27 Burst results for "Coordinating Committee"

Robert Moses, 1960s Civil Rights, Has Died

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Robert Moses, 1960s Civil Rights, Has Died

"Robert Moses a civil rights activist who adored beatings and jail while leading black voter registration drives in the south during the nineteen sixties and later helped improve minority education in math has died he was eighty six Moses work to dismantle segregation as the Mississippi field director of the student nonviolent coordinating committee during the civil rights movement and was central to the nineteen sixty four freedom summer in nineteen eighty two he founded the algebra project which included a curriculum Moses developed to help poor students succeed in math Ben morning hand with the project said he spoke with Moses's wife who confirmed her husband

Robert Moses Moses Student Nonviolent Coordinatin Mississippi BEN
A Civil Rights History Lesson

In The Thick

02:14 min | 7 months ago

A Civil Rights History Lesson

"Today we have a very special guest joining us from brooklyn. New york is gene. Theo harris distinguished professor of political science at brooklyn college a historian and author of the rebellious life of mrs rosa parks. She's co editor of the new book. Julian bonds time to teach the history of the southern civil rights movement gene. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me so today. We're going to honor one of the leaders of the civil rights movement and i. I actually met julian bond. I just can't remember where it's going to say that you probably did. I did meet him. And now i'm like you know i think it was before we had cameras in our phones. I mean bond is just a hero and a giant in the civil rights movement. He was an incredible human bean with. I mean his humanity just should out. He was an activist. He was an an educator he did. Pass away in two thousand fifteen. He was a founding member of the student. Nonviolent coordinating committee snake He had a political career. He served in the georgia house of representatives. He had to fight for his seat because of his opposition to the vietnam war and he was the first african american to be nominated as vice president though he withdrew his name and julian bond was an outspoken activist who fought his entire life whether it was civil rights to beaten way out of other people on the question of lgbtq rights all the way to protesting to shut down the keystone pipeline. Let's listen to julian bond in his own words to start off this show. This is from two thousand and two interview that julian did with phyllis leffler of the explorations in black leadership project at the university of virginia. Everything my parents. I told me about responsibility to others everything. I've learned that. The george school about speaking truth to power everything i learned about daring to stand up to powerful people and say no to them. Whatever the consequences. All of that came together when lonnie king came up to me and asked me if i would join this Movement

Julian Bond Theo Harris Mrs Rosa Parks Brooklyn College Georgia House Of Representativ Brooklyn Julian New York Phyllis Leffler Vietnam University Of Virginia George School Lonnie King
Catherine Coleman Flowers Addresses The Lack Of Basic Sanitation In The United States

Solvable

05:16 min | 9 months ago

Catherine Coleman Flowers Addresses The Lack Of Basic Sanitation In The United States

"Catherine you grew up in lowndes county alabama. Can you tell me a little bit about it. And what it was like growing up there yes lowndes. County is seven hundred and fourteen square miles very rule. When i grew up we could actually pick plums and apples off trees and our walk through cornfields and actually pick up in ear corn off stock and could sink my teeth in. Actually you know life the way. It tastes is supported by the alabama river there. Lots of creeks and streams there. It was a kind of community. Where people were self reliant and everybody had a garden and when you went to visit someone it was not unusual for them to talk about with a hickman. A garden need to give you something to take home and that is to the black belt is where cotton was historically ground in the country. It's got the very rich soil. We've got to keep in mind that lowndes county was very agriculture Plantations their allowance. Kenny also has a history of activism. That goes back really to after the civil war Were african americans which make a majority of the county our fighting not only for the right to vote but the right to control their own labor and because of the type of racial trauma and violence that was inlands can gain the name bloody lowndes so i grew up at a time when it was great. Change a lot of people are coming to visit primarily students that were part of the su nonviolent coordinating committee. There were organizing people for the right to vote because allows carries between the selma montgomery area in most of the march for the right to vote actually goes through lowndes county. You've highlighted this statistic that eighty percent. I think people live in las county or not on a municipal sewer system which means when you flush the toilet. It doesn't go in the sewer system. Because somewhere else is that. Is that the the situation. Yes the situation. In but of those eighty percent will of the twenty percents that are on a municipal system. Some of them are pana wastewater treatment. A emanate flush system instead of just going into the lagoon is coming back into their homes. They the yards so we not only see failing onsite septic systems or lack of septic systems. Will we also see failures. Their current with the wastewater treatment plants wale kevin. Can you explain to me. How septic fifteen works The simplest well quite simply what a in does sledge it goes into it. Jeremy looks like a concrete container. It goes into that container disciplines be natural processes that take place breakdown the fluent that goes there and then it goes through feel is once it goes to those field lies is supposed to come out to almost like drinking water quality but when it when it fails that's not what happens it get clogged up. Once it gets clogged up or eighties gets waterlog. It comes back into the home when it comes back into the home. The fluent that we thought would get treated with not get treated actually end up inside the house so even if you're system your get you don't necessarily have effective sewage presumably. If you have no septic system or inadequate septic system it depends on what you define this worse Inadequate septa system is probably worse than not having a septic system because of their straight pipe. They're taking away from the house. That's just a pipe that dumps the sewage outside the house right they often connect. Pvc pipe to a connection there at the mobile home. So when a flush the toilet in go go-to their pvc pipe. And wherever it is it extends. Sometimes i've seen it go into a appeared outside of the home. I've seen go into a pastor. I've seen it go into the woods when you have a septic system fails or you. Part of a treatment system failed. It comes back into the home quite easily and that usually comes back sometimes. It could flood the homes. I've been in homes where you can see their lands along the walls where was flooded with raw sewage. You can still smell it or come back into a person's bath to whatever the lowest point of entry is gonna come back into the home. These failures can create serious health consequences. What are some of the health consequences that you see in lowndes county but in other places where there is inadequate sewage or a total lack of food system in two thousand seventeen we found evidence of hookworm in other tropical parasites that a journal related to be exposed to raw sewage. We found that allowance karen. We haven't done those type studies in other places however we have collected soil samples in this study is currently being period viewed with samples collected in five states. In those five states. We also found parasites associated with raw sewage.

Lowndes County Lowndes Su Nonviolent Coordinating Com Selma Montgomery Las County Alabama River Wale Kevin Catherine Alabama Kenny Jeremy Karen
"coordinating committee" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:07 min | 10 months ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on WTOP

"The first vehicle to swerve. The car swerved off the road on ran into a telephone pole. Fortunately, that driver was not injured. Popkin says the man driving on the wrong side of the road, then crashed head on into a second vehicle. Sheriff Popkin says the man then came out of his car swinging a large piece of wood when he was confronted by a deputy sheriff. The sheriff's deputy interrupted that and then the guy turned on the sheriff's deputy, Popkin says The deputy tried to use his electronic stun gun, but the man striking the deputy with wood kept coming. The deputy opened fire, killing the man. Deputy suffered non life threatening injuries. None of the other drivers or passengers required hospitalization. Montgomery County Police are investigating the shooting in Gaithersburg, Dick Uliano. W T o P NEW. Well, it's Black History Month in on this week's episode of Wtl piece, Podcast colors. A dialogue on race in America. With Chris Scoring J. J. Green Courtland Cox, one of the legendary members of Snick, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, looks back on the remarkable July 1963 and Greenwood, Mississippi. Music legends Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger joined the group in an effort to promote racial equality. Pete Seeger was much older on had been through, You know, the Depression and World War two and McCarthy period, and he brought his creativity from there. Bob Dylan was bringing his creativity as a young man seeing the world in a different way. And the people. The sharecroppers in Mississippi will bring in their creativity out of their life's experience through segregation and the kinds of music and culture that kept them alive. You can download episodes of colors any time on apple podcast podcast one Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts 5 43, Now in Washington, the United States has the highest rate of incarceration in the world at the Equal Justice Initiative. We believe mass incarceration has to And there are thousands of innocent people in our jails and prisons. There is this.

Sheriff Popkin Pete Seeger Bob Dylan Mississippi wood Student Nonviolent Coordinatin Montgomery County Equal Justice Initiative Dick Uliano United States J. J. Green Courtland Cox America Snick Greenwood Gaithersburg Washington Spotify apple Depression
Civil Rights Champion, Unita Blackwell

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:24 min | 1 year ago

Civil Rights Champion, Unita Blackwell

"Hello for Wonder Media Network, I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Today. We're talking about a key figure in the civil rights movement who risked her life to lift her voice and the voices of other black. Americans. Through violence and abuse she campaigned for equality and became the first black woman to serve as mayor and Mississippi. This is the story of UNITA. UNITA Zelma Blackwell was born he uses brown on March Eighteenth Nineteen thirty three in Lula Mississippi. Her father was a sharecropper and you need a picked cotton in the field alongside her mother until her mother sent her to live with relatives in Arkansas to receive a better education. At that time in Mississippi, black children could only attend school for two years before they were forced to return to the fields. Though you need us mother couldn't read or write. She was determined to give her daughter a better life. You need a chose her own full name after her teacher told her. She couldn't just go by the initials UC. She decided to go with UNITA Zelma. At the age of twelve, you need a left school she returned to picking cotton until she was thirty one years old she married three times but kept the last name of her first husband Jeremiah Blackwell. It was with him. She had her only child Jeremiah Junior. The turning point of UNITA's life came in nineteen, sixty four during the freedom summer. The student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee or Snick was campaigning to raise awareness about registering black citizens to vote you need a signed up to help right away during her attempts to help register black voters across our community. She was arrested more than seventy times. She was also targeted by the K. K. K. members burned crosses in her yard. You need was one of only eight black people in her county who tried to register to vote armed white men threatened you need other brave people trying to vote outside the courthouse and nearly prevented them from entering when they were finally allowed to enter the building they were forced to undergo an unfair literacy tests which all of them failed. You need to realize that despite the fact voting was illegal right society still stacked all the odds against the black community. She was more determined than ever to make her voice heard. So she began to participate in one movement after another to fight the unjust system. In nineteen sixty five UNITA sued her county's board of Education for suspending three hundred students including her own son for wearing freedom pens. She also suit to desegregate the school district. These cases traveled all the way up to federal courts though the pins remained banned, the district was ordered to desegregate. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six UNITA was elected mayor of mayors spell. which reportedly made her the first black woman to serve as a mayor in Mississippi. When she took office, the five hundred person town had unpaved streets and no sewer system many residents lived in small tin roof shacks with no running water. UNITA immediately set to work on improving conditions serving the town for two decades from a one room. City Hall. She led the way for the town to pave a name. It's roads, install streetlights, built sewers, improve its housing, and even get its first fire truck. In nineteen eighty three UNITA earned a master's degree in regional planning from New Mass Amherst having never previously attended college in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, she brought national attention to mayors, Ville, and all rural communities when she won three, hundred, fifty, thousand dollar Macarthur Genius Grant. Throughout her career you traveled internationally she gave speeches advised presidents like Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton a never stopped fighting for civil rights. She was defeated for re election to her position in two thousand one by then she'd long made positive mark on the rural communities of Mississippi and beyond. You need. Blackwell passed away on May, Thirteenth Twenty nineteen she made an enormous difference in Marysville Mississippi enter influence extends far beyond her hometown. She fought for the rights of all Americans and brought attention too often forgotten areas of the country.

Unita Unita Zelma Blackwell Mississippi Unita Zelma Ville Jeremiah Blackwell School District Lula Mississippi Black Community Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Jeremiah Junior Arkansas Thirteenth Twenty K. K. K. Bill Clinton City Hall Marysville Jimmy Carter
Activists, Betita Martinez

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Activists, Betita Martinez

"Elizabeth Sutherland Martinez was born on December Twelfth Nineteen twenty. Five in Washington DC. Her father immigrated to the United. States for Mexico in one thousand, nine, hundred, seventeen in some ways historic exemplified the American dream. Here. Arrived with little to his name and ended up becoming a professor of Spanish literature at Georgetown University? In other ways his story serve as a cautionary tale he face racism and prejudice and top Petita to think critically about US policies and structures. The Titas American born mother whose family had come from Scotland and Ireland also helped to shape titas perspective. She was a teacher and activist. Batista. Grew up in Chevy. Chase Maryland a suburb of DC or she later wrote she felt like an outsider and what felt like an all white community after high school she left the D. C. Area to attend swarthmore college and graduated with a degree in history and literature in nineteen forty six. After graduation but thiede decided to go by Liz Sutherland in an attempt to better fit in with elites in the arts and Publishing World of New York City? She worked as a translator at the United Nations before moving into research and administration. PETITA studied European and US colonies in Africa and the Pacific Ocean working to shed light on conditions in places that didn't have self sovereignty. She, then worked at the Museum of modern. Art before becoming an editor at Simon and Schuster. In nineteen sixty four Batista became the books and Arts editor at The Nation magazine. PETITA had successfully broken into the New York, city. Cultural, elite. It was no easy feat. PETITA later said that she was a woman in a world dominated by men. Even. So she was adept at moving between worlds. TITA was equally at ease socializing on Fifth Avenue as at the Johns frequented by beat poets of the day. She was a very busy lady. In addition to her day job, the TITA found time to research and write pieces that landed in publications including the national. Guardian Horizon and the New York. Times. She also volunteered for political causes she believed in. petito wanted more than a successful business career she was driven to seek and push for change in the world. In nineteen, sixty, five petito left the nation to work in the civil. Rights movement. She then became the director of the New York Office of the student nonviolent coordinating. Committee or. And Major Civil Rights Organization. She was one of only two Latino women who worked as a paid employee at snack in her role Tita raised money organized events did research on the racial climate the American south. She wrote a book called Letters. Mississippi. About her experience working in the movement not state. Also continued to write for major national publications in nineteen sixty seven but he left snack and turned her focus to feminism before being drawn to the fledgling Chicano movement. Chicano Connex refers to people of Mexican descent born in the United States. Nineteen Sixty Eight petito left New York City for New Mexico. She went back to going by PETITA Martinez rather than the more Anglican sounding Elizabeth Sutherland. In New Mexico petita joined propelled forward what became a movement to promote the rights and celebrate the culture of connects people in the United States. She continued to maximize the power of her pen. She cofounded Allegri. Toe Del Norte a Chicano movement monthly newspaper in Nineteen seventy-three petita back the Chicano Communication Center and Albuquerque and served as its director until nineteen seventy six. The center used arts and media to educate visitors about the culture and struggles at the Chicano community. During her tenure there Petita also wrote another book. This one called five hundred years of Chicano history. From New Mexico petita moved to San Francisco where she continued to fight for a better future she served as the program director at global options an organization working on issues relating to labour conditions and social justice in. Nineteen. EIGHTY-THREE PETITA ran for governor of California as a peace and Freedom, party candy. In nineteen ninety-seven PETITA founded yet another organization the Institute for Multi Racial Justice the Institute served as the embodiment of her life's work to break down barriers between people fighting for justice especially different peoples of color. Following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eight, petito book called Deca Loris means all of us. But. Thiede has written and taught throughout her long and impressive career and activism. She's lectured at odds three hundred higher educational institutions. She's received many many honors accolades including as a nominee for the Nobel peace prize in two, thousand and five. Batista is a living example of what it looks like to keep fighting the fight against injustice in our own communities across the country and around the world.

Director Batista Petita New York City Elizabeth Sutherland Martinez New Mexico United States New York Elizabeth Sutherland Thiede DC Chicano Connex Chicano Communication Center Mexico Liz Sutherland Chevy Georgetown University Chicano Community Institute For Multi Racial Jus
"coordinating committee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tension this different experience head on hopes, allies accomplices. I'm talking to young Christopher Cole's an activist in Rochester, talk to marchers through a bullhorn while a police drone hovered overhead. This is not a video game for some of y'all that come here come here because it's an elective. We come here because it's survival. Just one block from here. A mentally ill black man named Daniel proved was held down by police last March with a spit hood over his head. He has fix e ated and later die that sparked weeks of demonstrations. Cole's voice to concern. You hear a lot among black leaders that white allies will march and carry signs and then go back to their lives, even if nothing changes to make black people safer. You get to be an ally one day and just write the next you get to live and lean on your privilege. But if you got privilege start spending thiss tension isn't new during the civil rights era black leaders like Charlie Cobb Were often leery of white supporters questioning their commitment and their willingness to be led and we were concerned they would assume responsibility for things. We wanted young black people to assume. Cobb was an organizer with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Mississippi during the 19 sixties, he says it worried him when White College students began arriving on buses such a large number of light coming out ofthe they overwhelm the still fragile route of the grassroots movement. We were trying to build. But Cub says black leaders then did find ways to lead white activists making big gains on civil rights. He thinks it's happening again. Now, as white people take to the streets in much larger numbers..

Charlie Cobb Christopher Cole Student Nonviolent Coordinatin White College Rochester Daniel Cobb Mississippi
"coordinating committee" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"This tension. This different experience head on White folks, allies, accomplices. I'm talking to young Christopher Cole's an activist in Rochester. Talk to marchers through a bullhorn while a police drone hovered overhead. This is not a video game. Some of y'all that come here. You come here because it's an elective. We come here because it's survival. Just one block from here. A mentally ill black man named Daniel Prude was held down by police last March with a spit hood over his head. He has fix e ated and later die that sparked weeks of demonstrations. Cole's voice to concern. You hear a lot among black leaders that white allies will march and carry signs and then go back to their lives, even if nothing changes to make black people safer. You get to be an ally one day and just write the next you get to live and lean on your privilege. But if you got privilege start spending thiss tension isn't new during the civil rights era black leaders like Charlie Cobb Were often leery of white supporters questioning their commitment and their willingness to be led and we were concerned they would assume responsibilities for things. We wanted young black people to Ah soon. Cobb was an organizer with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Mississippi during the 19 sixties, he says it worried him when White College students began arriving on buses, such a large number of light coming down till state overwhelm the still fragile route of the grassroots movement. We were trying to build. But Cobb says black leaders then did find ways to lead white activists making big gains on civil rights. He thinks it's happening again now as white people take to the streets in much larger numbers..

Charlie Cobb Christopher Cole White College Daniel Prude Student Nonviolent Coordinatin Rochester Cobb Mississippi
"coordinating committee" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on KCRW

"Head on white folks. Allies, Accomplices. I'm talking to young Christopher Cole's an activist in Rochester, talk to marchers through a bullhorn while a police drone hovered overhead. This is not a video game for some of y'all that come here. You come here because it's an elective. We come here because it's survival. Just one block from here. A mentally ill black man named Daniel proved was held down by police last March with a spit hood over his head. He has fix e ated and later die that sparked weeks of demonstrations. Cole's voice to concern. You hear a lot among black leaders that white allies will march and carry signs and then go back to their lives, even if nothing changes to make black people safer. You get to be an ally one day and just write the next you get to live and lean on your privilege. But if you got privileged start spending thiss tension isn't new. During the civil rights era, black leaders like Charlie Cobb were often leery of white supporters questioning their commitment and their willingness to be led and we were concerned they would assume Responsibilities for things. We wanted young black people to Ah, soon. Cobb was an organizer with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Mississippi during the 19 sixties. He says it worried him when White College students began arriving on buses, such a large number of light coming out of state overwhelm the still fragile route of the grassroots movement we were trying to build. But Cobb says black leaders then did find ways to lead white activists making big gains on civil rights. He thinks it's happening again now, as white people take to the streets in much larger number. Oops..

Charlie Cobb Christopher Cole White College Student Nonviolent Coordinatin Rochester Daniel Mississippi
"coordinating committee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This different experience head on your wife. Allies, Accomplices. I'm talking to young Christopher Cole's an activist in Rochester, talk to marchers through a bullhorn while a police drone hovered overhead. This is not a video game. Some of y'all that come here. You come here because it's an elective way. Come here because it's survival. Just one block from here. A mentally ill black man named Daniel prude. Was held down by police last March with a spit hood over his head. He has fix e ated and later die that sparked weeks of demonstrations. Cole's voice to concern you hear a lot among black leaders that white allies will march and carry signs. And then go back to their lives, even if nothing changes to make black people safer. You get to be an ally one day and just write the next you get to live and lean on your privilege. But if you got privilege start spending thiss tension isn't new. During the civil rights era, black leaders like Charlie Cobb were often leery of white supporters questioning their commitment and their willingness to be led. We were concerned they would assume responsibility for things we wanted young black people toe assume Cobb was an organizer with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Mississippi during the 19 sixties. He says it worried him when White College students began arriving on buses, such a large number of white coming out ofthe state overwhelm the still fragile route of the grassroots movement we were trying to build. But Cobb says black leaders then did find ways to lead white activists making big gains on civil rights. He thinks it's happening again now, as white people take to the streets in much larger number. Oops..

Charlie Cobb Christopher Cole White College Daniel prude Student Nonviolent Coordinatin Rochester Mississippi
"coordinating committee" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on KCRW

"This different experience head on white folks. Allies, Accomplices. I'm talking to young Christopher Cole's an activist in Rochester, talk to marchers through a bullhorn while a police drone hovered overhead. This is not a video game. Some of y'all that come here. You come here because it's an elected way. Come here because it's survival. Just one block from here. A mentally ill black man named Daniel prude. Was held down by police last March with a spit hood over his head. He has fix e ated and later die that sparked weeks of demonstrations. Cole's voice to concern you hear a lot among black leaders that white allies will march and carry signs. And then go back to their lives, even if nothing changes to make black people safer. You get to be an ally one day and just wipe the next you get to live and lean on your privilege. But if you got privilege start spending thiss tension isn't new. During the civil rights era, black leaders like Charlie Cobb were often leery of white supporters questioning their commitment and their willingness to be led. We were concerned they would assume responsibility for things we wanted young black people to. Ah assume Cobb was an organizer with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Mississippi during the 19 sixties. He says it worried him when White College students began arriving on buses, such a large number of light coming down till state overwhelm the still fragile route of the grassroots movement we were trying to build. But Cobb says black leaders then did find ways to lead white activists making big gains on civil rights. He thinks it's happening again. Now, as white people take to the streets in much larger numbers..

Charlie Cobb Christopher Cole White College Student Nonviolent Coordinatin Daniel prude Rochester Mississippi
"coordinating committee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Addressing this tension. This different experience head on your wife. Allies, Accomplices. I'm talking to young Christopher Cole's an activist in Rochester, talk to marchers through a bullhorn while a police drone hovered overhead. This is not a video game. For some of y'all Come here. You come here because it's an elective way. Come here because it's survival. Just one block from here. A mentally ill black man named Daniel prude. Was held down by police last March with a spit hood over his head. He has fix e ated and later die that sparked weeks of demonstrations. Cole's voice to concern you hear a lot among black leaders that white allies will march and carry signs. And then go back to their lives, Even if nothing changes to make black people safer. You get to be an ally. One day it just right. The next you get to live and lean on your privilege. But if you got privilege start spending thiss Tension isn't new. During the civil rights era, black leaders like Charlie Cobb were often leery of white supporters questioning their commitment and their willingness to be led. We were concerned they would assume responsibility for things we wanted young black people toe soon. Cobb was an organizer with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Mississippi during the 19 sixties. He says it worried him when White College students began arriving on buses, such a large number of light coming out ofthe state overwhelm the still fragile route of the grassroots movement we were trying to build. But Cobb says black leaders then did find ways to lead white activists making big gains on civil rights. He thinks it's happening again. Now, as white people take to the streets in much larger.

Charlie Cobb Christopher Cole White College Daniel prude Student Nonviolent Coordinatin Rochester Mississippi
Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

"From Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny. Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Very. Excited to present our. September. This month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up and fought against injustice and for a better world today, we're talking about a woman who doesn't often receive the recognition she deserves for her behind the scenes activism. As a prolific activist, she had a hand in society changing work major civil rights leaders turned to her for her organizational skills. Let's talk about Ella Josephine Baker. Sisters in the struggle for human dignity and freedom. I am here to represent. The struggle that has gone on for three hundred years. Ella Baker was born on December thirteenth nineteen o three in Norfolk Virginia. She grew up in North Carolina on the very same land where her grandparents were enslaved a few decades earlier. Ella's mother was part of the Local Missionary Association. She helped feed their hungry neighbors and encouraged women to be a force for positive change this activism and kindness stuck with Allah. Ellis studied at Shaw University in Raleigh North Carolina and graduated as Class Valedictorian nineteen twenty seven shortly after she moved to New York City in Nineteen thirty ELA joined several women's organizations and served as national director of the Young Negroes Cooperative League that organization focused on supporting the economic development of the black community in nineteen forty Ella started working as a field secretary for the N. Double A. C., p. she moved up to work as director of branches after just three years. She later also served as the president of the New York. City branch. Then in Nineteen fifty-six, Ella Co created the organization in French. Which bought the oppressive Jim Crow laws in the south. The following year a move to Atlanta to help with Martin Luther King Junior's Organization the southern Christian Leadership Conference. At that time, the SC L. C. was a brand new venture. It was created after successes like the Montgomery bus boycott black leaders including Martin Luther. King Junior created the organization to assemble more boycotts and. Throughout the south. But for the venture to be successful, it would take a masterful organizer while Martin Luther King Junior took the reins as the SEC's public figurehead Ella worked behind the scenes setting the organization's agenda and framing the issues. She organized the crusade for citizenship a campaign to support voting rights. For African Americans, she also helped Rodney Atlanta s ELC headquarters and even served as a temporary director for several months after the resignation of the previous office holder, Ellis desire to focus on the issues and to have influence over the. Direction often clashed with the group's main. Right, as ellos considering resigning in nineteen sixty radical act of civil disobedience inspired her to take a new direction on February first black college students in Greensboro. North Carolina where I'm from refused to leave a lunch counter. Worth's where they'd been denied service for Joseph McNeil Franklin McCain and their to college dorm mates that time was February first one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty. The day they walked into a Greensboro. Woolworth's and sat down at the segregated lunch counter. Ella wrote a letter that encourage students across the south to join forces and take similar acts of protest. She also organized a meeting at Shaw University for the students who spearheaded the citizens from those meetings, the student nonviolent coordinating committee or Snick was created. snick would have a profound impact on the civil rights movement. Ella encourage snack to focus on practicing group centered activism rather than leader centered activism in contrast to the SE L. C.'s leadership style with Mlk at the forefront. Under, this method, of Leadership Snick ran many successful initiatives including the nineteen sixty one freedom rides and the nineteen sixty, four freedom summer and Mississippi L. continued her activism through the sixties. She was also a consultant for the Southern Conference Education Fund and organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic. Party she later returned to New York City and continued her work until she passed away on. December thirteenth nineteen eighty six. She was eighty three years old. Ella Baker was an incredible driving force behind much of the public civil rights work. We learn about in school while she never sought the spotlight she was committed to improving life for future generations

Ella Ella Josephine Baker Ella Co Consultant North Carolina New York City Greensboro Martin Luther King Shaw University Ellis Martin Luther Kaplan L. C. Southern Christian Leadership Raleigh North Carolina Woolworth Joseph Mcneil Franklin Mccain Atlanta Montgomery
"coordinating committee" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And if he comes to me that if you had more responsive to Manhattan, where they control it since that 60% taking change the economy of the country and the pressure of the black people will fight. What will in fact motivated move the rest of this country because this country move precisely before Civil rights movement. That's why this country must stop the civil rights movement because it is the biggest threat to him. Man that looked at life a little bit different when he needed. Did you get along with him? I got along with Stokely. He came self during the fall of Late, some 1961 during the Freedom rise, and later came back doing the Mississippi Summer project in 1964. But I don't think Stokely ever understood the philosophy and the discipline a nonviolent he never made a commitment. He grew up in New York City. Uh, Ken, and how university and I think those of us who grew up in the heart of the deep South who came under the influence of monitor came junior and individuals like Jim Lawson, who had a sort of a baptism in the philosophy and the discipline of Nonviolence. We took the long hard look, we believe that our struggle was not a struggle. They last for a day. So few weeks a few months semester. It was the struggle of a lifetime, and I said then I said even today that you have to pace yourself along hearts. Look, the Longhorns struggle and you have to come to the point in a seven non violence as a way of life as a way of living struggle was not a struggle between blacks. White, not a struggle between people but a struggle between what is right. And what is Rome. What is good? What is the evil between the forces of justice and the forces of injustice in the movement? And I would share the student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and in the movement itself. In general, we call ourselves this circle of trust. A band of brothers and sisters. Is someone got arrested with fuels went to jail. Someone beating with you almost died with you. You forget about race and color. How did the student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee start and who funded it in the early days, and where did it start? The student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee grew out of the city and movement of a young woman by the name Ella Baker. She was not young at the time, but she was young and hard, now deceased dynasties. She was working for Dr Mourners, a Cane Jr as his executive assistant in Atlanta, the Southern Christian Leadership conference and when the city in store spread all across the self like wildfire doctor came requested of her. To call these young people together from different colleges, campers and have a conference and she made the decision to hold this conference Easter weekend, April 1960. As show University in Raleigh, North Carolina. And the reason she went to show university Seenu to school because he was a graduate. Uh, show University she had worked for the peace. He worked for the one W C a day for the she was. She was just one of these small, gifted Women didn't knew everybody and she pulled this conference off and a lot of these young people, but many not just like young people, but many young flight people. Was she wider, but she was blind. But she had many, many allies in the private community of friends in civic and social religious organization, and it was in that meeting. That Dr King thought that the students will become the youth on the student on his organization. But she insisted that we even make up all mine and create our own organization. So the organization was called a temporary student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and married Barry. Who had been a graduate student at Fish University, Nastya became the temporary chair. The temporary student Nonviolent Coordinating committee April 1960 later there was a fall meeting in Atlanta. Morehouse College campus where the student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee became a permanent organization with Marren Barry. As the chair of the organisation James Clyburn, who's 90 congress with one of the students from cycle. Lana, who attended the meeting with US in in Atlanta in October 1960 his daughter is now a member of the federal Communications. His daughter is a member of the federal Communication Commissioner Mignon, do you I want to show you some more video of Stoke. Michael, because I want to ask you what? What? Years later, I think I did the last interview with him, and he died back in 1998 99. His name then was Kwamie Turay. And in this interview, you'll see I asked him about it. His career and all that. Let's watch a little bit of what he had to say and tell us why he went one way. And you want another both worked. You know for me. The difference here was declared between King and I. We started to talk about it before precise ing the back power. But as we said King took it as a principle as the principal being an honest man, which he wants King had to use it all times under all conditions for us, not vice a tactic. If you go back and look at them your documentation, you will see me and not have been beaten at been sent to hospitals on not the administration's. And I've never broken nonviolent demonstration on Lee once in my life that was on the Mississippi in March, when the policeman pushed Dr King and I have broken nonviolent discipline so accepted, you know, but it is not We're working now. I'm not going to Dr King to become hostage to what I consider to be a tactic is a principle, not think of guns..

Nonviolent Coordinating Commit Dr King Atlanta Mississippi Stokely Marren Barry Manhattan graduate student New York City Jim Lawson Rome James Clyburn Ella Baker Raleigh Longhorns Morehouse College Ken Dr Mourners Kwamie Turay
"coordinating committee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Be a crucial week for the next Corona virus relief bill with so much hanging in the balance for local businesses and so many individuals around here. You remain unemployed, and if the schools are going to reopen the funding, they'll need for extra space and air filters and entered the buses and so many other things to do it safely. The house and senator about $2 trillion apart at the moment, so we'll get to that with Jonathan Capehart as well as a remembrance of John Lewis. But you've been hearing the obituaries and eulogies for Congressman Lewis over the weekend, his days as a Freedom rider, head of the student on Violent Coordinating Committee. Violence he endured at the hands of police how he came to be known eventually as the conscience of the congress and more And we were honored to have John Lewis has a guest on this program two times, one of them. Was at the Democratic convention in 2008. We were doing the show from there in Denver on the day that Barack Obama accepted the nomination for president of the United States. And that also happened to be the 45th anniversary. Of the march on Washington, The Martin Luther King, I have a dream speech march as many people think of it. John Lewis was a speaker to at that march, the youngest speaker Head of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee at that time at age 23 So it was 45 years earlier to the day of this appearance. Congressman Louis joined us at the convention hall to look back and look forward. This is a five minute clip. Congressman Lewis. Thanks so much for coming.

Congressman Lewis Student Nonviolent Coordinatin Congressman Louis Violent Coordinating Committee Jonathan Capehart Barack Obama Martin Luther King congress senator United States Washington Denver president
Rights activists, political leaders mourn Rep. John Lewis

Democracy Now! Audio

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Rights activists, political leaders mourn Rep. John Lewis

"The Nation is mourning. The loss of civil rights icon seventeen term Democratic congressman. John Lewis whose legacy of freedom fighting injustice seeking stretch from the Jim Crow era to the black lives matter movement. Lewis died Friday at the age of eighty. He was diagnosed in December with pancreatic cancer. John Lewis was born in Alabama to sharecroppers went on to become the youngest of the so called big six, who addressed? addressed. The nineteen sixty three march on Washington was ultimately elected in nineteen, eighty, six to be the congressional representative for his home state of Georgia a post he never left during the civil rights movement Lewis Marks side by side with Dr Martin Luther King helped found and served as chair of the student nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and helped organize the freedom rides who was arrested more than forty times protesting segregation. As a mentor to those who followed in his footsteps, Lewis was known for encouraging them to quote. Get in good trouble necessary trouble in an interview last month, Lewis said the video of George Floyd's death at the hands of Minneapolis police was quote so painful it made me cry. He said that he was inspired by how it sparked a new movement and. Injustice Congress member Lewis made his final public appearance in June at the street near the White House, that's now named Black Lives Matter Plaza where the words black lives matter are painted and thirty five foot yellow letters. Former President Barack Obama, said Saturday. He hugged Lewis at his inauguration in two thousand nine and quote told him I was only there because of the sacrifices he made. Meanwhile president, trump waited more than fourteen hours to tweet after he tweeted some forty times that he was saddened by Lewis is death. Flags have been lowered to half staff at the Capitol and the White, house and an Atlanta. Where Mayor Kisha Lance. Bottoms ordered the flags lowered to half-staff indefinitely.

John Lewis Lewis Marks Black Lives Matter Plaza George Floyd White House Mayor Kisha Lance Pancreatic Cancer Dr Martin Luther King Barack Obama Congressman Jim Crow President Trump Bottoms Alabama Atlanta Minneapolis Coordinating Committee Washington Representative
"coordinating committee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He was involved in lunch counter sit ins freedom rides on interstate buses, and he was the youngest speaker at the 1963 march on Washington being by policemen. We're helping our people locked up in jail over and over again, and then you'll be patient. How long can we be patient? We want our freedom and we want it now. In a 1998 interview with NPR, Lewis described being attracted to the movement as a teenager when he first heard about the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955. I knew then that Dr King was speaking to me and for me, and for so many other people who wanted to find a way to get involved in an effort to end racial segregation and discrimination across the south. He lived in rural southeast Alabama on a farm where, as a boy, his job was to tend to the chicken coops he'd face discrimination is a matter of course, often telling the story of how the Troy Public Library denied him a library card because of his race. His activism started in Nashville. When Louis was in college. He was a leader in Snick, the student Nonviolent Coordinating committee and was part of a group of young activists studying the philosophy of Nonviolence, Lewis said. It became both a tactic and a way of living. You never become better. You never become hostile. You never try to demean you opposition. He stuck by that create even in brutal circumstances, most notably this 1965 confrontation on Selma's Edmund.

Dr King Lewis student Nonviolent Coordinatin Louis Troy Public Library Washington NPR Montgomery Snick Nashville Alabama
"coordinating committee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Involved in lunch counter sit ins freedom rides on Interstate buses, and he was the youngest speaker at the 1963 March on Washington. We're proud of being a policeman. We're helping our people locked up in jail over and over again, and then you'll be patient. How long can we be patient? We want our freedom and we want it now. In a 1998 interview with NPR, Lewis described being attracted to the movement as a teenager when he first heard about the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955. I knew then that Dr King was speaking to me and for me for so many other people who wanted to find a way to get involved in an effort to end racial segregation and discrimination across the south. He lived in rural southeast Alabama on a farm where, as a boy, his job was to tend to the chicken coops he'd face discrimination is a matter of course, often telling the story of how the Troy Public Library denied him a library card because of his race. His activism started in Nashville. When Louis was in college. He was a leader in Snick, the student Nonviolent Coordinating committee and was part of a group of young activists studying the philosophy of Nonviolence, Lewis said. It became both a tactic and a way of living. You never become better. You never become hostile. You never tried to demean you opposition. He stuck by that create even in brutal circumstances, most notably this 1965 confrontation on Selma's Edmund Pettus.

Dr King Lewis student Nonviolent Coordinatin Edmund Pettus Troy Public Library Washington Louis NPR Montgomery Snick Nashville Alabama
Remembering civil rights icon John Lewis

NBC Nightly News

05:00 min | 1 year ago

Remembering civil rights icon John Lewis

"We begin tonight by remembering a civil rights icon congressman John Lewis flags have been lowered to half staff at the White House and on Capitol Hill to honor his passing the longtime Georgia, Congressman, died Friday at age eighty after a valley battle with pancreatic cancer, his tireless and fearless efforts for justice help change the trajectory of the civil rights movement, impacting countless lives less your whole now on more of this tremendous life. When you see something that is not right. Not Jazz not fair. Obligation to set something to do something. John Lewis devoted his life to the fight for Justice and equality. Deep. Down within me moving me. That I could no longer be satisfied or go along with an evil system. The son of Rural Alabama, Sheriff Cropper's Lewis was inspired as a teenager by the activism of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Junior. He joined the civil rights movement in. It's early days the sit ins and freedom rides, often facing arrest and violent opposition segregation was the order of the day that was a tremendous amount of fear, and I wanted to do something about it we wanted to. Redeem, the soul of America. And move toward a more perfect union. He became the leader of the student nonviolent Coordinating Committee and help organize the historic march on Washington I. Lewis spoke that day, too. He was twenty three. We do not allowed freedom. We wanted to be reading. Abbey was among the leaders who met that day with President John. F Kennedy I was not concerned about making history. just wanted to change things on March seventeenth nineteen, sixty five in Selma Alabama he did both. Much today to Germany ties to the nation leading a peaceful march for voting rights. And others were attacked by state troopers, wielding clubs and tear gas. It became known as bloody Sunday. Lewis suffered a fractured skull. Laws consciousness fifty years later. Don't recall. made it back across that bridge televised images of violence that day galvanize the nation, spurring passage of the Voting Rights Act signed into law just five months later. John Lewis was there to. John Lewis Education Project. He worked tirelessly to turn hard. One voting rights into political power to minute people. A two-minute black people died in the state for the right to register and the right to vote. He helped run volunteer programs for President Carter and in nineteen. eighty-six was elected to Congress from Georgia vegging. He served more than thirty years at enduring symbol and a tireless advocate for social justice. Let us. We came into do job. We came into work, a leading voice and a moral beacon John Lewis was known as the conscience of Congress admired respected and loved generations from now parents teach their children. What is meant by courage? The story of John Lewis will come to mind. An American. Who Do the change could not wait for some other person for some other times we must never ever give out. We must have an advocate. We must keep the fake key. Own the. Lesser Reporting! House Speaker Nancy Pelosi today, calling Congressman Lewis One of the greatest heroes of American History Jeff Bennett has more on the outpouring of touching tributes. Tonight tributes and remembrances for the civil rights icon and longtime congressman. John Lewis Former President Barack Obama saying that Lewis loved this country so much that he risked his life and his blood, so that it might live up to its promise. Lewis and Obama shared a deep admiration for one another last month, the to offering inspiration to young activists, leading the latest demonstrations for equality and justice. That's why when I see these young people. Here right now. I am inspired to go into him. Redeem this Sullivan Mercker. In say that country former President George W Bush saying tonight that America can best honor John's memory by continuing his journey toward liberty and justice for all Bill Clinton calling Lewis the conscience of the nation and from Jimmy Carter all Americans. Oh John Lewis a debt of gratitude,

Congressman Lewis One John Lewis John Lewis Education Project President John Congressman President Carter Selma Alabama Pancreatic Cancer America President George W Bush Georgia Barack Obama Martin Luther King Junior Germany Alabama White House
"coordinating committee" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on WTOP

"Of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He addressed the march on Washington Nation. The Black Master is on the march for jobs and freedom. Louis carried that fight for equality to the U. S. Congress, where he served for three decades. In 2015. He could look back at what his actions helped wrought. In the past 50 years. We have witnessed what I'd like to call the non violent revolution in America, not countries, a better country. Jim Taylor, CBS News To the epicenter of the Corona virus in Florida, where at least 337 total cases have been reported, and almost 4900 deaths officials in Miami and forcing an eight PM curfew along South Beach. But governor does, Santa says there is some good news statewide. Our new case positivity has been has been relatively stable, probably a slight decline from two weeks ago. We had kind of been in that for new cases about 15 to 16%. Now we're kind of in that 11 to 13% range. I think that Positive movement. I think you have seen that in Portland. Protests over racial injustice continue the mayor demanding that President Trump removed militarized federal agents he deployed to the city. This witness spoke with CBS. Suddenly unmarked vehicle pulls up and it looks like a rental car are an SUV. And suddenly you see, like for what? I assume our D. H s agents get out of the vehicle. Ryan's Jenny Young with more city leader state leaders extremely frustrated about this they have taken to social media, letting The Trump Administration know that now. So far, the Department of Homeland Security has not returned My.

Student Nonviolent Coordinatin CBS Louis President Trump Department of Homeland Securit Jenny Young Washington Nation Jim Taylor Portland America Miami Santa South Beach Florida Ryan
"coordinating committee" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Original reporting. I'm Lisa Matteo. He was the lion of the civil rights era with a long celebrated career in Congress. John Lewis has died at the age of 80. He's been suffering from pancreatic cancer. John Lewis was only 23 back in 1963 when he became known as one of the Big Six leaders of the civil rights movement. As chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He addressed the march on Washington Nation. The Black Mass is on the march for jobs and freedom. Lewis carried that fight for equality to the U. S. Congress, where he served for three decades. In 2015 he could look back at what his actions helped wrought. In the past 50 years. We have witnessed what I'd like to call a nonviolent revolution in America that countries a better country. Jim Taylor, CBS News To the epicenter of the Corona virus in Florida, where at least 337 total cases have been reported, and almost 4900 deaths officials in Miami and forcing an eight PM curfew along South Beach. But governor does, Santa says there is some good news statewide. Our new case positivity has been has been relatively stable, probably a slight decline from two weeks ago. We had kind of been in that for new cases about 15 to 16%. Now we're kind of in that 11 to 13% range. I think that Positive movement. I think you have seen that in Portland. Protests over racial injustice continue the mayor demanding that President Trump removed militarized federal agents he deployed to the city. This witness spoke with CBS. Suddenly unmarked vehicle pulls up and it looks like a rental car are an SUV. And suddenly you see, like for what? I assume er, D. H s agents get out of the vehicle. Ryan's Jenny Young with more city leader. State leaders extremely frustrated about this. They have taken to social media, letting the Trump administration know that now. So far, the Department of Homeland Security has not returned My M O. When I.

John Lewis Student Nonviolent Coordinatin CBS Lisa Matteo Congress President Trump pancreatic cancer chairman Department of Homeland Securit Portland America Washington Nation Jim Taylor Santa Miami Ryan Florida
"coordinating committee" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on KCRW

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon, representative John Lewis has died at the age of 18. It is hard Overstate the role he played in the struggle for justice in America. As head of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He was beaten on a march for voting rights across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. He recovered. He rose up. He used his voice and conscience for equal rights for the rest of his life. Representative Terry Sewell represents Alabama seventh District and joined just now, representative Sewell Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for having me sad day for America to lose one of its moral compasses. Oh, yes. And ah, it strikes me So much of your own personal history in a way is is and political history is tied up with John Lewis's life, isn't it? You who represent Selma? You're the first African American woman to represent Alabama in Congress and your Your mother was on the Selma City Council. Yes, you know, I grew up daughter of Selma, Alabama. I and I also am a lifetime member of Brown Chapel in the church. And so I grew up watching John come back year after year to reenact bloody Sunday. And to think that I could grow up one day be the first black woman to represent Alabama and to have the opportunity to thank that living legend who I owe my very political existence to and to get to know him as a friend. I cz just I'm blessed and I feel so honored to have had the opportunity to get to know John and to get to thank John because of his struggle and the freedom fighters in those who cross that bridge there to make America live up to its ideals. I get to know what halls of Congress so many African Americans. Elected officials owe their existence to John and I just my hardest full Today. I know that I mourn with the nation. But Selma really mourned for John, and you're just so grateful. For his eternal light that shines so bright. It was always hopeful in search of athletic community. We have some audio when Mr Lewis 55th anniversary of the remembrance of the Virgin and this is Mr Lewis speaking to the crowd along the bridge, keep eyes on the prize and vote like we never ever voted before..

John Lewis Selma Alabama Representative Terry Sewell Edmund Pettus Bridge America representative Selma City Council Student Nonviolent Coordinatin Mr Lewis Congress NPR News Scott Simon Brown Chapel
"coordinating committee" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Puso Fox News Flags at the White House and U S Capital are at half staff in honor of Congressman John Lewis in a tweet, White House press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany saying In part, John Lewis was an icon and he leaves and enduring legacy. Growing up in the Jim Crow south, he became acutely aware of racial injustice. As a young man. He became chairman of Snick, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating committee and organized peaceful protests that segregated lunch counters and bus terminals. Throughout the South. He was the youngest speaker at the 1963 March on Washington. He helped lead a march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, and suffered a fractured skull when state troopers used force to break up the peaceful demonstration. Fox says Jonathan Serrie, the longtime Georgia lawmakers, impact is being remembered by those who worked with him for this. Of the nation. But what a blessed life John Lewis lived. He loved everyone. Tim Scott of South Carolina, the only black Republican Senator John Lewis was 80. Most students in California won't be heading back to school did Arising infections of the Corona virus, but the ones that deal will have to wear face coverings, all staff. And students in third grade and above must wear masks students in the second grader below. We strongly encourage Governor Gavin Newsom as schools across the country formulate plans to safely re open. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill want to hear more about CDC guidelines. Democrats in the House say they'd invited CDC director Robert Redfield to testify at a hearing this coming Thursday, but his appearance is being blocked by the White House. Fox is jail NATO the White House, says Dr Redford. It needs.

John Lewis White House chairman Fox Governor Gavin Newsom Student Nonviolent Coordinatin Edmund Pettus Bridge Kayleigh Mcenany Jonathan Serrie Jim Crow CDC Congressman press secretary Robert Redfield Snick South Carolina Selma Dr Redford Tim Scott
"coordinating committee" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"In 5 90 A. M and K 259 A. Jay Austin, 99.7 at Bam Flags lowered in honor of a civil rights pioneer. I'm Pam Puso Fox News flags at the White House and U. S Capital or at half staff in honor of Congressman John Lewis in a tweet, White House press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany saying in part John Lewis was an icon, and he leaves and enduring legacy. Growing up in the Jim Crow south, he became acutely aware of racial injustice. As a young man. He became chairman of Snick, the student Nonviolent Coordinating committee and organized peaceful protests had segregated lunch counters and bus terminals throughout the South. He was the youngest speaker of the 1963 March on Washington. He helped lead a march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, and suffered a fractured skull when state troopers Just force to break up the peaceful demonstration, Fox, says Jonathan Serrie, the longtime Georgia lawmakers, impact is being remembered by those who worked with him. What a sad day for the resignation. But what a blessed life John Lewis lives. He loved everyone. Tim Scott of South Carolina, the only black Republican Senator John Lewis was 80. Most students in California won't be heading back to school due to rising infections of the Corona virus, But the ones that do will have to wear face coverings, all staff and students in third grade and above must wear masks. Students in the second grader below. We strongly encourage Governor Gavin Newsom as schools across the country formulate plans to safely reopen lawmakers on Capitol Hill want to hear more about CDC guidelines. Democrats in the House say they'd invited CD See Director Robert Redfield to testify at a hearing this coming Thursday, but his appearance is being blocked by the White House, Fox says. JAIL NATO, The White House says Dr Redfield needs to focus on the pandemic response. America's listening to Fox News Hi. It's Jamie Progresses. Employee of the month, two months in a row. Leave a message.

John Lewis chairman White House Fox Pam Puso student Nonviolent Coordinatin Governor Gavin Newsom Robert Redfield Edmund Pettus Bridge Jonathan Serrie Jay Austin Kayleigh Mcenany Jim Crow Congressman press secretary South Carolina Selma
"coordinating committee" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"coordinating committee" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"I'm ham who sell Fox News? That's how House Speaker Nancy Pelosi describes longtime Georgia Congressman and Civil rights leader John Lewis Hey, is too heavy a burden today with the death of John Lewis America has lost one of the most iconic figures of the civil rights movement. Growing up in the Jim Crow south, he became acutely aware of racial injustice. As a young man. He became chairman of Snick, the student Nonviolent Coordinating committee and organized peaceful protests had segregated lunch counters and bus terminals throughout the South. He was the youngest speaker of the 1963 March on Washington, He helped lead a march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. And suffered a fractured skull when state troopers used force to break up the peaceful demonstration, Fox says Jonathan Serrie last year, Louis announced he had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. He was 80 years old, another night of violent protest in Portland, Oregon, where federal agents fired tear gas to clear away crowds nor a federal courthouse. Those agents are unwelcome, according to Mayor Ted Wheeler, the videos the pictures the experiences that were all witnessing here in Portland should be shocking to all Americans across the country Fears debate over whether school should reopen as Corona virus cases surge in many communities in California most of the states nearly seven million students will be learning from home. At least initially, we want daily live interaction with teachers and other students. Students connecting peer to peer with other students,.

chairman House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Fox News student Nonviolent Coordinatin John Lewis John Lewis America Edmund Pettus Bridge Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler Louis Jim Crow Congressman pancreatic cancer Snick Selma Jonathan Serrie Georgia Corona
The Late George Curry

In Black America

10:56 min | 1 year ago

The Late George Curry

"The reason I do what I do because I grew up in Alabama and the first black journalists avenue with me. Get A job and couldn't get a job in my hometown newspaper so you will never be able to say you never met a black killed 'cause campuses around the country and some reading they always WanNa know what you think. What topic Us Don't ever have one called anybody who knows me knows that comes comes out but I actually have seen. I actually have a challenge tonight and I hope you make a decision tonight and my topic is in the form of a question. Do you want to be eight of Mamata or do you want to be a thermostat? Let me put it another way. Do you want to measure the temperature? The temperature the late George E curry former editor in chief of the National Newspaper Publishers Association New Service Former Editor in chief of emerged magazine author and syndicated columnist. Curry died on Saturday August twentieth. Two Thousand Sixteen. He was sixty nine considered the dean of black press columnists his weekly syndicated column appeared in more than two hundred. African. American newspapers. Curry was a journalist journalist. He began his career. Sports illustrated magazine. The Saint Louis Post dispatch and then the Chicago Tribune where he became the New York girl. Cheap two thousand three. The National Association of Black Journalists named him journalist of the year he is also in a BJ's list of most influential black journalists of the twentieth century. Curry was unapologetic. Stewart and champion for the Black Press and frequent need for it in the civil rights narrative. He was deeply committed to fostering the next generation of journalists of color. They became the founding director of the Saint. Louis Minority Journalism Workshop in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy seven. I'm Johnnie O. Hanson junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program a tribute to the late. George E curry in Black America emerged was a news magazine that was published for ten years up the year. Two thousand I was editor to the last seven years. In fact we have a book coming out in July called the best of emerge at Ballantine books a publishing in your arm of a random house and it has the best collection of Of Our stories over the years so it's very different and quite frankly one day soon. I expect this starbucks. We got the most attention. Because the way we Took on Clarence Thomas. Random as the amount of his head and they me ram two years later. The lawn jockeying for all right and That's the kind of thing that you've seen. Single Clarence comes today. People mentioned that though. That's that's not the stores I'm most proud of. I'm most proud of Australian Kemba Smith who was arrested. Twenty four give a twenty four year. Mandatory sentence been Amman. Mine are basically going with drug dealer. I mean the Fed said she needed sold or used drugs But she was very attached as ringleader. Who have been killed and We ran to cover stories on and ran a couple of other stories. In addition to that a couple of years ago she was pardoned by bill. Clinton I'll Office Delay George. E Curry is best known for his heir to ship of the former emerged magazine. Most recently for his work as Airdrie and cheap for the National Newspaper Published Association from two thousand to two thousand seven and again from two thousand twelve until last year. Warren George Edward Curry on February. Twenty third nineteen forty seven in Tuscaloosa Alabama is mother worked as a domestic and his father was a mechanic. His father abandoned fan when he was just seven years old leaving him to step into the role of the man of the house assisting his mother in raising three younger sisters and nineteen sixty five. He graduated high school where he was a member of the football team and sports energy to other school newspaper and nineteen sixty six curry moves in New York City way worked for the student. Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He earned his bachelor of Arts degree in history from Knoxville College. In nineteen nine hundred seventy fulfilling a lifelong dream. He began his professional journal. Career as reporter for sports illustrated magazine in nineteen seventy. He was the second African American hired by the publication. Curry died on August. Twenty two thousand sixteen. He was sixty nine. I met curry back in. Nineteen eighty one and N. A. B. J. National Convention in Louisville Kentucky. The following excerpts of interviews from two thousand one and two thousand and three well up up in totally segregated tuscaloosa hours can Segregate my feelings tell people that In terms of the so called gration after drink from separate water fountains right back to the bus go to separate schools and I have very strong feelings about that But at the same time when I look at my black community those black teachers black people who were supportive There's nothing in the world like it and I wouldn't trade if anything you a pretty good athlete. Bet Did all right for the country boy. I play football. Play quarterback When a quarterback call plays from the attendant Knoxville College in Tennessee? I'm Alma Mater and I'm still in the blue. I'm on that board of directors there and what sparked their initial interest in journalism and The newspapers Emma wouldn't do the newspaper hometown the only time they wrote about black people when they were suspected of crime committed crime plan football it being an entertaining and I thought they were so many other stories out there. It'd be told and since they won't go and tell them. I decided I had to be the person to tell them now. What is interesting is that I could get a job my first job out of Knoxville. What is that sports illustrated so I can get a job at Lodges Sports magazine in the world but couldn't get one in my hometown. Newspaper reminded me that every time I go should be sending a thank. You note saying thank you for not hiring me so I can go out and see the world but that meant that meant a lot. I mean that could not get heart my hometown paper and And whenever I go back I remind them how Tuscaloosa be. I was back a couple years ago and they gave me a key to the city then told me it was fine but you didn't open anything. And secondly I wanted to the bank and combination to the vault. But they haven't done that yet. Former editor in chief of emerged magazine. Tell us about that. Publication well merge was a news magazine that was published for ten years up to two thousand. I was editor of the last seven years. In fact we have a book coming out in July call. The Best of emerge at Ballantine books are published in the New York arm of Random House and it has the best collection of Of our stores over the years so it was very different and quite frankly one day soon expected starbuck and what was some of the highlights of of that publication well We did a lot of things and we're proud. We got the most attention because the way we Took on Clarence Thomas Random as the amount of not hit and they may ramp two years later. The Lawn Jockey for all right and That's the kind of thing that you've seen single Clarence Thomas. Today people mentioned that though. That's that's not a lot of stories. I'm I'm most proud of. I'm most proud of Australian Kemba Smith. Who WAS ARRESTED? Twenty four and give it a twenty four year mandatory sentence. I've been Amman mine of exit. Basically go over to the drug dealer. I mean the Fed said she neither Seoul nor use drugs but she was very attached ringleader. Who have been killed and We ran to cover stories on it and ran a couple of other stories in addition to that and Couple of years ago. She was pardoned by bill. Clinton in office and So we're real proud of that story. I'm proudest of is One of my staff members. I fortunately I feel vegetable about young since college lower. Hit a little little experience. Laurie Robinson was all right how she was on my staff and And it really shouldn't be up the whole Staffan certainly are and she's a graduate of Spelman in Atlanta and There was a allegation at Morehouse being raped. Spelman woman and only because laureate toby. She wanted to write a book about her experience. I suggested that she go back there to her alma mater right about that and then we've been home person experience with it and it was just one powerful story and those are the story. I mean a lot of store them reattached. But those are those are the real special with you on the immediate past. President of the American Society of magazine editors in the first african-american Elia and also not from New York. Right right they kinda you gotta be from New York and got to be life. Magazine's the worst newspaper in terms of diversity but They did in all fairness did let me president and it was indeed a Han and You know in fact. I'm coming from a black magazine representing the magazine industry so I was so pleased with that. Your current position as editor in chief of the National Newspaper Published Association. Give us a brief history of that organization and your responsibilities with black presses. About one hundred seventy six years old gotten around fighting against niches slavery and everything else. I have been here. Two years. Essentially is a federation of more than two hundred African American newspapers Most of them weekly and essentially what I do is provide news out of Washington and and National News as well For a member newspapers. And so we've pretty much such service. Washington bureau founders for audience. That aren't really familiar. That are not African Americans. Why has the black press particularly organization the two hundred or so Weeklies still viable in this country today. Well I wish having spent thirty three years journalism most of not into black press. I wish that the media was doing this job. And there'd be no need for the Black Press a Hispanic Women magazine but it but it is not doing. It does a terrible job and still a worse job. I think when I came to business thirty three years ago. So if you're going to get in order to be well informed you have to read from a variety of sources in the first place you know you just can't read just to Austin space when you just read just you know Dallas Weekly. Just can't you gotta read from different sources and so So would ask an American perspective gives you a different look at some of the same national issues and then he's going to be really inform. You need to reap the black newspapers and go out website. black press. Usa DOT COM

Black Press Editor In Chief New York Warren George Edward Curry Clarence Thomas Curry National Association Of Black Sports Illustrated Magazine Emerged Magazine National Newspaper Published A Alabama Knoxville College Starbucks Random House FED Editor Kemba Smith Tuscaloosa George E Curry Amman
The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

Retropod

05:10 min | 2 years ago

The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

"She walked with a limp. She had a blood clot behind her eye from being severely beaten in Mississippi jail. Her name was was Fannie Lou Hamer. She was the youngest of twenty children born to black sharecroppers in Mississippi and in late nineteen sixty four for president Lyndon B Johnson was absolutely terrified of her why she was about to make make an appeal before the credentials panel at the Democratic National Convention. The potential implications were profound. Hamer represented the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party a racially integrated coalition of delegates Hamer wanted to challenge the seats of the current aren't all white democratic delegation from their state saying that they were in violation of the party's rules because they had systematically excluded excluded black citizens according to Time magazine. Johnson was worried that Hamer speech could offend the Southern Democrats whose votes he needed for reelection he wanted her silenced but Hamer had a following that rivaled that of Dr Martin Luther Author King Junior and she would not go unheard. Hamer was born in one thousand nine hundred seventeen in the Mississippi Delta. The share cropping system kept her parents in debt and without enough food to feed their twenty children in the Winter Hebrew tied rags on her feet because she often didn't have shoes. She started picking cotton when she was six years old. Aw Hamer started her civil rights work in nineteen sixty one after she was sterilized without consent during what it should have been a minor surgery she tried to register to vote in one thousand nine hundred sixty two but was turned away after she failed illiteracy literacy tests which were used in the south to discourage black people from voting the clerk asked Hamer complicated questions like interpreting the state constitution after she failed the test. She told the clerk she'd be back when Hamer returned to the plantation in that day. She was fired from her job but she wasn't defeated. Hamer became a student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee a community organizer and helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in reaction to the lack of integration in the state's Democratic Party party as a candidate from the party. She ran for Congress in nineteen sixty four against democratic incumbent Jamie L whitten at that year's Democratic Democrat National Convention. Hey made her way to the stage through a crowd of men who refused to make space for her other members of the civil rights movement including Martin Luther King Junior spoke but all eyes were on her. She then talked for thirteen minutes Mr Chairman and to could dentures committee. My name is Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer. She called for mandatory delegation an integration and recounted her experience trying to register to vote. It was the thirty first of all the night being the eighteen of US travel. Put the six miles the county courthouse in in the normal tried to register to become first. I player Hamer describes being arrested in beaten in Mississippi jail after white waitress at a rest. Stop refused her service. That's how she got the blood clot. All of this is own account. We won't be registered to become first-class. NFL Freedom Democratic Party is not beating not after her testimony humor and other other Freedom Party members discovered that Johnson a wildly tough politician had held a news conference so that national television networks could he cover her testimony live. She was livid but Johnson's efforts to silencer didn't work that that night in a hot Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer and the rest of the country watched her testimony broadcast in prime time on the evening news news less than a year later. Congress passed the Voting Rights Act and at the nineteen sixty eight convention in Chicago. He became team the first African American to be seated as a delegate. She received a standing ovation.

Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi Freedom Democratic Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer Mississippi Hamer Lyndon B Johnson Freedom Democratic Party Freedom Party Stop Mississippi Delta Congress Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther Author King J Time Magazine United States Jamie L Whitten President Trump