24 Burst results for "Cookie Roberts"

Funeral held for legendary journalist Cokie Roberts

NPR News Now

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Funeral held for legendary journalist Cokie Roberts

"Washington safe. Matthew's Cathedral today legendary journalist Cokie Roberts was hailed as a keen reporter and analyst generous friend and an advocate of fellow journalists and Women Speaker of the House. Nancy Pelosi was among the luminaries remembering her her cokie knew her power and she used it to forge a better America. We will dearly miss her great spirit of generosity ARASA. Dean goodness radiating joy to all Roberts died from cancer at age seventy-five this is

Cokie Roberts Nancy Pelosi Women Speaker Matthew Washington Reporter Analyst Dean America
Funeral held for journalist Cokie Roberts in Washington, DC

Freakonomics Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Funeral held for journalist Cokie Roberts in Washington, DC

"At a funeral mass in Washington St Matthew's cathedral today legendary journalist Cokie Roberts was hailed as a keen reporter an analyst a generous friend in an advocate of fellow journalists and when the speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi was among the luminaries remembering her how she knew her power and she used it to forge a better America. we will dearly miss her great spirit of generosity and goodness radiating joy to all Roberts died from cancer at age

Cokie Roberts Reporter Analyst America. Nancy Pelosi
"cokie roberts" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Month if used to stay in the race the news comes a day after New York City mayor bill de Blasio dropped his bid for the White House Booker been a host of other twenty twenty contenders are campaigning in Iowa this week as they try to gain momentum in the first in the nation caucus state. memorial service this morning for veteran broadcast journalist Cokie Roberts who died Tuesday due to complications of breast cancer that the eulogy her house speaker Nancy Pelosi said this Roberts vantage point is a member of a very political family from Louisiana gave her the ability to tell stories with an insider's perspective but the knowledge and understanding developed as a daughter of the Congress she illuminated the workings of Congress in the fairest possible way with respect for all of the rooms for people across America Cokie Roberts says been Steve speaking of the service okay was a true Democrat I emphasize a small key Democrats. in a true Christian. she touched everyone she met especially those who were not famous or wealthy or influential. Roberts parents sale Lindy Boggs both serving in Congress from Louisiana Cokie Roberts died of complications of breast cancer she was seventy five. it's for people who are killed in a tour bus crash on an isolated road in Utah ABC's will Kerr reports from say George a fatal Utah tour bus crash left four people dead as many as fifteen with.

Cokie Roberts Congress Lindy Boggs bill de Blasio New York City Utah Louisiana Nancy Pelosi White House Booker Iowa America Steve Democrats. Kerr George
Funeral held for legendary journalist Cokie Roberts

Bouchey Financial

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Funeral held for legendary journalist Cokie Roberts

"A funeral today in Washington for veteran ABC and NPR journalist Cokie Roberts the speaker of the house among those eulogizing Roberts who she said did more than just report the news has less we were in Congress that she she used her gifts to study and sheer America's history and heritage helping tell the full story of our nation Nancy Pelosi Cokie Roberts succumb to breast cancer Tuesday she was

Washington ABC Roberts Congress America Cancer Cokie Roberts Nancy Pelosi Cokie Roberts
"cokie roberts" Discussed on Newt's World

Newt's World

11:51 min | 1 year ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on Newt's World

"You then go from the sort of wives of extraordinary very famous Founding Fathers To Mercy Otis Warren who really carves out her own space in a way that for that generation is pretty unique absolutely name. She grew up in a family where again she was treated. As an equal until her brothers went to Harvard and of course you couldn't do that but she wrote plays and poems that were published in newspapers around the colonies that were very influential and rousing opinion against the British should she was as influential in some quarters as Tom Paine with commonsense she also had the ears of many of the founders and so so when the British were in Boston and wreaking havoc her letters to the continental Congress made a big difference in terms of bringing people together together and their willingness to fight the British because of course the British were not fighting in the south point it took some convincing and her letters others were influential in doing that and then she became very suspicious of the constitution and all that because she didn't really believe in a strong federal government but she came around eventually and then wrote this remarkable history of the American revolution and one of the things that's impressive and and that is that and this is another reason why writing about the women is so important. She talks about things that happened. During the war didn't the men just never talk about rape as an instrument of war starvation. All of the things is not just the battlefield that she's talking in about. She's talking about the effects on all of American society and you know when you think about the bill of rights and quartering troops. Can you imagine the offensive. Those troops could have committed when they were quartered in people's homes. I mean it's really shocking thought she was there talking about it when nobody else was and that's another thing actually about writing these books the women's letters are so really delightful light full because they're not writing thinking that the letters are going to be published as the men were then not editing and redrafting drafting and all of that they're just writing letters not expecting me to read their mail two hundred years later yes they're full of politics but they're also full of the economic situation and who's having children and all too often losing them and what the fashions are and all of that so you get a much much broader autre sense of American society and you also get some more you the men so in that context was Mercy Otis Chris Warren unique or where a group of women who actually were public advocates in Rhode poured for the public. She was unusual unusual. There were some others and it's booth in Stockton whose husband Richard Stockton was one of the signers of the declaration and then recanted a ten point but she was still around and became a great friend of Washington. Her poems were published in the newspapers of the time and actually Washington Shington road to her when war was over and said basically now. It's kind of up to you women to keep this country going make it work. A lot of women not published under their own name so Judah Sergeant Murray for instance was published as the gleaner for a while but then she wanted people to know was she who I was writing and she wrote in you know an essay that was widely published in seventeen ninety seven on the equality of the sexes so so you know there were women out there arguing for equal rights even in the eighteenth century so jumping from literary advocacy to to sort of direct action. Deborah Samson does something which actually happens affirmative times in the civil war but I think was a little more unusual in the revolutionary war. She becomes a man order to fight right. She went to war. They're probably I'm sure there were people in all of our wars who did that but she she was Robert Robert Shirt leaf and she fought and she was injured several times and finally she got sick she they called camp fever and doctor came you to tend to her and found out her secret and so she was discharged and but she did receive a pension as her husband received a survivor's survivors bench and she was very much considered a soldier and then there were others who took over from their husbands on the battlefield Margaret Corbin the bottle of Fort Washington when her husband was shot took his gun and she's actually buried at West Point. There were several several women who actually fought and then lots of women rent along with the men to battle the CAM followers mainly three the wives of the man. Because what else would they were going to do. They didn't have any wherewithal to make a living and so they went with the soldiers odors and they then became useful they cooked and brought water and nurse and one point at Yorktown in fact this exchange that Washington it has memorialized of saying to some woman who was headed out to the field was bred. Aren't you afraid and she said well. If the men are out there I should be out there feeding feeding them. You know so they were very much on the scene and and Washington's general orders. He's constantly saying 'cause he. He cares about appearances and he's constantly saying this. General Motors wants to women and children to March with the baggage trains but he says it's so often that you I can tell that it's not happening and then at one point he finally says okay. Just the women who can move fast should move with the elite corps so they were. It wasn't molly pitcher. Yes she was at Monmouth and in New Jersey. We're not sure exactly who she was there so much. Wjr contemporaneous storytelling about her where she was filling the cannon with water and which was the pitcher and the man was husband boyfriend whatever was shot and she there's I think there's a very famous painting of her wielding the device that you shove down the cannon to Cantu into Philly and of course back in that period because of the kind of cannon they're using they needed to put the water in to make sure that there's no fire left from the last round when they put the powder could blow up before you wanted to be in the powder's rise well she actually at least by mythology she played it. You know she was one of those heroics years and that sort of helped build the morale in the sense of potential victory right when you add up all of these stories you really see but an incredible contribution these women make and let's not leave out the fundraising and seventeen nine eighty. It was a low point in the war. The French hadn't arrived yet. The British had New York and Charleston and soldiers were feeling very undefeated. Esther divert read who was an English immigrant who became a rabid Patriot was the wife of Joseph Reed who who was the governor of Pennsylvania and one of Washington's right hand man and she published in the newspapers the sentiments of an American woman calling rolling on women to sacrifice for the men in the army and then start a fund raising drive and they kept wonderful records record they went house to house around Philadelphia mainly but also in the other colonies the first lady's in each colony ran the driving even in fact. It's the only extant letter of Martha Jefferson that we have of her asking the women have to contribute to the fund for the soldiers and a few weeks they raised three hundred thousand dollars and at that point Robert Morrison cronies were trying to start start a bank and they had only raised three hundred sixty thousand dollars so the women did something quite remarkable and it contributed mightily to soldier morale other other lots and lots of newspaper articles attesting to that so they were just all kinds of ways that they made their ability available to this new nation. Let me take these last couple of minutes and switch gears pretty dramatically on you. You've had a remarkable career. You grew up with remarkable parents. Both your father and your mother had remarkable careers and you have carved out of niche for yourself as a journalist historian and as somebody who has an observer of our time and interpreter of the past if a young man or woman came to you and and said what's your advice given all the things you've been through all the things you've done. What advice would you give to a young person today. The you've learned do you think would and help them on the path they're on. I would say and I'm not just saying this because I'm talking to you. I would say find a way to contribute to the public preferably through public service. I am a great admirers of people who put themselves on the line the Famous Mrs Roosevelt Man in the arena and now thankfully women in the arena. I know how hard public services and I greatly admire the people who are willing to do it. I think that that is the way the nation thrives and grows and comes to understand our changes as an American American society is by young people taking on that obligation and being willing to fulfill it and I know it's tough I really do and I've always felt guilty about not doing it myself. I'm the only member of my original nuclear family not to run for Congress but I've tried to contribute by explaining leaning American government but I do think that we need the participation of the citizenry in any way that they feel that they can do it and I would advise any young person to whatever else they do to also a very participatory citizens citizenship comes in many ways. I would argue it as a journalist who has really tried to understand of course you came from a unique insight in very few journalists had quite the background of their childhood the you had but I've always felt like you were really trying to understand and explain. This process of self government that on on the one hand is very robust and on the other hand is very very fragile in that sense. I guess I'd echo he said except I'd say that citizenship can come in many forms and that if you figure out your particular path for citizenship you can do an amazing amount for America and do it in a way which is interesting and fascinating this leads to a good life. I couldn't agree more issue of her. Happy Mother's life thank you. I'm happy to say that I now have middle aged. Children and sixteen grandchildren looking forward today with you very much. Thank you so much lovely..

Mercy Otis Chris Warren rape Harvard Tom Paine Boston General Motors Deborah Samson Washington Congress Mrs Roosevelt Man West Point Rhode New Jersey Sergeant Murray Robert Robert Shirt Martha Jefferson
"cokie roberts" Discussed on Newt's World

Newt's World

10:17 min | 1 year ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on Newt's World

"I think the woman who gets the most attention because of the quality of letters is Abigail. Adams took herself seriously and obviously John Adams took Asia too but she's really a remarkable shift from Martha Washington in style. I sort of wonder sometimes how they must have gotten along or not. Gotten along is is kind of a classic south-north thing isn't it you know Martha graciously on the plantation entertaining endlessly Abigail Breath frugally in New England trying to keep body until together she I mean she was. She didn't in addition to her smarts. AH POLITICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL SMART The way she managed to support that family is just incredible. I mean you go to their first house and it's the size of most people's living rooms today and she had four little kids there and she had soldiers coming in stained from time to time time and she had been who was never home and she managed to keep it all together while keeping it all together to think think great thoughts about what the future of the country should be. She said at one point John. You know we women are really better patriots than you are. Because here we are are suffering all the hardships of this war and making all the sacrifices and if we win you men are going to be held in high regard and hold hold high office and we won't even be able to vote so we're better patriots than you are and I must say he agreed what strikes me about her is both her assertiveness in her clarity that this is a person who is confident in her right to be direct and who thought deeply in seriously about what she was going to be direct about but these are serious letters absolutely and of course we sell blessed because they fastened of them. He was gone so much she wrote him in Philadelphia Philidelphia. She wrote to him and Paris. She wrote to him in Holland. She wrote him all the time and then finally finally joined him. There are long stretches there and he really relied on her. When he became president she was back at the farm trying to get everything settled before she came to Philadelphia. Elsia and his mother was dying and you know she was very businesslike about all this and he kept writing her letter after letter. They're saying you've got to come. I must have you. I can't do this without you and stop worrying about my mother worry about me. He does say that at one point. He was totally reliant on her. Now tell you I think that when she became first lady that she fell in trapped in the way that so so many people in the White House do not that she was in the White House so the very end but in the executive mansion do which is that they've become so ooh isolated and so convinced that they are inside doing the truth right suggest and everybody outside is out to get them that she became less useful politically because she was so offended by the controversy and the opposition and all of that and so she became a huge supporter of the alien and sedition acts and that was a death blow to John. I'm curious. Whether any of the letters the youth found particularly moving the use really thought this is something for the ages of the ages because she is so smart and she sometimes it's so direct as you say she at one point again before the war she went to Church and the preacher was counseling that they get along better with England. You know reconciliation and she was furious. We're not reconciling with those people and the letter is very directed funny but you know the most touching one actually that I found was from John Adams when Abigail lost a baby and the baby was full term and she was very frightened that she was going to die and he was in Baltimore where Congress had gone to escape. The British letters take awhile so he writes through at one point and says you must have had the baby my now. I'm so eager to know oh about this new life and then and then he learned that the baby had died and he is just heartbroken and his letter is so ooh affecting about how he feels so on done by this life he never met it really gives you the stumps which he's really kind of John Adams you don't normally think of exactly he's usually so gruff and sort of clueless about how to deal it was people and in this case he's just a sad daddy. Now does a dramatic difference between Abigail and dolley Madison with Abigail. You get this really intellectual. WHO's thinking about all this and with dolley madison the you know the great moment is an action moment when when she saves Washington's painting when the British burning the White House kind of fascinating difference in the personalities well. I can make a case though the dolley Madison kept this country together in a way that was absolutely necessary throughout the early republic as the partisanship. Yep was getting reifer and Reifer and of course the sectionalism she was the person who made the congress come together and it started when she was secretary. Shave State Jefferson was such an odd creature and she's the person who entertained and she had the events at their house on F street and then when they were in the White House. She did it as well sixteen years of dolley Madison as the premier hostess in Washington where she made everybody come together. Drink some wine together. Have some punch and behave and it's where all of the deals were made. It's real all the information was exchanged and at one point. The federalist thought that they could boycott her squeezes. They were called and then they discovered they didn't know anything anything if they did that so they had to relent and go back because that was where business got done but she was brilliant about it and at one point Henry Clay said to her. Everybody loves Mrs Madison. She said well. That's because Mrs Madison loves everybody now. I've read her male. That's not true but that was the way she came across and when she laughed when the Madison Presidency was over the newspapers including including the federalist newspapers just wrote these pans appraised or you know these over the top tributes to her glory having come into the city and she shown upon it and then it disappearing she had her few years back at my failure but then she came back to Washington for much of her old age and remained very much a presence so she had a seat in the House of Representatives she was always consulted by the president's and First Lady's always visited by visiting heads of state. She really first lady for close to half a century. You mentioned how strange Jefferson Russian was. He's kind of an odd duck. He is very much so my mother always said he was a spoiled. Brat and that's probably true but he is I mean he was so oh smart thought great thoughts all the time but he was just such a bag of contradictions. I mean he knew slavery was wrong and yet he couldn't get away from it. He was so odd about religion and with women he had good relationships with women but always talked about how he didn't think women should be involved in anything political and that they had ruined France all of that but then he would have these long on political exchanges women so he was quite complicated when he was in the White House he would have federalist to dinner one night. Republicans incident or another night so that he could say different things to different people but you know the Sally hemmings scandal broke people don't realize this in eighteen o two it was in the papers in the second year of his presidency so he kept begging his daughters to come into Washington to basically serve as copper and they would come from time to time is younger daughter. Maria died in childbirth while he was president but what is older daughter. Martha came had the first baby and the White House James Madison Randolph and he was always after them to to come and be with him even as he would write letter saying women shouldn't be involved in these things he he was a complicated person. Captures just the degree to which that complexity in that sort of intellectual aloofness created a vacuum that dolley Madison could fill in her willingness us to do that if we had one or two dining rooms in this city today that were explicitly bipartisan the the city would probably be a lot healthier place absolutely absolutely would be and you know when I was growing up. That was very much the case but you know we live in different times best. Trauma Truman became president after Eleanor Roosevelt. She said that she was coming into the hardest job. Since Elizabeth Monroe came in after Dolly Life Matt so it was coming in after a very vibrant person when we come back not all founding mothers are or like next will reveal the mother who is one of the most influential and unique voices Verti-.

dolley madison John Adams White House Martha Washington Abigail Breath president first house Washington Congress James Madison Randolph New England Asia Philadelphia Philidelphia Elizabeth Monroe Henry Clay Sally hemmings Elsia Eleanor Roosevelt Holland
"cokie roberts" Discussed on Newt's World

Newt's World

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on Newt's World

"Cokie. Roberts was a colleague a friend and a respected journalist and author. I've known her personally since she began covering Capitol Capitol Hill for National Public Radio in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight Co.. He passed away this week at the age of seventy five from complications involving elving breast cancer our miseries. I think virtually everybody who cares about civility and decency in Washington will muskogee. She was born the Mary Martha Corinne Morrison Kleber Bugs even by New Orleans standards. That is quite a name. She's born back on December number. Twenty seven nineteen forty-three with all those names she got the name cokie from her older brother because he couldn't pronounce grin and he dubbed dubbed her cokie and it stuck her parents were members of Congress. Hale Boggs was the democratic whip tragically lost in the airplane crashed in Alaska. Here's succeeded in Congress by Lindy Boggs. His wife Cokie is survived by her husband of fifty three years journalist author and Professor Steve Robert Her children Lee Robertson Rebecca Roberts and her six grandchildren cokie was first and foremost a wife mother sister daughter and cousin in front and then she was a great career news person who really helped shape much of modern journalist career. She's been referred to as a founding mother for paving the way for women journalists across the industry this episode of neutral we are reentering the episode we record cookie for Mother's Day about her book. Founding Mothers.

Rebecca Roberts Hale Boggs Congress Mary Martha Corinne Morrison Lindy Boggs Cokie Professor Steve Robert Her muskogee Washington Co Lee Robertson New Orleans Alaska fifty three years
"cokie roberts" Discussed on Powerhouse Politics

Powerhouse Politics

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on Powerhouse Politics

"Of these handwritten notebooks and it was down to the Congressional district that she knew California forty two versus forty three and was pointing out how little errors that we had in our research and asking questions and again the night before the election. She's sitting there with her own spreadsheets that we're all hand-drawn in her notebooks where she's handicapping how many seats the Democrats would need and where they would come from and how the night would play out and I'm just thinking you know what she's at a stage people. She was literally a living legend right. You've been named so by the Library of Congress but she didn't live on that legacy. She could have just if at that point in her career as as someone from a political family the legendary journalist she could have just gone out there and and set a couple of things and it would have been a good night. That wasn't how she worked. She had all of this research all of this stuff at the ready every time we talk to her John. She'd surprise you with some tidbit or have some insight or some piece of reporting that you just didn't know and also the first rick to to respond when we when when you you had some bit of reporting yourself or some something that you were we live on email here all the cooking cokie reply I mean she she was she was in tune and in tune to also what what the the newbies. I mean you you you. You Rick You you. You know you have this group of incredibly talented in many of them very green. you know young journalists who are embeds out on on the campaign and and she I mean she's a mentor and has been a mentor. you know every every four years that class of embeds gets to know. Oh and here from cokie Roberts and you guys I only learned about some of it today in the wake of passing because people are are tests texting or sending emails or putting on twitter about their recollections elections and you find out that entire generations of reporters some of whom are still out in the field now others of whom have gone on to bigger and better things beyond that they all have these he's not that they have saved and printed out from cokie. Roberts and I didn't know sometimes she'd hit reply all accident so we found out but often it was just a private note of encouragement or just to check up on the human nature. I know when I started at ABC back in two thousand seven I had never been in the network before I was awed by these giants of the industry that I was working with people like Charlie Gibson Gibson and Sam Donaldson and Diane Sawyer and Cokie Roberts and when I wrote my first edition of the note back in April two thousand seven. ABC's one one of the responses I got almost immediately was from Kochi San thanking me for being smart not snarky and I saved that and and it's it's printed out in defiled roar of the kind of a kind of reminiscence that you go back to when you need it in the low times and it was that part of the tradition the way that she carried on the tradition of ABC News and political reporting it it was just it was on inspiring and I. I hope that that we now is veteran. Journalists can only do a portion of which she did in terms of mentorship sometimes sometimes implicitly and explicitly bringing people along and and she didn't like the snark and she was she was serious. She had integrity she came from a political family family. became a journalist and took that took the responsibility of of journalism seriously and I think it was uncomfortable when she saw uh journalists veer into partisanship or you know straight. SNARK MSCI respected the the the people we were covering but cheat she she called it called him out. Oh yes you call them out but I always thought the difference John and maybe this is being from a political family is that she didn't she. She didn't rush to ascribe evil motivation to to to to to politicians. She knew that they're human beings most of whom are out there to do the right thing or trying to do the right thing and she didn't need to be out there with the with the quickest commentary condemning something she understood she knew a lot of these men and women frankly on a personal level so that that helps but I s I aspire to that in in the political reporting that I do is to take the men and women that you run into in our jobs at face value until they give the reason not to but there's no reason to to rush to to to to have the the smartest and espn to say about someone when there's just such fascinating things that are going on you want to be learning learning from the people that that you are around you don't need to be passing judgment and somehow she always found a way to educate without feeling didactic and to and into judge sometimes but without feeling judgmental and she didn't like the reverse where politicians might be snarky to journalists. She felt that it should always stay at a very respectable level. Well Rick. Thank you for joining us. Where are you by the way I'm in Chicago on my weight. Iowa out to hit the trail a little a bit and hopefully make cokie proud well. I think I think coke would appreciate you. Were calling us. I in route to Iowa. Thanks thanks a lot recline. Thanks guys yet yeah. There was something somebody just sent me a picture as as we're here on the set I believe the two thousand eight election night set and you know sitting next to cokie Roberts key mashed. Let me just you know to be to to be there with somebody that I mean I had such enormous respect for and I had grown up learning from and watching and into to find out that that couldn't be a nicer for more generous colleague John. I found that handwritten letter of recommendation that Tokyo wrote for me when I was applying to Grad school back when I had just started. ABC and this is just a classic coke line. She said of me she has the great good sense to understand that she needs to accumulate more knowledge in order to be a useful journalists that is which basically means like keep learning kid. You got a lot to do but that's never stopped. She was still writing her own charts and spreadsheets for the midterms and looking up very minute house data and demographic data. She never stopped learning and it shows that in this industry history you could just sit back and pontificate and analyze talk but no she was still a practitioner of this and she was a reporter and she was still trying to you. Get the story so I think I think the essence of this the the the kind of maybe we should go back and read are kind of cookies guide journalism but but but I think it's it's it's do your homework know what's going on be prepared and it wasn't so part of that is what Rick was referring to you know she she knew the current landscape she new the player. She knew what was going on. She she took the research that our folks here at ABC. We're doing our own research. She talked to her own people but then that's one aspect of it. The other is the history because she spent so much time immersed. I mean she wrote her books but she spent so much time are immersed in American political history and you know those those two things I think were essential and if I can add a third word. It's the it's the respect it's respect for the people you're covering. That doesn't mean you're not really hard on them when you have to be it doesn't mean that you you know don't point it out. When they say something that is ridiculous or or hypocritical or not true she did that without fear and without hesitation Asian but she did you know treat the people that she was covering with respect and you know not like I said you know somebody jumped to the all politicians all jeep. She came from a family of politicians complicated people and she always also always did her homework. You all we're talking about the spreadsheets. Whenever we did any kind of interview or went on the campaign trail she had a thick folder tons of paper. She was also a historian just as much as a journalist ask anything about Abigail Adams make one mistake on that and and not just Abigail Abigail Adams. I mean you know hey. This is harding. Tell you all right. We we have to take a quick break. I WANNA I wanNA really thank every Miller and Karen traverse T to new cokie as well as anybody here at ABC News for sharing those recollections the the big journalism ones but also the personal ones we back.

Rick You ABC cokie Roberts cokie Abigail Adams John reporter Library of Congress ABC News Congressional district Iowa California Chicago twitter coke Charlie Gibson Gibson Miller Tokyo Grad school
"cokie roberts" Discussed on Powerhouse Politics

Powerhouse Politics

12:23 min | 1 year ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on Powerhouse Politics

"The stories you will tau will be special and different because of who you are welcome to special edition of powerhouse politics. I'm ABC News Chief White House correspondent Jonathan Karl and today we remember a friend a mentor colleague and one of my favorite human beings on the face of the earth cokie Roberts cokie our ABC News family. The rest of the world lured died two complications breast cancer we will be talking to her friends here at ABC. Remembering some of the incredible high points in boy were there many of her career as a journalist. I have to say say I came to ABC News more than fifteen years ago and cokie Roberts. I revered her. I was in awe of her and I walked into. ABC See News and the idea that I was going to be working at the same place as cokie. Roberts was something that that meant a lot to me. I grew up watching her her the combination of her our passion for history and her passion for politics her sense of humor. I it was amazing and what what the most surprising lied to me is how generous a colleague she was when I came in I was you know a Nubia. ABC It can be a tough place to come in from the outside and she welcome come to me with open arms and I wanna I wanna just start with with a moment that I shared with Kochi on the floor of the Democratic convention in Philadelphia Alfie in two thousand sixteen because I when I think of national political conventions I think cokie Roberts because as I grew up and I watched the conventions and one of the things that I remembered democratic and republican conventions we're seeing cokie. Roberts on the floor often generating more attention and excitement and the people she was trying to interview. She certainly more well known than most of them so I had a chance. This was a little bit of a thrill. I I mean I I you know cokie friend and a colleague but still still hit me I had a chance to interview cokie myself from the floor of the convention and I just WanNa play the very beginning of this interview because she she comes forward with a piece of information that kind of blew me away. I've got a really special guest this one. It means a lot to me. I've got cokie. Roberts and let me tell you when I think of political conventions when I think of national conventions I think cokie Roberts on the floor. You're I've seen you on the floor the floor reporter. Yes so I'm GONNA ask you. You don't have to answer it but I'm GonNa ask you. How many of these things have you been into the twenty second. Twenty guests can use just absorb that for a second twenty two conventions incredible spine find the will nominate a woman there you go with the sense of humor so that's cokie twenty two conventions obviously many as a young child with with with her parents and then as as a journalist so. I am joined right now by two of my ABC News of friends and colleagues on the on the White House what we call the Pennsylvania Avenue Unit Avery Miller of worked with for almost as long as I've been at ABC and Karen Travers who is side by aside with me in in the White House booth and with both of you you both have uniquely strong connections to Cokie Roberts and John as producers at this is Avery Miller have producer at ABC News and we try to stay behind the scenes but John Convinced both Karen and me to come on the podcast but very spoiled I been that ABC for twenty five years. I was Kochi's campaign producer up for a lot of that time together we interviewed Barbara Bush Laura Bush Gerald Four for George Bush Lynne Cheney Warren Buffett and she was just always the consummate professional You said that she was so well. Known tried traveling in an airport with cokie Roberts. We used to be mobbed and I used to tease her. How many refrigerators I do think your photo is on Cokie and she just laughed so modest but we we had one interview that I was reminiscing talking about that we were in Houston and we were supposed to do the very first interview with Laura Bush Barbara Bush together it was before the Iowa caucuses and typical cokie she sort of set it up and there were a lot of dynamics going on between Laura Bush as we know oh the daughter in law mother-in-law and cokie said you have said that he's in temperament and personality a lot like his mother and I remember Barbara leaning forward and saying they love and that was just consummate cokie she would get interviews news and emotions and such genuine truth out of people as they spoke I've been at ABC. This is Karen Travers for nineteen years and I'm here because of Kochi and every cokie spoke when I was an intern on Capitol Hill. It was a book signing. I have the book that she signed for me that that day on my shelf. I have a photo that I took with Kochi in nineteen ninety eight or nine hundred ninety nine and after meeting her the impression she made and just from seeing her work the only place I applied for an internship was ABC's this week and I only emailed avery I went around all of the process and just emailed avery directly because I found her name and had the privilege of working for Kochi and avery during the two thousand primaries and have been here ever since and Cokie was such a mentor to me and to so many especially especially young women at ABC she came into journalism with an incredible pedigree to parents are both members of Congress. She was the consummate Washington family but she did her own path. She worked her way up the ranks and never was somebody that was that came off does the insider she was still so kind and generous and she fought for her place at the roundtable this week's roundtable and the conversation in Washington and she always always impressed upon me and others. ABC How to make your voice heard. Do Good Work but be a nice person when you did it. You didn't have to change who you were to ask. It's tough questions and to get information. You do it with a smile. cokie would do it with it. Jabeen Grin when she has questions and Democrats and Republicans she she was aggressive passive and she called out. Es You know she she knew what was going on and if it didn't matter that there was no there was no theology there frankly and and and and how you know she took on the newsmakers but also also her own colleagues and and yet such a genuine genuine genuine and and kind and generous person you know I I this is just so amazing but I mean it was just about about two weeks ago that she took my daughter emily out to lunch and coke was going through all that she's been going through healthwise and she sent me this lovely note about my mazing daughter who she is mad at conventions in and around she kinda grew up with as well and I mean she's just so so she was. She was a mentor to to a lot of young women in this business and also a lot of people like me. I mean I I'm reading this book. Talk about my experience covering trump. It's a book that I'm writing in part because cokie encourage that and she was one of the very first people I had read my early chapters and when you know when I didn't know whether or not I was on the right track. I was going in the right way. She told me I was told me places where I wasn't and called out at least two errors in the history of things and I thought I was damn right about and she was like and you know I i. I just absolutely love it but I think I mean avery you. You worked for her on you know basically at she was at the peak of the profession I when she was the kind of person that could get you know a first lady and a future first lady together for a joint interview. I mean not many people could pull that off. interviewing people said Gerald Ford Presidents candidates for president but there's a personal side to her and she was just always always I mean we've talked about being a mentor but family I to you never ever hesitated to tell cokie. If there was something personal especially especially with our frenetic schedules she was at I will still never forget. I just had my baby girl and the nurse poked her head in to the AH Romans said to me. I think cokie Roberts in the hallway wanting to see you and my stock went up dramatically she asking for help on a story. I want to be sure because I might stop by and say you know when she walked in that door. There was never anything anything professional and I mean John even today. I'm getting these beautiful texts from friends of mine that she had connected with when I had said you know. This friend of mine has breast cancer can you cokie didn't know this person but she always tried to help with medical advice or the best doctors or and she just never has stated to do that and it was always family first when you would see her in the hallway she wouldn't ask. What was the best scoop you had recently. Or what story are you working on today. It was always how are the kids Ed's. How is life or are you doing anything interesting and an anecdote that I love about coke. Is that in two thousand fifteen or we had twins and they spent several months in the hospital. Kochi is the grandmother of twin so she knew what we were going through and she was incredibly kind. She checked in on me almost every week just to see how we were doing and when the twins were in the hospital title cokie signed up on the Google doc where our friends were giving us food cokie signed in and said what day she was going to bring food and she dropped it off herself. Oh five a text message from her. That just said hey travers. cokie left the food on your porch. Don't WanNa talk like you've got a lot going on. She had made homemade Louisiana of course food she was also. I think the only person in all of that wonderful generosity we got who also gave three bottles of wine to go with the food because she said I know what you really need right now and she I had friends saying I'm looking to sign up for food. Is that the cokie Roberts. That's on that list is it. It is the COKIE. Roberts and I got called out for this today on ABC News digital but I didn't return the dishes she had brought all the food in and I asked her once. Can I bring this back. Should I know it's not worth it so we have our cokie dishes that we differ leftovers. I have several of them which are lovely with Nice lids so we have. I believe Trevor Hastings our executive accurate producer. Has I believe recline on the on the line here right rick. Hey guys how are you sir rick. A cokie was a a regular on the powerhouse politics six podcast and I think it's fair to say one of our favorite guests. Oh no question question and you always knew she brought something. I mean that was the astounding thing is that the amount of history in her brain she was always studying always reading always asking questions always probing for more information. I- accumulating more knowledge all the time and that's the depth that she brought to any conversation and you could ask her about the state of a house race or a Senate race and she wanted to gossip soup about the latest in the presidential race. You always had a little bit of dish. She had heard from a friend who was at a fundraiser or or something like that. I just remember through the midterms last year. You know we do all of this fancy research for contributors so that people like giancarl frankly don't have to do all the hard work so we've done all this work on all these races says now cokie shows up with all.

cokie Roberts Cokie ABC Kochi ABC News Avery Miller travers. cokie producer Laura Bush Barbara Bush John Jonathan Karl White House Chief White House corresponden Laura Bush Barbara Bush Karen Travers
"cokie roberts" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"Online connect with new new customers and work more productively learn more at Google dot com slash growl what happens when Ronald McDonald walks into a poor immigrant neighborhood in south of France and sets off a supersized revolution story of how a company slogan to sell shakes and Burgers became a rallying cry for workers in France. NPR's rough translation and we're back back and not a surprise to anyone but the NPR family isn't the only family that is really sad today about the loss of cokie Roberts Michelle Shell and Barack Obama the former president put out a statement this comes from President Obama former President Obama Michelle and I are sad to hear about the passing cokie Roberts. She was a trail-blazing figure a role model to young women at a time when the profession was still dominated by men a constant over forty years of shifting media landscape landscape and changing world informing voters about the issues of our time and mentoring young journalists every step of the way she will be missed and we send our condolences to her family only I want to pick up on the mentoring part because we heard we heard Mahras story there. I have a note here from Susan stamper. Another of the founding mothers you just mentioned and it says she volunteered to go cover three mile island. Now people will remember of course that was the nuclear near disaster the near nuclear clear meltdown in Harrisburg Pennsylvania and I believe Nineteen seventy-nine people didn't know how dangerous it was or how dangerous is going to be Susan Rice. She volunteered to go cover. Three Mile Island said send me not one of the young ones. I've had all the children I'm GonNa have and she burned the suit. She'd worn there but you got back breath. I think of that now because she was thinking about people other than yourself. That doesn't surprise me one bit I would say that's exactly the cokie Roberts that I knew but like all stories involving legends and larger than life figures as cokie Roberts is fast becoming stories stories like that often have a different version and here's Kochi's the real reason was that I could drive. NPR At the time was driving impaired shop. several of our correspondents have been raised in Manhattan and never learned to drive a car others like Linda Wertheimer didn't drive because she had had a bad accident student when she was young and none of us wanted Nina Totenberg to drive because her eyesight is so bad so I could drive the two plus hours to Harrisburg so I was the the designated driver reporter on the scene that is beautiful. Just she was a great human being she was a great human being yes. I can say that from personal experience so what's your personal experienced him no she was just just incredibly encouraging giving nudges when nudges were needed and I mean going back to when I was a teenager and sent letters to all these NPR NPR personalities asking them how to do what they did. When I grow up she responded she called left me a message said whatever you do don't mean you're communications all right and did you follow that advice. Absolutely I majored in philosophy. There's no way I'd major in communications. cokie. Roberts told me not to all right nothing nothing against those who may be listening to majored in communications absolutely but if young people ask me for advice. What do I tell them. I just repeat cokie said be more like cokie. Be More like cokie. That's great so cokie. Roberts was this fixture on air for many many years and because she was a fixture on morning edition she frequently did her segment live from home so you know we have magical little boxes and devices that make it possible for us to be on the radio without actually doing our hair sometimes and when when you think of coke there is one moment that a lot of people remember it involves both cokie and someone named abner toast across the country. Liberal Democrats don't mm care for it either because we haven't heard much from them that was a Basset Hound and I think that was given Phillips and Edwards Condition and Abner the Basset Hound and then later because she definitely had a sense of humor she did an interview on NPR about abner the dog's appearance on morning edition he is about four years old brown and white very long ears and very sad eyes and he has been very very eager to make his radio debut. This has been a difficult task to keep him away from the microphone. This dog wants to be a radio dog and Wednesday morning. My husband happened to be up. Let him into the room next to the room. Where we were broadcasting bob. He was outside of a door behind closed doors ars while he was barking. He wasn't right at the microphone. If he had been I would have introduced him. Good lungs in that house all the way around so uh he really wanted to be on the air wasn't a case of his needing to go outside had been outside. I had been up for an hour. Just fed the beast. The dog eats. It's anything he can get. This dog can open the icebox door helps himself and the thing that really irritates me is then he doesn't close it will abner has a lot of fans conceivably good as on program here. He doesn't seem to talk on cute and I'm not sure how good he is talking to time but but he is a a a dog well worth getting to know one more appearance on morning edition and he has to join the Union. I think that's absolutely right but then of course he'll have a a good retirement plan. Thank you very much. NPR's cokie Roberts that was glorious and a great way to end on something a little bit happy happy. Thank you Steve and Mara for taking time today glad to do it and that is a wrap for today. We will be back as soon as there's the news you need to know about. I'm Tamra Keith and thank you for listening to NPR politics podcast uh-huh..

cokie Roberts NPR abner toast Harrisburg Roberts Michelle Shell Barack Obama Three Mile Island president Obama Michelle Susan stamper France Google Ronald McDonald Mahras Susan Rice Burgers Kochi Linda Wertheimer Nina Totenberg
Remembering journalist Cokie Roberts

NPR Politics Podcast

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Remembering journalist Cokie Roberts

"And we're back back and not a surprise to anyone but the NPR family isn't the only family that is really sad today about the loss of cokie Roberts Michelle Shell and Barack Obama the former president put out a statement this comes from President Obama former President Obama Michelle and I are sad to hear about the passing cokie Roberts. She was a trail-blazing figure a role model to young women at a time when the profession was still dominated by men a constant over forty years of shifting media landscape landscape and changing world informing voters about the issues of our time and mentoring young journalists every step of the way she will be missed and we send our condolences to her family only I want to pick up on the mentoring part because we heard we heard Mahras story there. I have a note here from Susan stamper. Another of the founding mothers you just mentioned and it says she volunteered to go cover three mile island. Now people will remember of course that was the nuclear near disaster the near nuclear clear meltdown in Harrisburg Pennsylvania and I believe Nineteen seventy-nine people didn't know how dangerous it was or how dangerous is going to be Susan Rice. She volunteered to go cover. Three Mile Island said send me not one of the young ones. I've had all the children I'm GonNa have and she burned the suit. She'd worn there but you got back breath. I think of that now because she was thinking about people other than yourself. That doesn't surprise me one bit I would say that's exactly the cokie Roberts that I knew but like all stories involving legends and larger than life figures as cokie Roberts is fast becoming stories stories like that often have a different version and here's Kochi's the real reason was that I could drive. NPR At the time was driving impaired shop. several of our correspondents have been raised in Manhattan and never learned to drive a car others like Linda Wertheimer didn't drive because she had had a bad accident student when she was young and none of us wanted Nina Totenberg to drive because her eyesight is so bad so I could drive the two plus hours to Harrisburg so I was the the designated driver reporter on the scene that is beautiful. Just she was a great human being she was a great human being yes. I can say that from personal experience so what's your personal experienced him no she was just just incredibly encouraging giving nudges when nudges were needed and I mean going back to when I was a teenager and sent letters to all these NPR NPR personalities asking them how to do what they did. When I grow up she responded she called left me a message said whatever you do don't mean you're communications all right and did you follow that advice. Absolutely I majored in philosophy. There's no way I'd major in communications. cokie. Roberts told me not to all right nothing nothing against those who may be listening to majored in communications absolutely but if young people ask me for advice. What do I tell them. I just repeat cokie said be more like cokie. Be More like cokie. That's great so cokie. Roberts was this fixture on air for many many years and because she was a fixture on morning edition she frequently did her segment live from home so you know we have magical little boxes and devices that make it possible for us to be on the radio without actually doing our hair sometimes and when when you think of coke there is one moment that a lot of people remember it involves both cokie and someone named abner toast across the country. Liberal Democrats don't mm care for it either because we haven't heard much from them that was a Basset Hound and I think that was given Phillips and Edwards Condition and Abner the Basset Hound and then later because she definitely had a sense of humor she did an interview on NPR about abner the dog's appearance on morning edition he is about four years old brown and white very long ears and very sad eyes and he has been very very eager to make his radio debut. This has been a difficult task to keep him away from the microphone. This dog wants to be a radio dog and Wednesday morning. My husband happened to be up. Let him into the room next to the room. Where we were broadcasting bob. He was outside of a door behind closed doors ars while he was barking. He wasn't right at the microphone. If he had been I would have introduced him. Good lungs in that house all the way around so uh he really wanted to be on the air wasn't a case of his needing to go outside had been outside. I had been up for an hour. Just fed the beast. The dog eats. It's anything he can get. This dog can open the icebox door helps himself and the thing that really irritates me is then he doesn't close it will abner has a lot of fans conceivably good as on program here. He doesn't seem to talk on cute and I'm not sure how good he is talking to time but but he is a a a dog well worth getting to know one more appearance on morning edition and he has to join the Union. I think that's absolutely right but then of course he'll have a a good retirement plan. Thank you very much. NPR's cokie Roberts that was glorious and a great way to end on something a little bit happy happy. Thank you Steve and Mara for taking time today glad to do it and that is a wrap for today. We will be back as soon as there's the news you need to know about. I'm Tamra Keith and thank you for listening to NPR politics podcast

Cokie Roberts NPR Abner Toast Three Mile Island Harrisburg Roberts Michelle Shell Barack Obama President Trump Obama Michelle Susan Stamper Susan Rice Mahras Pennsylvania Kochi Linda Wertheimer Nina Totenberg Union Tamra Keith Phillips
Veteran broadcast journalist Cokie Roberts dead at 75

Morning Edition

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Veteran broadcast journalist Cokie Roberts dead at 75

"Veteran NPR and ABC news political journalist Cokie Roberts has died Roberts died today in Washington DC from complications of breast cancer she was seventy five Roberts was known as one of N. P. R.'s founding mothers an imperious don Gonyea reports she was among the first women to rise to the top levels broadcast journalism Cokie Roberts started covering Congress for NPR in nineteen seventy eight she came from a political family her father was Louisiana congressman Hale Boggs he was democratic Majority Leader when he was killed in a plane crash in nineteen seventy two her mother Lindy Boggs then one that seat in Congress Roberts new politicians and future presidents as family friends this is from C. spanning twenty fifteen it has given me empathy for politicians I know that they go home at night too you know rowdy households and homework and all of that and and that they are regular people who deal with regular issues Cokie Roberts worked as a commentator for NPR from nineteen ninety two until her death she also hosted this week on ABC news from nineteen ninety six to two

NPR N. P. R. Don Gonyea Cokie Roberts Congress Lindy Boggs ABC Washington Louisiana Congressman Congress Roberts
People are again talking about slavery reparations

Morning Edition

03:16 min | 2 years ago

People are again talking about slavery reparations

"The subject of reparations for slavery has now entered the presidential contest democratic candidates repeatedly asked about this subject. Supporters of some sort of reparations often point to the fact that the United States has paid them in the past the legislation that I am about to sign provides for restitution payment to each of the sixty thousand survivors, of course, former president Ronald Reagan there with that law the nation, formerly apologized to Japanese Americans for their internment in World War Two and provided token monetary compensation the debate over reparations for slavery is our topic that we're covering this week s Cokie segment and commentator Cokie Roberts is here with us. I koki. Hi, David first listener, we have a MandA Trammell. She wants to know whether all this talk of reparations is something new there ever been a serious discussion about reparations for slavery in the pet. Absolutely. A former congressman John Conyers introduced legislation in every congress from nineteen eighty nine. On to establish a commission to study and develop reparation proposals for African Americans. It was reintroduced on the first day of the current congress by Texas congresswoman, Sheila jackson-lee, some form of what you might call reparations actually dates back to the end of the civil war when general Sherman promised land, freed slaves that came to be called, forty acres immutable like many such promises it was later, broken slave owners and the district of Columbia, however were compensated when the enslaved people in the capital refrained before general emancipation will we have another listener it's Eggers. And she wanted to know what has happened to all these other efforts to achieve reparations have attempt for reparation happened before in the US. Well, as you said earlier in nineteen eighty eight a law was passed giving living Japanese Americans who had been in intern not their states twenty thousand tax free dollars each but more important to the supporters. Of the Bill was the formal apology by the government and in nineteen seventy one the Alaskan native settlement act gave native peoples to title, more than forty million acres of land and did establish a fun to somewhat compensate them for lands and rights. They had lost in nineteen Ninety-three. President Clinton signed the apology resolution to native Hawaiians for overthrowing the islands. Monarchy cook, I'm just curious have all the efforts that we've seen or talked about been federal or have there been local or other kinds of of reparations. Well, we saw last week Georgetown University students of voting to establish a fund for the descendants of the enslaved people at Georgetown who had been sold by the university, and you have states and some cities that have in fact, inactive reparations, but for very specific wrongdoings. So for Jinya, for example, pay the survivors of its forced sterilizations program and granted scholarships to the residents who have. Been denied in education when the schools were closed during the fight over immigration, Florida gave a substantial sum to the victims of the nineteen Twenty-three horrible rosewood massacre where an entire African American community was burned to the ground. But David there's so many other atrocities that are still being

Manda Trammell United States David Eggers Congressman John Conyers Cokie Roberts Georgetown University President Clinton Ronald Reagan President Trump Sheila Jackson-Lee General Sherman Florida Intern Jinya Texas Georgetown
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KOMO

"From ABC news this week here. Now chief editor George Stephanopoulos. The allegation she's raised her series deserve to be treated with respect. And I hope that she comes in has a full opportunity to tell her story in a way that is respectful. But I also think judge Cavanaugh deserves a full opportunity to defend himself and to let the American people listen and come to an assessment of what happened Dr Ford's allegations should be investigated by the FBI full stop. There's precedent for that. That's the right thing to do given the gravity of the accusations Senator debate Friday night in Texas, not the last time, this is going to be discussed on the campaign trail, we're going to scusi now on cable joined by Cokie Roberts up political analyst, Matthew Dowd, Sheryl Stolberg congressional correspondent for the New York Times, Chris Christie, former New Jersey Governor now contributed here at ABC news and Patrick Gaspard presently open society foundations former political director in the Obama White House, and Cokie, I guess we haven't been quite. Here in since one thousand nine hundred one and eight held Clarence Thomas hard to overstate what's at stake in these hearings. Unbelievable, what's at stake, and in a very different time from the hill and Clarence Thomas. The metoo moment, and there's a tremendous amount of pressure on the committee because of that and a tremendous amount of support for Dr Ford without ever having heard her, and I think that that's going to be something this committee has to deal with and the supreme court will have to deal with and Cheryl you cover you cover this every day for your time in Cairo. This is something I think that. Senate Republicans really did not. Deal with I think they were kind of hoping that she wouldn't testify they were kind of hoping, but really George they can't avoid it for a couple of reasons. First off their Republican senators like Jeff flake who say they want to hear from her. He's on the committee, and he is not comfortable voting until he hears from her, Chris if one of those Republican senators called you up and said, how do we handle this? What's the answer outside counsel asked the questions and insist upon that? There's no way you should let a witness decide who's going to question them. And Secondly is to do what I've been saying for the better part of a week now. The doctor has right to have her allegations heard if she is willing to do that in public, which it sounds like she may be it should be preferably done in public. And then everybody should go ahead and make an assessment of the credibility of both and Catholic. How do the Democrats handle it? I think Democrats have to in this moment. Appreciate that. Everyone has the right to be heard. And.

George Stephanopoulos Clarence Thomas ABC news Cokie Roberts Cheryl Dr Ford Jeff flake Chris Christie judge Cavanaugh Patrick Gaspard editor Matthew Dowd New York Times Obama White House FBI political analyst political director New Jersey Senator Senate
"cokie roberts" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Oh well. Why say it like that just like six? Cokie roberts. Cokie, Cokie Roberts ABC news. Even the women have decided that Ford has to testify because Ford is making these accusations of sexual propriety of Brad Kavanagh when they were both teenagers, then she said, she testify then she said, no, no, I'm not going to testify Monday. No, no, no. There has to be an FBI investigation. A to my liking and the most recent is she's like, okay, I'll testify, but it won't be this Monday. May maybe Thursday of next week. Oh, and and you know, what has to happen? I can only be questioned by members of the judiciary committee. No, no lawyer is allowed to question me. No lawyers are allowed question the only members of the judiciary committee, and and I get to go last Cavanaugh has to testify I and we can't be in the same room together. Well, not being same room together is easy enough. If the members of the committee are the ones who are going to be questioning, you then everybody who's been screaming that the problem with this process is that old white men on the Republican side get to question her, and that's not fair, well Ford, and her lawyers just made it clear that those are the only people won't questioning our which is in and of itself. Interesting, but the big one she demands to go last, she's the accuser, the accused usually is the one who has a chance to respond. She's the accuser, and I'm going to say this as clear as I can. And as respectfully as I can there.

judiciary committee Ford Cokie roberts Cavanaugh Brad Kavanagh FBI
Trump needs Canada deal, or any deal really

Joe Pags

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Trump needs Canada deal, or any deal really

"Weekend President Trump needs, to get an update a trade deal with, Canada and, Mexico says, ABC, news political. Analyst Matthew dowd a former republican strategists this is why most of his voters voted for me was the art of the deal guy right and so he hasn't gotten to deal with north korea he hasn't gotten a deal with iran he hasn't gotten a deal in the middle east he hasn't gotten a deal on trade and now he doesn't have a deal yet on nafta so this to me is the president has to get something done because it's the second most vulnerable

Sarah Palin Matthew Dowd Joe Lieberman Aretha Franklin President Trump Political Analyst Donald Trump Vice President Analyst John Mccain ABC Cokie Roberts North Korea Iran Canada Mexico
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Today at church could lose its tax exemption for actually endorsing candidates but the extent to which faith should overlap with government remains a debated topic you our listeners had many questions about this and rachel martin pose them to commentator cokie roberts and state most ardently in the last century that would be john kennedy because he was under such suspicion as the only catholic to be elected president and just before his presidency a catholic organization the knights of columbus lobbied to get under god in the pledge of allegiance it wasn't there till i was ten years old of course the president who articulated the wall of separation between church and state was jefferson most presidents after him talked about freedom of religion starting in the late nineteenth century you started to hear more about freedom from religion our next question comes from mike cabin and he asks this i don't remember religion being miss involved with politics in the sixties and seventies when did this change or why am i remember hearing wrong but we're religious groups were actually very involved in the civil rights movement of the sixties and the antiwar movement of the seventies and before that i've been involved throughout our history they were on both sides of the slavery debate and many religions were ardent supporters of prohibition what changed in the seventies was the willingness of evangelical christians to get much more involved in politics and they're still at it today trying to remove an amendment to the law that says they can't be involved in politics and president trump is behind them on that.

cokie roberts john kennedy president columbus trump rachel martin ten years
"cokie roberts" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on WCTC

"Welcome to the show you you bring a cokie roberts wash she said about uh everybody knew given elevator with him well i would like to hear and maybe you could find what uh cokie roberts or other female reporters how they reported one mike pence said he wouldn't go out to dinner with someone other than his wife right i i see it is him protecting himself uh and protecting the honor of a woman uh i believe this uh a higher moral uh position then uh but you know most of these democrats are doing and i'd love to hear what the different people is love to hear what joy they had to save when mike pence came out with their you know it's interesting because they really do drop on both sides of things you know where they they and i don't know about coq roberts specifically and i'm not sure that she ever commented on that but certainly the left media in fact that was the whole that's how we learned about it it was a reporter that was clearly on the left that was making this big deal about the fact that the vice president would not sit down and dine alone with another woman well the because it was you know just almost the smarmy approach to you know something that was while that's just weird kind of idea protecting ed than the caller hit on something gary protecting the integrity of your your marriage and the honor of your wife that's a bizarre idea is it so bazaar now which was a a lot of us brought that up at that time apparently uh nobody's mocking mike pence at at yet at this moment that that seems to have uh that seemed to have stopped once all these allegations after weinstein came about right and and clearly and i think the caller hit on something to an and and we've pointed this out before bears repeating the the idea of protecting yourself in that case if you're an right and we was a he was a governor he's he's now the vice president and certainly any en any highprofile position you would want to do that.

cokie roberts mike pence reporter vice president
"cokie roberts" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on WTMA

"To the show you you bring a cokie roberts boyce said about uh everybody knew nothing elevator with him well i would like to hear and maybe you could find blood cokie roberts or other female reporters they reported one mike pence said he wouldn't go out to dinner with someone other than the way right uh i see it is in protecting himself uh and protecting the honor of a woman uh i believe that uh a higher moral uh position no what you know most of these democrats are doing and i'd love to hear what the different people is love to hear what joy they had to save when mike pence came out with you know interesting because they really do drop on both sides of things you know where they they and i don't know about cokie roberts specifically and i'm not sure that she ever commented on that but certainly the left media in fact that was the whole that's how we learned about it it was a reporter that was clearly on the left that was making this big deal about the fact that the vice president would not sit down and dine alone with another woman well the because it was you know just almost this smarmy approach to you know something that was while that's just weird kind of idea protecting ed than the caller hit on something gary protecting the integrity of your your marriage and the honor of your wife that's a bizarre idea is it so bazaar now which was a a lot of us brought that up at that time apparently uh nobody's mocking mike pence it at yet at this moment that that seems to have uh that seemed to have stopped once all these allegations after weinstein came about right and and clearly and i think the caller hit on something to and and and we've pointed this out before bears repeating the the idea of protecting yourself in that case if you're in right and be was a he was a governor he's he's now the vice president and certainly any en any highprofile position you would want to do that.

roberts boyce mike pence reporter vice president
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KKAT

"To the show thank you uh you bring a puk cokie roberts war she said about uh everybody knew nothing elevator with him well i would like to hear and made you could find what uh cokie roberts or other female reporters how they reported one mike pence said he wouldn't go out to dinner with someone other than his wife right uh i think it is him protecting himself uh and protecting the honor of a woman uh i believe that uh a higher moral position but you know most of these democrats are doing and i'd love to hear what the different people love to hear what joy bejart had to save when mike pence came out with their you know interesting because they really do jump on both sides of things you know where they they and i don't know about cokie roberts specifically and i'm not sure that she ever commented on that but certainly the left media in fact that was the whole that's how we learned about it it was a reporter that was clearly on the left that was making this big deal about the fact that the vice president would not sit down and dine alone with another woman well that because it was you know just almost this smarmy abpialage too you know something that was while that's just weird kind of idea protecting that than the kohler hit on something gerry protecting the integrity of your your marriage and the honor of your wife that's a bizarre idea is it so bazaar now which was uh a lot of us brought that up at that time apparently uh nobody's mocking mike pence at at yet at this moment that that seems to have uh that seemed to have stopped once all these allegations after weinstein came about right and and clearly and i think the caller hit on something to and and and we pointed this out before bears repeating the the idea of protecting yourself in that case if you're an right and he was a he was a governor he's he's now the vice president and certainly any en any highprofile position you would want to do that.

cokie roberts mike pence joy bejart reporter vice president kohler gerry
"cokie roberts" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on WCHS

"To the show thank you you bring up uh cokie roberts what she said about uh everybody knew nothing elevator with him well i would like to hear and maybe you could find what uh cokie roberts or other female reporters how they reported one mike pence said he wouldn't go out to dinner with someone other than his wife right uh i see it is in protecting himself uh and protecting the honor of a woman uh i believe it's a higher moral uh position and then uh but you know most of these democrats are doing and i'd love to hear what the different people it love to hear what joy they had to save when mike pence came out with their you know interesting because they really do jump on both sides of things you know where they they and i don't know about cokie roberts specifically and i'm not sure that she ever commented on that but certainly the left media in fact that was the whole that's how we learned about it it was a reporter that was clearly on the left that was making this big deal about the fact that the vice president would not sit down and dine alone with another woman well that because it was you know just almost this smarmy approach to you know something that was while that's just weird kind of idea protecting it then the kohler hit on something gary protecting the integrity of your your marriage and the honor of your wife that's a bizarre idea is it so bizarre now which was a a lot of us brought that up at that time apparently uh nobody's mocking mike pence at that yet at this moment that that seems to have uh that seemed to a stop once all these allegations after weinstein came about right and and clearly and i think the caller hit on something to an and and we've pointed this out before bears repeating the the idea of protecting yourself in that case if you're in a right and we was a he was governor he's is now the vice president and certainly any in any highprofile position you would wanna do that.

cokie roberts mike pence reporter vice president weinstein
"cokie roberts" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"This is 2017 convened kids he's are pinnacles the american media these are in cokie roberts awardwinning journalist she was cowed by politics to keeping quiet barbara boxer senator asked about tell whether john conyers should resign she knows it as well as anybody else even though she this matriarchal figure who's been there forever probably untouchable literally because with the old ladies of the of the house and the senate they they don't go after you you're not the fresh meat they want but these women they can vein of what's going on in the roost here she is barbara boxer hand but i'll tell you right now the light needs to shine on this he did the right thing by stepping down he was the ranking member unjudicial mary and he's going to pay the price for this because when three women come forward with similar stories of harassment and abuse at the end of the day as he said i think they will be proven right saito gain anything from this i believe that she had no idea view you believe a treaty being in the senate as long as she has been do you believe the nancy pelosi being in the house as long as sheep they had no idea about this these two hundred sixty four people paid off the slush fund to pay them do you believe that is a very sad chapter heirloom this lance life he he has finished fighter for equality and justice but it a they in for everybody else okay now he's a champion for women as long as the women don't work for him then they're just you know whatever harrison said on the way he ran his office he did not put those elements into practice yes what's good enough for you is not good enough for me he did not treat them fairly or he did not respect them and that's how i feel about it and it's up to him as far as whether he should resign or way to see what the investigation turns up all right so coming up a gutter must soundbites from outbreak in the he honestly he admits he admits to grabbing but he admits to the whole darn thing i've seen in them a democrat from new york says the took conyers and franken should resign your thoughts are joaquin 62 to 605 three nine four that i've got a couple of other stories before the end of.

john conyers the house senate harassment nancy pelosi harrison new york franken cokie roberts awardwinning barbara boxer senator saito joaquin
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Race and i am not remedy i actually think he's gonna win now you're gonna be like i i think there's a good chance rumour can win i think this is going to upset conventional wisdom big time and i'm not the only one let's go to audio sound bite number six cokie roberts yesterday on abc well that's how she says it be why you say cokie roberts that would look i'm a mimic know i don't and it's not to make fun of people it's to be descriptive cokie roberts abc news washington while wearing the trench coat illness through the ought to make it look like she was outside in the rain cokie roberts abc known whatever she was on abc's this week the roundtable of hill in host was martha raddatz they're talking about trump saying that alabama's should not elect dumb john's because the guy's a horrible democrat by the way trump's tweet today is laugh out loud of rory asleep 180 seen it we should have a contest as to which of the networks plus cnn and not including fox is the most dishonest corrupt and door distorted in its political coverage of your favorite president me they are all bad winter to receive the fake news trophy you know he just doesn't stop hitting these people know they're trying to claim he doesn't have the right to appoint mulvaney to the c f p v m he does he has total constitutional authority to appoint whoever he wants to the sea fp the cfpb is a bogus bs bunch of things stephanie went ought to be disbanded you know foca honda's created this and it's it's it's us down simply to guard against the ripoff tactics of banks in lending institutions and financial institutions who like every other american corporation either want to kill their customers are caused their customers the goal broke or caused their customers to lose their homes or caused their customers to destroy the planet and so foca honda's comes up with this thing i and of course the congress russia's to supported and inactive because it happened at a time when there was some financial malfeasance somewhere and it's made to look like it was every sharon omnipresent trump has a total of thorny constitutional and otherwise as the head honcho the executive branch to put in charge of it whoever he once.

president executive sharon congress stephanie cnn russia honda cfpb mulvaney abc fox rory john alabama trump martha raddatz washington cokie roberts
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KTRH

"You're looking at me like i i think there's a good chance rumour can win i think this is going to upset conventional wisdom big time and i'm not the only one let's go to audio sound bite number six cokie roberts yesterday on abc well that's how she says it be why you say cokie roberts that would look i'm a mimic you know i don't and it's not to make fun of people us to be described cokie roberts abc news washington while wearing the trench coat illustrate he ought to make it look like she was outside in the rain cokie roberts abc known whatever she was on abc's this week the roundtable a fillon host was marred rabta talking uh trump saying that alabama nhs should not elect dumb john's because the guy's a horrible democrat by the way trump's tweet today is laugh out loud of rory asleep 180 seen it we should have a contest as to which of the networks plus cnn and not including most diff honest carpool and door distorted in its political coverage of your favorite president me they are all bad winter to receive the fake news trophy you know he just doesn't stop hitting these people you know they're trying to claim he doesn't have the right to appoint more vein a to the sea f p v m he does he has total constitutional authority to appoint whoever he wants to the sea f be the cfpb is a bogus bs bunch of things stephanie went ought to be new banded you don't foca honda's created this and it's it's it's a stance sibley to guard against the ripoff tactics of banks in lending institutions and financial institutions who like every other american corporation either want to kill their customers are caused their customers the goal broke or caused their customers to lose their homes or caused their customers to destroy the planet and so foca hottest comes up with this thing i add course the congress russia's to supported and enacted because it happened at a time when there was some financial malfeasance somewhere and it's made to look like it was everywhere an omnipresent but trump has a total of thorny constitutional limit or wise as the head honcho the executive branch to.

abc cokie roberts washington nhs john rory president cfpb honda sibley russia alabama cnn stephanie congress executive