but at much higher rates The average yearly parent plus loan for example is around $14,000 So apparent borrower with a loan that size over ten years could soon end up paying an extra $1100 or more in interest And one more thing because these new loans at this higher rate won't be issued for a few more months if President Biden does broadly cancel some student debt it likely won't help These borrowers Corey Turner NPR news This is NPR news This is WNYC with blue skies out there and sunshine a high of 72 today and then tomorrow cloudy then becoming mostly sunny in the high once again of 72 Right now 55 and partly sunny it's coming up on 6 30 Support for WNYC comes from.

Delisle President Biden Corey Turner NPR news WNYC NPR
"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:03 min | 2 months ago

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Came with this big promise too This was the other big thing about this program that attracted a lot of people after 20 to 25 years the federal government said it would erase whatever debts are left but over the years it's become pretty clear that IDR is a mess Borrowers often ended up in costly long-term forbearances instead of IDR which was the fault of both loan servicers and the education department NPR also revealed a host of other really serious problems Some servicers weren't tracking borrowers progress toward loan forgiveness People making those $0 payments might not have been getting credit toward loan forgiveness and overall the record keeping in the program was pretty awful Just so I understand $0 payment means you put in no money but you get credit as if you did because you have low income right now That's what that is Yeah and you get credit towards loan forgiveness after 2025 years It's considered a qualifying payment Okay so it was supposed to be that wasn't working so what is the education department doing differently Yeah so first for folks who spent more than 12 months straight or more than 36 months total in one of these forbearances that time is now going to count toward loan forgiveness The department estimates at least three and a half million borrowers are going to get at least three years of new credit through that fix alone It's also saying that any months in which borrowers made payments are going to count toward IDR regardless of the repayment plan they were in The department even says it's going to start tracking borrowers progress toward forgiveness itself instead of just leaving it up to the servicers In all the department says these changes should help more than 40,000 borrowers become immediately eligible for debt cancellation and that it's going to bring millions more closer to eventual debt cancellation Wow I spoke with purses you who has done a lot to call attention to IDRs failures She's now at the student borrower protection center I am concerned that this fix actually reaches all of the borrowers But certainly it has the potential to really be huge for remedying many of the problems that has plagued IDR over the last several decades Corey I'm just thinking if there are millions of people potentially affected some of them are listening now What do they need to do Yeah so for most borrowers nothing The department says it will review and update their records automatically over several months but this is important Steve It's not going to be able to make these changes until the fall and that's because the department's antiquated internal data system actually needs an upgrade first So there is one category of borrowers at least who can do something for folks who are put into forbearance in short term So not enough time to qualify technically they can request an account review by filing a complaint with the ombudsman at the office's federal student aid but everyone else don't call your loan servicer just be patient Corey thanks for your reporting You're welcome Steve That's NPR's Corey Turner Multiple.

NPR federal government Corey Steve Corey Turner
"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:03 min | 2 months ago

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Came with this big promise too This was the other big thing about this program that attracted a lot of people after 20 to 25 years the federal government said it would erase whatever debts are left but over the years it's become pretty clear that IDR is a mess Borrowers often ended up in costly long-term forbearances instead of IDR which was the fault of both loan servicers and the education department NPR also revealed a host of other really serious problems Some servicers weren't tracking borrowers progress toward loan forgiveness People making those $0 payments might not have been getting credit toward loan forgiveness and overall the record keeping in the program was pretty awful Just so I understand $0 payment means you put in no money but you get credit as if you did because you have low income right now That's what that is Yeah and you get credit towards loan forgiveness after 2025 years It's considered a qualifying payment Okay so it was supposed to be that wasn't working so what is the education department doing differently Yes so first for folks who spent more than 12 months straight or more than 36 months total in one of these forbearances that time is now going to count toward loan forgiveness The department estimates at least three and a half million borrowers are going to get at least three years of new credit through that fix alone It's also saying that any months in which borrowers made payments are going to count toward IDR regardless of the repayment plan they were in The department even says it's going to start tracking borrowers progress toward forgiveness itself instead of just leaving it up to the servicers In all the department says these changes should help more than 40,000 borrowers become immediately eligible for debt cancellation and then it's going to bring millions more closer to eventual debt cancellation Wow I spoke with purses you who has done a lot to call attention to IDRs failures She's now at the student borrower protection center I am concerned that this fix actually reaches all of the borrowers But certainly it has the potential to really be huge for remedied many of the problems that has plagued IDR over the last several decades Corey I'm just thinking if there are millions of people potentially affected some of them are listening now What do they need to do Yeah so for most borrowers nothing The department says it will review and update their records automatically over several months but this is important Steve It's not going to be able to make these changes until the fall and that's because the department's antiquated internal data system actually needs an upgrade first So there is one category of borrowers at least who can do something for folks who are put into forbearance in short term So not enough time to qualify technically they can request an account review by filing a complaint with the ombudsman at the office's federal student aid but everyone else don't call your loan servicer just be patient Corey thanks for your reporting You're welcome Steve That's NPR's Corey Turner Multiple.

NPR federal government Corey Steve Corey Turner
"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:47 min | 5 months ago

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Some school districts are doing what seemed pretty unthinkable just a few months ago They're sending students home and resuming online classes The past few weeks have brought a dramatic spike in school closures And in some cases the whole thing is pit school districts against teachers unions against parents NPR's education correspondent Corey Turner joins us a Corey What are these Where are these closers happening And do they signal Maybe a meaningful shift back toward remote learning Yeah so we've seen closures in Detroit Milwaukee now Louisville they're all virtual as well as a third of Baltimore schools There's also Chicago where teachers and city leaders appear to have resolved their standoff overnight over whether it's safe to learn in person the mayor says students will return to class there on Wednesday A closures are still fairly isolated and short just a week or two but it wouldn't surprise me to see more You gotta remember oh Macron was hitting its stride right as we hit the big holiday travel rush You know I spoke with one elementary teacher in Louisville yesterday Penelope quesada She told me she supported the decision to go virtual for a week but she worries about her kids now her students She told me school staff met online yesterday to prepare for remote learning Man I mean nobody was smiling Everybody had this traumatic phase of oh my God we're here We're back again I know oma cron is more transmissible than other variants but it also appears to lead to less severe illness vaccines are all over the place and lots of pediatricians and child advocates have been very forceful Corey and saying that kids are better off in school So why are schools closing Yeah in many cases it really comes down to one word staffing So many teachers and bus drivers are out sick right now that districts just don't have enough adults Making matters worse many communities are suffering from a very real shortage of substitute teachers I spoke with Louisville superintendent Marty polio yesterday He told me last week he even sent staff from his district headquarters to cover for sick teachers But when you start on Thursday it was over 600 uncovered classrooms in our district It becomes really untenable at a certain point And you know a polio estimated that's roughly 10% of his classrooms that didn't have teachers That's a lot There have been a lot of conversations about COVID in schools the last couple of years Our school is better equipped to roll with these punches or is it getting more difficult You know I was talking to Dan Dominic yesterday He talks to superintendents all the time as head of the national school superintendents association And he told me he's heard something from a few superintendents personally that he's never heard before And I should say this this might be tough to hear Superintendent's calling me telling me that they're ready to commit suicide That I've never ever seen a period of time where at the deal with that Wow Corey I mean what is it about this moment That's left school leader superintendent's feeling this way Yeah the problem Dominic says is the debate around safe schooling has become toxic You know some families are angry if you close schools or make kids wear masks Others are angry if you keep them open You know not to mention some educators received actual threats not only to themselves but to their families during this recent critical race theory fight And the result really is that schools are a pressure cooker in a way that they just weren't when these closures started in March 2020 If there is hope right now it's that the closures we're looking at will be brief matter of a week or two buying districts time until omicron peaks NPR education correspondent Cory Turner Cory thanks You're welcome And before we go on we want to know if you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide There is help contact the national suicide prevention lifeline at one 802 7 three 8 two 5 5.

Corey Turner Louisville Macron Penelope quesada Marty polio NPR Milwaukee Dan Dominic cron national school superintendent Baltimore Detroit Corey Chicago Wow Corey polio Dominic Cory Turner Cory
"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:35 min | 9 months ago

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To exclude thousands of youth who came to this country more recently than the daca parameters allow for I'm Michael hill It's morning edition from NPR and WNYC We'll look at what life is like now in Afghanistan a new Taliban rule A new installation at the Rubin merges Tibetan Buddhism and interactive technology and a fancy dinner in a catering hall in The Bronx kicked off the unofficial start of the New York gubernatorial race It's Friday October 1st feels like fall time to plant some garlic The news is next Live from NPR news in Washington on Corvette Coleman House democratic leaders are negotiating the fate of a three and a half $1 trillion spending bill focused on domestic programs house progressive Democrats say they will hold up a separate $1 trillion infrastructure Bill unless there is movement on the other Bill moderate Democrats want to cut the cost Some lawmakers oppose linking the two spending bills Michigan Republican congressman Fred Upton wants to quickly pass the infrastructure Bill He says Democrats haven't finished writing the other bigger spending bill They don't have a bill yet It'll be weeks and weeks before they have legislative language and see where exactly where they are And who knows if they actually end up with the votes to pass it in either the House or the Senate So there are two separate bills And for us in the house we want to pass the same bill that the Senate did He spoke to NPR's morning edition Separately Congress passed and President Biden signed a short term government funding bill it averted a government shutdown at midnight The troubled student debt relief program for teachers police officers and other public servants will get a major revision Sources tell NPR that next week the education department will unveil a sweeping overhaul of the public service loan forgiveness program and PR's Corey Turner has the exclusive For years PSLF has been plagued by mistakes and mismanagement According to a source familiar with the department's plans but not authorized to discuss them publicly the overhaul will come in two phases Looking forward there will be a long-term renovation through a process known as rule making More immediately though the department wants to use its executive authority to retroactively relax the program's rules That means giving borrowers credit for payments on previously disqualified loans or even made through the wrong repayment plan as long as they can prove they were working in public service Corey Turner NPR news Gun makers Smith and Wesson says it is relocating its headquarters to Tennessee It has been headquartered in Springfield Massachusetts for 170 years from member station GBH Maryland sherr has more on the company's decision Smith and Wesson CEO Mark Smith cited pending gun legislation in Massachusetts that prohibits the company from making certain firearms like assault style rifles as a major reason for the move Springfield city council or goomer sindo Gomez agrees with the proposed gunville but says the loss of 550 jobs is a tough reality It is going to be devastating for this 500 families We the electoral officials and others here in the city have to come up with a plan The company says it will keep 1000 workers in Springfield after the move.

NPR NPR news Corvette Coleman House Corey Turner Michael hill WNYC President Biden Fred Upton PSLF Bill Senate Bronx Taliban Afghanistan Washington Michigan New York Wesson
"corey turner" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:02 min | 10 months ago

"corey turner" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Hurricane slammed into our coast and sat on us for nearly twelve hours. The worst case scenario it did not happen. We did not have another katrina. Cantrell says the elaborate levy system built after hurricane katrina protected. The city as designed debbie elliott. Npr news the us department of education is putting five states on notice their bans on indoor mask. Mandates could violate students civil rights. Npr's corey turner has details. The agency's office for civil rights is investigating five states. That are barring schools from requiring masks iowa oklahoma south carolina tennessee and utah at the center of the education department. Civil rights concerns are students with disabilities. Who may be at heightened risk for severe illness from cove in nineteen. The department says it's investigations will focus on whether these bands are discriminatory. Insofar as they prevent students with disabilities from safely returning to in-person education. The agency says it is not investigating other states with similar bands including texas and florida because those bands are not currently being enforced corey turner. Npr news this is npr. A cdc advisory panel has voted unanimously to recommend pfizer's corona virus vaccine for those aged sixteen and up. It's another key step. After the fda granted full approval a week ago health officials say if the cdc acts on the recommendation more americans will get vaccinated. Israel is now offering cova nineteen booster shots to residents age twelve years and older as npr's daniel estrin reports from jerusalem and israeli study has found an extra dose significantly reduces the risk of infection. Israel began the world's first wide-scale booster shot program a month ago officials have gradually lowered the age of eligibility. Now all those twelve and above may get a booster shot five months after their previous shot. A recent study of a million israeli residents found those who got the booster. Were five to ten times more likely to avoid confirmed infection. Israeli vaccination passports will now expire six months after the last shot which means many will need to get boosters now to continue to ease their access to gyms restaurants and other venues. President biden says the us considering israel's advice to offer boosters five months after the last shot instead of eight daniel estrin npr news. Jerusalem evacuation orders have been issued for thousands of people in the resort city of south lake. Tahoe as the call door. Fire spreads in hot temperatures and high winds. The massive blaze has now skirt scorched. More than two hundred seventy six square miles in his only fourteen percent contained. I'm barbara klein npr news..

Npr news corey turner debbie elliott us department of education office for civil rights center of the education depart daniel estrin Cantrell npr cdc hurricane katrina katrina Hurricane Npr nineteen israel south carolina oklahoma utah iowa
CDC to release new guidance telling schools how to reopen

Morning Edition

01:00 min | 1 year ago

CDC to release new guidance telling schools how to reopen

"Dona as NPR News. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is expected to release new guidance today. It is intended to help schools reopen. NPR's Corey Turner reports. There has been confusion over where the Biden administration stands in the school reopening debate. In recent days. CDC director Rachelle Wolinsky has said schools should be the last place is closed and the first places opened. She's also said that schools can safely re open even if teachers have not yet been vaccinated, a statement that angered many teachers. The White House later said Wolinsky had been speaking in a personal capacity. CDC Scientists also published an article last month, saying data show little evidence that school's contribute meaningfully to the spread of covert 19. In spite of all this, the White House set a low bar this week for its promise to get schools reopened, saying classroom teaching should be happening at least one day a week. They hoped to do

Npr News CDC Corey Turner Biden Administration Rachelle Wolinsky Dona Wolinsky NPR Confusion White House
How To Talk To Your Kids About The Election

Morning Edition

03:03 min | 1 year ago

How To Talk To Your Kids About The Election

"Feel like you've been riding an emotional rollercoaster this election season. Well, guess what the kids in your life have noticed. But this anxious moment in history also presents a learning opportunity. Anya Kamenetz and Corey Turner cover education and parenting for NPR, and they have these tips for talking to kids about the election. In pre coded times. Hassan Cua May, Jeffries remembers taking his daughters to vote in 2016. We were right. There was me and all three of them the youngest one. I had her in my carrier, and I have my other two right there that we don't vote. Jeffries is a professor of history at Ohio State University, he says this year his middle daughter who's eight. Wanted to know was our voting plan. You know, Like what? So she's not fully clear, but she knows enough that there needs to be a plan. So step one in the election parenting playbook. Get active. Show your kids that you and by extension, they have a voice. Children are picking up on so much right now, And unfortunately, that also means in many cases they can see that we're on edge. So be honest. Tell them Adds a little nervous about the election. It's helpful for kids social and emotional development to hear you naming your feelings, yes, and to reduce that stress as much as possible. Try your hardest to turn off the TV or the radio, Put away your phone and connect with their kids Ask what they've been hearing and feeling and then listen carefully to what they share. It's so important for young people to be Engaged in conversations about meaning and purpose and different political viewpoints. Ashley Burner at Johns Hopkins University is an expert in civics education. She says. It could be tempting to stay in our bubbles and bash the people We disagree with. Politically. It's always been difficult, and it's even more difficult when we have media that helps create these separate holes in which we're all siloed in our own worldview with without touching others, Burner says. We actually need to strive for the opposite. Actively expose our Children to a range of opinions that can help our kids build skills like empathy and evaluating claims and evidence skills that are absolutely necessary for a functioning democracy. We know that civic formation is the prime reason why modern democracy started funding education in the first place was to raise able citizens. To be those able citizens. Kids also need to know about the world. Its history and geography or under, says research shows that students who spend more time with East social studies topics in school actually do better in other subjects, too, And this basic context will help them sort fact from everything else. Yeah, election season is full of learning opportunities. Just take a look at all the maps that are online. Or for slightly older kids. You can talk about the 18th century origins of the electoral College. You know, the thing about talking about history with our kids is that they're living through history right now.

Anya Kamenetz Corey Turner Jeffries Hassan Cua Ashley Burner NPR Ohio State University Johns Hopkins University Burner Electoral College
"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The same Corey Turner NPR news You're listening to NPR news. Now. Toe Oakland, California to meet Juan Vaca. He is the principal at Global Family Elementary School where all of the 453 students receive free or reduced lunch. We have, like 98% Latino that necks and we have students. They're newcomers are English language learners. They're newcomers coming from other countries. With very minimal language, very minimal educational experience, no schooling, So we try to find ways to actually make sure that we're also holding them in a way that they're actually have the support that they need to be able to be successful. His school has always had students who needed help getting food or enough food, but things got worse when the pandemic hit. Families had to figure out how we're going to supplement this food that used that we usedto get at the school. It's it's kinda is difficult to exactly Ah, fathom to think that we take something simple things like like lunch and meals and breakfast for granted, because it's it's expected. It's there. And once we've removed and you give him something else, a different avenues Dracula Tina, lt's thinks it's kind of difficult entire guitar job. I think to find ways to toe mend that and connect families to these these services. This summer, Vaca worked at a food distribution center at another school in the area. But families from his school couldn't make it usually because they lacked transportation or were quarantined. So he got creative and what what I would do is that would go check in the morning at that school and make sure that everything was going well and what I would do it, I would bring food back because I knew that there's families would be I need this food and I would. Ah, how's it at my my sights and parents know that they could come and pick it up or I would drop off on my way back to my school? Still, that wasn't enough. Vodka and a staff of global family got even more hands on teachers would buy groceries for struggling families and do wellness checks. Eventually, vodka arranged a food drive at his school twice a month. He says. More than 100 families show up each time. They're very thankful. They always think this and they always wanna know once the next one, and because families leave with a lot of bags like it's not just here's two apples Here's to. No, it's There's a lot of food and I think they're very grateful. I think it's sometimes isn't words Don't don't express what they're feeling. I just this 1000 the face that they're thank you. Ah. Says a million words and I just feel like it speaks volumes right Vodka says the drives are a chance to check in with students and their families. That's where he learns how they're adapting to distance learning amid the pandemic. It's tough because you have these students were having to take these rolls right of the roles of making sure that they can. You know, Mom and dad have to be quarantined. And now you have a kind of to fend for yourself. So it's it's one of the situation. They're very grateful, very grateful. We provide them, but it's It's not consistent, right. We it's not. We're not there every single day. We don't. We're not sure we're not there with them. 24 hours a day and we could provide one need, but we could try toe help him overcome Pronostica, But there's still so many more. Despite the challenges, Vodka remains optimistic. The food drives continue as do the check ins. He says. He learned a lot in the early days of the band Derek and has adapted to this new normal We needed. Just continue working and making the drive. Striving. T do that what we're doing in regards clothing, the Snowden security gaps and making sure they're Ah. At least some of their basic needs are met to the capacity that we could provide so that it's one less thing. They have to worry about that Swan vodka principal at Global Family Elementary School in Oakland, California,.

Juan Vaca Global Family Elementary Schoo Vodka Oakland California NPR Corey Turner Dracula Tina Derek principal lt
CDC delays school reopening guidance

Morning Edition

06:47 min | 2 years ago

CDC delays school reopening guidance

"School officials face an agonising choice in the next few weeks. How, if at all, did they send their kids back to school? To them. It's a decision about public health and about the kids who are closest to them. The president alleges. The decision is really about him. He's urging schools to open and criticizing his own administration's guidelines for opening safely and claiming without evidence that governors in school leaders want to keep schools shut to hurt him. They think it's going to be good for them politically, so they keep the schools close. No way. So we're very much going to put pressure on governors and everybody else to open the schools to get him open District leaders in Los Angeles, Houston, Atlanta and many other communities have announced they will keep teaching remotely when school resumes. NPR's Corey Turner has been covering this and joins us now, Corey Good morning. Good morning, Steve. I want to mention that the White House press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany said behind the lectern yesterday. Science should not stand in the way of reopening. Now people mock. That is if she was dismissing science. But in context, she appeared to be arguing that the science supports reopening. That's what she said. But what is the research to actually say? Yeah, That's right. The the science suggests that kid's generally don't get very sick from Cove in 19 so the administration is not far on that one. But it is less clear how easily kids spread it, especially if they're clustered in schools. But we have to remember that the realist you here is that many states are right now seeing substantial community spread of the disease, and the science is not clear that reopening schools in that context is smart or safe. As for that CDC guidance you mentioned Steve, our colleague, Franco Ordo. Nia's reported last night that the agency is going to delay some new school reopening documents, although it's a little confusing here because CDC has said these documents are not a revision or a softening of the old guidance that President Trump doesn't like, just sort of an elaboration. Well, that's right. Because the president criticized the guidelines to toughen. The CDC essentially said Too bad the science is what it is these guidelines so what would make the guidelines contentious? I mean, some of them are really tough having kids where face coverings, staggering school schedules, But maybe the hardest is keeping kids six feet apart in the classroom, you know, do the math to do that you a have to divide kids into smaller classroom groups. B. Find more classroom space and see find more teachers on that stuff, And that's why some places like New York City say. They're going to have to do a hybrid schedule, bringing some kids in some of the time What our various school superintendents saying as they make these decisions, So they're saying that you know, in spite of President Trump trying to sideline the CDC, they're still very much working with and listening to local, state and federal public health officials and Levet. She heads the savanna Chatham County public schools in Georgia. She told me she's constantly checking in with the head of her public health department and looking over daily infection data for her community. Every day and look at the numbers and I'm like, Please, Please let him go down. Please let him go down and they're not going down. Which is why Levet says her hardest day in this pandemic was not when Georgia closed her school's back in March. I was just last week when looking at the numbers, she decided there was just no way for her to fully reopen at roughly the same time is when President Trump began his campaign to pressure school leaders into quickly reopening Accusing them of not doing what's best for kids. Anyone out there who's questioning whether not educated or at home and not doing the work that I young people need us to be doing the wrong. That's Louvel Brown, He's head of the Ithaca City School district in Ithaca, New York, were working even more now, and we can't wait to get these babies back in our spaces. Superintendents do at least share President Trump's sense of urgency. It is better. To have kids back in school every day. Paul Imhoff is the superintendent of Upper Arlington schools near Columbus, Ohio. All of us want that all of us are anxious for that. But then in half pauses as soon as it's safe, Michael Ina hosta who runs the Dallas Independent School District puts it this way. Sometimes parents forgive us if we commit educational malpractice. They will never forgive us if we let something happen to their Children, So what does it mean to open schools safely? Many school leaders are following. CDC is recommendation to space desks six feet apart, and Brown says that's forcing him to get creative will use everyone about spaces. We hope to be able to get outside and you those faces as well. But I still don't think we can get all of our young people in school at the same time in Dallas. Michael in a hostess says. We think we can have a pretty safe learning about him. But we're gonna have mask We're goingto have face shields. We're going to have a Plexiglas in the classroom. The plexiglass. He's Says, helps him fit more students into each classroom. Even with that, though, Dallas County is seeing substantial community spread of the disease. So in a hostess says he wants to delay the start of school by several weeks. Chad guest in the head of the Phoenix Union High School District, says this pandemic is forcing educators to become epidemiologists. We were spending so much time studying Respiratory droplets and measuring classrooms and how many kids fit on a bus and how to transition thousands of kids between periods that we lost track of the core of our work. And that core guest in says is teaching and learning. So Steve with infection rates skyrocketing in Arizona to guest in recently announced that for now, at least all of his students are going to keep learning remotely. And that way, he says he and his staff Khun Get back to focusing on you know how to be a great school. Well, sounds like the bottom line is that many schools maybe even most schools will not open on time in August of the start of September. At least not fully know. I think there's just too much uncertainty, especially with infection rates rising again in so many places. It's also worth noting, though, that several recent national polls show a majority of parents Really opposed schools rushing to reopen two parents are on the side of schools. In many places. I even heard from the superintendent in Ithaca, where infection rates are pretty low, Super intown Superintendent Brown told me. You know the key to everyone being able to return to school there. Really boils down to one word, vaccine them. And if you have different schools, making different decisions in different areas, you have parents looking around and saying, Wait a minute. What are we supposed to do here and wanting to be conscious with their own kids, right? Absolutely. I mean, it gets back to the same old line I've heard every day since covering schools, which is their controlled locally. Cory, Thanks for your work. Thank you. Steve, NPR's education

President Trump CDC Steve Superintendent Louvel Brown Ithaca City School District Phoenix Union High School Dist Dallas Independent School Dist NPR Michael Ina Ithaca Georgia New York City Levet Dallas County Dallas Corey Good
"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Profit career college in Florida received seventeen million dollars in corona virus relief money from the federal government which is not that unusual really many schools have gotten help from the coronavirus aid relief and economic security act or cares actors politicians like to shorten it what is unusual here is that Florida career college faces a class action lawsuit one that calls the entire school a sham NPR's Cory Turner has been covering the suit good morning Corey morning Steve what kind of colleges Florida career college well it's a for profit vocational college with ten campuses across Florida one in Texas according to federal data it serves about six thousand students are so it offers mostly short term certificate program so thank H. back technician auto mechanic medical assistant and the school you know they really sell themselves as the gateway not just to a job but to a career which sounds good but I presume this lawsuit alleges they do something else yes so let's start with the student I spoke with his name is Steven Stewart he enrolled in FCC's H. fact program using federal Pell grant and taking out some fifteen thousand dollars in loans for a ten month course here's what he told me seem like they're gonna put you into a job and the job is going to be paying enough to the point where you can handle your own necessities while still paying this ridiculous collision in reality none of those jobs were paying like that at the point of sale this is the pattern that FCC charges exorbitant prices and pressure students in the loans that they don't understand by promising to find them jobs that it never does the complaint also says multiple programs lack basic equipment one student told me his teacher admitted to the class that he had little experience in their field mmhm but as someone who's studied lawsuits like this before Steve what really sets this complaint apart is that it alleges that FCC specifically targets not just low income students but communities of color it's a practice known as reverse redlining well reverse redlining I I've heard of redlining before I'm familiar with it from real estate where where where you like to draw off minority neighborhood and banks refused to lend their what is reverse redlining that's right instead of denying a product to a protected group of people a reverse redlining is essentially targeting that group with an allegedly predatory product students of color make up the vast majority of SCC student body and the complaint says too many leave without a job training or really any hope of paying down their loans it's also worth noting that the FCC is private for profit around eighty six percent of its revenue comes from federal student aid and that's not counting the seventeen million dollars it's getting from the cares act how does Florida career college defend itself so it did not respond to my multiple requests for answers to individual questions but I did get a statement from the school's general counsel that says quote this lawsuit is baseless legally and factually the we cannot comment because the matter is in litigation we will aggressively fight these false allegations memo here what the court has to say about that Cory thanks so much thank you Steve the Tempe our education correspondent Corey Turner.

Florida
Letters Urge Betsy DeVos To Erase Student Loans For Borrowers With Disabilities

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Letters Urge Betsy DeVos To Erase Student Loans For Borrowers With Disabilities

"More than two dozen groups including those representing teachers are urging the department of education to fast track the elimination of federal student loan debt owed by borrowers with severe disabilities and PR's Corey Turner reports on two letters sent to education secretary Betsy to Voss federal law says borrowers with severe permanent disabilities can have their federal student loans erased but an NPR investigation last year revealed that just twenty eight percent of eligible borrowers either had their loans erased or are on track to in part because of a cumbersome application process one of the letters was signed by more than thirty advocacy groups including Easter seals and the American federation of teachers both letters call on the department to automatically discharge the loans of all eligible borrowers with disabilities in a statement to NPR the department signaled a potential shift saying it is now interested in such a move though it's not clear how or how quickly it would consider

Corey Turner Betsy NPR Department Of Education Secretary American Federation Of Teacher
Food Fight: How 2 Trump Proposals Could Bite Into School Lunch

All Things Considered

01:58 min | 2 years ago

Food Fight: How 2 Trump Proposals Could Bite Into School Lunch

"Two new is now that the trump administration is working on a pair of rule changes to reduce what it calls fraud in a big government program but as in pairs Corey Turner reports hundreds of thousands of kids will lose access to a free lunch at school for change number one the trump administration is targeting the supplemental nutrition assistance program known as snap or food stamps Sonny Perdue the US secretary of agriculture told reporters that states have been too generous with the program some states are taking advantage of loopholes that allow people to receive the snap benefits who would otherwise not qualifying for which they are not entitled by tightening the rules the government estimates more than three million people will lose access to food stamps now what's that got to do with the free school lunch program it depends on who you ask the truth is the real impact of this rule on school lunches is virtually zero that Sam Donaldson policy director of the foundation for government accountability he testified earlier this month before the house oversight committee but at the same hearing Dianne Sullivan told a very different story without snap in addition to having less food at home my sons could lose access to free school meals Sullivan is an advocate with the group witnesses to hunger and has two sons in high school not everyone can agree on at least one fact here food stamps and free school lunch are separate programs but for millions of kids they're connected that's because years ago Congress worried that many low income kids weren't eating at school simply because their parents hadn't filled out the paperwork so lawmakers throughout the paperwork telling school district any child in a family that gets food stamps should automatically get free lunch so what happens to kids when their families lose access to food stamps well the trump administration

Fraud Corey Turner Secretary Director Dianne Sullivan Congress Sonny Perdue United States Sam Donaldson
Education Department Probes Harvard, Yale Over Foreign Funding

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Education Department Probes Harvard, Yale Over Foreign Funding

"The US Department of Education announced late yesterday that it is investigating two elite. Us Universities Yale and Harvard. The government says the schools failed to report hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign gifts and contracts. Npr Education correspondent. Returner is following this and joins us in Studio Corey. Rachel all right tells more what exactly is the education department saying. Harvard and Yale did wrong. Well it's saying. They violated a part of the higher education. Act specifically section one seventeen and it says colleges and universities have to report to the US government any contracts or gifts from foreign sources. If they're worth more than a quarter of a million dollars in the case of Yale the department says the school failed to report at least three hundred and seventy five million dollars in foreign gifts and contracts and chose not to report any gifts apparently over the last four years the department says it is also concerned. Harvard hasn't fully disclosed all foreign gifts or contracts and is this really just limited to Harvard and Yale not even close We should say both schools Harvard and Yale confirmed NPR. They have received These notices investigation. They are preparing to respond but the government has already been looking into other schools including Georgetown. Texas AM CORNELL RUTGERS MIT Maryland. This is a widespread problem. The department says since July of last year it's enforcement efforts have triggered the reporting of about six and a half billion dollars in previously undisclosed foreign money. Okay so corey explain what? The trump administration is really worried about here. Yeah a few things. Espionage certainly wants to protect US intellectual property and Research. It also wants to make sure. Foreign governments aren't exercising. You know undue influence It's chief concern here seems to be China remember. It was just a week or so ago. That the chair of Harvard's chemistry department was arrested for allegedly lying to Defense Department investigators about lucrative research contracts. He may have had with the Chinese government. And I should also say Rachel. There was a Senate investigation last year that found nearly two thirds of US schools that received more than that quarter of a million dollar threshold from what it calls a propaganda arm of the Chinese government actually failed then properly report it. So as a result basically the Senate brought the hammer down on the department for non enforcing the law and so now. Ed is bringing the hammer down on schools. So where's the line though? Corey explained the line between gifts that then opened the door to espionage and gifts. That are just gift something less than furious. I think the challenge here is that line is not even remotely clear There's just a lot of gray area. One example is is a central focus of that Senate investigation from last year. They looked into what are called these Confucius institutes that are on dozens of us. College campuses and They're funded essentially by the Chinese government and they're meant to promote Chinese language and culture and they're essentially a a really powerful expression of of China's soft power here But it also clearly made Senate. Investigators really nervous right so so. What are the schools saying? I mean? Are they defending this? Well you know what no one denies that this is a problem that they need to disclose this stuff They told me though. You know one reason. There's such a need for this. Money is because state funding for higher. Ed really hasn't fully rebounded since the great recession I also heard from a few folks saying like look when it comes to cutting edge research scientific development. Collaboration is important and that collaboration is often international. I also want to say one more thing which is a few folks told me that. Look you know what the department is also to blame here because this law has been on the books since the one thousand nine hundred eighty s and the department has never bothered to enforce it or to clarify to create any sort of rules to make clear to schools. This is what you need to do and this is how you need to do it. So there's plenty of blame to go round. Npr's Corey Turner. Thank you corey. Thank you

Harvard Corey Turner United States Us Department Of Education Universities Yale Chinese Government Senate NPR Rachel ED Defense Department Yale China Georgetown Texas Maryland
Tips For Dealing With Anxious Kids

Short Wave

10:34 min | 2 years ago

Tips For Dealing With Anxious Kids

"Today on the show life gets corey. Turner and Anya Chemnitz. Give us tips for dealing with anxious. Kids I want you to meet a little boy from Central Ellen Oi at five he loves to draw and wear capes and play with the Wooden Sword that his dad made by eight or nine he also has this constant pit of the stomach. Feeling that something's about to go wrong. He's scared of storms and high places when he flies on an airplane he can clearly feel it breaking in half and imagine what it would be like to get sucked out most most of the time. Nobody else can see all of this worry and he doesn't talk about it because it's either normal. Nobody talks about it or it's not normal. That's super embarrassing. Finally after forty years he describes his fear to someone else a doctor. The WHO very quickly gives a name this shadow. He's been living with all his life anxiety. And this is a hard story for me to share on on you because it's my story. This is me and I'm sharing it because it's also a lot of other kids stories right now and this episode. This is all about how we grownups can help them. So they don't have to live quite so long in the shadows. Thank you for Sharing Cory. Thanks for listening hard. I know I know but I really respect it because you know childhood is a growing issue right now. It's one of the most important mental health issues. He's out there. Researchers have found that one in five kids will experience anxiety that rises to a clinical level before Leci- now most of that experts say won't last no but some will without help where we going so we are going to Dr Danny Pines on campus It's in building fifteen at the National Institutes of health north of Washington. DC and. I'm here because in my research on childhood anxiety nearly everyone. I've spoken with has asked me the same question. Danny Pine people I really respect told me they really respect a guy named Danny Pine. Anytime would be a great person to talk to you about that. Dr Danny Pine Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist at the National Institute Institute of Mental Health. And he's one of the world's top anxiety researchers will so the main thing to know about anxiety is that it involves some level of perception about danger so when somebody's anxious or afraid they're concerned about harm harm. That hasn't happened yet and that's takeaway number one. Anxiety is fundamentally a fear of the future and all of its unpredictability. We're all born with some anxiety because we need it. Young children are naturally afraid of strangers. That's an adaptive thing they're afraid of separation. That's an adaptive thing. These fears have have stuck because they've helped keep us safe but full blown anxiety happens when these hardwired fears get amplified. It's somebody turn up the volume volume and they last longer than us most when it goes into the one to two month range. That's that's where parents should really start Thinking about it worrying about it. Danny suggests your child's pediatrician is a great place to start we. We should also say corey that our understanding of why anxiety affects some kids but others has really changed and parents reach out to us and we heard this question. Can I passing anxiety the onto my kids. The answer is yes it is somewhat genetic but we also know that stressors in a child environment are also really influential triggers. There's like poverty bullying violence in the neighborhood. Racism or factors even closer to home like abuse or apparent addiction. All all of these can increase a child's risk of anxiety. Now take away number to look for the signs of anxiety. We spoke doc with a colleague of Danny's Dr Crystal Lewis. She's also a clinical researcher at NIH who provides therapy too anxious kids we just look at the level of interference appearance for the symptoms We look at yes avoidance behaviors. But are there things that child really wants to do or needs to be doing and they can't do those things and so if you feel you're you're hitting a wall in terms of trying to get the child to do those things that might be another Indicator that You know we should get some help so Rachel Imam in Belgrade. Montana says her six year old son is avoiding something that for. Many children is their favourite part of the school day. He doesn't like recess he just started kindergarten. Mom Mom I love school. I don't like recess so unstructured time seems to be the worst and it's not just recess. We have like a super cool splash park in our little town and he refuses and I'm not going to drag him. I'M NOT GONNA draw a crying kid out and stick him in the water like that's not fun. We heard this kind of thing from so many parents corey. I mean. My child is terrified to do something that I know is not gonNA hurt him that. I think that he might actually love what I do. So we're going to go step by step now through some strategies adages that we hope will help. All of you grown-ups out there and your children takeaway number three before you do anything else says Rosemary truly of sesame workshop tried tried to help your child relax. You're not going to be able to move forward until you get them to calm down and I think that is just so important. Know what you can do physically only to reset their system so that you can then have a conversation okay. So in that heightened moment how do you break through. It's so important to learn these belly leave breathing techniques because that deep belly breathing. Cleansing breaths is a re centering of your physical Michael System on. You feel like every episode we do we end up circling back to that episode. We did a while ago with cookie. Monster Alma God. How can I forget the the power of belly breathing? Pretty good tried again okay. So let's see you managed to calm your child down what's next takeaway number four. You need to validate date. Your child's fear. We heard from lots of parents who say they really struggled to know how to respond when their kids worry about really unlikely things especially if their fears getting in the way of busy daily routine or maybe a fun. Family Outing Dr Chris. Lewis offered some suggestions. She gives to grownups. Who in the moment? If you'll stymie by what seems like a child's irrational fears. I know that you're feeling uncomfortable right now. I know these are scary feelings. You want to personify personify the anxiety and so you can almost say you know we know that this is our worry brain and so using the language so the kids understand okay. Mom knows dad knows that I'm feeling uncomfortable right now. I'm feeling anxious. I have to admit on your actually use the worry brain line on my kids the other day I said Oh sorry guys thousand my worry brain I love it I love it. Yeah and here's another. Don't from Rose Marie if your child's afraid of something say like a tornado or a car crash believe in. Don't just tell them. Oh that's never gonNA GONNA happen so no matter. How rational you think the fear is? You need to validate it and make sure your child feels heard. Quite this makes me think of that. Mom We heard from earlier Rachel all the one whose son was terrified of splash park. I mean is it ever okay to just make your child do what they fear. This prince suspected Dr Danny Pine Takeaway number five one of the things that we've learned from watching kids over time and helping kids who are having problems with anxiety diety is that we've learned how important it is to face your fears. Okay so this is a tough assignment for some parents because they know just how stressful it can be for their kids to do something. That's new that they're worried about but we heard the same thing from every single expert. So here's Dr Louis. The more that you avoid or don't do certain things things. It's almost implicitly teaching the child that there is a reason to be anxious or afraid. So it's important that children understand you know things are going to be difficult in in life. Things are going to be scary. We can do them as I say and I tell some of my patients you can feel scared. That's okay we're going to do it anyway. And that sets us up for takeaway number six help your child build a sense of control. This is crystals job helping kids face their fears. It's called cognitive behavioral therapy and a big part heard of that is exposure therapy and she is a big fan of baby steps. Yes Oh she shared the story of one eight year old girl who was so afraid of throwing up that she actually wasn't eating entering flu season. She was too scared to go to school and kiss. Some of the other kids may throw up. Yes so how do you baby step your way through that just a little little warning. We're about to say the word vomit a lot. We did a lot of practice which included Buying vomit spray off Amazon and vomits Lever Jelly beans. We did a a lot of practicing Up to the point where we create they plate against the point seriously. All you need to know corey is did it work. You're slowly but yes she got to the point where she was in school and One of the peers had vomited in the classroom and she comes into session and she was just like someone vomit in my class and I ran to the corner of the classroom and she's just like didn't help but I was there in the classroom which really showed some growth and so she was just very proud of the progress so she was making in the past she would have ran out of the classroom to the counsel's office and then the school fit like the next week. So Dr Lewis says that US parents when our kids kids are making baby steps on this or really anything. That's hard for them. You know you use small meaningful rewards along the way like maybe picking what movie we watch and family movie night or or maybe they get to stay up an extra ten minutes and so little by little with these baby steps. Your child starts building. Her confidence facing facing your fears is important. But kids don't have to do it all at once.

Anxiety Corey Danny Pine Dr Crystal Lewis Dr Danny Pine NIH Rachel Imam Dr Danny Pines Ellen Oi Montana Turner United States Dr Chris Anya Chemnitz Belgrade Dr Louis Washington FLU Amazon
How To Help A Child Struggling With Anxiety

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

02:25 min | 2 years ago

How To Help A Child Struggling With Anxiety

"This is NPR is life kit I'm on your cabinets and I'm Corey Turner I want you to meet a little boy from Central Illinois at five he loves to draw And where capes and play with a wooden sword that his dad made he has one big brother two parents three cats but by eight or nine he also has this he's scared of storms and high places when he flies on an airplane he can clearly feel it breaking in half and imagine what it would be normal nobody talks about it or it's not normal that super embarrassing in spite of all this he married finds a job he loves becomes dad but the worries follow him until he has a panic attack in front of his kids so after forty ears he finally describes this fear to someone else a doctor who very quickly gives a name to the shadow he's been living with all his life and diety and this is a hard story for me to share on your because it's my story this is me but I'm sharing it because it's also a lot of other kids stories right now and this episode is all about how we grownups can help them so they don't have to live quite so long long in the shadows thank you for Sharing Cory thanks for listening that was hard I know I know but I really respect it because you know childhood anxiety clinical level before adolescence now most about experts say won't last no but some will without help we know that anxiety in adulthood it is also incredibly common though somewhat more common in women than men that's right so today we're going to go deep on how anxiety works how parents spotted what they can do to help kids with anxiety and when to know it's time to get professional help

NPR Illinois Corey Turner Cory
How To Talk To Your Kids About Climate Change

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

01:20 min | 2 years ago

How To Talk To Your Kids About Climate Change

"This is NPR's life kit. I'm on your cabinets I'm Corey Turner and this issue my name is Shula Pasco Yang and I am a Baba and In organizer Baba is dad in Mandarin Shula lives in Tarrytown New York and his daughter is now a toddler after my daughter was born billions of people would die which was crazy if we don't do anything that is about climate change and what he learned kind of freaked him out oh my God what what's going on I have to stop this cell he made a promise to his baby girl I actually wrote a message to her it's a little bit talk about but you know basically it's that your future is it has been promised to like me and many others is not what that will be it's not what that will look like I didn't know exactly about this ripping you into this world I'm going to fight as hard as they can to give you the kind of future that I think you deserve and that other kids deserve

Shula Pasco Yang Mandarin Shula Baba Corey Turner NPR Tarrytown New York
Congress Promised Student Borrowers A Break. Education Dept. Rejected 99% Of Them

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:29 min | 3 years ago

Congress Promised Student Borrowers A Break. Education Dept. Rejected 99% Of Them

"This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like xfinity x. by get get fast speeds. Even when everyone is online working to make wifi simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply now a story that affects tens of thousands of student loan borrowers congress expanded an effort to forgive the student loans of public servants. A new government watchdog report court says ninety nine percent of those people have been denied. N._p._r.'s corey turner got an early look at the report if you're feeling deja-vu well that's because this is is me on this program about this time last year twenty nine thousand applications for public service loan forgiveness have been processed so far and of those ninety nine percent have been denied in other words public service loan forgiveness or p._s. L. f. began in two thousand seven and it seemed simple enough work as a nurse firefighter. A teacher of the list is long while paying down your federal student loans and after ten years the education education department would forgive whatever's left matthew and heather austin who are teachers built their future around this promise. I remember sitting there when we found out that heather was pregnant with our first child and saying okay well when he's ten. We can take a vacation ten because that's when heather student loans would finally finally be forgiven under p._s. L. f. had there by the way did not want to talk about what has been a long painful odyssey for them. Both see p._s. L. f. isn't simple at all borrowers also have to have a certain kind of loan in a certain kind of payment plan last year when heather thought she'd met all the requirements the austin's got the letter. They'd been looking forward to open it up. Just kinda dropped instead of congratulations. The the letter said the austin's were still somehow ten more years away from loan forgiveness. It turns out. Matthew says they'd been in the wrong payment plan plan. I'm trying not to swear i i really this is the youngest i've been in my adult life. Congress heard the outcry from borrowers last year and tried to help this wasn't a puzzle or lottery congressman bobby scott. He is a virginia democrat and chairman of the house. Education committee is just incredible that we we had to <hes> last year passed legislation to create an emergency programme congress set aside seven hundred million dollars and relaxed some of those rigid rigid requirements so more people could qualify so for the past year tens of thousands of borrowers like heather austin have applied for this emergency n._c. Temporary fix but n._p._r. Has obtained an audit of the program's first year by the government accountability office and here's the deja-vu g._a._o. G._a._o. says as with the original program ninety nine percent of applications for this expansion of p._s. L. f. are also being denied nine. I think we were disheartened. I think we were discouraged. Melissa emory heiress led this new g._a._o. Investigation and he wanted to help a lot a lot of people <hes> and you don't want borrowers to be confused about the eligibility criteria and to face a high denial rate <hes> in yet. That's what we found the g._a._o. Report out today says most denials seventy one percent were because of a technicality borrowers who know they don't qualify for p. S. l. f. still have to apply for it so they can be rejected before they can apply for the fix and that's exactly what's happened to matthew and heather royston. What sort of kafka's thing we in here where i apply for one thing. I'm told them tonight for this and if i'm denied for this i should apply for another thing and then when i get to the second can thing. I'm told that i haven't been denied for the first thing i mean i really i mean. I'm just cross eyed reading these things in its review the g._a._o. Recommends that the ed departments simplify the application asian process and give borrowers better information to navigate such a complicated system for its part the department says it agrees with the g._a._o.'s recommendations dacians about how to improve the programs and that a number of those efforts are already underway corey turner n._p._r. News.

Heather Austin Heather Matthew L. F. Corey Turner Congress G._A._O. Bobby Scott Heather Royston Melissa Emory Kafka Congressman N._P._R. Chairman P. S. L. Ninety Nine Percent Seven Hundred Million Dollars Seventy One Percent
"corey turner" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"corey turner" Discussed on No Agenda

"<hes> <hes> the place begins where it all begins. It all begins in new brownsville texas which makes a great barbecue pit. The honda used to be the one that was the most was famous. Corey turner lives their lives around near came in with an outrageous one thousand two defied odds and fifty five cents. Wow so what is what is the number signifying. What is the show fifty five fifty five for adams how al man that's fantastic for your birthday but nice. She needs to be clear. It cleaned up. Apparently please night me as sure corey akari night of the com- komal river deduce me all on let me get some deduction ready for you and good good helping of it dishes commissioner. I need some help commerce for his recent kidney transplant and a dealer's choice for adams birthday. Wow another while let us know how that what's. The story is just one kidney. Did you get the kidney from a friend usually have two kidneys ain't. I don't know what you can't have two kidney transplants. I've never heard anyone having two kidneys transplanted. I wanna know where you've got the one greedy. It's i want to know where he got the new one from. Can i have two kidneys. I i know i know people who have donated their a kidney to a good friend. I mean those beautiful both of them. Well no you should try and find multiple friends. If you need that <hes> okay dealer's choice then the move joyce happy birthday. Uh the <music> happy birthday to birthday adam adam thank you for your courage and such chris wilson is is a is a fee a fee nom. He is <hes> so since it was a birthday gift fifty five fifty five thousand dollars here. Though is your big ass health karma with a goat twist.

adams corey akari Corey turner honda adam adam texas komal river chris wilson joyce commissioner fifty five fifty five thousand
"corey turner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"corey turner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Office. We. Yes law that is that is incredible. Clearly, the Lancs that they were willing to go to do this and things got even crazier. They they hired a former exotic dancer to be part of their sales team. She is actually one of the defendants who was found guilty yesterday in the trial is she she gave a lap dance to a doctor to try and convince him to prescribe their opioid medication. Who am I? So you have the chance to talk with one of the patients whose impacted by this scheme. Let's listen to what he had to say. If this doesn't wake the pharmaceutical company. I don't know what will I mean, they've been getting fines millions, and but when you're making billions of dollars that just small change. So that was the patient Paul or he was a commercial fisherman in Texas. He never should have received this drug, but his doctor was being bribed to prescribe it. He ended up testifying for the prosecution in the trial. And basically what he was alluding to. There is that this is a criminal case, not a civil case often, you see pharmaceutical companies getting in trouble in civil cases that means big fines. But this criminal case means possible prison time these executives are facing up to two decades behind bars. The other thing to note here is that they were charged with racketeering conspiracy. That means this crime these crimes were systemic. They were conspiring. This was not just a few bad actors racketeering was originally designed to go after organized crime. The prosecutors are essentially saying this these pharmaceutical executives were like druglords, just briefly Gabriella is case going to set a precedent. Yes. Most likely this kind of represents in Greg strategy by the federal government to go after pharmaceutical companies for their role in feeling the opioid epidemic. And experts say that this is likely the beginning of a trend, and this case could be a blueprint for future prosecutions Gabriella manual of member station, W GBH, thanks so much. Thank you. More than two thousand teachers and counting have just had a mountain of student loan debt lifted off their backs. This follows reporting by NPR that exposed a nightmare for public school teachers across the country in exchange for green to work in low income schools, aspiring teachers could get so called teach grants from the US department of education to help pay their way through college sounds good. But those grants meant to be free money in exchange for service, we're often unfairly turned into loan sometimes upwards of twenty thousand dollars when December the education department proposed a fix and now that has been expanded to reach even more teachers here are NPR's Chris Arnold. And Corey Turner, the trouble at the heart of the story is that small paperwork problems triggered catastrophic consequences for many teachers, the rule said teachers have the send in a form every year to prove they were teaching. But if they sent that form in one day late or it was missing a signature date or any. Little problem. There grants were turned into loans, and that was irreversible. We've been following one teacher Kaelin McCollum and for her and her husband them more than twenty thousand dollars in debt that they never plan for and couldn't afford and her small teacher's salary in Tennessee. They also had a baby on the way, but with this fix if teachers can prove they've been teaching like McCollum can they'll get their grants back McCollum. Got her official Ed department letter a few Saturdays ago, she opened it in the car as she and her family began a spring break vacation. Here we go. Congratulations..

Kaelin McCollum racketeering Chris Arnold Gabriella NPR Paul Lancs Corey Turner Tennessee US Ed department official Texas twenty thousand dollars two decades one day
"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Clip. While you fail with. Discussing subsidies. Yes. Low dot is. That is incredible. Clearly, the Lancs that they were willing to go to do this yet and things got even crazier. They they hired a former exotic dancer to be part of their sales team shoes. Actually, one of the defendants who was found guilty yesterday in the trial. She she gave a lap dance to a doctor to try and convince him to prescribe their opioid medication whom are so you have the chance to talk with one of the patients whose impacted by this scheme. Let's listen to what he had to say. If this doesn't wake the former suit company, I don't know. What will I mean, they've been getting fines millions, but when you're making billions of dollars, that's just small change. So that was the patient or he was a commercial fisherman in Texas. He never should have received this drug, but his doctor was being bribed to prescribe it. He ended up testifying for the prosecution in the trial. And basically what he was alluding to there is that this. Is a criminal case. Not civil case often, you see Armagh Suto companies getting in trouble in civil cases. That means big fine. But this criminal case means possible prison time these executives are facing up to two decades behind bars. The other thing to note here is that they were charged with racketeering conspiracy. That means this crime these crimes were systemic. They were conspiring. This was not just a few bad actors racketeering was originally designed to go after organized crime. The prosecutors are essentially saying this these pharmaceutical executives were like druglords, just briefly Gabriella is case gonna set a precedent. Yes. Most likely this kind of represents an aggressive strategy by the federal government to go after pharmaceutical companies for their role in feeling the opioid epidemic. And experts say that this is likely the beginning of Trent. And this case could be a blueprint for future prosecutions Gabriella manual of member station, W G, B H. Thanks so much. Thank you. Two thousand teachers and counting have just had a mountain of student loan debt lifted off their backs. This follows reporting by NPR that exposed a nightmare for public school teachers across the country in exchange for green to work in low income schools, aspiring teachers could get so called teach grants from the US department of education to help pay their way through college sounds good. But those grants meant to be free money in exchange for service, we're often unfairly turned into loan sometimes upwards of twenty thousand dollars on December the education department proposed fix and now that has been expanded to reach even more teachers here are NPR's Chris Arnold. And Corey Turner, the trouble at the heart of the story is that small paperwork problems triggered catastrophic consequences for many teachers the rule said teachers had to send in a form every year to prove they were teaching. But if they sent that form in one day later, it was missing signature date or any. Little problem. There grants were turned into loans, and that was irreversible. We've been following one teacher Kaelin McCollum and for her and her husband them at more than twenty thousand dollars in debt that they've never plan for and couldn't afford and her small teacher's salary in Tennessee. They also had a baby on the way, but with this fix if teachers can prove they've been teaching McCollum can they'll get their grants back McCollum. Got her official Ed department letter a few Saturdays ago, she opened it in the car as she and her family began a spring break fake. All right here. We go. Congratulations. Louis..

Kaelin McCollum Gabriella NPR racketeering Armagh Suto Lancs US Corey Turner Chris Arnold Texas Ed department Louis official Tennessee twenty thousand dollars two decades one day
"corey turner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"corey turner" Discussed on KCRW

"We can bring some lunch. Subsidies. Yes. Slow that is that is incredible. Clearly, the the lengths that they were willing to go to do this. Yeah. And things got even crazier. They they hired a former exotic dancer to be part of their sales team. She was actually one of the defendants who is found guilty yesterday in the trial. She she gave a lap dance to a doctor to try and convince him to prescribe their opioid medication home. I so you have the chance to talk with one of the patients whose impacted by this scheme. Let's listen to what he had to say. If this doesn't wake the pharmaceutical company. I don't know what will I mean, they've been getting fines millions, but when you're making billions of dollars, that's just small change. So that was the patient Paul or he was a commercial fisherman in Texas. He never should have received this drug, but his doctor was being bribed to prescribe it. He ended up testifying for the prosecution in the trial and basically. What he was alluding to. There is that this is a criminal case, not a civil case often, you see pharmaceutical companies getting in trouble in civil cases that means big fines. But this criminal case means possible prison time these executives are facing up to two decades behind bars. The other thing to note here is that they were charged with racketeering conspiracy. That means this crime these crimes were sustained. They were conspiring. This was not just a few bad actors right racketeering was originally designed to go after organized crime. The prosecutors are essentially saying this these pharmaceutical executives were like druglords, just briefly Gabriella is case going to set a precedent. Yes. Most likely this kind of represents in Greg strategy by the federal government to go after pharmaceutical companies for their role in fueling the Oakland epidemic. And experts say that this is likely the beginning of a trend, and this case could be a blueprint for future prosecutions Gabriella Emmanuel of member station W G, B H. Thanks so much. Thank you. More than two thousand teachers and counting have just had a mountain of student loan debt lifted off their backs. This follows reporting by NPR that exposed a nightmare for public school teachers across the country in exchange for green to work in low income schools, aspiring teachers could get so called teach grants from the US department of education to help pay their way through college sounds good. But those grants meant to be free money in exchange for service where often unfairly turned into loan sometimes upwards of twenty thousand dollars on December the education department proposed a fix and now that has been expanded to reach even more teachers here are NPR's Chris Arnold. And Corey Turner, the trouble at the heart of the story is that small paperwork problems triggered catastrophic consequences for many teachers the rule said teachers had to send in a form every year to prove they were teaching. But if they sent that form in one day later. Was missing signature date or any little problem? There grants were turned into loans. And that was irreversible. We've been following one teacher Kaelin McCollum and for her and her husband them at more than twenty thousand dollars in debt that they never plan for and couldn't afford and her small teacher's salary, Tennessee, they also had a baby on the way, but with this fix if teachers can prove they've been teaching McCollum can they'll get their grants back McCollum. Got her official Ed department letter a few Saturdays ago, she opened it in the car as she and her family began a spring break vacation. Thank here. We go. Whereas, congratulations. Louis..

Kaelin McCollum racketeering Gabriella Emmanuel NPR Paul Ed department Corey Turner Chris Arnold US Louis Tennessee Oakland official Texas twenty thousand dollars two decades one day
Trump signs executive order on free speech at schools

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:54 sec | 3 years ago

Trump signs executive order on free speech at schools

"The president signs an executive order today that he says will protect free speech on college campuses. But NPR's Corey Turner reports the move does not require much more than what schools are already doing the order make schools promised. To uphold free inquiry in order to qualify for billions of dollars in research funding, but public colleges and universities are already required to uphold the first amendment and the order says nothing about how it might be enforced. Trump has repeatedly criticised campuses for being hostile to conservative views two years ago. He raised the possibility of withholding funds from UC Berkeley, when it canceled a controversial right wing speaker, citing security concerns, the order does do a few new and interesting things it tells the education department to gather more data that will show more clearly how students do when they leave a given program including what they earn and whether they default on their

Donald Trump Corey Turner NPR President Trump Berkeley Executive Two Years
"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"corey turner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"What about the the saying goodbye part of death right funerals themselves memorial services. Those can be really hard for kids. What did you learn about that? Yeah. Absolutely. And actually felt like I came full circle on this because this past December we had another death in our family. It was my wife's grandmother. The boys called her Nana, Betty, we all flew to Kansas for the funeral. But really felt like this time. I was ready because just a week before I had talked with rose Marie at sesame about what to do in situations like this. And she said when it comes to funerals. Now, you need to tell them what to expect. What will it be like be clear and concrete, but then give them a choice. So here's a little bit of tape of my wife in the rental car with our two boys explaining this big choice. They have soccer bodies been fixed up, and it'll be in a coffin in a casket. It will look kind of like her, but not entirely because her, you know, her spark in her spirits not inside anymore. So she'll look. Different. Now, my six year old Rohan he thought about it for a few seconds. And then he said, yes he'd like to see her. And then here's my older son Ayman who was nine at the time. Yes. You want us here body? I've known her my whole life. I can't just be afraid to see her body. Just because she's dead. Well, yeah. Both my boys walked right up to that casket. They knew what to expect. And they said goodbye. Hard lessons and hard conversations. But so important to have we're glad you're doing. This Corey Turner is an NPR education reporter and the co.

Rohan Betty rose Marie Corey Turner Ayman soccer Kansas reporter NPR six year
Sex and Drugs Decline Among Teens, but Depression and Suicidal Thoughts Grow

All Things Considered

02:22 min | 4 years ago

Sex and Drugs Decline Among Teens, but Depression and Suicidal Thoughts Grow

"Behavior survey the cdc just released results for two thousand seventeen and his npr's corey turner reports there were a number of surprises i sex and here the news is almost all good says kathleen f year she's director of cdc's division of adolescent and school health fewer are initiating sacks fewer currently sexually active they're having fewer partners and they're using more effective hormonal birth control methods one change in the data that easier is not happy about is a decline in condom use she says that's likely because many schools have stopped educating kids about the risks there has been a decrease over time in requirements that school cover hiv and s cd in their health education programs when it comes to illicit drugs like cocaine and heroin t news is way down compared to a decade ago for the first time though the cd also asked teens if they ever misused prescription opioids and fourteen percent said yes we don't know what this fourteen percent number means but we were quite surprised by it one in five teens also said they'd been bullied at school but students of color are far more likely than white students to say they missed school because of safety concerns some of the biggest red flags were in mental health if you're says a third of teens reported persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness he that's really significant and certainly not what we want to see if we're trying to send our kids into adulthood in the most healthy way the news is even worse for students who identify as lesbian gay or bisexual in fact in every category lgbt's were at higher risk than their heterosexual classmates nearly two thirds reported persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness they're twice as likely to be bullied and four times as likely to attempt suicide it's shocking and alarming and tells us that things are terribly wrong and we seriously need to address this ellen con is director of the children youth and families program at the human rights campaign foundation she says these data are a stark reminder of the lack of protections for lgbt means and why she says they're sorely needed corey turner npr news washington.

NPR Director Cocaine Ellen Con Washington Corey Turner Heroin Fourteen Percent