35 Burst results for "Copeland"

R. Kelly Assistant Says He Made Her Write False Confession

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

R. Kelly Assistant Says He Made Her Write False Confession

"A long time assistant R. Kelly is the latest to testify at his sex trafficking trial Diana Copeland served as an H. R. Kelly for fifteen years and she says well she never saw any of the alleged sex abuse that the R&B star is accused of she did witness some odd stuff when she says he asked her to change into a robe to prove that she wasn't secretly recording him and she says Kelly even had her write a letter falsely confessing to stealing from him she testified also about how Kelly relied on his inner circle for example Copeland says the singer struggles to read and write and had no control over his own bank account well where his royalties were going she also says R. Kelly didn't even know his own social security number I'm a squirrel's Gabriel

Diana Copeland H. R. Kelly R. Kelly Kelly Copeland
QB Debate Continues as No. 13 Florida Routs USF 42-20

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

QB Debate Continues as No. 13 Florida Routs USF 42-20

"Thirteenth ranked Florida use outstanding play from two quarterbacks to defeat South Florida forty two to twenty starter Emory Jones ran for one score and threw a touchdown pass to Xavier Henderson for another Gator backup quarterback Anthony Richardson threw two touchdown passes to Jacob Copeland and scampered eighty yards for another score Jones was happy that both excelled we just go with the flow every week and every job go slow and the my columns and write my lover and you gotta be ready to go out there and L. savings opportunity south Florida's jaren Mangham provided the brightest moments for bulls fans on touchdown runs of one and three yards I'm Tom Aikens

Emory Jones Xavier Henderson Anthony Richardson Jacob Copeland South Florida Gator Florida Jones Jaren Mangham L. Bulls Tom Aikens
Blatant Oregon Shoplifters Walk Out of Lowe's With Full Carts

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:53 min | Last month

Blatant Oregon Shoplifters Walk Out of Lowe's With Full Carts

"Video of seen in oregon that will turn your stomach. And this is happening in democrat run state all over america shoplifters stealing thousands of dollars worth of wires from a lowe's home improvement store in oregon kaiser oregon resident andrew sullivan who filmed the incident told the kaiser times it was so blatant. That's what's wild me up. They just strolled through the parking lot. Riding the karch. Now again you can. You can see the video if you're watching mike. Online dot com click. Watch mike on tv. Two men pushing shopping carts loaded to the brim with thousands of dollars worth of electrical wire. Walking out of the lows doors as to employees are helpless to stop them. According to fox news dot com a lows employees standing at the door asked the men to show their receipt as they approached. They just kept walking. They refused to do so. Another lows. employee is then seen approaching the men in the video to which the first employee said. Hey don't do this. It's not worth the police said. Essentially jails don't take offenders such you shoplifters in states like oregon in order to cut back on their populations wait for it due to coverted. According to police. Lieutenant andrew copeland of the kaiser oregon police department. The men would likely face some fines. Get a ticket and be released. Copland said once you've stolen from lowe's wants and know that they can't stop you. There's no real consequence

Oregon Lowe's Home Improvement Store Kaiser Times Andrew Sullivan Mike Kaiser America Fox News Lieutenant Andrew Copeland Kaiser Oregon Police Departmen Copland Lowe
"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

01:47 min | 2 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"I really enjoyed <Speech_Male> it and <Speech_Male> Irs <Speech_Male> was labeled to <Speech_Male> help shape our <Speech_Male> music our dna. <Speech_Male> All those bands. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> was there was a <Speech_Male> time when we looked <Speech_Male> at the label and like <Speech_Male> oh if this is on <Speech_Male> the zone. Irs <Speech_Male> it's gotta be good. <Speech_Male> It's or it's worth <Speech_Male> our time and so <Speech_Male> that <SpeakerChange> happens a lot <Speech_Male> of time so it <Speech_Male> was fun. It was fun <Speech_Male> basically <Speech_Male> i was signing what i <Speech_Male> like and <Speech_Male> i was not really <Speech_Male> following any rule <Speech_Male> other than the fact that has <Speech_Male> three affordable <Speech_Male> and i have to like <Speech_Male> it and i figured <Speech_Male> all i gotta do. Is this reach. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> must be other <Speech_Male> crazy. People like me out <Speech_Male> there in the world and <Speech_Male> i'd have to find <Speech_Male> him. That was the game <Speech_Male> anyway. I guess we found <Speech_Male> you. So <Speech_Male> she's <Speech_Male> need. You <Speech_Male> did and look at us now. <Speech_Male> I tell you <Speech_Male> take <Speech_Male> care all right. Well thanks <Speech_Male> a lot appreciate <Speech_Male> it okay. <Speech_Male> That concludes our talk <Speech_Male> with miles <Speech_Music_Male> axe copeland. <Speech_Music_Male> The third <Speech_Music_Male> is book is <Speech_Music_Male> two steps forward. <Speech_Music_Male> One step <SpeakerChange> back. My <Speech_Music_Female> life in the music business <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> really thin <Speech_Female> i think is <Speech_Female> that the stories are <Speech_Female> great and i'm really <Speech_Music_Female> loved hearing him. Tell <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> some of them. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Love learning about <Speech_Music_Female> the castle on the songwriting <Speech_Music_Female> retreat. <Speech_Female> I guess you call <Speech_Female> her. Songwriting <SpeakerChange> workshop <Speech_Male> that he holds their. <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah <Speech_Music_Male> very fine <Speech_Music_Male> just like our podcast <Speech_Male> so if you <Speech_Male> loved what you heard <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and this is your first <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> time. Welcome to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the what differences make podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Please subscribe <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And you can also find <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> us on youtube. We <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> were trying to build up <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our subscriber base. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> How do they find us on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> youtube. Holly <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> doesn't make podcast <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and thank <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you. Thank you for listening. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Thank you for subscribing. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We're <SpeakerChange> so happy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to have you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> episodes every <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> friday. So <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> i'm <SpeakerChange> aboard. Won't <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you join <Speech_Music_Female> us way. <Speech_Music_Female> I we are <Speech_Music_Female> a proud <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> member <SpeakerChange> of the pantheon. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcast family. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that's good <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> epilogue <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> very important. <Speech_Music_Male> Yes so until <Speech_Music_Male> next <SpeakerChange> time this <Speech_Music_Male> day. This <Speech_Music_Female> is holly check. You <Speech_Music_Male> later vernon.

"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

02:41 min | 2 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"I think i heard about from you. Just a when the bengals and the goes broke up. You said what about the ban goes. Is that true you to get to the bands together and just calling the bongos or the bango goes it. Sounds like something i would have done. Probably did because the goes broke up basically because charlotte caffey. Who's a wonderful person at a great songwriter was making more money than genus shock. You know who is the drummer. And she kind of resented. I think they later realized what they had and reformed and the bangles kind of degenerated through a series of things that had nothing to do with the group but anyway the point wise. I figured well you know you can take a couple of people one group and the other group and put them together. It would probably work. So yeah i would. I would say. I probably did do that time but i just want to ask you really quickly about the in the upcoming film we we were rebels. How do you feel about. Have you seen any part of it. Yet director came to me with the idea of doing good. I said look. I mean best. Yemen is going to be your baby. Want to influence. You wanna be the guy telling you what you need to do. Because a lot of people thought that somehow a we would we would control what was happening and i. I didn't want it to be. I wanted to be an outsider. Looking in basically. I said but really the story of irs. This universal is that we start off being rebels but we ended up as another just another corporation. Said that arch is interesting to me because a lot of people are gonna go through that and it's an art that's interesting for people to avoid you know so. Iran has a lot of lessons within it. So make sure that. That's what's in the story because that's really where the story is. So you have to think story. You have to think what's going to hold the attention of people whereas the garlic milkshake. I waiting to see how this ends up but it was fun to see a lot of the acts and what they had to say was fun for me. I hope we get to see it. We can't wait to see it. Thank you so much for your time. So the book is out now. It's two steps forward. One step back my life in the music business. Miles aac copeland the third. The ace stands for acts by the way. Do your brothers have other cool. Middle names ax is a great middle name. Actually my oldest son is miles. Axe copeland a fourth nice. My youngest son is named his action pakistan. Emerson soy so. Yeah acts seems to be the name that does sort of play with the family you know and here. I am mccaslin. Yeah we have battleaxes on the wall. Thank you so much for your time. It was a fun. Read really Both hollering.

charlotte caffey bengals Yemen irs Miles aac copeland Iran Axe copeland mccaslin Emerson pakistan
"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

05:18 min | 2 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"Appeal to me. And i figured i wasn't so crazy that if it appealed to me i might appeal to others as well but i did. It caused a you know. A bit of a furor within the belly dance community because they here's this man coming in from the outside telling you know saying who's a superstar star not and then all the dancers were into superstars became very successful ended up become major teachers in in that world. I wanted to go back to you. Touched on you know a good song when you hear it. One of the stories in the book is about the recording of mercury following sting's album where you didn't hear a single at all and so what is it about the song and it seemed like sting was happy with. I mean you told them what what you needed to tell him but was at the beginning of the end with your relationship with sting thing was always somebody that wanted to hear the truth but i think in the beginning. He really wrote very catchy songs. But i think he probably got a little bored with them so the formula bursts bursts course middleweight verse cars and sort of the standard formula and that album. He got two point where he was the. The chorus was not coming in where i expected it to and i told him so he agreed with me but he said i like the way it sounds. You know i'll stick with it. And i'll pay the price if it doesn't work and then i talked to the producer. Who agreed with me but said it wasn't his role to tell sting how to write a song and i said yeah but the producer. That's exactly what you're supposed to do. Well i made sting agreed that we would change producers on the next record which we did so i know i don't think that any effect on a relationship but it was really a matter of distinct saying like that hits and we and we did on the next record you know. He went back to writing songs with or more traditional verse chorus. And then after i stopped being manager he kind of reverted back to verse. Verse verse so the chorus didn't really happen. Were exposed to. And of course he didn't have any hits that ever appeal to you to be a producer or someone effectively was for many of the acts although i never took credit for it but i did influence in how the records are made or i chose songs and said this is the single or whatever and a lot of ways i was the producer the manager and a lot of ways is a producer or can be. It's not just the business managers are business. People do the contract. Some are creative some get involved in the imagery and all sorts of things. I always found the imagery. And how you sell it. Marketing marketing merchandising Blow goes also the sort of interesting aspects of what's necessary to work. I was lucky was staying in that. Most of the songs he wrote were hits off the back of writing great songs which was not the case with my earlier. Bands wishbone terance. I mean they were great players but they were not brilliant at righty hit singles. There's a phrase in the book that you mentioned con that you mentioned a couple times. It's called you say it's a garlic milkshake. And he didn't really define it in the book..

sting wishbone terance
"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

03:39 min | 2 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"Story. And that sorta of in that you reinvent yourself after irs records. I'm leaving records. And if i told you i'm gonna get into billy dancing. I don't think you probably would have believed that. Well i think it really was is sprung from the desert rose success the fact that we had an arab artist on dueted with staying a lot of arab artists. I guess they had heard that. I grew up limit least and could get by with arabic. The i started getting calls from big stars in the middle east saying well. Would you be interested in my records in america so i put a few out and then we were curious because they were actually selling and we wanted well. Who's buying well. It wasn't arabs. 'cause they were getting downloading it off the internet so he was american women who are into belly dancing and i thought well there's an interesting concept american women who have nothing to do with the middle east or belly dancing route who knew that this existed and i thought well if i created a show thinking of river dance which was very successful selling irish music which was not hit. You know top forty music but it was a very successful show. So i thought well if i could create a a river dance style. Show with belly dancers. Maybe that would help me sell music and that was really. The germination of the belly dance superstars who ended up doing eight hundred shows and twenty three countries around the world or something so it was successful and a lot of ways but never a successful enough to really bill. What i wanted so we finally gave it up but finally enough. It led to pentagon calling me because became the de facto anglo who anything about arabic music in america. So in the pentagon we're thinking about do we win out so minds in the middle east you know after invading iraq turns out i was the only guy could call. That could help him. So i was asked to go and tell the pentagon what to do so i became an adviser to the pentagon. What migrate moments of achievement. I would guess but who would have thought or belly dancers. The pentagon is that something you're down with. The proud of the funny thing was the. My father had a hand in putting saddam hussein in power in the first place so i the other day the podcast with tori clarke. Who was the deputy secretary of defense. Donald rumsfeld and i reminded her. I said well you know you invited me to the pentagon well. Did you know that my father had actually put saddam hussein in power. She said well we did actually know that. So but anyway i was. I went to the pentagon. And i told them what to do. Not that they paid any attention to what i said was. I don't think any of them had a clue but still it was. It was fun but there were good people at the pentagon. I must have i. I was kind of impressed with the fact that they wanted to do something. Good and tori clarke later came through. She got me a pbs special on arabic music and we succeeded in one of the things that i pitched to. The pentagon aljazeera bought this documentary. We made about americans working with arab music musicians and proving that really under under the skin..

pentagon billy dancing middle east irs tori clarke america saddam hussein iraq Donald rumsfeld
"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

03:57 min | 2 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"Come back to my office and say well. Here's what warner brothers have said. They say whatever miles offers. You will double it at that. I knew that was it. And so i i looked at the manager and the the lawyer said. Here's what i suggest. Get out of my office. Go straight through warner brothers. Signed that deal is the best deal acura saw and of course they did and of course it was the best deal. But you're right. Rem was an anomaly for irs. They were not particularly Outrageous or they were already at all. They didn't even want to be their own videos. They just believed in what they were doing. And they just kept at it and live within their means and they grew and grew and grew and grew. And i don't know that it's a formula that other bands immediately copy. But it definitely worked. And i say in the book those to them that they were the one band that really survived the whole irs period. You know and did did everything right. I mean go-goes broke up on a third album find cannibals on the second album while bhutto on the second album most never made it beyond the first album. Here i was. Resigning goes and agreeing to extend give them higher royalty and more money in return for a couple of records at the end of the deal. Of course they broke up on the third record. So i never got what i did for. Rem with rem and squeeze. who you. i compare them to because they both were not so interested in the image. Rem when huge. And in my mind i mean squeeze obviously very successful one of my personal favorite bands. But what do you see as the difference. I am just curious. Rem where we're actually similar in the idea that they didn't really want to play the game of the music business joel holland however i mean the differences. The squeezed was really a two headed animal. Basically you know jewels on one side and kristen glenn on the kristen glen would have been more in the in the vein of of Rem same with pat mcdonald. And tim buck three. You know there were there were a lot of. Irs acts were corky enough who did not want to play the game..

warner brothers Rem acura irs bhutto joel holland kristen glenn kristen glen pat mcdonald tim buck corky Irs
"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

01:42 min | 2 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"Wild squeeze was always difficult to make them do something that would seem to be contrived and i think they ended up being a lot bigger on the radio but it was something where radio would play their songs over a long period of time but not in a concentrated amount which would have been the number one singles or something but they did get to be. They had a couple of number two singles in england. They get to be pretty big worldwide and were successful. But i think with the police. There were several elements that made it really successful one. There are three guys so it was cheap to they. Were prepared to do whatever it took. They were positive now. So you can throw out some nutty idea. And they were predisposed to say well. Why not. let's do it. They would reject them every now and then but they were open to ideas. And i think that's an important for manager like me. You know where. I like to think of myself as an idea person you throw out an idea if it's always rejected or it's always second. Guess they're all god. What am i gonna thank. Oh by. i shouldn't do that pretty soon. You stop coming up with idea. So i always did better with those people that would go with some of the ideas. The police were certainly a perfect example. And of course she was home. The go goes where a great example of a group which had all the gimmicks you could possibly want five girls doing their own songs and everything. It seemed like social obvious winning formula yet. That's what got them rejected by every record company one only one that would sign so that's always been something that's i always say is important in one of the points in the book is that look acts may come along and say look. It's all about the music man. And i would say. Well no. it's not about the as its first about getting noticed because there's nobody notices you never gonna hear your music so music only important as number two..

england
"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

04:40 min | 2 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"Called squeeze are also very young. They were all like seventeen. Eighteen years old. I was started work with all the punt groups. Even the even the sex missiles. Before i knew it i was just sort of at the center of the punk world. It was a pretty exciting time. So even though i was written off by the mainstream the press decided i was some sort of span. Golly of this new punk this outrageous puck movement and when i book the sex pistols in into holland and actually went with. That made me acceptable to all the punks billy idol and all these people began to think. Well this guy must be okay. He's working with the sex pistols. I soon became the one of the the big players in the punk movement in england story about this pistol in malcolm mclaren abouna discovering that. They didn't necessarily wanna play well. He didn't want him to play. They wanted to play the story. Is i recount in. The book was that. I kept reading in the newspapers. That you know no one would book the sex pistols because they were so and i thought well that's a little weird people like notoriety and so I called up some promoters. That i knew and i said would you book the sex pistols. So they said well sure so. I'd go upstairs. Malcolm an office above me and the in a in a crappy office building in the center of london and i'd go upstairs say mountain. Good news i. I found some show so the sex pistols. You know he'd give me some excuse sister why he couldn't do them though i'd go downstairs and i call it promoters said we'll stay workless spines new and so i i go back upstairs and say well. I managed to change the dates this acute times and finally he starts yelling at me. Why don't you get it. I get more press saying the sex pistols can't get a gig they can and if you get gigs. You're ruining my whole rap. Get outta my office. At that moment. I realized what he was all about. He was all about getting depressed. And as i left i said i did get an offer to do a show in holland and case you're ever interested and at that moment he sort of stopped. Oh alan we can do holid- that's when i went to holland. But basically he was all about. You know notoriety. You know getting noticed. Whereas when i went to the band made it was pretty obvious to me. They liked you know. Get on stage. Play to people and be a band and they wanted to do gates. They wanted to play when we go back to squeeze firm in it in the book. The feeling we've got his. You remained close to djilas holland. But not so much with differed until yeah. I think squeeze was very difficult because they transition group i. I signed them when i was still working with. The you know the climax blues band and wishbone ash and curved air and all that he had they were all sixteen and seventeen year old. They were more like the beatles you know they were singing love songs a good solid pop songs but the group was really it was jewish. Hollander was into boogie. Woogie and fun and he was just a good character. Chris and glan who are kind of very arty and into music and mia was kind of hard to get to know them then. We brought in a drummer who was bigger than all of them put together..

malcolm mclaren abouna holland billy idol Malcolm england djilas holland london alan gates glan beatles Hollander Chris mia
"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

03:20 min | 2 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"One of my dax was lou reed and apparently knew nothing about the tour because he he had left the agency that i've made the deal with as the day was approaching that he was supposed to join the tour which was a good idea. Basically that you know put all these headliner acts on. And i have my acts on it as well and that would make them more exposed and bigger it was sort of like a lollapalooza or one of these other. Big festival towards. Is it happening today. But lou wasn't going to show up. Well i finally found him in a hotel room in australia or new zealand or somewhere. And i talked about it in the book. I finally got through to his room and his assistant answered the phone. And i said well i need to know and louis coming. The assistant said well. Louis not doing it tour. We don't really think about it tour. And he's in the bathroom and now he can't come to the phone that i said well i'll wait and they said well might be a long wait. So what are you talking about. Well he's been in there three days and i don't see him coming out anytime soon. At that point i knew the tour was in big trouble. So lou never showed up the promoters hit me. Of course i had to scamper around finds a replacement which contained it. Turner did which was a great show but of course it cost a pretty penny and i ended up bankrupt just on the verge of bankrupt and lost everything all the bands me off i had the more money and i was basically back down to zero where actually less than zero because i a lot of people money it was a great lesson in what goes up can go down and it's not that difficult to go down. I guess this was one of the lessons. You didn't give up. I mean. I'm sure there are other options. I'm sure your dad might have said okay. You gave this a try. We've got something for you..

lou reed lou new zealand australia louis Louis Turner
"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

04:40 min | 2 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"I mean you think we're after you graduate from college. It was like okay. What now you happen to to see some bands can kind of touch on like at the start of your career. How are you kind of fell into it. Well yeah i was again one of those accidents really. I mean a british i was in beirut doing my ma degree at the american university. You know thinking. I would go into some sort of middle east business. I didn't really know what. But you know. I figured well you know i'll get an mba. Degree and british group comes through lebanon to play in them in In the summer which the some promoter decided to bring a british group were they were in a particularly big group or anything recall. Rupert's people that promoter approached me to help out on communicating with the band and putting a show together and all this sort of thing. So i met the group and helped them out of some scrapes because the promoter was bit flaky and then i graduated and went to america thinking. I would get drafted which i did. Actually the group came to see me in. London said well. We want you to be our manager. And i'm thinking what are you talking about. I don't know anything about the music business. I'm billy bay. Beirut for the last god knows how many years what do i know about music let alone the music business and they said. Yeah but you got a good attitude. It was like one of those moments. Where i said i got drafted. I reported for duty and got rejected higher arches so unfortunately i never did know about bone spurs. I had a lot of friends who are thinking about everything they could to figure ways to get out of the army. But i figured what the hell a brother ian was already in vietnam and i figured it was an experience that i'd have to go through and so i reported for duty like good american but i got rejected so i then went back to london and the group candidacy me said okay bear manager and i thought well what the hell my father was a bit crazy but you know he said well that that's what you wanna do. I started learning about the business probably made a lot of mistakes which was part of the game. And that's how. I got into just by fluke had was supportive because he didn't want you to be cia government or government or any to go into the cia because it had changed so much from the days that he had been in there where it was really an intellectual organization where you really wanted to know what's going on in the world during the at phnom it became operational where they were busy getting up to things. They probably shouldn't have thought that that the people that were coming into the agency were not the kind of people that i would enjoy working with so he talked me out of going in the cia. But he didn't talk me into what going what i should go into. Which was kind of a problem was like well. What am i gonna do. So i was sort of loose ends which i guess is why i you know when when this group is said to me. Well be our manager thought. Well what the hell. I got nothing else to do. And he he thought i should probably get a real job first and then go and start by on business. But i thought well you know at least i know i like music. What the hell and there i was i was in the music business..

billy bay american university beirut Rupert lebanon middle east cia government Beirut London america cia ian vietnam army london phnom
"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

04:32 min | 2 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"A memoir. I thought well what the hell. What else am i gonna do. So i started writing but like the title says two steps soared. One step back. It does go into the you know the reality that i don't care how smart you are. How successful you are. You're gonna have a misstep every now and then and that's your step backward you know but just keep going forward and somehow you'll you'll get there in the end. I made a point of giving lessons in that. Were ones that. I learned from mistakes just as much as i. Learn from successes. Would you ever consider. Because i found that every chapter could have been a book in itself or every few chapters could have been has its own story but growing up in the middle east and your family. Would you ever write a book solely about your experience as a child or youth growing up in the middle east with your parents and specifically what they did. Because you've mentioned it. Maybe i should. I hadn't really you know i. You know like. I was saying i i didn't really conway writing a book. I mean you know you have to sit down at it's kinda tedious but writing about oneself. You know one of the things i did do. I read my brother's book. You know and i read all the other books were written about the police and andy summers book and things book and a lot of other people who wrote about the various bands or iras records of the go-goes whatever and one of the things i realized was that a lot of people made stuff up or got things wrong. You know so. I decided that. I needed to at least correct some of the mistakes or you know so. I made a point of calling up. People that i hadn't talked to in years. You know and decide. Look here's what. I remember what you remember you know and so i talked to all the people and and i think you know i was pretty accurate but going back to the beginning. Part of the problem was you know. I mean i've been into business fifty years you know. What do you put in what you leave out. What's going to bore people. Maybe growing up in the middle east would have been appealing to certain a group of people but probably not others. I don't know. I kinda like condensed it to degree which i thought would be a good cross section of you know what i did and what i learned. Basically you're looking for the mainstream hit. You're doing the things that seemed to attract a wider net for right now before you niche it up. You know one of the things that that kind of scared me about writing it..

middle east andy summers conway
"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

05:02 min | 2 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"Yes it is. It's always a great day on the web differences. Make podcasts but this is really nice. Because we're gonna talk to the architect of our musical. Dna in a way this is miles. Copeland president of irs records just guy who recognizes talents. Miles copeland was such an enormous piece of our youth are growing up as said he's in our dna not literally figuratively that. We really were very excited about talking to him about that. You know some of our favorite artist and his story itself is so meeting by the way yeah manager of a band called the police. I don't know if you familiar with this band but This was the band took him into the stratosphere. And it was because of the police that we got into. Irs records and we got squeezed and we got rem and we got to go goes in the bengals and all these amazing dan's that we love so much so before we get into the book. Holly tell people about youtube and where we are on. What difference as a make you can find us on youtube. At what difference does it make podcast subscribe. We're very excited for you to see all that we put out there. We do lots of outtakes from our chats and hopefully things that you'll find it interesting as we do. Check it out on youtube spoiler alert. Some of the things we talked about with miles will not be on this podcast but they will be on the youtube page. Subscribe to our podcast. Subscribe to youtube. Let's talk with miles copeland. His book is two steps forward. One step back. I live in the music business on the. What differences make podcast. Hey right miles copeland happening we are. Are you in your castle. is this a catha wherein i am in a castle. That's exactly where i am. And the name of this castle is motto. Watch what okay. That's how you pronounce. We we reading about it because this is apparently it comes from the latin mood autumn which means wall. It used to be a roman camp two thousand years ago. We should on no story behind our homes and it's a songwriting camp. Well now we do songwriting. We do painting. We do Book writing scriptwriting photography But yeah it's become quite well known as a songwriting center because we did a deal with as cap now..

Miles copeland youtube Copeland irs miles copeland bengals Irs Holly dan copeland
Alan Turing: Thinker Ahead of His Time

The Science Show

02:34 min | 5 months ago

Alan Turing: Thinker Ahead of His Time

"Alan turing one of the more original scientific brains of the twentieth century. Sheeran change the world. There are several sides to the story of exactly how he changed. The welder insiders the cobra. King bletchley park the impacts. You head on the wall. The other side of it is what feels most relevant to us today. Cheering invented the modern computer. Teach orange the lives of every one of us who whose work all play involved with computers. Jack copeland founder of the alan turing online archive. An eccentric englishman. Tragic figure and one of the top scientific brains of all time because he influenced so many different areas. According to the science journal nature. The scope of cheering is a chievements is extraordinary. Mathematicians will honor the man who cracked david hilbert decision problem and historians will remember him. As the man who broke. Nazi germany's a 'nigma code and help to shorten the second world. War engineers will hell the founder of the digital age artificial intelligence. Biologists will pay homage to the theory rhetorician of morphou genesis and physicists. Were raise a glass to the pioneer of non linear dynamics philosophers. Meanwhile a likely to continue to frown over his one line. As on the limits of reason and intuition if a machine is expected to infallible it cannot also be intelligent. He said in a nineteen forty seven talk to the london mathematical society. The biography alan turing. The 'nigma by andrew hodges was probably the first major work to bring this extraordinary. Scientists academic strengths and personal foibles to a general audience. Dr hodges a fellow in mathematics at oxford university he had very isolated sort of boyhood and his parents were often india. Father was an official in indian civil service. Very middle class. Sort of life sent off to foster parents. Prep school this public school. She wasn't his thing at all but then when he was sixteen someone broke into his world is design and now the boy called christopher volka and they share this great interest in science fundamental science thinking about things scientifically

King Bletchley Park Alan Turing Jack Copeland Alan Turing Online Archive David Hilbert Sheeran Science Journal London Mathematical Society Andrew Hodges Dr Hodges Germany Oxford University Prep School India Christopher Volka
pisode #35  Le voyage initiatique de la maternit et parentalit avec Bianca Thuot - burst 3

Conversations pour Elle, partages de sagesse féminine

05:02 min | 8 months ago

pisode #35 Le voyage initiatique de la maternit et parentalit avec Bianca Thuot - burst 3

"With us on the lobster savvas zone. The was pm almost young. Duncairn unix daniels on punk combined and his sons pissy ticket shows kush toll bagel Fox replays on. He added shushma There mickey soc nine now was super allows. this was so in motion. And i'm on the the kiss jan mumbo from the in toss financial concerns me yet put down stairs committee. All the polar dogs s become should body police secret dossiers even modern jeep indefensibly young put on the hostile metro area. Don't kill lou wop are highly. Listen you can lose moisture inch normal analysis To new to new number. don't care. Skiing mongrel geneticists tizzy komo privacy solutions. More lab senior key can you. He ended up. Don't do these emotion. Keith's manifests komo. Hover says it said burial laps yemen ad. Foam kiss turned ma on the. Da shows moldova's young till noon. We'll see a pattern allergy. Lucy bacall tunnels on a cd-rom metal set. Espy la pursue clash. Pf of wa. Who passer washington komo On a duty newly well spa style Example second level year until voc grew in neon new palette bent medlock A sorta p pallet fantasy. Not man and knock them up. You can see on this deserve. Speak here look trap. Kalani fungus kong secure. This is super sandy Tom put the point. Back by the copa habita- homes bhaskar bessemer dot. There are five are were doto the question and data sonate signed on as all put dorothy house. Ski faker bail you. Devolve year this town under file a cuisine and mia to new white house signed on it cuts the and bounce kotova. You're just took on paschi spouse wall septum farm. So michael community agreement signed docile cume of peer pundit poor pe- can you dr pair basketball dominate bonanno cast cylinder labus much. Craig glossy found league dick's p male fiscal sur. Five are tom of walk. It's just a kick acre cuisine. Could to serve democra- chris european malcolm dot com massacre And super attack my bhakta. The league belle pound. I love the minds found evil just wonderful spots if oh nouveau producer. Spirit said whenever say formats if calmly copeland apple dies on me the a mark. I'm so the fam- keep rooster while dope pass on liz off downscale. Vp conquer a nozzle bikes hotter yet. Dope person give the shows but panay ms similar p dishes the savasta savage Plant the kootenai against the for his social museum nesper. Pacifica defy fan cone factory the global and our cats in addition the performance. And the rest. Of the sixes. Not after the war. Just explain me them jobs. We have come up with a quantum abi of board. don't just get dot com. Donald took sa- salad come Less bengals facilitator. Some mr scuola. Paul son vie to see up. You don't don't the caribbean on the wii sipple. Total if die but access simba's school for dawn that built

Shushma Mickey Soc Jan Mumbo Lou Wop Lucy Bacall Espy La Sandy Tom Dorothy House Komo Daniels Labus Craig Glossy Moldova FOX Chris European Malcolm Skiing Keith Allergy WA Bonanno
"copeland" Discussed on Apocalypse...Now?

Apocalypse...Now?

04:55 min | 8 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on Apocalypse...Now?

"You're <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> ready so head <Speech_Female> over to audible. <Speech_Female> Trial dot <Speech_Music_Female> com slash. <Speech_Music_Female> Apo <Speech_Music_Female> c. a. <Speech_Music_Female> l. y. <Speech_Music_Female> p. s. e. <Speech_Music_Female> p. o. <Speech_Music_Female> d. c. <Speech_Music_Female> a. s. T. <Speech_Female> for your free <Speech_Female> thirty day trial <Speech_Female> of audible <Speech_Female> and you won't regret it. <Speech_Female> Thank you jedi. <Speech_Female> I can't wait to <Speech_Female> watch the premiere of quarantine <Speech_Female> dream on <Speech_Female> instagram. <Speech_Female> I will have that <Speech_Female> embedded <Speech_Female> in the show notes <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Female> it premiers on february <Speech_Music_Female> eighteenth <Speech_Female> and make <Speech_Female> sure you <Speech_Female> follow quarantine <Speech_Female> dream tv on <Speech_Female> instagram. Follow <Speech_Female> jetty on instagram <Speech_Female> at jazzy <Speech_Female> jeff. And <Speech_Female> thank you. <Speech_Female> If you've supported <Speech_Female> me on patriot <Speech_Female> like we said in the conversation. <Speech_Female> You <Speech_Female> are <SpeakerChange> the special <Speech_Female> sauce. <Speech_Female> I joke around <Speech_Female> and say let's keep this <Speech_Female> train going but <Speech_Female> god damn it. I'm serious <Speech_Female> without <Speech_Female> support from patrons. <Speech_Female> I wouldn't <Speech_Female> be able to make this content <Speech_Female> for you regularly <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> i did drop some <Speech_Female> bonus content <Speech_Female> all my patriot last <Speech_Female> week for my <Speech_Female> film producer <Speech_Female> tears. I <Speech_Female> have shared <Speech_Female> a short film. That <Speech_Female> i've been working on over the <Speech_Female> past few months. <Speech_Female> I am currently <Speech_Female> submitting it to film <Speech_Female> festivals. But <Speech_Female> if you join <Speech_Female> as a film producer <Speech_Female> you get to see <Speech_Female> it before anyone else <Speech_Female> so go to <Speech_Female> patriotdepot. Dot com <Speech_Female> slash. Joanna <Speech_Female> t supporting <Speech_Female> the own patriotic <Speech_Female> helps me make <Speech_Female> this show possible. <Speech_Female> So thank you <Speech_Female> to all of my patrons <Speech_Female> your contribution <Speech_Female> means so <Speech_Female> much to me. And <Speech_Female> i will never forget <Speech_Female> your support. <Speech_Female> Find me at <Speech_Female> john van. Fine dot <Speech_Female> com. Follow me on <Speech_Female> instagram. At <Speech_Female> j o pin cushion. <Speech_Female>

"copeland" Discussed on Apocalypse...Now?

Apocalypse...Now?

07:34 min | 8 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on Apocalypse...Now?

"Get out of this house. Hi joanna van fine actor. Comedian podcast filmmaker. You can join me on patriotic at patriotair dot com slash. Joon of et and also. Send me a tip on ben. Moa at j. o. Pincushions and don't forget to follow me on instagram. At j o pin cushion. Find your next favorite podcasts. At the apocalypse podcast network goto apocalypse. Podcast network dot com sign up for our email list. Get the latest episodes directly to your inbox and the link is in our show notes. We are also going to start doing some live. Private zoom events like dance parties to accompany our lady gaga themed podcast entitled chromatic has And the only way to get the invite linked to these dance. Parties is by subscribing to our mailing list. So go down to the show notes. Click that link sign up and you're said we also have a discord. you can join that server. The link is in the show notes as well and the network of course we talk about. It has a twitch channel. Follow it at apocalypse podcast network. I'm working on a brand new podcast. I just mentioned briefly called chromatic. Cast with my friend callie tropoje's and it premiered last friday and it was really fun. We streamed it on the facebook and we streamed it on twitch. It was great. We also had a v. h. smash episode on tuesday. We talked about the film little monsters. So if you want to see what i look like and you wanna see all the other good looking people in the apocalypse podcast network. Make sure you follow that twitch channel and this week the voicemail question. I'm keeping it the same. Have you been vaccinated. I wanna hear from you. How do you feel you have a new arm. Let me know nine. Two zero four seven four six seven. Six three let. Everyone know how happy you are. What are you going to do next after your vaccinated. I apologize that this episode is a tad tardy my students that teach our on winter break and i'm very thankful for that because i am running behind a lot of work that i need to trying to get a lot done not getting it all done but hopefully i have lists and i'm checking them off and hopefully we'll get more stuff done. I am also dealing with some health issues. Not corona virus related But i'm not a good patient. I'm miserable. I don't like to get sick. That's why eat well and exercise. Getting sick is not i. If you listen to the show you know he pandemics Very very Scared of being sick so I'm dealing with that. I'm currently on steroids. I i hate to medicine. I don't mean that but It's knocking the wind out of me. Kind of making me a little bit slower than normal. And thank you for your patience. And now i have three podcasts at. I'm doing in the middle of taking steroids. Getting blood work done I'll keep you posted. But i'm dealing with a lot. I also did. My taxes did my taxes. Which means it's been a year. Because i just did my taxes right before everything. Locked down in twenty twenty Another like looking back at your expenses from january. Twenty twenty to make you miss. You know simple things like meeting your friends at a diner and a manhattan Shit i miss spending one hundred dollars a month to rent a rehearsal space so i can interview people for this show. Yeah yeah that's right. I spend money on this podcast. Please pay dot com slash. Unlv t- Yes so i'm responsible with money. It's true i understand it. I'm very cautious I over save. But i don't make a a huge amount of income and it's stressful to see all the money that i'm spending an order to achieve all the goals that i have because they say you need to spend it to make it right We'll i need things like clothes. And i'm sure we're all feeling this. I need life experiences. And i haven't gone on a legitimate vacation in like seven or eight years maybe even longer than that. I've been with my boyfriend for seven years and we've never on vacation so i'm realizing things that i need to do to take care of myself But i can't reach those goals Yet and we're all feeling this collective cabin fever aren't we. I know what you're thinking. How did it become a year. Am i wasting my hot ears. Listen to me as as just you and me talking right now. We have been held back goon for years numerous times and we're sick of it. We're ready to grow. Were ready to become the people we were meant to be. We just constantly feel like we're being held back so if you're frustrated with being inside all the time and being unsure of what the future holds you are not alone. I might even create another quarantine brain episode With another guided meditations. It's been a year. I've been feeling the need to take things a little slower. So i encourage you to give yourself that break and take things a little slower. And i'm sure we're all feeling quarantine brain but this week. Our guest took that quarantine lockdown stress and turned it into a cuaron dream. Jetty copeland is a comedian writer. And all around hilarious woman. I met her while recording and episode. Vh smash and she was so fun. So hilarious. I knew i had to talk to her about the apocalypse on the show and then she dropped a trailer for her new web series. Cuaron dream tv She took her lockdown experience and turned it into art. Which i love to see and let me tell you. The series looks hilarious. I loved it. I reached out to her right away and I know this series is going to be great because jetty is great. So i wanted to talk to her about that and i do so. I talked to jetty about making the web series. Her post pandemic career cuaron dreams and everything like that so get to know the wonderful talented judy copeland. Thank you so much for granted. Talked me as soon as i saw the trailer for quarantine dream. I love that words I got really excited. I was like. I have to talk to about this This awesome. i usually don't start right out the gate with people about what they're doing but like your thing made me so excited i feel like i wanna talk about it right away. No let's let's talk about it. I feel like we're just gonna go into in the world so let's start. Hi yes that's good start positive before we start facing the turmoil that all ya'll corn dream is just like honestly. I went home when things got really bad in new york. I'm from atlanta. So i went back to my parents and i really thought i was maybe died like was the end of the world like i just had this feeling of like you know i just wanted to make something to make people laugh in kind of capture. All the crazy ship happening. And that's warned dream is. I told myself if i survive to make it back to new york. I was gonna make it matter what that's what it you can feel like i. I like to support artists. And i whenever i see people make a web series and i'm like oh that looks fun though looks cool but i saw i really felt the passion behind it and it's got some magic to it. I think and you know with this time. We're all definitely feeling our mortalities. So i guess when we're all scared shitless we make really good stuff. You.

joanna van january seven years tuesday ben. Moa atlanta eight years last friday facebook j o pin cushion judy copeland twitch this week new york cuaron Joon j. o. Pincushions Jetty copeland little monsters instagram
"copeland" Discussed on Apocalypse...Now?

Apocalypse...Now?

02:25 min | 8 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on Apocalypse...Now?

"This podcast is supported by members of my patriotic head over to patriotic dot com slash joanna t- and get early access to commercial free episodes of apocalypse now for five dollars a month. These commercial free episodes have extended interviews and i dropped. Bonus content monthly learn more at patriae on dot com slash joanna. Dt that's p. A. t. r. e. o. n. Dot com backslash j. o. a. n. n. a. v. t. Thanks are you thinking about. Starting a podcast. You're going to need podcast hosting like a website. Your episodes need to be hosted somewhere so they can be distributed onto your favorite podcast platforms. So why pay for hosting when you can use free sites like anchor. Well blueberry has lots of great features you get unlimited downloads on your content. Content is optimized for apple and every other podcasting platform blueberry validates. All of your media to make sure your episodes will play on all of the podcast platforms you want and you get premium podcast. Statistics which is really a five dollar a month value. Absolutely free and what i like. Most about blueberry hosting is the free technical support by email phone or zoom. That's right they'll set aside time to talk to you face to face. If you have any problems with your show and now you can get your first month of hosting for free when you use the code apocalypse. Podcast at checkout. That's four episodes. If you plan on creating a weekly podcast look hosting members. Get a customizable audio player. Your own podcast webpage at blueberry dot com and even supports scheduling your episode. If you opt for a wordpress site with your hosting you have complete control of your content and you own it you can upload your episodes directly from your wordpress site you can take advantage of. Seo on your website your rss feed along to that website and all of your podcast links point directly back to your website and not to mention that you can take advantage of all of those wordpress plug ins the platform has to offer. Now start podcasting the right way with blueberry go to blueberry dot com that's b. l..

With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 9 months ago

With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

"Virus. Pandemic vaccines will have to be distributed around the world. For most countries. The vaccines available in the U. S right now are simply too expensive and too difficult to transport as NPR's Joe Parker reports that is making vaccines made in Russia and China look attractive. There's a good reason China could play a key role in ending the global Corona virus pandemic. China has an enormous vaccine production capacity. Deborah Seligson is a China watcher at Villanova University. That enormous capacity is at least in part because China is an enormous country. And since public health measures have largely kept the virus in check in China, that means some of that capacity can be used to send vaccines around the world. There are going to be huge advantages to these Chinese vaccines once they're, you know, fully tested, and if they turn out to be a fact, if for one thing they don't require special refrigeration, and for another, they'll be cheap. But there's still that question of if they turn out to be effective. We just haven't seen the full trial results published yet. Abigail Copeland is on the faculty of Vassar College. She keeps her eye on Chinese biotech companies. The technology behind the two leading Chinese vaccines is decades old. It's an approach that was used successfully in the 19 fifties to make a polio vaccine. It involves growing the virus in a lab than in activating it with a chemical like formaldehyde and using that in a vaccine there, inactivated viral vaccine is based on research that they had conducted to develop a vaccine for stars and so that actually gave them a head start. SARS was a deadly outbreak in the early two thousands in China. Caused by a close relative of the covert 19 corona virus, But the virus causing stars disappeared so that vaccine got shelved. Hopeless. He's nothing nefarious about the delays and learning the results of trials of the Chinese vaccines. Since there's very little virus circulating in China to test their vaccine, the Chinese have had to turn to countries like Brazil, Indonesia and Turkey. And so when you're running that many trials internationally, it does take a lot of time to actually analyze that trial data. What's more, the results that have come out on how well the vaccine works have varied widely from 52 close to 90%. Without definitive results showing a vaccine works. Why have apparently more than a dozen countries around the world signed deals to get one of these vaccines? It's a measure of how desperate countries feel and how much uncertainty they face. J. Stephen Morrison is director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Most countries they're not throwing themselves hook line and sinker into partnerships with the with the Chinese. That's because there are other low cost alternatives. A vaccine. Made by Oxford University and AstraZeneca's also racking up lots of international customers, and it has been given some form of regulatory go ahead in several countries, including India. That country is also likely to have a vaccine candidate that will be inexpensive and widely available. But Judith Twigg says there's already another major entrant into the international vaccine arena. Back on August 11th the Russian government with great stand, Fehr announced the first in the world registration of a vaccine against Cove It twig is at Virginia Commonwealth University, and she follows Russian health policy closely. The Russian vaccine is what's known as a viral vector vaccine somewhat newer technology than the two leading Chinese vaccines. The Russians chose Sputnik V is the name for their vaccine. Tweak says They did that for a reason. They're very deliberately invoking imagery of Russia re emerging is great power status. We're back. We're at the scientific and technological top of the world, and we're ready to start sharing our technology with everyone. The problem there is that they had not only barely Started phase three clinical trials, They had barely started ramping up productions that was back in August. Twigg says production has ramped up and Russia now claims its vaccine is more than 90% effective, although data for that claim haven't been published yet for other scientists to scrutinize Several countries are ready to try the vaccine, including Argentina, Mexico and India. One thing is clear the world is going to need a number of vaccines to work if the global pandemic is really going to be brought under control. Joe

China Joe Parker Deborah Seligson Abigail Copeland Villanova University Vassar College NPR J. Stephen Morrison Global Health Policy Center Russia U. Polio Sars Judith Twigg International Vaccine Arena Russian Government Center For Strategic And Inter Indonesia Brazil
With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

All Things Considered

02:57 min | 9 months ago

With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

"Thank you. And the Corona virus. Pandemic vaccines will have to be distributed around the world. For most countries. The vaccines available in the U. S right now are simply too expensive and too difficult to transport. As NPR's Joe Packer reports that is making vaccines made in Russia and China look attractive. There's a good reason China could play a key role in ending the global Corona virus pandemic. China has an enormous vaccine production capacity. Deborah Seligson is a China watcher at Villanova University. That enormous capacity is at least in part because China is an enormous country, And since public health measures have largely kept the virus in check in China, that means some of that capacity can be used to send vaccines around the world. There are going to be huge advantages to these Chinese vaccines once they're, you know, fully tested, and if they turn out to be If active for one thing, they don't require special refrigeration, and for another, they'll be cheap. But there's still that question of if they turn out to be effective. We just haven't seen the full trial results published yet. Abigail Copeland is on the faculty of Vassar College. She keeps her eye on Chinese biotech companies. The technology behind the two leading Chinese vaccines is decades old. It's an approach that was used successfully in the 19 fifties to make a polio vaccine. It involves growing the virus in a lab than in activating it with a chemical like formaldehyde and using that in a vaccine there, inactivated viral vaccine is based on research that they had conducted to develop a vaccine for SARS. So that actually gave them a head start. SARS was a deadly outbreak in the early two thousands in China caused by a close relative of the covert 19 corona virus, But the virus causing stars disappeared so that vaccine got shelved. Copeland sees nothing nefarious about the delays and learning the results of trials of the Chinese vaccines. Since there's very little virus circulating in China to test their vaccine, the Chinese have had to turn to countries like Brazil, Indonesia and Turkey. And so when you're running that many trials internationally, it does take a lot of time to actually analyze that trial data. What's more, the results that have come out on how well the vaccine works have varied widely from 52 close to 90%. Without definitive results showing a vaccine works. Why have apparently more than a dozen countries around the world signed deals to get one of these vaccines? It's a measure of how desperate countries feel and how much uncertainty they face. J. Stephen Morrison is director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Most countries they're not throwing themselves hook line and sinker into partnerships with the With the Chinese. That's because there are other low cost alternatives of vaccine made by Oxford University and AstraZeneca is also racking up lots of international customers, and it has been given some form of regulatory go ahead in

China Joe Packer Deborah Seligson Abigail Copeland Villanova University Sars NPR U. Vassar College Russia Polio Copeland J. Stephen Morrison Global Health Policy Center Indonesia Brazil Turkey Center For Strategic And Inter Oxford University
"copeland" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:21 min | 10 months ago

"copeland" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Shot, Copeland. Merry Christmas. Yeah, Yeah. E Do you think of any why are you Why are you playing this song? You see, it's very cold, and it's kind of take a sleigh ride. I'm gonna beat the Huskies to pull the slave because really good in the snow like this, You know, that's that's what I understand anyway, along Alaska's so it's lovely weather for a sleigh ride together with you R B. What if I 0.7 Very Christmas. Merry Christmas. I really feel it. I get into the spirit be 105.7 Indies Christmas station. That's a dream. Maybe past things that close again. Thank you very much. Your passes this way. Hurry. Change me hang up the prizes. Nemazee side effects In this case, it's time me home, some juice and one never green. Hanging in the rafters. Christmas, right? Very WeII. You got a 5.7 eighties Christmases and that's what we need A little Christmas. I think we've got a two and a very cold Christmas little rain. This was snow often on yesterday. And possibly today's So.

Indies Christmas station Huskies Copeland Alaska
Comparison Shopping (MM #3555)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 10 months ago

Comparison Shopping (MM #3555)

"The with kevin mason copeland nineteen has definitely changed the way we're all shopping. Shopping online really isn't an option. It's a necessity because so many people are afraid to go in stores and be honest with you. It's just hard to go shopping in a regular store. These days a lot of people always used online shopping sources as a way to compare and contrast they go online and look for the information and tried to go into a store and buy the actual object but of course not as easy this year there. Too many people who are paid for their opinions to determine what's best. We're finally going to get a ring doorbell camera. But i got to figure out which one i want to buy but finding the right one for me is the key you think that was easy. I couldn't just go to the ring website. And compare the four versions. They've got because they don't want you to look at the older one. That's still available. They want you to only by the hot new fresh expensive one so i had to go online and find other sources finally found the camera. I'm going to buy but it wasn't easy comparison shopping. There's gotta be a better solution. We'll find out when. Kobe defends itself out. What happens in the real world right now. Trying to comparison shopping online still not an easy chore.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Kevin Mason Copeland Kobe
Comparison Shopping (MM #3555)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 10 months ago

Comparison Shopping (MM #3555)

"The with kevin mason copeland nineteen has definitely changed the way we're all shopping. Shopping online really isn't an option. It's a necessity because so many people are afraid to go in stores and be honest with you. It's just hard to go shopping in a regular store. These days a lot of people always used online shopping sources as a way to compare and contrast they go online and look for the information and tried to go into a store and buy the actual object but of course not as easy this year there. Too many people who are paid for their opinions to determine what's best. We're finally going to get a ring doorbell camera. But i got to figure out which one i want to buy but finding the right one for me is the key you think that was easy. I couldn't just go to the ring website. And compare the four versions. They've got because they don't want you to look at the older one. That's still available. They want you to only by the hot new fresh expensive one so i had to go online and find other sources finally found the camera. I'm going to buy but it wasn't easy comparison shopping. There's gotta be a better solution. We'll find out when. Kobe defends itself out. What happens in the real world right now. Trying to comparison shopping online still not an easy chore.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Kevin Mason Copeland Kobe
Chris Doering talks Florida and Georgia

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:59 min | 11 months ago

Chris Doering talks Florida and Georgia

"We welcome in chris during Who gives us her. Quite a look ahead to tomorrow's game. Chris in most years florida hosting lsu of the sec this week. It's been pretty quiet. I am curious as you know those two teams so well especially from florida side What what are they thinking as they get one of their bitter rivals in a bitter rival that they are a prohibitive favorite. It is weird. Isn't it paula. Me and thinking back to win. This game was originally scheduled. I thought most lsu people felt like we're gonna get a chance to play later in the year we'll get healthier. We'll get miles brennan back. We'll be in better position. And i would argue that. They're actually in a worse position now than when they were originally scheduled in october. So i it's kind of a weird dynamic with a lotta florida. Fans looking forward to sec. Championship game next weekend for me. This is all about. Florida has nothing to do with their opponent. Lsu it's about getting right offensively full full-fledged dress rehearsal right costumes everything. Let's go for what we're gonna do next week. I i honestly been kind of disappointed with florida's offensive performance. The last three weeks dating back to the vanderbilt came. Because they just look inconsistent. They look like they walk through a haze periods of time. They look like they're not executing and part of it's their own fault for looking so good against arkansas in the second half and missouri against georgia. We set the bar pretty high for them but focused level has not been there for a full sixty minutes. I want to see all fence. Get back to executing at the level. They were early in the year defensively. Let's get some things shored up. Let's figure out how to keep from giving up these long passing plays. Let's get generate some more pressure on the quarterback. Let's be able to to penetrate and stop the run something. I thought they did. Well against tennessee last week but The thing i'm gonna keep my paul. What are the numbers for. Kyle trask because obviously this is a game as you said against a A bitter rival one. That beat florida by fourteen. Last year florida's got a chance to return the favor but they also have a chance to outduel in back to back weeks what mack jones get did against the very same defense. And don't think that winning the heisman trophy is not something that dan mullen really wants. For contrast and something that will help his program significantly going forward in on that subject. How do you compare. Kyle trash to meg jones. And that's really his main competition now and that we know we know what had next two weeks especially next week but what what what what separates college trask. If anything well first of all. I love both of these guys you know as a former receiver. I love the the accuracy. I love the the the way they re defenses and get the ball to the right guy. On what the defense is dictating But i would go back and say kyle. Traffic is probably had a tougher. Time than what mack jones at and. That's not taking anything away. From mac ios but look at how. Good this offense of line is for alabama. Look at how well they've run the football over the last six games or so look at what. Najji harris has done. Devante smith the reason why iraq jones's numbers look so good on the deep passes over twenty yards and no disrespect. Mac has been really accurate. But when you're throwing a guy that's five yards behind the nearest defender. It makes it a little bit easier. So again i think without the run game florida certainly not able to run the football very well. I don't think they're offensive. Line is the most consistent So i think the load that kyle. Trask bears a little bit harder to to carry them. What jones does now with that being said. Look at the weapons of florida has i. I don't think i've ever been able to say at least in recent years. That florida has more receiving weapons around their quarterback than what alabama does. They've been absolutely loaded but Looking at the way that that not only kind of is utilized trayvon. Grimes justin shorter. All those receivers. Jacob copeland has come on as well Forgetting about tony. Who might be one of the biggest Factor mismatch guys in the sec. Right now but the way. They use the running backs as well. That was something that we saw against georgia so a lot of different guys. That are helping. Kyle trask out. But i think with the advantage that alabama has on the offensive line and that run game to complement the throws down the field. I think kyle may have a little bit more of a impressive Season just because of how much he's had to do himself chris. Couple of games. I want to ask you about one. Particular auburn at mississippi state mississippi state has been up and down we. We've been through that conversation. But i'm really curious about auburn. Because they've had some really good moments this year and then some clunkers especially lately. I know what you're doing here paul. You love it. When i go off on auburn and it's been up and down year with them right early in the season. I was really down on him. I was starting to get A little bit more positive with the way they were able to run the run the football figuring out who they were with take bixby and that offensive line and then they got hit with a bunch of injuries up front Bixby was was banged up.

Florida LSU Mack Jones Kyle Trask SEC Meg Jones Brennan Najji Harris Paula Devante Smith Dan Mullen Kyle Vanderbilt Chris Alabama Georgia Trask Arkansas
Shoppers spent record $5.1 billion on Thanksgiving

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:29 sec | 11 months ago

Shoppers spent record $5.1 billion on Thanksgiving

"Day meant more than eating Turkey for shoppers online shopping surged, according to John Copeland, Adobe vice president of marketing and consumer insights. We saw $5.1 billion spent. That's a new record. 21, a half percent increase over last year. On the same day, Copeland says $71 billion had been spent in the red up to Black Friday as retailers brought black Friday deals forward. To make up for the expected loss of foot traffic and physical stores because of the pandemic.

John Copeland Adobe Copeland
Shoppers spent record $5.1 billion on Thanksgiving

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

Shoppers spent record $5.1 billion on Thanksgiving

"Thanksgiving Day meant more than eating Turkey for shoppers online shopping surged, according to John Copeland, Adobe vice president of marketing and consumer insights. $5.1 billion spent. That's a new record. 21, a half percent increase over last year. On the same day, Copeland says $71 billion had been spent in the run up to Black Friday as retailers brought black Friday deals forward. To make up for the expected loss of foot traffic and physical stores because of the pandemic.

John Copeland Adobe Copeland
Shoppers spent record $5.1 billion on Thanksgiving

Bloomberg Wall Street Week

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

Shoppers spent record $5.1 billion on Thanksgiving

"And I'm Susanna Palmer in the Bloomberg News Room. Thanksgiving Day meant more than eating Turkey for shoppers online shopping surged, according to John Copeland, Adobe vice president of marketing and consumer insights. We saw $5.1 billion spent. That's a new record. 21, a half percent increase over last year. On the same day, Copeland says $71 billion had been spent in the run up to Black Friday as retailers brought black Friday deals forward. To make up for the expected

Susanna Palmer John Copeland Bloomberg News Adobe Copeland
10 Strangest And Creepiest Things Found in Storage Devices And Lockers

Creepy Horror Stories

04:39 min | 11 months ago

10 Strangest And Creepiest Things Found in Storage Devices And Lockers

"You can feel comfort in storing your private belongings inside lockers and other storage devices however sometimes the private belongings found inside. These storage devices are rather strange and disturbing number ten. The only time it's acceptable to keep around a headless doll is the five minutes between the dog ripping the head off and discovering it when someone stores headless doll among knives. It's most likely a problem. Robert dewey hoskins who was rearrested after escaping from a mental hospital in february of two thousand twelve was convicted of threatening to murder madonna and that headless baby doll was found in his storage unit in long beach l. a. weekly reports on the ten creepiest items found in the madonna stalker storage unit. Besides the headless baby dolon. Dozens of knives hoskins kept a very scary clown mask. A sumo wrestler back doubt a barbie backpack and so much more number nine. A married couple with two kids made a horrific discovery when the mother mrs copeland found a safe in her ten year old son's room when questioned about where he got it and its contents. He simply pleaded the fifth. Both parents were unable to get any info their son eventually. Mr copeland was the safe open and was shocked at what he found inside. The head of their dog that had recently passed and was buried in their yard was stuffed into the safe. Blood poured out of the box as mr copeland screamed in horror. Their son said he loved that dog so much that he wanted to have a part of her forever so he dug up the body cut off its head with a tiny kitchen knife and stuffed it in the safe that was found by the mother of later on that same day number eight some people like to take their work home with them but dr michael berkeley a former medical examiner took his work to a storage unit in pensacola. And when i say work. I'm talking about body parts for more than one hundred people all this craziness was discovered in august. Two thousand twelve win some poor soul both the contents of dr brooklyn's unit at a storage option. It seems that dr brooklyn's hobby included the storing of ten brains as well as other body parts lungs hearts and tissue samples. Dr burke was thrifty as well as creepy keeping a hard stored in styrofoam cup. Police noted that formaldehyde was leaking from the cracks lid. The body parts which were harvested during private autopsies performed inside funeral homes in florida were also found inside tupperware containers. Trash bags specimen cubs. Interestingly dr berkeley was fired from his job as a medical examiner in two thousand three for failing to complete autopsy reports in a timely manner and for a big backlog of cases number seven unit be aid. And you store self storage in clearwater. Florida held something. That couldn't be auctioned off on. The family fell behind on payments in january of two thousand twelve when the storage facility manager told the family that the contents were going to be sold. The truth came out among the banana boxes and old. Tv's rested the greenwich skeletal remains authorities. Identify the grandma as an bunch born on january. First one thousand nine hundred. Since the woman's death in nineteen ninety five her remains had been stored inside a painted blue coffin in a storage unit. That wasn't air conditioned for seventeen years. Her remains rested inside a warm storage unit. The body had been properly prepared for burial by funeral home. L. bama which explains the lack of odor number six. A lot of people refuse to go to public pools and he'd be. This will be one more reason. An elderly man named jacob pastor who swam in a public pool in colorado used the same locker in the changing room. Every time he visited a lot of the lockers went unused as most people didn't even need to use them and it wasn't a very crowded pool to begin with one unfortunate day however perhaps he had tired himself out a little too much and opened the wrong locker. The one right next to his usual one. The skeletal remains of human fell out from the locker. Almost as if tackling him to the ground by the looks of the body that once was had been there for years as it was fully decomposed. It looked as though somebody had been forcedly jammed in there or perhaps they simply got stuck in their themselves. That mystery will remain unsolved

Dr Brooklyn Robert Dewey Hoskins Mrs Copeland Madonna Mr Copeland Dr Michael Berkeley Dr Burke Hoskins Dr Berkeley Long Beach Pensacola L. Bama Cubs Clearwater Jacob Pastor Florida
Boston - Patriots' Copeland hosts Zoom chat for students

WBZ Morning News

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Boston - Patriots' Copeland hosts Zoom chat for students

"Of Patriots player using his off the field skills. To help students plan for their financial future. Very cool story here. Linebacker Brandon Copeland hosting an online virtual financial seminar last night, saying, kids need to spend smartly going to challenge that they're gonna have their education. Round and also to focus on Financial literacy, education, The things in life that we all will use credit are budgeting all of those types of things. So I'm really excited by invaluable information. Copeland in the Pats hosting the Denver Broncos this Sunday, actually, by the way, Brianna Copeland in the Off season, a part time economics professor at

Brandon Copeland Brianna Copeland Denver Broncos Pats Professor
Interview with Misty Copeland

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:23 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Misty Copeland

"Hey everyone it's currently this show might sound a bit different today because the scam is still working from home for the time being due to cove nineteen. Today Misty Copeland joins me and skin from the couch she the most famous ballet dancer in the world she made history when she became the first black female principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre. She has also a bestselling author philanthropist and advocate her new children's book. Bun heads comes out this September mystique. Thank you so much for being here. I am so excited. To, be talking to you welcome to skin from the couch. Thank you so much. I'm really excited to. So I was kicked out of ballet at age four. So naturally made sense that I. Did this interview with you very excited for a cer- bond over all things ballet. So we're going to start how I like to start all interviews with just skim your resume. I started bollywood thirteen years old. It was not something that I had thought possible or knew anything about a my stumbled into it was discovered at my boys and Girls Club, the local community center across the street from public. School in San Pedro California, it was there that my valley teacher taught me my first class on a basketball court and she told me I was a prodigy after an hour of working with her she ended up inviting me to train with her in her studio on full scholarship and I ended up moving. In with her and her family to be able to train lean tensely for the next three years I trained for another year and a half at a different studio. By the time, I was seventeen about four years of training. I was living in New York City dancing professionally for American Ballet Theatre I went on to dance as a quarter ballet member for seven years I was the only black woman in American ballet theatre for the first decade of my career I then went on to become the third black female soloist in their history. In in two thousand, fifteen I became the first ever black principal Ballerina. Ballet, theater now, in their eighty year history found a lot of incredible opportunities along the way amazing opportunities for endorsement deals things that you don't typically see ballet dancer getting the opportunity to do estee lauder in Saco in. Getting the chance to perform with Prince and Taylor. Swift. I've had a very diverse career adding author to it. Extremely excited that I have the opportunity to. Children's books along with other genres but I'm really excited about this upcoming book on heads. I just got the book and it's fantastic. So I'm very excited to give it to people as gifts. Obviously you've lived in the public eye now for many years and you have a lot of fans especially, it's Kim H. Q.. What is something that your fans don't know about you something we can. Google. Recipe Ah. So this is proof of this. I'm I'm probably one of the clumsy as people we recently moved into. Will me my husband bought a home and amazing designer newly renovated everything and yesterday I was enjoying my Sunday with spicy crab kind of jump Eliah and I tripped over the carpet in spilled the whole thing on our Blue Velvet Sofa and how did you have an emergency let cleaner come in and clean like deep clean. The entire thing I am very surprised you. I would. Never Clumsy. How can you be a clumsy Ballerina I think there's something that happens when you're not on stage you're not in the studio where you're so focused. So much of the time on I mean naturally I'm coordinated but I'm there's just so much focus on my body that when I'm not having to do it I feel like I just completely let go I. Think the title of Your next book should be the Clumsy Ballerina just putting that out there. Yes. Next Children's book. I WanNa talk about your childhood. This career podcast, we talked to you so many amazing female leaders at the top of their respective names and obviously so much who each of us are because of how we grew up and the mark that are our parents family structure leave on us, and that informs how we can go out into the world top. Tell us a little bit just about your childhood and what it was like growing up. Yeah I mean absolutely shaped informed how I saw the world and approached everything that I did I was born in Kansas City Missouri, which a lot of people don't really know that I was two years old when my mom left my father and took her four kids on a bus. We drove from Kansas City Missouri to southern California where that was kind of the start of my life That's pretty much in my memory. All I remember is California growing up we moved a lot my mother married two more times had to march children my. Life which is constantly in motion and it was constant. There just wasn't a lot of security and so I think that it made me into the extremely introverted girl that I was I was embarrassed about the way that we lived We didn't have a home a struggled to put food on the table. I'm mother ultimately ended up raising six children on her own, and there was just a lot of hiding things. I wanted in no way to stand out which is pretty crazy. I ended up in a field where I'm out there exposed in performing for. So many but but it was on my terms and so when I could, when I could be a part of something where I could share my voice and my experiences without speaking, it was exactly like what the doctor ordered. It was just what I what I needed as a young person in I didn't have arts in my life until I was thirteen and so it was really difficult for me to survive by the time I started dancing. We were living in a motel just constantly moving from different places whatever we could afford I think that had. I not experienced. You know just no stability a lot of abuse There were so many things that I just felt like I learned to be a survivor and I was just constantly in survival mode. So stepping into the world of ballet, it was like peace and balance and security and consistency, and it was the opposite of what my world was in. So I think that's one of the reasons I was so drawn to it as well as you know I, think a lot of people look at the ballet world and they think you know it's Mean, it is difficult to thrive and to be successful in. All the hardships I felt like if I can get through all I have in my thirteen years with the life I've been living I can get through anything so I felt like I was so prepared not only as a young person to be in in the ballet world, but also as a black woman that was probably the one thing that I really felt secure in my identity was the fact that I mother raised me with the understanding that as soon as I leave the house every morning I'm a black girl in that so I'm going to be viewed and treated in. So there was no a lack of understanding in that area. Of My identity and so I think that really served me well when I entered the very white valet worlds.

American Ballet Theatre Principal Kansas City Missouri Misty Copeland California Saco Google New York City Basketball Girls Club San Pedro California Kim H. Eliah Missouri Prince Taylor
"copeland" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"copeland" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"I'm your host Terry Well Rock in very excited to have with me today Lisa Copeland I'm going to read for me sheet of paper because of my menopause brain. That's selling author Speaker Love Coach in dating expert for women over fifty I'm very excited to have you here. So welcome. Hi Terry. I'm so excited you have here. Thank you. This is an honor to be here. And I just love it. Before we hit record we've found so much in common that we up. So. Yeah we did. Turn out we grew up in the same city exactly know all the kind of the same stomping grounds. So yeah. So yes. Tell everybody who you are and what it is you're doing in the world. So? I am a love coaching dating expert for women over fifty and it started because I had so many miserable experiences dating. I was told I was emasculating man I was I didn't know what to do. I mean truly. I didn't know what to do because we weren't really born knowing how to date in our fifties we're like one of the first generations to do that. And I felt. So not confident and so disempowered in the dating world and it was not fun. It was horrible and. That's what led me down a track after my second marriage ended and that was the second guy that said to me. You don't know how be a man that led me down the path to doing what I'm doing today and I love love helping women shield their hearts and then be able to come to a place of loving themselves loving men, and then fighting love with the right man. Beautiful and I love the idea of yes. Healing ourselves first because that's such an important step in the process of well, it's just it's a critical step. It has to be done. Yeah. Most a lot of people skip that stop they get out of a relationship and then they go into the next relationship and what ends up happening is you re attract the same person while they're not the same person or a different person with different shoes, different hair different job, but the same underlying emotional issues that you just laughed and you need to get yourself back, I think that..

Terry Lisa Copeland menopause
Stuart Stevens was an uncompromising Republican  until Donald Trump

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:51 min | 1 year ago

Stuart Stevens was an uncompromising Republican until Donald Trump

"Stuart. Stevens, thank you so much for coming on the PODCAST. Great. Longtime fan first time caller. Will thank you. You know you sent me a DM on twitter asking. For me to to read your latest book and where could you where could you send it and I thought if Stuart Stevens is sending me a message about a book he's written I probably need to read it. The name of the book is it was all a lie and I am so glad I, read it because in some ways it was. It was Cathartic for me to read because you know it's so secret. I'm a Democrat will little left of center and always these suspicions about the Republican Party. But you as a creature, the Republican Party someone who helps set up the Republican Party to hear you. Just. Sort of. What's the right? What's the right word to describe? What you do in this book before we dive right in. Look I. started. On the quested ended with this book asking myself how is trump could happen? and. You know kind of the old saying that your high high-scoring English if you can't ride that, you don't really understand it. So for me, it really began is a very personal quest You know two, thousand, sixteen, a lot of people were wrong about Donald trump it's hard to find anybody was more wrong than me. I didn't think he'd win the primary win the general and I realized in retrospect a lot because I didn't want to believe it. And then I went through this period after his elected, a lot of my friends did like Donald Trump is it really the Republican Party? But I don't really see how you sustain that. if part of the realities of what trump is brought to us as a death of truth. I think being truthful is all the more important. And it on one of the things that really drew me to the Republican. Party. Was the concept of personal responsibility. which now we've become the ultimate victims. Party. So for me I just kind nutty idea that if I believed in, I turn responsibility, it should be the first one of responsibility. I. Didn't want to write. You know the trope of books in DC of if only they'd listen to me. I couldn't write that because they did listen to me. I couldn't sort of like going them. So that's that's what led me to write the book I think it's a combination of a Mayor Copeland of your. That is the word I was looking for, and I couldn't find it was it was may Copa on on page thirty, six at the end of a gets the first chapter. Is a paragraph that I think encapsulates what you were just saying but also the premise of the book you write, how do you abandon deeply held beliefs about character personal responsibility, foreign policy, and the national debt in a matter of months you don't the obvious answer is those beliefs weren't deeply held in the end the Republican Party rallied behind Donald. Trump. Because if that was the deal needed to regain power, what was the problem because it had always been about power the rest, the principles, the values, it was all a lie. that. Is when I read that I underlined it practically ripping up the paper and underlying underlining it because that's what I've been seeing and has taken my breath away about the Republican, Party in the age of trump. All of these things I grew up hearing and learning from Republicans have been completely junked. You're right. We were wrong. I. It's I don't think we've really seen a collapse of a political party A. The way the Republican Party's collapsed in modern American history and probably not American history. To me, the Republican Party doesn't exist political party now exists cartel. WHY DOES IT Exist? It exists to be Democrats. That's not a political theory. It's just a marketing principle. It's like asking OPEC with the higher good of OPEC. Sell oil what an Arco. Darker curtail say what are you guys really trying to do tried to sell dope man and you know what's the Republican Party is trying to beat Democrats. and. To know. Tower to no purpose I think other than power

Republican Party Donald Trump Stuart. Stevens Twitter Opec Mayor Copeland
A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:11 min | 1 year ago

A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

"Google and its parent company alphabet on the precipice of several major challenges regulators are expected to file antitrust lawsuits as early as this month and other example some faith company isn't as innovative as it used to be. A CEO of alphabet sooner Pechanga will play a key role in how the company navigates the headwinds, and while Pichai, is not nearly as in the spotlight as the other tech leaders. He's already had a long history Google, and by taking a look back, we can try and get some clues about how he might move the company forward a reporter Copeland joins us with an inside look rob. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. So, at the tech hearing before the House antitrust subcommittee earlier, this year Pichai himself as an immigrant sort of the picture of the American dream. And wonder if you could start by telling us more about the Chinese upbringing shore so Definitely outlier in many ways in Silicon Valley perhaps the most famous way that he stands out is that he was born in. India. So he grew up middle-class for India but not necessarily add western standards. He famously talks about growing up and getting in his first. Rotary phone. He is in such an older guy that the technology was just a lot less developed there. So he speaks frequently about the connection that he feels to technology and the knowledge that new technology can really change someone's life. So pettah eventually came to the US for Grad School. How do you find his Google? He worked relatively ordinary corp jobs until he joined Google right after its IPO google was not the Google that it is today it really was just a search engine. Quickly impresses people for his ability to one build consensus, which is true to this day, but also get the job done his first major job at Google. toolbar product. So before there was chrome there actually was an add on on your browser to search google. So his job was to convince companies like Dell when they sold you a laptop to have an automatic google search bar on there. So he's moved through the ranks since then becoming CEO of Google and then last year taking over as alphabet. CEO How did he make his way up the ladder? What's so remarkable is he's been at Google for sixteen years and we even though we're the Wall Street Journal have never done a full profile of him. So a big part of my task for the last few months was really unpacking who he is and how he got to this position and what really emerges is that Google was a place and still is a place with big personalities people who scream at each other people who say we should bet the farm on this or that and what sooner sort of did. was stay in the background, but he was also very careful that whatever he did it worked starting with toolbar but that extends to chrome the browser which he co lead and is now by far the most used web browser one of the big reveals of this reporting for me was that he's a very strategic person. It's not an accident that he stayed in the background for instance, someone who used to report to him. Told me early on in a meeting with with Larry? Page. who was CEO of Google before soon Dr Sooner made sure that they never disagreed in front of Larry. He really didn't want anyone to see any cracks and this also emerges in a lot of the people I spoke to some of whom sooner himself suggested that I speak to. But then when I got on the phone with them, they didn't seem to know him personally well. So he he keeps it very close to the vest. So it sounds like he's pretty deft at navigating the company politics now that he's in the top spot. What's he known for as a leader? So to a man to a woman ever and I spoke to said that sooner has a tendency in the middle of meetings to stand up and begin pacing in the middle of your presentation. He won't say anything necessarily sign that he likes or doesn't like it. It's just signed that he's thinking. So you can imagine people have spent weeks preparing for the CEO and he leaps up in the middle just starts pacing it can be quite disarming frankly this comes back to the criticism. Of Soon Dr to standing up in the middle of meeting and pacing as you think is not necessarily your traditional hey drive the car forward leadership. There's a big knock at Google today it's that and this comes from investors analysts even some executives of the company it's that the company is pretty much operating on autopilot. It makes almost all of its money from online advertising and you don't really have to do much besides sit there and the money comes in adding an extra add to youtube isn't exactly a high level. Decision. So the criticism is that sooner hasn't necessarily made the big move to position Google for the next decade on the other hand. When you have such a head start that Google has just not messing up is a billion dollar proposition. And what about as a coworker? What's he known for that? The best thing that's has going for him is that people genuinely like him in fact, one of his deputies Caesar. Gupta told me he loved sooner Pichai. He said the reason I stayed at Google this long as because of Dr He's someone that I trust. He moved to Jakarta because soon are asked him to. People. Say in this world where everyone is obsessed with Silicon Valley with what is happening in Menlo Park and Palo Alto and San Francisco that soon Dr a truly global outlook that he cares for instance, about Google pay in India where there are many multiples number of people using payment products in there are in the US. But tacitus surly had as much investment and one of the really fun things that is in the story is he's very much a creature of habit. You can imagine your CEO of of Alphabet you're traveling the world whenever he's in Korea he goes to the same burrito place an orders, the same Veggie Burrito. And in this world of he's hard-driving CEOS who appear in TMZ or go through high profile divorces. Everyone says that sooner Chai's legitimately just a kind nice guy.

Google CEO Pichai India Silicon Valley United States Larry Tacitus Jakarta Dell Wall Street Journal Copeland Reporter Caesar Grad School Korea Pettah
"copeland" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"copeland" Discussed on The Big 98

"Was another dude told her Copeland that she dated before him. Wasn't. He said Coldplay. Funny. No, it's both of them like a couple of weeks away. So anyway, I wanna play Dan shea tequila right now here, go, Bobby bones show. Shutdown. Aw. King. Same. That boiling water challenge for people take it, and they thought up near freezing cold.

Bobby bones Copeland Dan shea