35 Burst results for "Copenhagen"

"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

04:10 min | 3 months ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Which today is a spacious and popular square reserved for pedestrians, was treated just like a cobblestone parking lot. The lakes, at least, remained a popular and beloved space for pedestrians, but Copenhagen's lord mayor at the time, a self proclaimed modernist named urban Hansen became interested in changing that when he saw plans for something called stirring and the Lake ring. The late green was first proposed in 1958, and then it was approved by parliament in 1964. The plan was simple, but massive. It proposed to build a 12 lane highway running from the northern suburbs, directly into the heart of the city. From there it would start to curve in a ring along the lakes before it met a brand new motorway interchange where it would then direct cars out to the southwest towards the rest of Denmark and towards mainland Europe. And to build this highway, the city would need to demolish existing housing in the north and nearly eradicate a large section of the neighborhood of festival just to make room for all those automobiles. And as for the lakes, the shoreline would need to be extended, meaning the city would need to fill them with tons of new dirt in order to make sure there was enough land to accommodate all 12 sprawling lanes. That's what Copenhagen's may be the busiest bicycle intersection in the world, almost became. And I doubt many young mothers with strollers or early morning joggers or post work colleagues would gather along the side of a 12 lane highway to take in that diminished Lake view. It would have just been a busy road with the sole purpose of connecting disjointed spaces of the city, and that would be it. Now, obviously, and luckily, this never happened. But it wasn't because officials realized this was such a horrible idea. It was something much more typical. The project was too expensive, and it progressed too slowly. Some buildings were demolished in anticipation of the road and a few smaller 6 lane highways were constructed around the city, but the project's slow pace allowed time for groups who opposed it to gain steam. Grassroots organizations started to build road barricades and protest, and politiken, the country's largest newspaper, ran stories denouncing the plan. But the true final nail in the Lake ring coffin that came in the early 70s and the form of a series of oil crises and a period of economic stagflation. Oil prices skyrocketed and automobile use plummeted. At some points in the crisis, the government even declared car free Sundays in order to retain enough oil just for energy use. After decades of decline, bicycle usage went up for the first time, purely out of necessity. And then, on some of those car free Sundays, Copenhagen has got a taste of what it was to live in their city without automobiles clogging up those beautiful historic squares. Eventually, that led to a groundswell of activism to pedestrianized more of the city and to shift infrastructure investments away from automobiles and toward building out an extensive network of biking lanes. At first, the government attempted in vain to confine bikers only decide streets so that major thoroughfares remained the domain of the car. But bikers defied, they continued to use the roads made the most sense for them, and ultimately the city submitted. De prioritizing motorways and building out the bicycle infrastructure that serves as the basis for what we have today. I like this story because as much as I love Copenhagen, I think people look at it now and assume it was always destined to be what it is. It's a mistake we make a lot with history. People think that bicycling must somehow be genetic for Danes. They look at the lakes and think they must be this space because they always have been. But it isn't, and they haven't. We're lucky enough to have what we have today because of a mixture of weird economics, grassroots activism, and frankly some dumb luck. It's a simple but important lesson to remember, because it also means just because we have something today,

Copenhagen Hansen Denmark Europe government
"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

05:58 min | 3 months ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Wrapped up. Established in two 1006, the event is a boon for Nordic design and sees the fashion set to send on the Danish capital. And in that fashion set, of course, is monocles fashion editor Natalie, who reported from the event, and has joined me in the studio to provide a little recap of the week. First, naturally, welcome. Thank you always a pleasure to be here. Always a pleasure. Tell me, what was the mood like in Copenhagen? You know, I'll be honest, I was there for a reporting trip separately, but the sun was out. The harbor was right for swimming in, and I guess there was fashion to be talked about too. Tell me about your week. It was an amazing week as you saw as well with the sun out with everyone, swimming in the harbor, the mood was incredible. I think it was one of the most optimistic mood boosting fashion weeks I have been to in a very long time. And that translated into the clothes as well. The Danes really took advantage of the city and chose outdoors venues. So it was just an amazing place to be. Tell me about those outdoor venues. That sounds sensational. I mean, that almost is exactly what you want in summer when you're going to something like this. Copenhagen designers do that extremely well. It helps sort of democratize fashion week in a way because when you choose this outdoor public venues, people can look from outside, passersby can peek in and see what's going on. It's not as closed off and exclusive as fashion weeks and fashion shows are usually known for. One example would be the wood wood show that is a Danish brand celebrating its 20th anniversary, and they actually closed off a bridge by the harbor, and just as the sun was setting, presented their collection. So we were sat on the bridge to see the shows, but people on the boats, people from nearby offices could also just take in the view and then see what's going on, get a taste of fashion week. I mean, that sounds sensational and I am a huge Woodward fan. So I'm very, very jealous of you. I mean, the question I did want to ask you, and I guess certainly my focus tends to be architecture and landscape architecture and furniture design. But for people that maybe are less into fashion, why is this sort of event important and why is making it accessible to them? Whether they can see it from the bridge or from the water or from a building important. I think especially with Copenhagen fashion week because there's a certain pragmatism and the clothes that you see on the cut walks are usually closer, you can wear and they will make it onto the shop floors. It's also clothes with what the Danes called honest price points, which means that the markups are not huge. It's more accessible prices and still good clothes that are well made that me and you could buy if we saved up a little bit. I think it's interesting following Copenhagen fashion week just to see interesting clothes you can eventually shop for and on top of that you get to experience beautiful venues and storytelling when you get to look at the show itself. So if you're in Copenhagen you could catch a show on a square or in a bridge or you can look at it online. And I think that storytelling is there's a really nice work because certainly I feel like that's what we're trying to do when we even pick out our own wardrobes in the morning like you're trying to tell a story about who you are. So seeing how brands do that for themselves. I imagine incredibly exciting and inspiring. Exactly. You get to just pick into the world of this really creative really interesting brands and see not just the fashion that they create but also all the different forms of inspiration that form those worlds for music to sometimes it can be designed and architecture depending on the venues that they chose. Another example of that is the sunflower show, which is a young men's wear brand in Copenhagen, who invited people to their office to show the clothes very casually and they had a concert at the same time with one of their friends singing from the top floor from the window and you could just have a listen, have a look at the clothes and chat to the designers. And this cozy relaxed atmosphere is very typical of Copenhagen fashion week and it makes everything so much better and so much more enjoyable. I mean, it sounds like they're really breaking the mold of what a fashion week can be. Tell me a little bit about the evolution of this actual event. Do you see it challenging the likes of Paris and Milan and London? Is it pushing its way up there into perhaps one of the most significant fashion and design events on the calendar? A 100%, I think a lot of cities are trying to do that to get on the map. But Copenhagen fashion week has actually made incredible progress. It started with a few names like Ghani or synagogue who are now household names put in Copenhagen fashion week on the map for a very casual optimistic colorful look. But the city has kept evolving now. The menswear offer, for example, has really broadened a lot of talent in that sector as well. And a lot of younger creatives offering lots of different styles, and the other point of difference is their approach to sustainability, which is incredible to watch. They really care about not making ways, making things much more responsibly investing in material innovation and also the CEO of Copenhagen fashion weeks, Cecilia, source Mark, has set up this set of sustainable requirements. So by next year, if you don't fulfill those requirements, you can not participate in Copenhagen fashion week. And that's really setting the bar really high and parries, Milan, London, have been looking at her plan and trying to emulate. Look, that feels like a perfect place to end and setting us up nicely. Not only for the next Copenhagen fashion week, but other fashion weeks looking to it for inspiration. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you. And that's all for this week..

Copenhagen swimming Natalie Woodward Milan Ghani London Paris Cecilia Mark
 Denmark: Gunman acted alone, likely not terror-related

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 5 months ago

Denmark: Gunman acted alone, likely not terror-related

"Sunday's Denmark shooting was likely not terror related Chief inspector Soren Thomas says Copenhagen police believe a shopping mall shooting that left three people dead and four others seriously wounded was not terror related it's thought the government acted alone and appears to have selected his victims at random Thomas and tells the media the victims are 17 year old boy and a 17 year old girl both Danes and a 47 year old Russian man were killed when the gunman opened fire on Sunday afternoon in one of the Scandinavia's biggest shopping malls I'm Charles De

Soren Thomas Denmark Copenhagen Thomas Scandinavia Charles De
"copenhagen" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:30 min | 5 months ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on AP News

"Reports are emerging of a shooting at a mall in the Danish capital of Copenhagen, police have confirmed that several people were shot at the field's shopping center which is near to the airport. The police also said that one person has been arrested in connection with the shooting, but gave no other details. Images from the scene showed people running out of them all and local TV posted a photo of a man being put on a stretcher, witnesses said people were crying and hidden shops, a huge police presence was on hand with several fire department vehicles also parked outside the mall. I'm Karen Chammas. It's a week off for the January 6th hearings. In a taped interview with ABC correspondent Jonathan Karl, representative Liz Cheney, who is vice chair of the January 6th committee, says the hearings will continue to show why a former president Donald Trump should not run again. A man is dangerous as Donald Trump can absolutely never be anywhere near the Oval Office ever again. That interview aired on ABC's this week with George Stephanopoulos. Meanwhile, on Fox News Sunday, another Republican governor Tate Reeves of Mississippi says, most Americans are not watching the hearings. They're not worried about this trial that's being had by only one side in Washington D.C.. They're focused on the issues that matter to them and their pocketbooks. Reese would not commit to supporting Trump if he ran again for president. I'm Shelley Adler. Minions the rise of gru is poised to set a box office record at marchesa a letter with the latest

Karen Chammas Jonathan Karl Liz Cheney Donald Trump Copenhagen ABC Tate Reeves George Stephanopoulos Oval Office Washington D.C. Fox News Mississippi Shelley Adler Reese Trump gru marchesa
Danish police arrest one in connection with shooting at Copenhagen mall

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 5 months ago

Danish police arrest one in connection with shooting at Copenhagen mall

"Reports are emerging of a shooting at a mall in the Danish capital of Copenhagen police have confirmed that several people were shot at the field's shopping center which is near to the airport The police also said that one person has been arrested in connection with the shooting but gave no other details Images from the scene showed people running out of them all and local TV posted a photo of a man being put on a stretcher witnesses said people were crying and hidden shops a huge police presence was on hand with several fire department vehicles also parked outside the mall I'm Karen Chammas

Copenhagen Karen Chammas
"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

07:02 min | 6 months ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"For many, Copenhagen conjures images of colorful buildings, tightly squeezed along busy harbors. Maybe they think of old cobblestone streets winding through the medieval city center or of the crowds of Danes sitting out and streets and parks, drinking carlsberg's and coffees, and congregating in the sun wherever it shines. But if you hop on the M1 metro line and ride just ten minutes south from the old city center, you'll find yourself in a sort of reverse image of Copenhagen, a place where the buildings are large and gray, the roads are wide and straight, and the historic city gives way to a much more modern international style. This mirrored a Copenhagen is called era still, and the region was once Copenhagen's big vision for how the city would redefine itself coming into the 21st century. To do this, Copenhagen created Aristotle as a new town, a concept originated in post World War II England, where a community is entirely pre planned and built with the intention that it will be fully self sustaining. Was to be a town unto itself, not just a housing district for Copenhagen. But over the past three decades, the aristo project has had some very mixed successes. And it carries important lessons for Copenhagen and other cities as they continue to grow and plan major projects for the future. Today, uris del is a roughly 5 and a half kilometer corridor that begins where the traditional neighborhood of essence boyega ends. From the northwestern tip of the island of ama, Aristotle extends as a narrow line directly south until it runs into the preserved natural area of calva Bo fela. On a map, it looks a bit odd to see a town plotted along such a straight and narrow line. They typically radiate out in a more circular shape from a center point. But Aristotle follows this linear path for a very specific reason. It follows the metro. That's because Copenhagen's metro system was actually built in conjunction with the development of Aristotle. In fact, the symbiotic metro in town were proposed in the same piece of legislation. The uris del act of 1992, and in many ways, the Aristotle act had just as much to do with building the metro as it did with building a town. You see, though Denmark is known as a very rich and prosperous nation today, Copenhagen experienced a difficult economic period from the 1970s through the early 90s. So when aristo was proposed in 1992, it was not only sold to parliament as a new town for people to live in, it was proposed as a public private partnership between Copenhagen, Denmark, and private financiers, who would bring in an influx of international capital and new money into Denmark. To attract investors, Copenhagen would plan to create the metro line, which would serve as the major transport artery through Aristotle. In turn, the municipality would sell plots of land along the proposed metro to these private investors, and the money made from selling that land would be used to finance the metro itself. The land was attractive because of the metro, and the metro is to be built with funds secured by land sold on the promise of its own creation. It was both the chicken and the egg in a sort of self fulfilling financial prophecy. And now today, you can easily see how this financing deal laid the basis for the shape and rhythm of Aristotle. The town is dominated by massive architectural projects. Many of them congregated around each stop of the metro. Across the street from ur as del station, fields shopping center, Denmark's largest indoor mall, takes up a full square block complete with a trampoline park, children's playgrounds, and a gym. Just a few hundred meters away from fields, sits the recently completed royal arena, a massive indoor stadium that holds thousands of spectators for international sports events and Denmark's largest concerts. From there, one metro stop away brings you to Bella sky hotel, twin buildings with a sharp and sleek, glassy style that contains four stars, 23 floors, and if you haven't since the theme yet, was the largest in Denmark when it was completed. Adding even further to Aristotle's architectural prowess, the region is also home to three buildings from big, the firm headed by Denmark's biggest stark architect, Bianca engels. These include 8 house, which earned the distinction of housing building of the year from the 2011 world architecture festival. So Aristotle has succeeded in some of its goals. It's attracted some major investment, its development spurred the creation of the Copenhagen metro system, which has since been expanded multiple times, and it attracts architecture fanatics and students to the region to visit this new town and see the buildings and people who live there, which brings us to earth del's failures. In many ways, Aristotle looks like an architecture model that's been scaled up from a boardroom table to life size. And in many ways, to live there, feels like living in a model. That is, it doesn't feel like a place built with a focus on the people actually living there. And the older neighborhoods of Copenhagen, like nearby essence boyka, local shops dominate the storefronts and people fill in the spaces, shopping, eating, or just sitting out in the sun. It's the sense of local character and a human scaled neighborhood that makes living in Copenhagen so appealing. But because of its linkage to the metro, eris del feels more like a series of station islands within a long, empty ocean of concrete than it does a contiguous community. It has the bones of infrastructure, but it's why distances between buildings and a lack of human density make it feel like it's missing the rest of what it takes to be a community. This new town's top down creation came at the expense of any bottom up personality. So that it not only looks much different than the rest of Copenhagen, but to live their feels much different than the rest of Copenhagen. And Aristotle is not alone. Since its creation, Copenhagen is continued to create newer neighborhoods such as suhan to the west, nor vest to the north, and nor hound to the northeast. Many of these have so far faced similar struggles of a top down approach resulting in little local character. But that doesn't mean it'll always be this way. Many of Copenhagen's most vibrant neighborhoods today dealt with their own growing pains throughout history, and ersel.

Copenhagen Denmark del station fields shopping center royal arena aristo Bella sky hotel ama Bianca engels Aristotle England parliament ur eris del
Ukraine fears a long war might cause West to lose interest

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

Ukraine fears a long war might cause West to lose interest

"Ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky is calling for more actions from Europe to support Ukraine and stop Russian aggression Speaking by video link from Kyiv at Copenhagen's democracy summit zelensky says European countries must not hesitate to cut off any relations with Russia He wants the European system can lose if words are not backed up with actions Zelensky's call for Europe to support Ukraine's bid to join the EU is echoed by the president of the European Parliament Roberta met Sola also in Copenhagen But it is high time that it is also given the real opportunity to join our European project I'm Charles De

Volodymyr Zelensky Ukraine Zelensky Kyiv Copenhagen Europe Roberta Met Sola Russia European Parliament EU Charles De
"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

Wardrobe Crisis

04:35 min | 10 months ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

"In order to get our messages out. And I'm not saying that one is more right than the other. I just know that with all the work that we have put into place with our sustainability requirements. That have the potential to be implemented by other fashion weeks, other fashion organizations, even in basically any part of the fashion ecosystem magazines could implement sustainability requirements. Influencers could imagine or could work with sustainability requirements. Yeah. I actually, well, it's maybe a little difficult to imagine, but it's actually. We see a lot of retailers now also implementing sustainability standards. That's true. Yeah. So my point is that since we have the potential to inspire other industry players, it kind of lies on our shoulders to grow the international community. You could just stop me coming because obviously flying from Sydney's not going to do much for your cup. And we're just like to say that in previous seasons, then I have gone to Copenhagen. I haven't flown from Sydney to Copenhagen and back. I've come from London because I'm working there for a longer period of time. But even so, some people might say, why not just go digital? Now, there's quite a lot of data around the cutthroat of digital presentations. There was a particular business of fashion article which I linked to it. Basically saying digital shows don't go anywhere near as much attention from media. But why not just turn everything online? We've got the metaverse, have we not coming up? Unfortunately, it's not the answer to our challenge. I think a lot of change and a lot of action derives from these human connections and the conversations that you have and how you can be inspired by seeing what others are doing. And it just, to me, it doesn't seem like the digital space office.

Copenhagen Sydney London
"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

Wardrobe Crisis

04:36 min | 10 months ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

"And of course, it's not something that we find satisfactory in any way. But and this is just to also maybe give the listener an idea of how heavy impact of the flight industry is because we've actually managed to reduce our carbon emissions significantly. By half in many categories, even 100% by just not doing something any longer, we had merchandise before, we don't have merchandise now. So we have managed to reduce all categories of our carbon emissions. Except, which is great, except fights. And actually, from also evolving as a fashion week that gains international relevance more and more season after season, we've actually been in a position where we have deliberately chosen to increase our number of international guests at Copenhagen fashion week because we want people to come here and see our fashion week. Of course, see what Danish fashion is all about and Scandinavian fashion is all about. But also to talk or involve them engage them in our sustainability discussions. So we have increased our hospitality guests and that means we have an overall level because I think flights is around 90% of our carbon emissions. That means that on an overall level, we have actually increased our carbon emissions. No, for sure, not good enough. But so, okay, what do you do? What to do? Of course, we are looking at, for example, guests coming from neighboring countries can travel by a train instead of flight. That's an easy that's an easy solution that said, we have also decided to not reduce our hospitality guests. So we are also hoping for miracle. I mean, we are hoping for the flight industry to be disrupted. And it's actually I mean, I remember clearly when I sat with this sustainability action plan back in it was in 2019 where we developed it..

Copenhagen
"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

Wardrobe Crisis

04:21 min | 10 months ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

"That don't accept and that won't accept a status quo and our society, but that will only accept progress and action. And change. We could have a whole podcast about, in fact, we've already got one. So I would suggest that listeners go back to I forgotten the number of the episode, but we'll share a link a very nice podcast that I did with a clima activist here called Anna rose. It's about courage in the face of climate grief, but it's actually an incredibly hopeful, even joyful episode and it looks back at her. Very long history because she started being an activist 14, which is crackers, but how she fosters hope through action and actually I got so much from listening to her. If you're listening to this dear listeners and thinking bloody hell, that's gloomy. What am I supposed to do about it? I worry about it too. I don't know what to do. I really believe that the antidote is action. And that everyone can find a different route to action. But let's talk about yours Cecilia about what you're doing because through your policies, you can say, all right, in my world, in my, it's not the whole world, but in my lane, what I do, I can actually try and change policy, and I can get people to really address their carbon footprint. All right, let's just explain or unpack how you do the work of addressing the carbon footprint of fashion week. At the August 2019 edition of Copenhagen confession week, you measured your baseline of 45 tons of CO2 emissions. Before we go any further for listeners who are like, what are we talking about? Could you just in lay terms summarize how an organization or a brand or in this case your case an event goes about measuring that? What do we mean? What is baseline? So by baseline, we simply mean that the first time we measured our carbon emissions was in 2019. So that number will be used as the reference point in the future. So in 2019, we.

Anna rose Cecilia Copenhagen
"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

Wardrobe Crisis

05:27 min | 10 months ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

"Job would suit me. And at that time, also having worked at the global fashion agenda for so many years and having been promoting sustainability and the fashion industry, the first thing that struck me was if I go into Copenhagen fashion week instead, that would be like contradictory to everything. So everything that I've been working with and dedicating my professional career to a fashion week isn't that just this glamorous event where we celebrate fashion and all of this stereotypical images that you get when you think about a fashion week people that are sipping champagne, cheek kissing or whatever. And really not. But also selling clothes. That's what I think. Commercial at its core, fashion week is about presenting new collections and helping brands to sell them. Sell more and stimulate a demand in consumers that we could argue how much more close we need. And of course, I mean, I love fashion. I think you do yourself as well. I love the creativity. I love the creative persons working in our industry. I admire people working along the entire supply chain of the industry. I think there's so much so many human touch points that if you come to actually appreciate that entire process, then you can not but really cherish your clothes. But and I love the I think I already mentioned the creativity and the handcraft and the creative thinking and the creative expression and all of that. I love the creative industries in general. But what I found was, yeah, just a need to really revamp and reset fashion week. So that was the reason why I applied because I thought there was potential to turn things around a little bit and do it differently. What did they say or what sorts of reactions did you have when you presented your ideas? I've actually been very overwhelmed by the support. And I think it's a very clear signal that the industry has has really lacked a direction or has lacked some of the requirements and of course it's bold because I think we will go back into exactly what we're doing, but we are requiring some very high standards.

Copenhagen
"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

Wardrobe Crisis

04:36 min | 10 months ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

"Many things have also happened during the pandemic. We've had loads of challenges for businesses struggling to survive and struggling to get there. Supplies and just in general, you know, global economies really being impacted by the pandemic. So companies have also had a reason to focus on their own businesses. And I fully respect that. And I'm not saying that that was a wrong move. But we are living in a capitalist world and the fashion industry is one of the very capitalist and very not regulated industries as well. So things have maybe gone a little bit out of hand again. I think that's at least what I'm observing and definitely not the only one. I agree. I think it's like this rush to try to get back what we had before. And I get it. And so we talked before about that quote saying about the human connection of shows or even just meetings. We miss it. We want it back. And yet, the job is actually to try and find some sort of balance between not simply hurtling back and missing this window of opportunity to re design the system, I guess. Yeah. Yeah, I think that's where we're at. And that's also why I think that we continue doing what we really believe in and I know that luckily so many other organizations and players and companies are doing the same and they're kind of revitalizing their sustainability efforts and the latest news around the New York fashion act is also another good sign that things are still happening and also hopefully from a political level there's attention to we must we must take better care of the people and the planet working in this industry and if they can actually pass a bill in the state of New York and regulate a very not regulated industry that would be a major leap forward. I think it's super ambitious. What do you think about it Claire? I love that you mentioned it because we didn't talk about this before, did we, but of course you're watching the news. I'm actually going to interview a Mexican beta. Who is the founder of the new standard institute about this two episodes after this one. So yeah, I think it's been very, very interesting to see that happen there because there hasn't been to my mind anyway as much momentum in New York around sustainability from the big brands. We haven't seen that. So to me, that was very interesting and kind of cool, right? Because it's quite far reaching, what they're trying to propose. Yeah. Let me take you back before we get into the sustainability action plan that I just mentioned. Because I'm interested to know if you had a plan like we started talking about when we first met because you used to work at global fashion agenda, which puts on the Copenhagen fashion summit, which, if people are into sustainability, they will have heard of. But in 2018, you became, was it 2018? Yes. 2018 became the CEO of Copenhagen fashion week. I want to know. First, how did you get the job? But mostly, did you start out with this big idea of almost putting a stake in the ground going right so we're going to set a benchmark for sustainability and be really full on a bold with this? I think you're completely spot on in asking that question because the only reason why I applied was because I saw the potential to rethink Copenhagen fashion week and kind of reinvent the role of a fashion week in general..

New York new standard institute Claire Copenhagen
"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

Wardrobe Crisis

05:31 min | 10 months ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

"Today's session and I've also been a little bit nervous about it because you were one of the first podcasts that I really like really dug into and listened to and I remember, I don't know which episode it was, but you know listening to the best here, collective podcast, which is ages years ago. And yeah, and helping you out is to set up Cobain and confession. So I'm back in what 16 17? Yeah. Yeah. Awesome. Thank you. Now, I need to begin with a very important question firstly, are you wearing some Danish clothes? In fact, I am. You know, right now, I'm actually we built a garden office. Just in the beginning of the pandemic, I think, you know, after a few months seeing that we would be working from home a lot, we built this wooden it is insulated, but it is so my point is I'm sitting down here and it is a little bit chilly, so I think right now I might look like I'm going hiking maybe. I'm wearing a padded vest and I'm wearing knit knitwear and I'm wearing a turtleneck and I'm very comfortable and yes it is actually all Danish fashion. My boyfriend full disclaimer has a Danish fashion label. So I am the happy receiver of a lot of a lot of his clothes. What's it called? It's called soland. And so basically, your office is like a fancy garden shed that you had built so that you could make sure you could work from home. I love it. It serves multiple purposes, but this one is actually by far my favorite moment. When I work from home and I can actually go down into our garden and sit here and still enjoy the daylight outside and yeah, it's quite nice to see a cat passing by some random random city cat. But also get some distance because we've all got to adapt, haven't we? I mean, I always joke that I called this podcast water crisis, but I never meant to be in the wardrobe making it. And yeah, I am because my office is my wardrobe. It's a room, it's a little room that has my wardrobe in it, but it's funny. You just have to find new ways to make things work. And we're going to talk about how you did that on a grand scale with Copenhagen fashion week. But I think people relate to just having to improvise a bit. Yeah. And you know you're lucky if you've got a space at home, but lots of people have to work in, I don't know how corner of the kitchen or whatever it is and just try and figure out a strategy, right? Because we've been thrown into so much disarray. Exactly. And I think, you know, we have two kids. So when we're all at home in isolation of whatever reason, there isn't really room to work or at least not to work in a quiet space. All right, I want to talk about what's coming up. So last week, when this comes out, which is actually on January 24th, we're recording a few days before. You published your latest annual sustainability report. And the introduction looks at the pandemic and how last season, Copenhagen fashion week was able to return in a hybrid form and experience at least in part, and I'm going to quote a return to the tactile experience of fashion you talk about the liveliness and the buzz around the city and human connections, which we miss, right? But you also note, while we appreciate this sense of normality, we don't want to forget what the pandemic tortoise in fact is still teaching us. We've experienced a rise in voices advocating for responsible business practices.

Cobain Copenhagen
"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

Wardrobe Crisis

03:40 min | 10 months ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

"And I don't just mean by outlawing plastic water bottles and throw away sets. We're going to talk about that. Cecilia is the CEO of Copenhagen fashion week. And her work is really paved the way for bigger, more established events to take her queue. In 2019, Cecilia set up a sustainability advisory board for the fashion week, and she asked me to join it along with some of the people I'm most admire working in this space, including Ghani's Nikolai ref strip. But also another one who's been on the show, Amy powney. She's the designer behind the British label mother of pearl. She's an episode 71, by the way. I wrote all these down because you want to go back. Okay, this episode goes live just as the latest edition of Copenhagen fashion week is happening for the autumn winter 22 collections. And they're going to be actual shows. And so we ask, is everything going back to normal in adverted commas now or to the way it used to be pre-pandemic? Why shouldn't it? And what's the alternative? Why do we need fashion weeks at all? Can we reinvent them? And what role could they play in a more sustainable future? Okay, let's get into it. Please say your CERN over Thor's Mark. They're beautiful. Yeah. Was it? In English, I say thorough smack. Yeah. Pronounce the Danish. It's still to us Mark. So you don't do the because it's just the T but my name and English would be Cecilia, thaws Mac. I really love the Danish pronunciation and want to get good at it. That's why I asked you. Anyway, I'm actually delighted to welcome you to the wardrobe crisis podcast. Thank you for joining us. Thank you. Thank you, Claire for having me. It's a very busy time for you. So we're lucky. What's going on with you? It is a very busy time. We have a week and a half to go until Copenhagen fashion week kicks off in a slight and another pandemic edition, but it's actually going to turn out better than what we could have feared. A month ago. So looking forward. I kept thinking Cecilia that we would get to do this in person, we're Friends. We've worked together a bit. We know each other. I was always thinking, well, I'll come back to Denmark and we'll sit down and we'll do this podcast. And yet here we are, who is January 2020 last time I was with you in Denmark. And two years later, there's still all this disruption, right? So I'm glad we get to do it digitally, but it has just been such a long time, hasn't it of dealing with this? Difficulty planning. Yeah. I mean, I think, you know, some procedures have been made easier..

Cecilia Copenhagen Amy powney Ghani CERN Claire Mark Denmark
WHO Europe warning on COVID deaths ahead

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

WHO Europe warning on COVID deaths ahead

"The world health organization's Europe office rooms of a possible surge included deaths ahead WHL Europe says projection show it's fifty three country region could face a double seven hundred thousand deaths due to the corona virus pandemic by next spring topping two million in total the group based in Copenhagen also points to growing evidence of a decline in protection against infection and mild disease through vaccines it says a booster dose should be given as a priority to the most vulnerable populations including people with weakened immune systems as well as all those aged over sixty and health workers I'm Charles de Ledesma

Europe World Health Organization Mild Disease Copenhagen Charles De Ledesma
"copenhagen" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Up of the ninety s that will soon have a financial crisis and it took ten years and then it came but at that time. I've been a many many times. Oh yes but you said that already last year or the year. Before stuff saying indian. Yeah it makes. It makes a lot of sense to me now. So renters persistent mediations. It appears to be seven forcing some level because they're stipulation. Stipulation is going to get higher leverage and continue to deviate away and i. Some point is going to great but we have no clue as to what the timing might be right exactly. Yeah that's a problem. And in my view i think policies should be not trying to to sam have guests bat. The debris comes by the instead. Avoid the set persistent deviations yes. We met diplomacy again from us. Central bank perspective based on. You're sort of hypothesis here and ideas. What would be covered. The color of the central bank policies. Cheat yeah i i i think first of all central banks should give up the idea that that the the main thing is to control inflation because that that means that the focus his in something which is the market takes takes is already somehow takes responsibility for that want but i think they should be much more worried about the house Flation and the stock price inflation and the This is also something. We discussed some out here in in denmark. And you can say that well you know we have a. We have a house. Prices have increased a lot and the question is is it. Is it the bubble or is it just an imbalance..

Central bank sam denmark
"copenhagen" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"And i had to get twenty five dollars dollars. I had to get some sort of central bank clearance exactly in the mid eighties. So are the sort of constraints than the way and And so in some sense money. Creating inflation was to in such a very constrained localized markets. Right money can go anywhere. Yeah i i actually have to say that. They have not been terribly convinced that created inflation but ecause it allowed for for Say inflationary expectations and they are the ones that actually very important. Yeah and and it's consumer price inflation. I think you make a distinction. And i was thinking when i was leading the paper. You know. event little in experiment in the us. At i guess you'll has done similar. A few trillion dollars of stimulus as part of a pandemic essence really gone into consumer price inflation but guest nearly gordon to asset price inflation. Right exactly this through the markets and so on so that the ad is sort of proving what you were hypothesizing and that lots of them so same excess money leading to say a stock price inflation and house price inflation so but that not the consumer price inflation knowing all the details. It's a bit county to there. It is but but really understanding. It's it's not the accounting to log at. I think it's reasonable but you know also when you have a so much house price inflation and so much shit. Price inflation digest. Now i've been. You actually have no long run price. Newt neutrality and as i mentioned in the beginning that is something that is just routinely a suit and if you do not allow the data to speak freely about did you not real real. That is a very very important problem to solve salon of implications for policy. Would you say that then. The money bucket is taken away by the central bags. Would you say that this artificial price inflation. Would you see that go back. That's a very hard question. I'm because one can point out. What is say problematic better. The the policy then works. It's much harder because that so many things to consider. And so i. I have spent my lives trying to understand structures by the i would be scared to death to have conveyed policy advice because i think that that is very very difficult. The school i guess this gives central banks the typical metrics like cpi and so on. You don't see inflation so they get go back and say there's no inflation continue at low interest rates forever at us. Actually what's happening in many cases right. I think what one could say. Well we need to have foot example you could have higher reserve ratios force them onto the the private backs so that for example that would put a damper auden debt on on house prices. You you could say well you have to have a twenty percent..

gordon us
"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Bookshops creates community and they create community around stories so it gives people an opportunity to meet around subjects that they might not otherwise talk about so it opens up lots of doors and lots of ideas for people visibility. Smith opened books and company over twelve years ago. A small light bill book shop and cafe located just off the high street and help an affluent residential district. Just north of copenhagen looks and company is the danish capitals only english language bookshop it houses anything from bestselling fiction to cook books. Magazines and newspapers. Titles that isabella likes to display in the shops main window overlooking the quiet side street often by lining color coded book covers today on an early autumn morning. The display includes rows of carefully placed fiction and nonfiction books in varying shades of yellow over the years. Isabella learned that relying on such a well selected and diverse stock. Hus- kept her customer base strong so in a world where most book selling happens online. An independent bookshop needs to be able to persuade people to leave their computers. Walk outside and into independent bookshop. And the way to do that is to have a well. Curated selection of books and in our store the way we choose books. Is we really choose. According to our interest and we have a very wide selection of books and they may not all be books that we would personally want to read but we find them interesting for one reason or another and that also makes it much easier to sell a book. If you find a book interesting is much easier to sell isabella. Who is of mixed. Iranian and danish origins has always had a passion for bookshops as someone who grew up in multiple countries around the world. She came to appreciate the familiar and welcoming ambience over neighborhood bookseller and most of all its contribution to the local community. Establishing meeting spot around books. So when i moved back to copenhagen after living abroad for over ten years i discovered that i had spent a lot of my time in foreign cities looking for a place where i could feel at home and that was often book shops and cafes or ideally both in one place and then when i moved back i realized that that didn't really exist in the city and definitely not with english language books and i wanted to create a place where people could come and feel at home. They could sit. They could talk to us. They could have a coffee or tea that could browse the books but really a huge part of it of opening the bookstore was to create a hub for the international community. And she tells me how over the past. Decade books and company has established itself as popular community hub welcoming everyone from commuters popping by for alati and a copy of the f. t. to residents hungry for their next page turner all by ensuring that the neighborhood can rely on the healthy variety of businesses big and small so one of the reasons that we stay in hill is also that over the past twelve years that we've been here. We have realized that would makes a small town like this come. Alive is to have a diverse selection of shops and often if you're in an expensive neighborhood. The shops that survive are the ones that are clothing shops or restaurants and cafes which is great but what is really nice to have small unique independent bookshops or other kinds of unique shops. That will create more of an atmosphere and a greater selection for the people who live in the neighborhood and is very important. Because that is what makes a neighborhood unique so it doesn't become a generic street that looks like any other street everywhere else but that it has character and personality and makes you want to go from shop to shop instead of doing going to one shop and going home again and as all restrictions are lifted and denmark this month isabella is looking forward to hosting weekly book clubs and organizing book launch events over the autumn for a place that relies and thrives on an enthusiastic customer base books and company. And it's small team of seven have much to look forward to the season. You have lots of challenges when you have a small independent bookshop but it is by far the best business to be in. And i've been here for twelve years and i still get excited. Every time new books come in.

isabella copenhagen Isabella Smith denmark
"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Bookshops creates community and they create community around stories so it gives people an opportunity to meet around subjects that they might not otherwise talk about so it opens up lots of doors and lots of ideas for people visibility. Smith opened books and company over twelve years ago. A small light bill book shop and cafe located just off the high street in help an affluent residential district just north of copenhagen looks and company is the danish capitals only english language bookshop it houses anything from bestselling fiction to cook books. Magazines and newspapers. Titles that isabella likes to display in the shops main window overlooking the quiet side street often by lining color coded book covers today on an early autumn morning. The display includes rows of carefully placed fiction and nonfiction books in varying shades of yellow over the years. Isabella learned that relying on such a well selected and diverse stock. Hus- kept her customer base strong so in a world where most book-selling happens online. An independent bookshop needs to be able to persuade people to leave their computers. Walk outside and into independent bookshop. And the way to do that is to have a well. Curated selection of books and in our store the way we choose books. Is we really choose. According to our interest and we have a very wide selection of books and they may not all be books that we would personally want to read but we find them interesting for one reason or another and that also makes it much easier to sell a book. If you find a book interesting is much easier to sell isabella. Who is of mixed. Iranian and danish origins has always had a passion for bookshops as someone who grew up in multiple countries around the world. She came to appreciate the familiar and welcoming ambiance over neighborhood bookseller and most of all its contribution to the local community. Establishing a meeting spot around books. So when i moved back to copenhagen after living abroad for over ten years i discovered that i had spent a lot of my time in foreign cities looking for a place where i could feel at home and that was often book shops and cafes or ideally both in one place and then when i moved back i realized that that didn't really exist in the city and definitely not with english language books and i wanted to create a place where people could come and feel at home. They could sit. They could talk to us. They could have a coffee or tea that could browse the books but really a huge part of it of opening the bookstore was to create a hub for the international community. And she tells me how over the past. Decade books and company has established itself as popular community hub welcoming everyone from commuters popping by for alati and a copy of the f. t. to residents hungry for their next page turner all by ensuring that the neighborhood can rely on the healthy variety of businesses big and small so one of the reasons that we stay in hill is also that over the past twelve years that we've been here. We have realized that would makes a small town like this come. Alive is to have diverse selection of shops and often if you're in an expensive neighborhood. The shops that survive are the ones that are clothing shops or restaurants and cafes which is great but what is really nice to have small unique independent bookshops or other kinds of unique shops. That will create more of an atmosphere and a greater selection for the people who live in the neighborhood and is very important. Because that is what makes the neighborhood unique so it doesn't become a generic street that looks like any other street everywhere else but that it has character and personality and makes you want to go from shop to shop instead of doing going to one shop and going home again and as all restrictions are lifted in denmark this month. Isabella is looking forward to hosting weekly book clubs and organizing book launch events over the autumn for a place that relies and thrives on an enthusiastic customer base books and company. And it's small team of seven have much to look forward to the season. You have lots of challenges when you have a small independent bookshop but it is by far the best business to be in. And i've been here for twelve years and i still get excited. Every time new books come in.

isabella copenhagen Isabella Smith denmark
"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Bookshops creates community and they create community around stories so it gives people an opportunity to meet around subjects that they might not otherwise talk about so it opens up lots of doors and lots of ideas for people visibility. Smith opened books and company over twelve years ago. A small light bill book bookshop and cafe located just off the high street and help an affluent residential district. Just north of copenhagen looks and company is the danish capitals only english language bookshop it houses anything from bestselling fiction to cook books. Magazines and newspapers. Titles that isabella likes to display in the shops main window overlooking the quiet side street often by lining color coded book covers today on an early autumn morning. The display includes rows of carefully placed fiction and nonfiction books in varying shades of yellow over the years. Isabella learned that relying on such a well selected and diverse stock. Hus- kept her customer base strong so in a world where most book-selling happens online. An independent bookshop needs to be able to persuade people to leave their computers. Walk outside and into an independent bookshop. And the way to do that is to have a well. Curated selection of books and in our store the way we choose books. Is we really choose. According to our interest and we have a very wide selection of books and they may not all be books that we would personally want to read but we find them interesting for one reason or another and that also makes it much easier to sell a book. If you find a book interesting is much easier to sell isabella. Who is of mixed. Iranian and danish origins has always had a passion for bookshops as someone who grew up in multiple countries around the world. She came to appreciate the familiar and welcoming ambiance over neighborhood bookseller and most of all its contribution to the local community. Establishing a meeting spot around books. So when i moved back to copenhagen after living abroad for over ten years i discovered that i had spent a lot of my time in foreign cities looking for a place where i could feel at home and that was often book shops and cafes or ideally both in one place and then when i moved back i realized that that didn't release this in the city and definitely not with english language books and i wanted to create a place where people could come and feel at home. They could sit. They could talk to us. They could have a coffee or tea that could browse the books but really a huge part of it of opening the bookstore was to create a hub for the international community. And she tells me how over the past. Decade books and company has established itself as popular community hub welcoming everyone from commuters popping by for alati and a copy of the f. t. to residents hungry for their next page turner all by ensuring that the neighborhood can rely on the healthy variety of businesses big and small so one of the reasons that we stay in hill is also that over the past twelve years that we've been here. We have realized that would makes a small town like this come. Alive is to have a diverse selection of shops and often if you're in an expensive neighborhood. The shops that survive are the ones that are clothing shops or restaurants and cafes which is great but what is really nice to have small unique independent bookshops or other kinds of unique shops. That will create more of an atmosphere and a greater selection for the people who live in the neighborhood and is very important. Because that is what makes the neighborhood unique so it doesn't become a generic street that looks like any other street everywhere else but that it has character and personality and makes you want to go from shop to shop instead of doing going to one shop and going home again and as all restrictions are lifted in denmark this month. Isabella is looking forward to hosting weekly book clubs and organizing book launch events over the autumn for a place that relies and thrives on an enthusiastic customer base books in company. And it's small team of seven have much to look forward to the season. You have lots of challenges when you have a small independent bookshop but it is by far the best business to be in. And i've been here for twelve years and i still get excited. Every time new books.

isabella copenhagen Isabella Smith denmark
"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"copenhagen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Bookshops creates community and they create community around stories so it gives people an opportunity to meet around subjects that they might not otherwise talk about so it opens up lots of doors and lots of ideas for people visibility. Smith opened books and company over twelve years ago. A small light bill book shop and cafe located just off the high street and help an affluent residential district. Just north of copenhagen looks and company is the danish capitals only english language bookshop it houses anything from bestselling fiction to cook books. Magazines and newspapers. Titles that isabella likes to display in the shops main window overlooking the quiet side street often by lining color coded book covers today on an early autumn morning. The display includes rows of carefully placed fiction and nonfiction books in varying shades of yellow over the years. Isabella learned that relying on such a well selected and diverse stock. Hus- kept her customer base strong so in a world where most book-selling happens online. An independent bookshop needs to be able to persuade people to leave their computers. Walk outside and into an independent bookshop. And the way to do that is to have a well. Curated selection of books and in our store the way we choose books. Is we really choose. According to our interest and we have a very wide selection of books and they may not all be books that we would personally want to read but we find them interesting for one reason or another and that also makes it much easier to sell a book. If you find a book interesting is much easier to sell isabella. Who is of mixed. Iranian and danish origins has always had a passion for bookshops as someone who grew up in multiple countries around the world. She came to appreciate the familiar and welcoming ambiance over neighborhood bookseller and most of all its contribution to the local community. Establishing a meeting spot around books. So when i moved back to copenhagen after living abroad for over ten years i discovered that i had spent a lot of my time in foreign cities looking for a place where i could feel at home and that was often book shops and cafes or ideally both in one place and then when i moved back i realized that that didn't really exist in the city and definitely not with english language books and i wanted to create a place where people could come and feel at home. They could sit. They could talk to us. They could have a coffee or tea that could browse the books but really a huge part of it of opening the bookstore was to create a hub for the international community. And she tells me how over the past. Decade books and company has established itself as popular community hub welcoming everyone from commuters popping by for alati and a copy of the f. t. to residents hungry for their next page turner all by ensuring that the neighborhood can rely on the healthy variety of businesses big and small so one of the reasons that we stay in hill is also that over the past twelve years that we've been here. We have realized that would makes a small town like this come. Alive is to have diverse selection of shops and often if you're in an expensive neighborhood. The shops that survive are the ones that are clothing shops or restaurants and cafes which is great but what is really nice to have small unique independent bookshops or other kinds of unique shops. That will create more of an atmosphere and a greater selection for the people who live in the neighborhood and is very important. Because that is what makes the neighborhood unique so it doesn't become a generic street that looks like any other street everywhere else but that it has character and personality and makes you want to go from shop to shop instead of doing going to one shop and going home again and as all restrictions are lifted and denmark this month isabella is looking forward to hosting weekly book clubs and organizing book launch events over the autumn for a place that relies and thrives on an enthusiastic customer base books and company. And it's small team of seven have much to look forward to the season. You have lots of challenges when you have a small independent bookshop but it is by far the best business to be in. And i've been here for twelve years and i still get excited. Every time new books.

isabella copenhagen Isabella Smith denmark
Greenland Island Is World's Northernmost Island

BBC Newsday

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Greenland Island Is World's Northernmost Island

"In the architects say they've inadvertently discovered the world's most Northern Ireland. The Danish and Swiss team revealed that they thought was that they were in a different place until they checked their position and found they were on a previously undiscovered 30 square meter agglomeration of mud and rock. Mike Sanders has more details. The scientists flew by helicopter to what they thought was Kodak Island to collect samples, no great excitement there. That tiny outcrop has been known about since 1978 but when they checked their position with the Danish official in charge of registering Arctic islands There were 800 M further north. Team leader Martin Rush of the University of Copenhagen said they were standing on land closer to the North Pole than anyone had been on before. The team suggests calling it attack Havana like meaning the northernmost island in Greenlandic, an

Danish And Swiss Team Mike Sanders Kodak Island Northern Ireland Arctic Islands Martin Rush University Of Copenhagen Havana
Container Ship Stuck in the Suez Canal

All Things Considered

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Container Ship Stuck in the Suez Canal

"The Suez Canal, One of the world's vital shipping routes, is blocked by one of the world's biggest cargo ships. This ship the ever given ran aground on the bank of the canal and is blocking it. NPR's Jackie Northam reports on what happened and what it might take to move the enormous ship out of the way. Ever given is an enormous ship about a quarter of a mile long, so navigating it through narrow waters, such as the Suez Canal is a challenge. It's still unclear why, but somehow the bow of the vessel began to drift towards one of the bank's maritime consultant. Battle Keratosis was Karatz. This Marine advisors says the vessel is relatively new, so there shouldn't have been any mechanical issues. A ferocious sandstorm may have played a role. There have been reports that visibility was low at the time and may have impaired the capitals and the crew on the bridge. Their visibility and the ship, which is operated by Taiwan based Evergreen Group ended up across the Suez Canal. Karadzic's says powerful tug boats have been trying to pull the vessel out of the sand bank. They may have to bring other vessels and take off some of the containers off the vessel. They may have to take a ballast water out of the vessel. Another connect the vessel right there and to make it, you know, lift itself from underwater large. Jenson, the CEO of Copenhagen based See Intelligence Consulting, says supply chains were already in disarray caused by a ripple effect from the pandemic. So you have a job or congestion. You have shortages of vessel capacity of shortages of empty containers. There's a myriad of things that are out of kilter will supply chain already distant and some top of it. And that's not good guy plant in with the International Chamber of Shipping, says 12% of global trade passes through the canal and more than 100 ships are now waiting to enter

Suez Canal Jackie Northam Battle Keratosis Karatz Evergreen Group NPR Karadzic See Intelligence Consulting Taiwan Jenson Copenhagen International Chamber Of Shipp
Main cooperative selling mink to shut as virus forces cull

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Main cooperative selling mink to shut as virus forces cull

"The world's largest for auction house says it will be closing over the next 2 to 3 years settle over. God reports that the announcement from Copenhagen for follows Denmark's decision to destroy millions of mink as a result of Corona virus variants being discovered, citing a high risk to public health. Danish officials last week ordered the country's 17 million mink killed after a Corona virus mutation showed reduced sensitivity to anti bodies. In the political fallout that's followed. There was some waffling over whether mink farmers should be allowed to keep breeding stock that would enable an eventual restart of the industry but for Copenhagen for a cooperative owned by Danish mink farmers. The writing is on the world. The CEO says Even the strongest community cannot survive the decisions that have been made. Meanwhile, Humane Society International hails the news as a tipping point that could signal the beginning of the end of the fur trade. For NPR News. I'm Cecil Oh, Regard in

Copenhagen Denmark Humane Society International Npr News Cecil
North Denmark in lockdown after mutated coronavirus infects minks being farmed for fur

The World

01:02 min | 2 years ago

North Denmark in lockdown after mutated coronavirus infects minks being farmed for fur

"The little country of Denmark, population less than six million, is the biggest producer of mink fur in the world. But now Danish for farmers are worried about going out of business forever. Facing a government order to exterminate 15 Million minx to stop the spread of the Corona virus. Tom Carson has this report from Copenhagen. The Danish government has made its decision. All the country's minx must be put down the prime minister made if Alex and sits on a press conference held on Wednesday, So you should know that The press conference was held in an unusual way. All the ministers and public health officials were not physically in the room but talking to journalists via screens. This is because a number of Danish politicians have caught Cove in 19 and are in isolation. Most mink farms are in the north of the country. After the latest outbreak there, people were told to stay within the borders of the local towns. All pubs, cafes, restaurants and sporting events in the region were shut down. These authorities say that mink are now considered a public health risk.

Tom Carson Danish Government Denmark Copenhagen Alex Cove
Copenhagen's Palads Teatret

Monocle 24: Section D

01:06 min | 2 years ago

Copenhagen's Palads Teatret

"If you were to ask Copenhagen Irs. About plaster this Pastel colored eye catching cinema located in the heart of the city. Just a stone's throw from Arne Jacobsen conic. Sas. Royal Hotel. They will likely describe it as for key fun and charming building a site that has for years made up a unique and special part of the cityscape the building dates back just over a century and was the city's former train station. Yet as demand grew and passenger numbers increased a new bigger station was built close by and palace went onto become Scandinavia's biggest entertainment center at the time. Counting roughly three thousand seats and space for thirty man orchestra. And after years of renovations and adjustments, the space turned into the seventeen screen cinema it is today. It took its distinctive look in the eighties when Danish artist Paul Gann coated the building's facade with a vivid mix of Pastel, hued blues and pinks. Turning the site from architectural landmark into a piece of art.

Arne Jacobsen Royal Hotel Copenhagen IRS SAS Scandinavia Paul Gann
Politicians, Vigds Finnbogadttir

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:18 min | 2 years ago

Politicians, Vigds Finnbogadttir

"Meet Iceland's Fourth President Vigdis. Finnbogadottir. Victis was born into a wealthy family on April. Fifteenth Nineteen Thirty Vic the capital of Iceland. Her father was a civil engineer and a professor at the University of Iceland. Her mother was chair of the Icelandic Nurses Association for over three decades. Education and travel were highly valued invictus his family. Both of her parents studied in Europe before this was born and they often told tales of their travels. After graduating from junior college wreck you back in nineteen, forty, nine fifty has got the opportunity to travel through Europe and to pursue her many areas of academic interest. She studied French and took courses on literature and drama in Paris. She. Also studied at the University of Saleh in Sweden and continue to pursue her theatrical interest in Copenhagen where she studied theater history. Finally she returned to her home country to study English literature and Education at the University of Iceland. Becoming a teacher was a natural next step for victorious. She taught French drama and theater history at the University of Iceland for breaking away to develop the French department at a selective experimental school in the city. Also participated in many projects that brought her into the public eye. She taught French. Television example and later hosted programs about drama. During summers she gave official tours of the country for journalists and writers hoping to gather research material. In the nineteen seventies, victis also served as the director of the Reykjavik Peter Company. All of the public facing work helped grow popularity and name recognition. In addition to all the other things she had going on figures also adopted a daughter in nineteen, seventy two and raised her as a single mother. All while acting as a cultural ambassador for country. Just. remained relatively a political at first. I some experienced some turbulent politics including housing shortages in the sixties, an ongoing conflict between integrationist and isolationist political ideologies. This is early detachment from politics came in handy when she ran as a candidate for president in nineteen eighty. When asked is it fair to say that that you should be elected for being a woman fixes responded? No I shouldn't be elected because I'm a woman I should be elected because I am a human. She secured a narrow victory against three other opponents all men. Her focus on the cultural identity and history of the country rather than more polarizing issues served her well in the race. Just like that big became the first democratically elected woman president. The Icelandic constitution grants, the president only ceremonial power while the prime minister takes more typical leadership role. Still. took an active role in the development of her country both at home and abroad. She spent time advocating for reforestation. She also used her fluency in multiple languages to serve as an impactful ambassador. Educating about the culture and rich literary traditions of Iceland. She personified the unity of her country and gained massive popularity across the world. Victims was reelected three times until she decided to retire from her position in. Nineteen Ninety six. But her participation in politics didn't end there. The following year she went on to serve as president of the UNESCO World Commission on the ethics of scientific knowledge and technology. Thickness made history by becoming the first woman president, a glass ceiling she broke surprisingly and depressingly recently. Thickness encouraged women never to settle for less. She said get educated never accept shorter education than your brothers.

President Trump University Of Iceland Iceland Europe Victis Icelandic Nurses Association University Of Saleh Paris Engineer Unesco World Commission Reykjavik Peter Company Director Official Copenhagen Professor Sweden Prime Minister
Places to Fly Fish

Travel with Rick Steves

03:51 min | 2 years ago

Places to Fly Fish

"Desportivo fly-fishing has become a favorite way for many urbanites to decompress. And that's how Chris Santillo started his fifty places recreation guides. He now also writes about places to paddle bicycle golf end snowboard, but his number one passion is fly fishing Chris thanks for joining US great to be here, Rick. Thanks what is it about fly fishing that those who know it and love it or so passionate about I've thought about this a lot oftentimes when I'm out on the river and I think that people come at it from a lot of different directions I. I think there's the chance to be out in nature in a quiet and beautiful place. There's an old saying that's trout don't live in ugly places and neither do bone Fisher Tarp in Atlantic Salmon. So you're usually in pretty pristine places that can support these fish species. About especially, if you're river fishing about being in the water, I don't mean to sound cliche but there is something about the oneness of being with the river in that sense of flow I drive a lot over mountains and past beautiful rivers in Europe and the United States and I see a lot of people with hip Bhutan standing deepen in the river and there is something. Special about that I would imagine you have there is a feeling of being. In the moment and in the flow of life of the rivers as a metaphor for flow of life and time passing, and it's never the same water that you're standing in and I think there is something profound rap subliminal about that that has an appeal There is an analytic. A fly fishing I think it has appealed to people the whole idea of trying to determine what the Fisher eating at a given time, and then trying to either look in your fly box and find the the right fly that seems to match the kind of bugs at the trout might eating or I know some friends will bring a fly tying vice in some feathers and hair and hooks to the side of a stream, and if they don't have what the right bug is at the time or the right fly, they will go and tie it. Up on the spot and hope that they're going to make that match matching the hatches, the term that writer named Ernie Schreiber came up with years ago the hatch being the kind of insect that is occurring on the river at that time but just having the arsenal and matching the flame with the others that are being eaten that's probably integral to being successful fly, Fisher and very important, and you'll find some anglers that are you know better equipped than others I've been out with some friends who will have literally five hundred or a thousand flies. I usually have one or two boxes and and hope that what I have. Oh, cover things ninety percent of the time, but there's always ten percent that doesn't work and one blanket work. Great. This morning in another flight would work great in the same hole this afternoon exactly because what happens on many river systems as you will have different sorts of insects emerging coming out of river or settling down upon the river at different times of the day you might have may flies that are. Popping up from the bottom of the river as Nymphs, and then turning into adult bugs and being on the surface in the morning, and that might be a white insect, the size of your Pinky Nail, and then in the afternoon as it gets warmer, the grasshoppers might become active and the wind may be him into the river and they are green and yellow, and they're the size of your thumb. It's sort of a a battle going on what are the it is it's man versus nature. Chris and Taylor has written a dozen best selling books about outdoor adventures in his fifty places series. One of his titles collects the thoughts of Passionate Anglers Y. I, fly fish and their favorite fishing places are covered in fifty more places to fly fish before you die you'll also see Chris's byline and major sport fishing publications.

Chris Santillo United States Desportivo Atlantic Salmon Europe Ernie Schreiber Bhutan Fisher Writer Rick Taylor
The Future Of IVF with Dr. Zaher Merhi

Mom Brain

08:37 min | 2 years ago

The Future Of IVF with Dr. Zaher Merhi

"So My name is Dr Marie? Reproductive endocrinology further specialist. My is in Manhattan on Columbus Circle. The practice is called new hope for not center I. Am a father of two boys. Ryan is fifteen years old going through puberty and Adam is eleven years old and I love my boys and my dot com will be he's my favorite history years old any sleeps with me every night I literally feel like we're just gonNA continue a sentence from from before. So we were talking about all your. Treatments in all the different things that you can experience while you're having your IV thing that sounds like somewhat not want to call it a SPA treatment but there it just sounds. Nice. Amazing this it is treated. You know it's funny to warding job honestly, and I really love my job and a lot of time I get attached to my patients because you're helping them have a baby and you know I get Christmas cards every year and saying, Oh thank you give me a baby. What kind of you know it's it's really happiness I cannot explain and actually they send pictures of the kids and the children and I put them on the wall and my house. So I have a wall full of pictures of the baby, the baby's. Saying So let's go back because I. think part of this conversation was really like I the F. One. Oh one if you've ever been curious if you've ever thought about it if you've ever been, you know sort of confused about what it entailed. We really covered all the details. So those of you listening who are still curious about that providence to go listen to part one of this conversation part two is going to be more of like you. I mean, you're just so knowledge what everything. More of the cutting edge stuff because I think that that's really what your outfit specializes in and is so prized for is that you really are on this cutting edge of what does it mean to be able to bring Tila to a challenging situations and to do it in a really as noninvasive way as possible, which is actually fascinating Lee sometimes with better results. So I guess we got cut off at noninvasive chromosomal screening is that right? Am I like looking at this? Okay. Then noninvasive chromosomes screening our next is the following. Let's say Daphne has three boys and now she wants to have a car. And now she comes to my office and tell me Dr Marie I WanNa have a boy now are we gonNa do is we're going to do something called IVF. We suck the ads at your husband's sperm, and then we make embryos right sperm and egg may can embryo it takes down a week to make an embryo Now, a days in the last few years more and more centers are testing the embryos not just for the gender also chromosomal screening. You don't want to worry about having a down syndrome baby and then I'm Houston later on or have a miscarriage and then was centers. Do they take a piece of your embryo and then freeze the embryo and test this piece for the chromosome because it's coming from the embryo? We don't do that with the Knicks are noninvasive chromosome screening. We take the fluid at your embryo where it's growing. Just. A fluid water and with that fluid for the end without taking off your angrier. We're only has this technology and I can tell you a lot of people come to us because they were like you know I don't know if the biopsy off Ambrose rain debut and I don't want south sticking out of my my future baby you know they can out to be tested. So that's that's the knicks or none of his of chromosomes I can tell you I love it because it doesn't put on your embryo if you see how an embassy biopsies down the stretch like this and the Pum, a piece of snaps out. It's a little bit aggressive. So the next I think presents a lot of things and then you can also for tomorrow and you can have your boy if you want just journalists election. Yeah. Fascinating because the the a when it's growing remember we put it in a culture dish and over the week after we had the sperm and egg over the growth of. The DNA is thrown in that fluid. So that's how we do it. So that's I think is cutting edge technology reverted proud to have it at new hope fertility center. Why is it only you guys that have this technology you know other centers have done it for research and stuff, but I did not get a good result when we started this technology. I can tell you my secret sauce by the way to have fun. Waiting. But before we offered the to patients, you have to test it. Right. You have to do on the same embryo both technologies the old one and the fluid L. We got ninety nine point nine percent correlation other places they got sixty, eighty percent Max, and so it's the the lab hasn't really got the as good results if I wanNA, say that's Why it's not. So we have great technology. We have great lab, and that's why we have a thousand nine point nine percent correlation between both understood and has a nice. So we talked before about the Needle Free Ivf, we're you take pills instead of injections, correct pills and patches and everything. Correct. There's no patches. This fills by mouth by GINA NASAL spray. Spray interesting correct. Is it just as effective show? We have to be very careful because if someone is young and they have a lot of eggs, it's not it's less effective. Why because? The shots are more aggressive food for the eggs and younger patients have lot of eggs to feed. So they need more food. So the pills is not enough they need addition to shots but women thirty five years, and above it's as effective as the old conventional where patients plenty of shots That's so interesting and I told you I have a patient and Amazon me she wants to talk about experience about the. Home Ivf because she get, we sent to the house no shots just spilt and nasal spray and that we got a lot of eggs as she made four embryos and that's that's a lot I mean it's this is favor good. So yeah it's effective and then how long can you freeze embryos for twenty five years? So it's good and bad guy, and this is great question. Let me tell you why it's good and. It's bad. It's good because nowadays, some countries by some doctors are struggling with Beijing let's say you come to me ten years ago you've eggs and you at forty now you come to me after ten years. Now you're fifty years old and you. WanNa get pregnant with my own exodus froze ten years ago. Some doctors have issues with that because now they think well, what if something happens to you now you have diabetes and you know so we're GonNa be stuck in situations where actually have a patient I was doing a patient from Norway she froze her ex in Copenhagen ten fifteen years ago. Now she's fifty one and they said we cannot use your eggs because getting you're pregnant at this age is dangerous. But, that exactly so I mean I love the fact that twenty five years but also. Having Siblings Twenty five years apart. This we it. Let's say you do IV after they get pregnant and twenty five years. Oh, my my my brother is. So. There's a lot of things but last last part which is. The great thing about freezing for twenty five years is that there is a lot of abandoned embryos what am I gonNa do with them right. I mean some clinics in this country has adult fourteen percent of the embryos abandoned coupled who left Leftover Embryos And are gone and they're not being the freezing fees because they finish this they finished family. So that's why when you go back to the conventional idea when you tell me, I get tons of eggs but guess what kinds of embryos to that you're GonNa be stuck with for live. So I won't vicious the thing that, yes home ivf or gentle IVF or neither free IVF. It's good effective at your to be stuck situation where you're going to be freezing fees for twenty five years for embryos that you might not need. Right. A lot of my consultations are bishops will finish their family and they just WanNa talk to me about what to do that embryo and I don't know what to say, what are the different options, throw it out, give it to another couple or give it twenty such but

Knicks Needle Free Ivf Dr Marie Manhattan Columbus Circle Dr Marie I Wan Ryan Adam Gina Nasal Tila New Hope Fertility Center Daphne Beijing Diabetes Ambrose Houston Amazon
No country for face masks: Nordics brush off mouth covers

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:14 min | 2 years ago

No country for face masks: Nordics brush off mouth covers

"The AFP. Nordics brushoff mouth covers Stockholm as most of the world either orders or recommends the use of facemask swith even US President Donald Trump, seen one nordic nations are remaining hold-outs in supermarkets on buses along with the streets of capitals, such a Stockholm Copenhagen Oslo Helsinki, and Reykjavik. That's the Nordic nations. Face masks are a rare sight worn only by a small minority many of whom are tourists according to a recent survey by YouGov only five to ten percent of respondents in Nordic countries said they used masks in public settings figure that has remained stable since the start of the crisis in March. and. Yeah I. Mean You know I I think that what I would like to see as we walk out of this as masks for. Sort of for people who want to wear them specifically for people who? Aren't feeling really super great that day maybe maybe today's good data wear a mask and not fill the era with whatever you've gotten sometimes, I don't feel good when you get up I. would certainly be railing against the idea if if someone was like, no, we as the government have decided that we need to have heard immunity as quickly as possible. Therefore, we are forbidding masks offer bidding people to wear them or for them to be made or for them to be distributed I, would be railing against that kind of also be a non issue for sick people if it was the social norm that you don't have to go places when you're sick, right I think that that's Know the first thing is that we have to get rid of whatever that idea was. That was going on in the parents of in the ideas of the heads of my parents when I was a kid. Came from a family admittedly, you know the sort of Lutheran Calvin est kind of cut from that cloth where. You could stand you went to work. Suffering is good for your soul that kind of thing, and I got at least half of the Times throughout the thirteen years that I went to school perfect attendance. They'll that is is a declaration that I made people ill. I mean. You there shouldn't be an award for perfect attendance at school. What that says is that you've made poor choices to my mind. So does your parents have made poor choices because they're not talking about college talking about underage people understood but I, and again I'm not an opposing to hang. You know anybody for this. I'm just saying, Hey, we need to stop and think about this. 'cause only recently in the relatively recent past the last couple of decades or something have I heard people talking about you shouldn't go to work or school if you're sick. Actually. I was hearing the opposite when I was young. And so let's go on. That's a move in the right direction. At the same time, the corresponding figures have risen between seventy and eighty percent for most of the other twenty, eight polled including India and the United. States. So that's people wearing masks. Going up to seventy and eighty percent. I have the impression that if the government doesn't say clearly, we advise you to wear a mask nobody will twenty one year old French. Student Camille four to know of Fortuna Rowley told the F. adding that she was shocked to see how rare masks were in Stockholm. Bridget Y DEL sixty three year old pensioner told AFP that she would have preferred if Sweden's authorities recommended masks at least on public transport, but she added that she would keep going without one unless there was a shift in official policy not only she wants you to take care of her health. She doesn't have a car as an adult and she also doesn't intend to where mask until everybody else does. So. I found a couple of graphs which are not exactly easy to talk about verbally but I mean, tell me what you when you look at the graph tell me what you think of. Here's. So this is a daily new confirmed Kovic nineteen deaths and I think the the confirmed part is a very interesting thing because you can think this was covid nineteen you can say it but like to confirm it is a little more solid Canada Okay So you've got the line for America which okay. It shoots up at the beginning and starts to round off a bit and then just sort of goes over to the right and wavers a bit and doesn't really fall that that that low. Now you've got Sweden which it goes up and then it tapers down and down and down, and then it just crashes at the end. So at the very end we're pretty much where we started and they're zero. Like, they're down to zero confirmed covid nineteen deaths now, and this is the country that had the least amount of government regulations and requirements. They're like, Hey, here's what we advise be smart about this be considerate. Fair what is the age. Difference though. The. Democrat shoulder. Oh Yeah. There's a lot of old people in Sweden. So here are the White Gal sixty, nine years old says if they don't if they don't I will not wear it because nobody else does. Martin Spoil Wrong fifty year old businessman said that he would follow government recommendations. If they tell us, we don't need masks we don't wear them. Sweden has received global attention for softer approach to curbing the spread of the virus which coupled with relatively higher death toll has led to the region's largest country being shunned by its neighbors, but when it comes historically about minding their business. But when it comes to masks, the Northeast Nordic nations look staunchly united. So except for Sweden, there are a few cases in those countries KK Chang Epidemiologist University of Birmingham since two for applied health research told AF pay. So I don't blame them for not doing it as long as they have reasonable social distancing and contact tracing has been done properly. Was We to do that? Asked Tuesday what long as you're being spied on I'm okay with it. Yeah. what might change his mind on recommending the use of facemask. Sweden's chief epidemiologist Anders Tangle said that he's still waiting for some of the proof that they're -FFECTIVE So what a novel concept? Portraying some logic questionable I. think it's wrong a responsible and it's stubborn. The epidemiologists said if he's wrong, it cost life. If I'm wrong. What harm does it do? The epidemiologists says there's no harm to wearing masks so we should all wear them I'm not entirely sure that that's true. And I mean. Okay. So there's there's the direct physical health oriented harm that he's talking about. Okay. Well, we've we've discussed some of the issues with that. You've got your mask mouth you've got one of the things that bothers the most bothers me the most is not seeing people's faces actually really bad for your immune system epidemiologist should know bacteria grows in wet damp dark places you would think well, right now they're looking to covert and they're not looking at much else. They're certainly not looking at dental issues and even just looking at cove it. Okay. Let's let's assume. That nothing else exists this is the only thing that means any of our attention. Okay. Viruses need cells to procreate. That's what they are. That's how they work. Now, if you have a multicellular organism, it has defenses it has t cells that will attack the virus and will attack cells that have been infected with the virus. So what what it wants is bacteria to eat that's that's what it means. It means defenseless little single celled organisms so that it can get in procreate and explode. That's what they do. So if you make more bacteria if you well, if you create this environmentally. Rich you will get a lot of viruses I get the idea but wouldn't we be seeing more many more cases and deaths and all these sorts of things going on in countries where mass compliance is significantly higher if that's the case no ours covert isn't. Necessarily, because Kobe isn't all that deadly except to people who are already very fragile.

Sweden Stockholm Nordic Nations Yougov Stockholm Copenhagen Oslo Hels AFP Donald Trump Reykjavik United States Suffering President Trump Kk Chang Epidemiologist Univer America India Kobe Camille Fortuna Rowley Bridget Y
Pompeo addresses order to close China's Houston consulate

Balance of Power

03:03 min | 2 years ago

Pompeo addresses order to close China's Houston consulate

"Setting out clear expert ations for how the Chinese Communist Party is going to behave, and when they don't we're going to take actions that protect the American people. That was Secretary of State Michael Pompeo talking earlier today, over in Copenhagen, Denmark. This was in response actually at the United States closed the Chinese consulate down in Houston, We turn now to Bill fairies. He heads up our national security coverage for Bloomberg. So, Bill this was quite a dramatic announcement that most was well, two up to this morning. What happened here? Well, you know, there's been a drumbeat of tensions back and forth between us and China. The U. S. Says that this is in response to ongoing intellectual property theft by China. That Secretary Pompeo said, has cost us hundreds of thousands of jobs. What we don't know if if there was, for instance of specific intelligence Operation going on that the US was trying to shut down. We do know that in the last year there have been two Chinese citizens in Houston, who have been indicted and convicted for trying Tio trying to steal trade secrets from the energy industry. So we don't know that specifically is related. But it is something that's obviously been on the U. S radar for a little while now. So in the terms of diplomacy, this is a pretty serious step for one country to kick out consulate out altogether, having a few years ago as I recall with Russia as well, what's likely to be the Chinese response. Well, Typically, it's a straight kind of protesting where the Chinese would look a U. S consulates in China at and close one of them with the same 72 hours notice. It'll be very interesting if they do something that's a little bit less than that, because that would signal on attempted de escalation. But the U. S has, I think five consulates in China And I would expect everyone who's based their eyes a bit on it now about whether they'll have to be going home this week. So, Bill, What's the endgame here is far as you can figure. I mean, do we think that the Chinese are going to change their conduct on intellectual property because we closed a consulate in Houston? The short answer is no. I don't think this will probably, you know, served. I think it's much more of a symbolic kind of moved by the U. S. And It keeps up these tensions that have been growing, you know, over over things like the origin of the Corona virus over issues like Wow, way. I think it's another strike in that category. Just yesterday, the US accused Chinese hackers of ah of more than a decade of attempts to try to steal hundreds of millions of dollars and trade secrets. From the U. S. I don't think a TTE this point. We see what the exit ramp is here for either side, other than some sort of a de escalation, So the ball is really in China's kind of court. Right now on, I think we'll be watching carefully to see whether they have more of a nuanced

China United States Chinese Communist Party Chinese Consulate Houston Bill Secretary Pompeo Michael Pompeo Copenhagen Bloomberg Denmark U. S Russia Theft TIO
Witold Szabowski

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:16 min | 2 years ago

Witold Szabowski

"Guess today's Polish journalist, who's reported from across the world including Cuba's of Africa Turkey and is land. He's previously been recognized by some of Poland's most prestigious literary prizes as well as Amnesty. International. English pen and the European Parliament. Journalism Prize his latest book. How to feed a dictator provides a unique perspective on some of the world's most evil men through the eyes of that cooks. The Toll Sh- lebowski welcome to the show. Can you tell me a little bit about your background? Were you born in Warsaw thank you for having me and the answer is no I was born. Hundreds kilometers from Warsaw, which made me very well linked to Warsaw and I had a lot of contacts which people from there at I graduated, I finished my by school in very very small town, Ostrich Moskowitz, and were you encouraged to write or indeed to cook at that time? That's all my mother was cooking really well. And when I was six or seven, I had that fashion to bake, and I was really it was a master of cheesecake, but then I never actually had any links to cooking until I graduated from Warsaw University, and then I went to Denmark and the full story seem the book, but shortly speaking. People in Denmark earned much better those days and people in Poland. And Poland was joining you those days, so I could easily meet right. I went to Denmark. And I spend a couple of months, and my first job was cleaning the dishes very good, fancy restaurant in very beautiful Barcus Copenhagen, but then I made a beautiful rape currier name became a chess, so that was the first serious cooking for me. But you ended up walking out of the restaurant, throwing your apron down and walking out. All Yeah Oh. Yeah, that's because I went to. I made a mistake actually. I'm joking, but I went to point just for a couple of weeks. I took a short break. The restaurant with my plan was to come back after a couple of weeks, but then in Warsaw I got the job actually I. It was an internship. But in the best newspaper, having all. So, that was something I couldn't really skip I never. I never went back to cooking. And in fact that was the start of your journalistic career. Because at twenty five, you became the youngest reporter at the Big Polish daily newspaper. Tell us about that. It'd be far. I was working for a top law. No, like the sound on or something like that and I was writing about everything related to religion that totally season church, the Polish Pope, who had died just a couple of months before, and that was my first serious job, but right after that. I began. That's true. At the biggest Polish daily called Gazit of has its weekly supplements with Literary Report Dash, which is really gorgeous, which is which is really a pearl to be a discovered one day for the international reverse. I believe because every week they used to print. Two or three really goods pieces of beautiful literary record dash in Richard Kapucinski style. And that's true. I began working there when I was twenty five, which was quite early. Usually, that was a place for very experienced, very very good journalist. And almost straits from the kitchen in Copenhagen I went to. Supply! With with the best quality reputation the on so that was kind of amazing for me. For the first couple of years, they couldn't believe that it's July It's a beautiful dream. They thought that at some point someone would come and wake me up.

Warsaw Poland Denmark Warsaw University European Parliament Barcus Copenhagen Africa Cuba Ostrich Moskowitz Reporter Rape Currier Richard Kapucinski
Hundreds of protesters rally in London, Berlin over U.S. death

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Hundreds of protesters rally in London, Berlin over U.S. death

"President trump says the U. S. government will designate the anti fascist group antifa as a terrorist organization as NPR's Joel rose reports the trump administration is linking it to protests against police brutality that have turned violent in recent days president trump said on Twitter that the US will be designating antifa as a terrorist organization but didn't offer any details it's something he's called for before Attorney General William Barr blamed radical agitators for hijacking peaceful protests Barr said such violence is quoted domestic terrorism and will be treated accordingly it's not clear how many if any of the protesters involved in violent clashes around the country are associated with antifa as protests over the death of George Floyd have grown government officials have put the blame for violence and destruction on outsiders officials in Minnesota where Floyd was killed offer a very different assessment of who those outsiders our governor Tim Walz says far right white nationalists maybe sparking the violence Joel rose NPR news governor walls also said today protests were mostly peaceful in Minneapolis overnight after National Guard troops joined local and state police in a show of force to quell violence but governor wall says it will take far more fundamental changes to address the problem in his state we don't just right near the top on educational attainment we rank near the top on on personal incomes on homeownership on life expectancies things that make this and when they came out awhile back we are we rank second in a survey of the fifty states second in happiness behind a white but if you take a deeper look and peel it back which this week is peeled back all of those statistics are true if you're white if you're not we rank near the bottom wall cited unequal educational opportunities for children of color and lending practices that suppress black homeownership demonstrators turned out in Berlin Copenhagen in Toronto today saying they were rallying in solidarity with American protesters and NPR's Frank Langfitt reports hundreds of people marched on the U. S. embassy in London the protests began in London's Trafalgar Square where hundreds face Britain's National Gallery and took a knee the March continued across the river Thames to the U. S. embassy where protesters packed enough against a police cordon a black lives matters group in London organized the protest a Twitter account for black lives matter U. K. which said it is not affiliated with the London group questioned a mass gathering while Britain is still largely under lockdown adding quote we are currently discussing the implications of calling a mass March in the middle of a pandemic that is killing us the most government statistics show British blacks of African descent are nearly four times more likely to die from covert nineteen than white Britons Frank Langfitt NPR news this is NPR this is WNYC in New York I'm lance lucky governor Cuomo says new York's Attorney General will investigate the NYPD's actions during yesterday's protests the demonstrations turn violent at times with protesters hurling objects at police and police pepper spraying protesters video also show police SUVs driving into a crowd of protesters Cuomo says any allegations of police misconduct should be investigated by an external authority nuts local officials are they really in a position to be feet fair and objective they will say yes I say from a public confidence point of view have the investigation done by someone else Blasio has announced two of his some point appointees are conducting an investigation into the violent protests in the past few days in addition to the NYPD's internal probe the governor says the AG's review will be done by next month and in his press conference this morning mayor de Blasio largely praise the NYPD for its approach to policing this weekend's protests but he said his administration needs to do more to identify police officers in leadership or on the beat who he said are not cut out for the job that work needs to be amplified it speeded up intensified we need to make sure that anybody who should not be a police officer is not a police officer the NYPD says three hundred forty five people were arrested and thirty three officers were injured last night it is not clear how many civilians were

Donald Trump President Trump
How scientists are thinking about reopening labs

Science Magazine Podcast

04:59 min | 2 years ago

How scientists are thinking about reopening labs

"We now speak with David Grimm online news editor at science. His recent article navigates the treacherous waters of researchers returning to their labs and fieldwork amid the coronavirus pandemic even for scientists fortunate enough to resume their research. Strange situations await greatly reduced lab teams physical distancing and face masks and the risk of corona virus infection to name a few. Hi David Angel. There's been plenty of talk about how and when researchers might return to their labs and it seems that now. The time has come for some of them. Could you highlight a few major studies that have now resumed work in a sense if it remains true that most labs especially labs that are not working on component virus are still closed or only partially open right now? It seems like labs in Europe have opened a little bit earlier. There was allowed to open a couple weeks ago and more opening now when my story I talked about any everything from research vessels going out in the Gulf of Alaska to study fish populations to archaeologist steady each feces and so obviously none of us have to do with corona virus which is why all these studies were shut down but some these are gingerly starting to reopen a little bit. How our institutions deciding which labs reopen? Will you know? It's really interesting. Some places are allowing all labs to reopen but the after we open a very limited capacity Aquino only a twenty five percent capacity will be a couple of people can be in the lab at one time in other places. Universities are prioritizing critical projects. And in that case that that be you know. Post are for Grad. Student is only a couple months away from finishing their post doc or their thesis and they just needed to accomplish more experiments. They're being allowed to come in just to finish those experiments and some of them. Don't even have supervision right. Now is not the case. So one re-stripe talks to a Nora Sistiaga who is at the University of Copenhagen Denmark. She's wants studying each and feces and she was allowed to go back into her lab by the team because she was so close to finishing data that she needed to complete her post doc but she can't do that because the restrictions are such that she can't go in by herself and her project requires somebody to supervisor and so the both can't be there at the same time because the restrictions imposed by the university so even though the genes allowing her to go back. She can't go back because she she. She can't do this work by herself. Even cases where people are allowed to go back. They're not always able to go back. One thing. Everyone even those outside of science or grappling with is that business as usual is no longer a thing what changes are being implemented in labs and feel work that might represent the new normal. Yes so the biggest thing is is the physical distance thing. So that's why the numbers have been so reduced so you imagine if the lab of twenty people were crowded together on the small lab benches knees take orders. That just can't happen right now. Because of the risk of transmitting corona virus and so she having instead his labs being allowed to have. Maybe two or three people come in Saint Time. And everybody's got to be in a separate room or the least have to be six feet of ARD and so that's one of the big things and also most decisions are requiring employees to wear face masks so even if you only have a public lab. Everybody's gotTa wear face masks at all time. Those seem to be the standard things. That are the same regardless of the type of laboratory. You're talking about. There are differences now because some labs are used to labs at deal with ancient DNA for example. These people are wearing full protective gear all the time because they don't WanNa candidate per sample. So they they are. They're already very used to wearing masks. Whereas maybe physicists owners who don't normally have to wear masks are now being forced to wear those fulltime. At least when they're in laboratory conditions a lot of these scientists and institutions are taking that leap to reopen labs and go back to research are scientists and institutions preparing for the possibility of labs having to close again. Yeah that's the really big problem. Because even as lobs kind of gingerly reopen and they're taking all these protective measures to make sure researchers can be there do their experiments. There's always a chance that things will up again. There could be an outbreak of cases in a particular area and then Milan has closed down again with university has to close down again. That's still something that's being actively sort of considered about how to deal with that and again different universities institutions dealing met with that in different ways so for example the Swiss veteran institute of Aquatic Science narrow allowing people to come back to work but one of the edicts is. Don't start new projects and don't start any projects that can't be stopped on short notice and the idea is that you don't want to start a project that's going to take you a year to finish and has to be done continuously. If there's a chance your research going to be shut down again in a month or two and so it really trying to ties the work. That is just finishing up or work that can be done. Maybe just a few weeks in case things have to shut down again.

David Angel David Grimm Gulf Of Alaska Europe Saint Time News Editor Institute Of Aquatic Science Aquino Nora Sistiaga Supervisor Milan University Of Copenhagen Denma
Saint Laurent’s is ditching the traditional Fashion Month Calendar

Fashion No Filter

06:49 min | 2 years ago

Saint Laurent’s is ditching the traditional Fashion Month Calendar

"Get down system news breaking news this week. I was pretty at. He can aback by the SUNOL announcement. Picking them back in a good way. Ya was although I guess in the last episode we'd been wondering whether big changes were actually going to end up happening so I guess there's your proof that's your answer so for anyone who doesn't know son. A Hall has decided to drop out of Paris fashion week and set its own pace for showing collections direction of the year. And it's going to pivot to adapt to the corona virus crisis and has said they told. Ww W D Saddam will said in a press. Release wd conscious of the current circumstances and it's waves of radical change. Santa has decided to take control of its pace and reshape. Its schedule creates Dr Anthony. Vaccarello said the violent impacted covered nineteen outbreak. Which has forced the closure of most of Santa Stores meant business as usual was not an option chief executive officer Francesca Valentini. Hinted that the brand famed for its spectacular outdoor women's catwalk shows set against the backdrop of the Eiffel Tower in Paris could still age a physical show at some point this year. But his favorite formats. They're more intimate and closely aligned. The final customer room. What do you think that means? It's such big news. I think that a house as respected and that does such exceptional job also needed such an exceptional job for its Shows has decided to to step down. Because that's a really really positive meaning that others will feel other smaller. Brands will feel like they can do the same without sounding like their brands in an unhealthy state. Because I feel like a lot of people will be worried about the way to investors and stuff at the same time as So that's also something to take into consideration when you're canceling big show and some of the big names of doing it gives a lot more room for others. I mean the rose also says that that's what they're going to be doing next season and I think this is a really positive outcome. I do that like brands. Moving away from the long lamented fares suck in place flashing. Schedules is a good thing. There is part of me. Worries that with brands. Big Sahel if they're off schedule but still in Paris are still gonNA maybe in completely off the mark with this that people are still gonna fly to Paris from other places to see that. But they're saying they're not showing. Well are they saying they're not showing? Yeah they said they're not doing a show could still stage a physical show at some point this year. Yeah at some point means one show instead of like the fashion week schedule. Which basically these three shows. Because that's two women or four shows to women's and men's which is from going from four to one is a big step. It's a big step back totally and I'm totally in agreement with that but I just worry that everything is going to become cruise collection competition e where big brands compete to have a more extravagant location or timing or whatever and then we're all just going to have to be on airplanes all the time in random directions and if that's what's going to happen? I would just rather we stick to the fashion week schedule because at least you just take one flight and then you go to Paris and you see the shows you know. That's the devil's advocate but bear in. Mind that that's if international flights have resumed. Which for the time being. It isn't the case and bronze will not have healthy budget. They used to fly people around on a whim as much as they used to. And I feel that for example a brand like Santa Hall would make sense to host an event of some kind in the form of a show. Something else every year in Paris. Because that's whether the house is located and you do have to find a way to promote and showcase what the designers creating certainly certainly so there is you have to be able to allow for some kind of formats. I think it's positive to see that it's going to be less than than it was and I really liked the idea of rethinking a system. That was so wrong but yeah I agree with you until we see what the outcome is. Exactly we can't really speculate county yet. No I assume you know what it occurs to me that some of our listeners might not beyond the fashion week circuit. I feel like I'd love you to go into a little bed and you're really up -cluded on the stuff as well. What about the fashion calendar is has been so wrong for so many years but especially in recent years? Can you speak to you kind of just touched on it? I think the competition for each brand to do bigger and better viral. Basically shows has become completely out of hand plus the fact that there are an increasing number of brands increasing number of people wanting to attend shows. Because it's good for positioning or like people just want to be seen their raw than the because they're actually you know helping promote the show itself and I also feel that we talked about this before. It's always fashion week somewhere and whereas they used to be only one week for each city it's now becomes so long and there's men's could chew and crews and then all the minor fashion weeks like Copenhagen and button and all the others that I can't think of the top of my head right now but I know there are loads of them. Do we really need a show format in an era which is increasingly digital. And when actually sitting front row to show would only be important if that show. It really is a proper added value to the brand. I think partly because of how exhausting has become for everybody and by everybody. I'm not talking about myself. I'm talking about people who really work super hot during that time. So the bias. The brands you work super hard juryman time. Yeah at the end of the day. I'm just that to report I'm not Like I feel like there's a lot of pressure during those those busy busy busy times and having so many shows back to back over a period of a month then Rick 'cause two three times in Aghia and where every single time you have to travel to a different city and attend just absolutely absurd amount of events and shows parties all in the name of promoting a brown and it just turns into a ridiculous exercise which is actually quite just quite cringe and especially after everything. We've gone through in last in the last few weeks. I think it would be quite distasteful to return to

Paris Sunol Eiffel Tower Santa Stores Santa Vaccarello Saddam Dr Anthony Santa Hall Chief Executive Officer Francesca Valentini Sahel Rick Aghia Copenhagen