35 Burst results for "Contemporary Art"

Interview With Curator, Silja Leifsdottir, Norwegian Sculptors Society

The Wise Fool

01:17 min | Last week

Interview With Curator, Silja Leifsdottir, Norwegian Sculptors Society

"Could you please pronounce your name correctly for me. My name is celia life stupid and you do many things you are both an artist and curator and then even within those. It seems like you're very many different things. Gimme a lay of the land. What are all the different roles. You have in the arts industry right now jeff. I have many hats. And i do enjoy that. Although we can be a bit confusing for myself and others at sometimes my main job my hundred percent main job is to be a curator at what in the region is called nashville running which translates to the region sculptor society. So that is one thing that i spend mondays to fridays on. But then i'm also the chair in the region curtis association and then. I started eleven years ago when i moved back to norway in oslo ice started what is now known as the snow art guides which is a free guide to the contemporary art scene in oslo and along with that we also arrange the also art weekend in september each year

Celia Region Sculptor Society Curtis Association Jeff Nashville Oslo Norway
"contemporary art" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

04:01 min | 2 months ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"Now yeah. I think something i will always have. I mean it was very explicit in luke on the move and he was very loose. I think how i defined it to the autism was if they could find some aspect of the neighborhood citizen very diverse neighborhood that's within the close vicinity of the museum that had been in some way marginalized overlook ignored so it had not necessarily anything to do with the autism passenger identity so it worked with queer artists. Tuna has made quaint work but also with straighten sis autists. Russa made work that they've describing sort of kway away unquote qantas. Who didn't make quail can all permutations of those things. It was of course some. I will project hats with the ones that were very very quick. I mean the ones that had a huge visibility. We did Pride parade floats with role. Kim and twit editor. Of course that's gonna be very visible as a contribution into a quick conversation quayle landscape but oh the most subtle projects as well hold on one second. It's backup a little bit on stupid. Keep in mind the titles the wise fool for the project. So i'm gonna ask a stupid question. Give me a definition of queer specifically. I mean that sort of in contrast to like lgbtq and like all these like how does that fit. What's your definition of what you're calling queer curatorial work. Yeah i think is important to emphasize. This is just how i work. Could it right. And because so many different ways in which people described themselves in one to express.

Russa Kim one second Pride parade Tuna one qantas lgbtq twit
Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness: Kinitra D. Brooks

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

02:04 min | 3 months ago

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness: Kinitra D. Brooks

"Joining us. Today is dr caen. Brooks kimmy tra. Is the jury end john. Leslie endowed chair. In literary studies in the department of english at michigan state university. She also spent the two thousand eighteen twenty nineteen academic year as the advancing equity through research fellow at the hutchins center for african and african american research at harvard university. Where she worked on the project called the conjure women's garden black women's route working tradition caniggia's public scholarship specializes in the study of black women. Genre fiction and popular culture. She is the author of three books. The first searching for sickle racks lack women's haunting of contemporary harbor which is a critical treatment of black women in science fiction fantasy and horror the second sigur axes daughters in edited volume of short horror fiction written by black women and third the lemonade reader. Which is a collection of essays. On as twenty sixteen audiovisual project lemonade kenichiro designed and taught first ever college course dedicated to beyonce's with local national and international press coverage. She is also the co editor of the new sons book series at ohio state university. Press most recently you may have read her weekly blog series on. Hbo's lovecraft country published on the dot com where she provided pointing analysis of each episode and the ways they contended with contemporary art pop culture and critical race frameworks in the context of black lives and horror narratives. I am sure you are as excited as i am to learn more about current projects to welcome kenichiro you for me joy to be here. I've been following you and your work for some time now. I've been intrigued by your public. Scholarship and the way to use your platform to engage audiences critically but most importantly you're engaging audiences on issues related to blackness in a very accessible way so i'm eager to learn about your journey. So are you ready. I am

Dr Caen Brooks Kimmy Hutchins Center For African An Caniggia Department Of English Michigan State University Leslie Harvard University John Beyonce Ohio State University HBO
Boston Tenants Protest Against Corporate Landlord Fineberg Management

Cindy Stumpo is Tough as Nails

00:57 sec | 4 months ago

Boston Tenants Protest Against Corporate Landlord Fineberg Management

"In Boston this afternoon tenants and housing activists speaking out against a rental company, WBC's Mike Macklin was there and brings us this story. The protest of the I C a had little to do with art. The protesters, tenants of Boston landlord, Gerald Feinberg brought their complaints against him here because Feinberg is a wealthy patron of art and the icy A. Hey, I Institute of contemporary Art. You think we could get our names up on that wall years, Din Albright of the Association representing 140 of Feinberg's tenants, blasted Feinberg for high rents, deplorable conditions and tentative actions. It is illegal to evict people during this pandemic. But Feinberg management, one of Boston's largest corporate landlords, in business for over 40 years, acts like they never heard of the moratorium. The tenets vowed to stop paying rent. If there Demands are not met. Mike

Mike Macklin Feinberg Gerald Feinberg Boston Din Albright WBC Institute Of Contemporary Art Feinberg Management Mike
Tenants Protest Against Corporate Landlord Fineberg Management in Boston

WBZ Morning News

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Tenants Protest Against Corporate Landlord Fineberg Management in Boston

"Protest in Boston yesterday, tenants of Feinberg management and housing activist speaking out against that company way. They chatted their demands as they marched in front of the Institute of Contemporary Art Tenants of Boston Landlord and Museum patron, Gerald Feinberg issued several demands to their landlord. Laura Rent, No evictions. Feinberg, You must improve conditions. Did Albright of the tenants Union? We are going to bring you to the bargaining table. We are preparing to go on red strike way well when protesters charged Feinberg with illegally evicting tenants during the pandemic.

Feinberg Institute Of Contemporary Art Gerald Feinberg Laura Rent Boston Albright
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art sets reopening date after a year of COVID-19 closure

All Things Considered

02:45 min | 4 months ago

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art sets reopening date after a year of COVID-19 closure

"Exhibitions. Inside, those museums have sat mainly unseen by people in person. The L. A County Museum of art or lack money to name just one has lost millions of dollars during that time, those dollars by the way, helping to maintain collections and pay their staff and we'll help art in the community thrive. As of Monday, Lackman got the okay to open for indoor visits as covert case numbers continue to be on the decline. And Lackman is among a handful of museums that you can soon enjoy inside, masked and distance. Of course. Art INSIDER Lindsay Preston Zappa's is editor in chief of Contemporary Art Review. Los Angeles She's here to run down the openings or the re openings as it were in what you will actually be able to see when you go inside. Hey, Lindsay. Hey, Steve. Museums are back open. Yeah. I mean, I want to knock on some wood right? Because obviously, you know, we don't know what's gonna happen down the road, but we're hoping this is Better world or at least ah, more open world lack MMA announcing that they're gonna They're gonna open to a modified capacity inside 25% starting the first of April. That is obviously just a couple of weeks away, But there's Art inside those galleries. It's already up ready for people to see. I mean, well, you have to make an appointment to go. How's how's all this gonna work? Yeah, Exactly. There's a lot of details. As you can imagine that kind of need to be rearranged and reorganized. And this is such an exciting moment. L A has really been waiting for this. Go ahead. San Francisco was able to re open museums earlier this month. So l A art institutions have been very patient and also very frustrated as we've, you know, kind of waited to go back into this red tear that actually allows for museums to now re open. Um so lack. MMA is one of the first that I've seen to really announce a specific date and to roll out a very specific protocol of how they're going to be doing this. S o. They'll be using advanced time entry online tickets, eh? So you have to order your ticket ahead of time. You can't just show up to LACMA and buy a ticket on site. You have to order online by using the Internet or by calling and I read that tickets will be released in batches, so to be sort of one week at a time on, But first tickets go live on March 25th. So And then once you arrived to lack, Ma, you'll do an online health screening and also a temperature check. Um and you know, there's so many other protocols that they've listed as well. So they were clearly ready for this clearly waiting for this moment and waiting for the county to kind of give the green light and Yeah, they're ready to go with a plan. Mean Lackman. Other museums and galleries too. I would

Lackman County Museum Of Art Lindsay Preston Zappa Contemporary Art Review Lindsay Los Angeles Steve San Francisco Lacma
'Black grief and white grievance' at New Yorks New Museum

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:06 min | 5 months ago

'Black grief and white grievance' at New Yorks New Museum

"Now. The new museum in new york this week open grief and grievance art and morning in america and exhibition originally conceived for the museum by the hugely influential curator of queen ways or before. He died in two thousand nine hundred nineteen grief and grievance features thirty seven artists to address the theme of morning commemoration and loss in response to the racist violence experienced by african american communities the title the museum says refers to quote the intertwined phenomena of black grief and a politically orchestrated white grievance against each structures and defines contemporary american social and political life. Curatorial advisory group has worked together to realize an interpreter. Basil's vision maximiliano gio knee of the new museum. The artist glenn ligon in ways. As regular curatorial collaborator mark. Nash and owe me beckwith scenic creator of the museum of contemporary art in chicago. He's just been appointed chief curator of the guggenheim museum in new york editor in the americas. Helen stolis spoke to beckwith about the exhibition. I wondered what's it been like bringing the show to its final stages making sure that oakley's incredible vision has been realized. What was your thinking through the process to make sure you've got this kind of final end stage oak. We have a brial mind. There were always so many things that he was thinking about and working on and he can have an idea a decade ago that manifests itself into a show much much later and so his ability to kind of hold and juggle things Intellectually and mentally that then get realized later was uncanny honestly the more that i read essays of his from about ten years ago i realized the core of some of this thinking was already there especially the core of ideas in grief ingredient. So all that is to say that this actually is unlikely to be. Oh quiz show believe it or not. They'll be more coming more things to watch and see. The man's ambitions were amazing and so lars they will extend extend far past life But in terms of grief and grievance started as a lecture series for harvard and oh a curator. He thinks through art a curious interesting. That i'm still speaking about him in present tense and so he thinks through ours and he started then to take. These ideas That he'd been mulling over these ideas around. What really are the kind of core conditions of american race relations. Where did they begin. What catalyzed them and what are the ramifications of that core This sense of black loss and a sense of white grievance let really in his mind got catalyzed around the civil war. What are those ramifications for the american polity right now our process as curatorial advisors which is what we've been calling ourselves has really been about trying to round out oh quiz vision where it was necessary. Okay already had a rather. Set schematic for the show. He had core objects that he was interested. In working with a painting of awesome blogs painting by daniel johnson another awesome. Blah's painting by jack whitten and a painting regime michel basquiat. He was really interested in these three objects as the ways to anchor away of of both thinking through reactions to Black and justice but also aesthetic forms that moved between abstraction and figuration between forms that are legible and gestures that deal. Mostly i think with the monochromatic. So these being the kind of catalyzing ideas for the show. were great signposts for us so then began to work with those themes and ideas for the rest of the checklist.

Beckwith Maximiliano Gio Glenn Ligon Helen Stolis New York Guggenheim Museum Museum Of Contemporary Art Basil Nash Oakley Americas America Chicago Lars Harvard Jack Whitten Michel Basquiat Daniel Johnson Blah
"contemporary art" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

01:53 min | 6 months ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"On there. You have it. The aims of another episode of the joys. Art history podcasts. I would once again lead spend alley for coming on and speaking so honestly about this topic of using animals and contemporary art is like i said it's such a thought-provoking subject and one as i said in the podcast i hadn't ever really considered before so i have to thank kelly once again for really bringing it to my attention making me think kubota and really uncover something within the history of our the very much skipped over really an of course you can't know everything but it just shows you. You can always learn on continuing to learn the more that i do these podcasts. That is just yeah happening more and more and more so. Thank you so much for a really wonderful chat. If you late to get in touch and talk anything appeared to d- please feel free to do so. You can email me. Joe's art history at jail. Don't call or you can. Dm me on instagram. Which is at choose art history. These make sure that you like wait and subscribe to the podcast as it helps other listeners. Fine does also if you while lessening thought of someone that perhaps make benefit from less into this or be interested in this conversational. Please do pass on. It would be great to get more people listening. This podcast is also available to view on youtube with subtitles. Finally my name is joe mclaughlin. I have been your host on your resident art historian for this episode. I just want to thank you so much for listening. And i look forward to welcoming you next on the jaws art history podcast until then keep learning and remember art as for all by..

joe mclaughlin kelly youtube Joe jaws art history instagram art historian art
"contemporary art" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

08:34 min | 6 months ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"The paint off the elephant and just had the elephant in the room but the the owners of the elephants said that he was used on movie and he was really used to me. Competent wasn't cruella toll. But when you when you see the elephant in this context of the exhibition it just. I don't know it didn't doesn't set well with me. But then knowing that it had agreed strange ahead of background and being exposed and used to of felons and make-up's in large crowds of people kind of almost as if it was justifiable in some way and because it was so impactful as using the animal that spread this message whether or not good. It does in terms of like people taking action against us. 'cause i don't know but it's so funny when someone was on there so used to it because of done this movie in this movie and don't know as funny why i don't hide haiti's immediately i don't know the fact that you said When he was actually used to being performed reminding me like child performers when their parents to send them to go to all the auditions and stuff like that so just because they're conditioned to do it doesn't mean they like it and it's something that i really think really shows like the diversity of ways animals can be used in our like. I think that piece the elephant in the room isn't necessarily about the elephant but rather to conversation he's having around i think like also play and then of course you're seeing the poverty line so is something that really saying. Is that the most beneficial use of an animal. Do you think he could have done that with a robotic elephant instead of done it with like a giant lake even tax dairy or meat elephant or something could have that same effect if is not directly involving an animal but would have it chigney shock with shock factor shock value. Well yeah well. That's it. Because i i don't think it weeds. I think the idea that this elephant was moving out and but camouflaged as really hits home. The point perhaps bashar them more attacks thermos are taxidermy elephant. But then again we wouldn't. We won't know because that's never happened. And that piece was like that for the fourteen days of its life cycle. And then it's just you know immortalized and photographs in an acc. And things like that. So i don't know it's really made me rack my brains on really question. Have i feel about animals and arts and it's really made me look at things differently so so after thank you for. That is a really interesting topic. That i don't think gets enough for your team. Really i mean high of you find of researching defeated. There's a wealth of material on. Do you feel as you beg and regulations and also people are having these conversations. I think within the last couple of years people are starting to have conversations. But in terms evacuations in institutional policies. They're still aground. Works because something that within the last twenty years animals have been placed more than a museum like current context. So it's something that we're really trying to handle as it comes up but then the fact that if you tell artists now it's going to make them want to do it even more so we're as a whole trying to fill in. What ways can we just handle it as a whole and how me essentially respond to animals center are and where should they be shown how to be treated and the fact that such a wide topic. It's going to need a lot more attention. Yeah absolutely well keeping you're doing your phd on it so there's plenty of time to time you're answering your final your final year of Phd dissertation. i'm actually in my second year of three. So i'm i'm almost almost i can see the light. Amazing that's great. I'll eat thank you so so much. Is there anything that you feel before we can have sane off. Is there anything that you feel that you haven't mentioned yet. That's supporting that. You really want people to listeners to thank to bow or consider when the when you look at these things. Yeah i'm i think jewish right now just laid about the gap the groundwork for the conceptual ideas that could actually help. Advance animal ethics within contemporary art. But i really think people need to have more conversations so do more research and really look into the artworks. We discussed today. because. I think that they're so interesting. And the more people talk about it more we can really uncover what is the essentially. The heart of the issue is. How do we treat the animals. Yeah i guess thank you for having me. It's in lovely. Oh my goodness thank you. So much i feel like you have completely like wait and my eyes to a whole set. Kinda like underwater. Would you in the had really no idea about the more of lieutenants with so many people on and things and animals have been used and it's a really really interesting topic an an every saints. And i do second you said. Please go away. And here's the shown what special published below and look at these images look at these artists a lead this linked to this artsy article which is interesting and essentially i was. I started reading and within about forty minutes of reading. I wasn't even halfway through essentially whenever they were talking about something. I find myself like going off in like ending up doing some sort of lake animals and our wormhole number like on each. Finish this article and go back to it interesting and chasing meats and Yet alley thank you so so much an before you go so. There's one final question that i like to ask everybody or trying to remember to ask everybody on the podcast and you can ticket as wade or as narrow as as to you but my question is why is art. Important are important. I think for me. Art has always really been about examining the human condition. And what does it mean to understand our human experience. And i think our gives us a new london into uncovering what it's really trying to focus on. Which is the the life the feelings that intense like profound. Like i guess like curiosity and complexities of life and i think that are to me. This means exploration. And it's something that i hopefully can continued to look into but it's yeah it's really all about i. Guess human condition for me. I mean i. I love asking people this question. I just get such a varied response every time but amazing really beautifully. Put ali before you go. Where can people find you and perhaps you rating and what you're up to. Where can work in. Everyone get in touch my instagram. At allie carbone and my website is alyce a cargo Us cargo dot site. I'm still working on it. But i guess i keep in touch because i love the yard. You guys have to say about it. Yeah absolutely you're knock test as well. Yeah i'm painter by trade a i am. I always use of course ethical products. And you know Paintbrushes without the use of furniture and stuff like that keeps values. Yeah so that they amazing. Thank you so so much for coming on. It's been an absolute pleasure to talk to you and thank you once again. I kind of opening my eyes. And i hope listeners home. You've you've learned a low. I know. I've learned absolute louis but it's been it's been a pleasure to talk to you. Thank you so much. Best of luck with peach. Thank you are. Thank you so much i.

instagram second year fourteen days allie carbone today london one final question each three about forty minutes jewish last couple of years last twenty years alyce louis
"contemporary art" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

08:11 min | 6 months ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"Naturally or otherwise. So it's i don't know it's so interesting but for me i would say once they've died then surely that's just use a using them in a different in a different way but then again it s the ethics of i don't know they're dead or is that just very ignorant of me. I think the fact is that animals can't really express their views. It's like if some like once like a human rights and writings in like i want to be launched into iraq it afterwards. I want to donate my body to science afterwards. Humans about ability to express it where animals are kind of at the mercy of i guess humans once they die i guess. Is it really fair. When you're thinking about how we treat the dead versus how he treated like human life. I think that's on a similar plan. Ground but i feel like an art. It's been many examples of like even deeming hearses own work. Read also equates human with the for the love of god crystallized skull and also animal deaths. I feel like he's less. I don't wanna say sinister in the sense that he's using animal life but he's also i think making an equal by using human life although it gets ethical again if the use of a human child skull some of his other pieces so it's just showing overall how using actual living things in art really needs to be handled a lot more. I think Delicately but also For essentially the future of art art practice I think there's a piece that we are eventually going to hopefully hallam. Yeah not ready to that gap so that we can adjust. See that. I didn't really know what to do when i read about this piece. When you send it to me. It was one of the few times the an artwork became like get off of walk around and be like. I don't i don't actually know how that sets with me so i'm just telling the artist on or just who. The artist is the peace wars. Can you set scene friis. Oh yeah sure so. The peace was called halama. It's basically a work by marco. Sti i believe. I don't know how to pronounce his last name. I'm the same. I think we'll try retry. So basically he plays the fifteen goldfish and fifteen plunders in. Fill them of water. Blenders plugged in and posed to the viewers To possibly end the fishes life with a passion of biden so the audience had the power basically to essentially kill fish during the exhibition. And i believe during exhibition toothfish were killed by participants. So not only were two lives at a toothfish consciously ended but it was also the preservation of them in exhibition in these blunders. That was an issue because there's no stimulus freedoms restricted for these fishes existence. So it's really helping us. This examined how. I don't want to say how drastic art can cut. But how extreme and how powerful and how i think really harming it is to animals in the utilized within art practice because like you said to animals where were liquid is on the cover of the people that entered the galaxy not the artists themselves. You know like you could essentially plea god's on cow these animals if he wanted to and i just feel the fact that you knew exactly. I read this article that was like you know. The blenders were visibly plugged on right away. He knew was at the game where do could praise on on liquid is the the animal or you could be a spectator and somebody or you could be the person. That's of mortally stunned back and says this is wrong message role on its i mean. How did you come across. Piece in ho ho. Do you hide as ethically for you set. What kind of questions is the piece. Boys huge huge. Obviously but. yeah. I guess they originally came across was piece when i was doing research about animal. Ethics contemporary art. Because there's pieces. I believe shutdown within like fifteen days or two weeks of showing it. And there's an uproar about it. Although like when i first saw the piece i was thinking yes. He can press the blender. But it's interactive. Why don't you unplug it as well or why. Don't you do something about like the something to make it overall better for them. Rather than just the two people. I would love to interview them and ask them why they actually did it and they're no in jail for doing something so ready. Oh i know those are two serial killer socially but then i like the real issue is whether the intent to employ harm is justifiable I think that the fact that every see killed two fish. Do you think that to fish should also have the opportunity to have an equally enjoyable life or the fact that None of the animals moral rights for intent or like were inherently respected and. So it's not fair to them to have that existence but i'm of the fact that artists controversial and it's making us hobbies conversations at the speech that exist that like i feel like i would be missing so much from the art world feel like wouldn't have challenged us wouldn't have pushed us this. I even examined. What of animals should have an art world but also how do we value life as a whole so. I'm torn because. I love this piece because stirs controversy but then on the other hand i'm like this is so morally wrong. Why my drawn to this. Well say there's this very. I think he's just morbid fascination that people genuinely whole though and it's been that way through arts you know throughout the history of art there's always these of Bets on of you know remainders that you are mortal unto of live your life and i think this is essentially what he's trying to supply with here on how quickly it can be taken from you on completely out of your control but i i just think it's i don't know it's it's like you said it's an incredible piece butts. Why could you not have the power to it and then just like recorded but you know and just say to people. Oh it's they are plugged. The didn't have to actually be plugged in his a lot of ways. But again it comes back to that sort of you know one for the greater goods unless case to it sparked a huge conversation an article and ali and the show was below for anyone. That's listening that wants to read this and as an interview with the artist and it's published on this paper and then continued to add responses to people who've written in even years after this article has been published. So it's just screens and screens and streets and it really divides people fifty fifty. But there's a really interesting quotes anne. So the journey essentially asks the artist. As ethical to use live animals arch on the artist is quoted as saying i believe that sometimes necessary to sacrifice one means for the sake of another in this case it was the life officials that would at stake to be honest people's harsh reactions. Surprise me as we in my opinion are surrounded by programs. That are so much more serious than what we encounter with every evening watching the news at what. He's me that we are passive and such fronts of these news and that my art piece treated such a start in states. People find that my use of goldfish and my art piece is unethical. I would invite them to have a closer look themselves on.

fifteen goldfish two fish two weeks two people fifteen days marco iraq fifty fifty first two lives one two serial killer fifteen plunders
"contemporary art" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

07:22 min | 6 months ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"Art history. Podcast podcast which celebrates all things arch stoorikhel every single day. Welcome back and today it is episode eighteen and this one is a less. Oh bit different today. This week i sat down with art historian. An artists alley tar really thought provoking discussion. All around the use of animals and contemporary arts and the moral questions that can provoke from artists living impact pains and footing sharks and time to fish and lenders and painted elephants. Eileen i talk about a lot of clarity orange using both live and dead an art and the questions the ethics and morality of using animals that can arise. We've thought of it ever okay to count animal for the sake of art and why these works. Allu- shocking are really really important. That making us not only reflect on our values but think about how we take action against certain things but not others so elianora went for the three artists and particularly who have used animals. Very definitely the issue of using art. Very very differently and mrs moore chem damien hirst of course on an arches code marco every no word of warning we start to speak about marco's boat the twenty five minute mark and has pieces quite shocking so it kinda upset some people but it's just so just as a warning if you will but i want to thank kelly. This is a really interesting topic. And something that i really have never considered before and particularly some someone damian hirst who we own also well for using animals in art. How he acquires has animals is very controversial and sparked of questions and debate. And i would really love to know when she blessed into this where you stand on using animals and arc anyway. It's a really talk. It's very thought provoking and yeah. I think it's very evident that throat the who podcast myself from stoves of wrestling things. I had read and really trying to piece together. Have i feel i've to seek answers for things. That really aren't very clear. But i really hope you enjoy it. This is such an interesting charts and another example of just varied amazing the history of artists and the questions that can arise sit back and relax alley and discuss the complex issues of animals in contemporary art. I think arsene foremost my question for this is when you responded to at my odds and rage proposal i was like this is so interesting because as as an art historian haven't really thought about this topic and greet which is really a feeling on my part and from the research that i've done this podcast founder. So interesting and it's taught me a little about particular artworks and made me look at particular things. And a very very way. From what i have so i think really my first of long winded way into my first question. As what got you interested in this topic. I guess for me i'm i am. I've been vegan for about ten years. Now and i always had an interest in how animals come into our and they're essentially Away that art historians tend to like approach animals so in our normalized through so many current ethical debates about animals zoos animals in research but not so many conversations are held with animal ethics within our contemporary art practice. So i started looking at my own university's policies. At the time. I realized there was just like two sentences on the subject matter. But i felt like this was such a prevalent issue on Examined artists like damien. Hirst her like mira cam. You realize there's such a diverse the way that we can handle animals within contemporary art so it just essentially ignited this entire like field of study to see what's out there which apparently not much yet. No it's so interesting that you say that because it's really even this like you said this of ethical question over kanye us on our something that i've never even thought i mean you. You're an artist yourself. Did you train. You went to school of art. Was that was fine art degree or was that an art history degree. What was the thinking was to use something practically. I guess a little bit about my background is i did. My undergrad in art studied at queen's university in canada and then my master's curatorial research contemporary art with glasgow school of art. And now. I'm doing my doctorate with the university of southern queensland in australia and doctorate of creative art so it's a fine art oriented a research and although it's on a different subject matter together so let's get into this thing so the start work that you sent me was an artist code. Murray kempton on can you just for the listeners. Home pages of scrape. What concept of this piece as. yeah so. i'm for those of you. Who don't know kin. She's a performance artist by trade and her work called the pig. Therefore i am is a performance piece where she spent. I believe a couple of days immersed in a pig farm and she was completely nude and she lived like pigs and just essentially felt that connectedness with the animals and when she was there she just essentially let down her guard at embrace animals and overall this piece is something very interesting in terms of contemporary art. Because she's respecting the animals upon me than also engaging with them i think at a like minded level. She was quoted as saying that when she looked into the eyes of the pigs. You dislike felt that connection with them. And i think that's something very interesting or was more than art pieces more of an interactive engaging with the animals yet. It's it's a really really interesting concept so The as well as obviously being an art student or an artist rather she was made school for less over as well on that she the used to dissect pigs and it was during that team that she realized that anatomically humans. Pegs are very very similar. And it's a really really interesting concept when you see images of this installation because there's times for me personally where i had to kind of really look for her with an these pins on just kind of really got me thinking about how similar on animals and humans are. We're both were were living breathing. Settings book by harsh often. Sarachan herself into these pains. Emit me think. Is that a form of.

Murray kempton Eileen Sarachan australia canada This week first question kelly today about ten years first both three artists twenty five minute two sentences queensland single day university marco elianora
A rare Botticelli portrait fetches $80 million in Sotheby's auction

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:31 min | 6 months ago

A rare Botticelli portrait fetches $80 million in Sotheby's auction

"About cheddi portrait. This week smashed the auction record for the nasal artist. Portrait of a young man with a roundell hammered at eighty million dollars. Sotheby's in new york on ninety two point one million with fees. The previous record for was relatively low. Ten point four billion dollars set in two thousand. Thirteen by the so-called rockefeller madonna portrayed. A young man had lost come to auction in one thousand nine hundred eighty two and its attribution to put. A chill was doubted by everett. Fall by then. The director of new york's frick collection. Who declared to be by francesco. Totti cini a follow of botticelli for he apparently later changed his mind and now the work is widely agreed to be a botticelli but while that work the price it was expected to a small but luminous rembrandt painting abraham and the angels from sixteen forty six which had estimate of twenty to thirty million dollars was withdrawn at the last minute. As we recorded the podcast sotheby's not yet given an explanation for its withdrawal. I spoke to scott rayburn a contributor to the newspaper and the new york times immediately after the sale. About whether it's a risk to bring these works wash now amid the pandemic and what it tells us about the market for your masters in general scott before we talk about the particular. Lots came sotheby's today. I wanted to ask you about the old master market in general and obviously the fact that he are in the middle of a pandemic and we're in an economic crisis. Does it make sense to bring these kind of lots to watch it this time. Well this is how the b.'s. new york gets the big master cell. Everyone wants to consigned to this sale. This is the moment The markets dealers on people. I speak to in that world. Say new york is where everyone wants to sell their overly only one sale year evening sale and that was the time to sell uncles. The pandemic been going on for nearly a year now in terms of restrictions on auctions sotheby's created incredibly slick format for this hybrid livestream sale It seems to be working. Well the thing about losses of courses. This isn't contemporary art. It's an unfashionable collecting field and it was always going to be a real test for that collecting field in the current environment. That's the interesting thing is because of course the leonardo so and of course the leonardo salvator mundi was very very unusual. So we have to caveat everything with that sure but christie's when they sold that put that into the contemporary sale. Luckily and i wondered how you feel about whether old master lots might do better in more mixed fields versus the traditional roadmaster sale. And who dictates that but with the salvator mundi. My understanding was that it was just a brainwave by the genius auction air Loic gouzer Thinking well let's put it in a contemporary sale. It's such a strange object If it's an old master sale than people just pick it to bits and criticize it in a contemporary sale be would just be looking at the image. And of course christie's marketing machine went into absolute overdrive and they marked it absolutely brilliantly Using the typeface of the dan brown novel to promote it You know they pulled out every stop and it worked sensationally. Well whether you the extent to which you can do again is is really questionable. Because that is as you point out in uttar outlaw. They self-talk mundi in in every respect. But what was interesting about. The marketing of this sale at celebici's is once again. The sophistication of the marketing with every lot. The work was shown online hanging on a white wool in a contemporary style. Interior where you'd expect a damien hirst to hang on then there would be to further reassure the contemporary minded by will the asian bah. There was a very attractive. Cooley dressed asian girl standing next to the painting in a contemporary interior. I that all walking the hilarious thing about this marketing ploys that in both cases they weren't actually looking at the picture they were just standing there. It was clearly if he's of marketing to reassure contemporary art buys but it was very smart and slick and clever and they and they're pulling out the stuff that incredibly inventive about it

Sotheby Cheddi Portrait Roundell Rockefeller Madonna Totti Cini New York Scott Rayburn Botticelli Francesco Everett Abraham Christie Angels The New York Times Scott Celebici Dan Brown Uttar
"contemporary art" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

03:52 min | 6 months ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"So hello nick. Hi oscar a nice to see you. Yeah the lunchtime. You work about one hundred meters from my house. Yeah so whenever. I walk past the dramatic arts theater. I always think of you. I always look for you. But i never see you. You're you're always busy a somewhere. Well i wanted to ask you about your life since we did our first recording the first thing i wanted to ask you was so during corona virus. Many plays you right now. Yeah yeah that. I really do. The question because Special in the february in the the hormones instead the whole law. So i have a plan have time to to ride the read and also i finished my phd also in february what. Yeah congratulations. thank you and also about the full place four. Yeah in covert some people. They were very creative and other people. They were blocked and they could not create anything. You were quite successful in creating. I knew you would have the two different apart. That one part of that. He's a for the closed by the we needed to prepare and we needed to deal with. All things happened jerusalem times that in meg to also think about the audience how to to get it out the back we kind of other to everything on nine out in that period. Have something to try so we try to everything to try to get the audience. Go back to the theater but now the is does seem to get better and better right. And this is where we in. China in luckier position than many people outside. Yeah yeah yeah for us because we have a program. We decided one. Yeah ahead. yeah you plan so far ahead. Yeah yeah but we have allows Autism from abroad right so the byu problem for us. So we're still council we counsel the muslim fifty plays yes. I didn't think about that in my mind when you open. You could just put on a program but if the actors and the artists were from overseas then you'll still stuck so in that case. Do you have a plan a and then you have a backup plan b. Yeah we'll have see also planned facilitate. Yeah and then. Did you find it difficult or were you just focused on your work. I think he's not really to to be difficult for my life. I think the every time when we decided that we must to to Whereas a mosque that it become a habit. I think he's a good habit. We not really to have the flu. The other things that he can nest the as good habit. Yeah it just shows. The people in china were very adaptable. They adapted very quickly when corona virus adopted very quickly. Once it started to be a little bit freer so it was interesting to see Well i am releasing this in parallel to the episode of john. Un who was the referral. You gave me for season two. I just want to say thank you again nick. I'm really glad that you can continue being part of the mosaic family thank you..

china oscar China first fifty plays two nick february one hundred meters first thing season two muslim jerusalem one one part john meg
"contemporary art" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

07:21 min | 6 months ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"Is renovating there. Is there something. That's still surprises. You about modern life in china technology in a way or not. I mean i believe we cannot live without technology. The philosopher who just passed away bernard stiegler his head. This the technology is the poison but on the other hand is is to solution so you have to get along with. What is the best or worth purchase. You have recently made so. I love this experience when i worked with some artist and they would give their piece of work to me as gift so i appreciate that a lot. I would say this kind of economy of gifts. I love that thank you. What is your favorite place to go out to eat or drink or just hang out so that will be home now. So i mean home means my home and friends home and i even think of curate. Some say about the future we can blur the board of public and the privacy if compression performance to pills hall as me what is your favorite which at sticker. Let me send you. Okay here it is. Oh okay now hang on. Let me say this dan. Now e kong buy yes. Okay few i could read it. What does that mean. that means nothing ahead all. I think anything like it so somebody asks you a question you don't want to or you can't answer you. Just send that. Yeah yeah. It's like nothing the tv screen great important one. What is your favorite song to sing at k-tvhe a haiti but come on. If you drink too many beers you never attempted to have a thing. Of course have word. They were. Coerced me to see our seeing. You are not alone. Know that i do michael jackson. Yes why that one. 'cause people i mean when you grew up together in cloudy you are lonely. But you're saying you're not for me. It's really touched your heart. Yeah can touch his touching in a way the size surface touching. Yeah is cusack. thank you. And finally what china-related media or full of information to use. I have to confess a reno more papers. I mean journals magazines. Or this sort of thing. I spend most of time to get information through social media and so even in a specific niche like contemporary art. Everyone's still just relies on reaching. Yeah yeah there are priorities. But i don't think people reading it. Zero people would take a look but we're not spend much time on. Well thank you so much man. I really enjoyed that. Thank you. I enjoyed it too. It's really hard for chinese to talk about china. Will he is living yes. There's a poem famous chinese poet. It's hard to see the true face of lucia mountain when you are in the mountain right. I like it. And what i'm talking about moment. I think it's mostly the my my life inc. Shanghai and shanghai to my knowledge is not china sliding now america burnings to germany. In no way but more shanghai's not china. Absolutely i mean shanghai has more in common with new york than it has with an way province right indeed. Finally the only thing i want to ask you is out of older people. You know in china. Who would you recommend that i interview. In the next season armor sake of china. I would introduce mr wong each will we all call him shelter and now i call him mr president. He's awesome. he's not only an artist not only a curator but he is at entrepreneur. He was pulling beijing. United story between north and south people in south live north north monotonous. South's but he as if they beijing needs. Choose to leaving. Shanghai became very active. So i think he's special. Thank you for to meeting. And maybe i shouldn't call him that. Thanks very much. Thank you another big. Thanks to genuine. Least of all for being the first person to mention the fray mama who who meaning so so i had been expecting someone to say this phrase long before episode seven of season two. It's definitely a favorite especially among foreigners in china. I did my research and this phrase apparently dates back a story from the song dynasty. That's around a thousand ad. The story goes that an artist was painting a tiger when his friend came and asked him to paint horse instead of starting a new picture. The artist simply drew the body of a horse onto the tigers head that he had already painted. The outcome was met. Mama who the other thing i wanted to clarify. Was the proper translation of the dubbing. How the shanghai breakfast food. Un said he would miss the most if he left china the best translation for this should actually be flat. Bread fritters rather than what i said. Which was those oil sort of sticks. So there you go that was me being decidedly mama who okay here are some clips from the premium version of the show. Please subscribe at patriotair dot com slash mosaic china. If you want to hear the full interview. Private museums became a phenomenon. And no one knows hotline. We lost we are recreating. The life of left over girls in child inspired by deep since these people is new members of the will create their own festivals. So in this respect. i'm very much prevalent. Kind of got a marriage parents theory with three or four months and finally today random connection with an episode from the past. If that un's favorite karaoke song michael jackson's you are not alone. Is exactly the same as the song chosen by astronaut. Pogosyan the violinist from season one episode. For i could never have predicted that of all the things that would come up twice in this podcast. It would be guns and roses last week and michael jackson today. You guys make me want to scream. Mazeikiu china is me. Oscar kooks with artwork by denny. Newell coming up is an except from my ketchup. Chat with nick you from the shanghai dramatic center and please listen to nick's full episode from season. One if you thought. I was just being mean to you in about the reputation for shanghainese food. Nick it's very clear about his opinion on the matter. Also we'll be taking a break for a few weeks now as we're heading into the chinese new year periods so going she fought fight and twenty kwa to all of you. And i'll see you back.

michael jackson three bernard stiegler germany today last week four months new york nick twice denny america shanghainese china Nick shanghai One patriotair dot com Oscar kooks United
"contemporary art" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

02:14 min | 6 months ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"That. Let's get on with the show. I'm here with un win oscar. So the thing i want to do is to play you. Something and his name is and the medical john. Yeah we the theater but the here. He dived to be an artist as in his works really interesting. That was our friend mic. You'd think a mutton in two thousand four. I was called to have an internship in a theater where he worked. They need a translator to work between the director and.

oscar thousand four medical john two
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:37 min | 6 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Sandra Shave W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Boston Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Korir
Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

New Yorker Radio Hour

00:17 sec | 6 months ago

Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

"Guggenheim disappointed Naomi Beckwith as it's deputy director and chief curator. Back with his currently the senior curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, where she spent since 2011. The Guggenheim says she will oversee collections, exhibitions and publications. In her new role. Beckwith is the first black woman to hold the

Naomi Beckwith Guggenheim Museum Of Contemporary Art Chi Beckwith
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:41 min | 6 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Andrea Shea W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Npr News
Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

All Things Considered

00:29 sec | 6 months ago

Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

"The Guggenheim has appointed Naomi Beckwith as it's deputy director and chief curator back with this currently the senior curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, where she's been since 2011 the Guggenheim special, oversee collections, exhibitions and publications in her new role. Back with is the first black woman to hold the position. The appointment comes after long time Chief curator Nancy Specter stepped down last year following allegations of racial bias in independent investigation found no evidence to support that claim. Liquid begins her position in early June.

Naomi Beckwith Museum Of Contemporary Art Chi Chief Curator Nancy Specter
Museum of Fine Arts Houston will unveil new building for modern and contemporary art Nov. 21

Money Matters with Ken Moraif

00:18 sec | 9 months ago

Museum of Fine Arts Houston will unveil new building for modern and contemporary art Nov. 21

"Museum of Fine Arts, Houston is going to show off their complete reconstruction and new building next Saturday. Even better than that there's going to be free admission, the new Nancy and Wrench candor building will increase the museum's exhibit space by 75%. In

Museum Of Fine Arts Houston
"contemporary art" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

06:45 min | 10 months ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Chaos everybody was into it and that guy and and obviously some women as well. But that guy predominantly is now forty five to fifty and has children that are now eight and nine and just like in the toy industry and other businesses. You see reboots every thirty years you're seeing that sports that's one to gambling the explosion of gambling in the last decade what gamblers are realizing instead of daily fantasy and just betting on games that they're able to make more money being right about Jason Tatum or tyler hero or Jaanus than even betting on those teams or those variables. So that's been a huge factor and then three you've got the sneaker flipper kids. For people that are listening if you've got kids that have been doing this over the last ten years, but the flipping of premium sneakers buying and selling. So the entrepreneurial element there that's happening and then for Youtube, there's the explosion of people opening up packs on the Internet and that being entertainment this what's called pack breaking? So those are four major. Things converging at the same time that has really led to and then social media overlay like people sharing their Zion poll or they're great Kobe collection. You. Have a lot of ingredients stanford why this is happening now what is hot right now? Basketball. Basketball's on comfortably hot both. And modern I think a lot of people will lose money and I'm going to say again clearly, people will lose money on modern because they're going to bet on a young player. Let's use tyler hero because it's relevant who looks all the part but so so did derrick rose I mean derrick rose looked more the part and injuries are variable and if you spent one hundred thousand dollars investing derrick rose years ago, it would looked good but you would have got caught. You would have got caught on Bo Jackson and grant hill and others. But young basketball modern basketball's very hot. Vintage basketball has completely exploded Dr J. Rookie cards in a eight out of ten grade as get more into the world you know that there's companies now that you send it to and they great it PSA BGS. The companies that great cards a doctor J.. Eight was eight hundred dollars a year ago, and now is an eight thousand dollar card. That's ten times. Explosion are these new stocks I mean would you rather invest in cards or stocks? I would rather invest in cards but I need everybody to hear this why I'd like to diversify from the stocks that I own. When you're dealing times like this uncertainty potential recession after the Kobe thing. Non Stock Market Assets, alternative assets tend to go down, but not as much upside three it makes me happy so I would rather own. A Wilk Chamberlain two, hundred, thousand dollar piece of art than an actual piece of art like I. Don't want that. I don't want a Jackson pollock I want the greatest sports cards because of my interest because growing up watching you every single day that was my life. And because of the rarity I, think that the top five percent of sports cards the most rare stuff. is about to go through its contemporary art phase that we saw in the late sixties, seventies and eighties with the before mentioned Warhol and pollock. So I just think Michael Jordan rookies in a perfect ten there's only three hundred thirteen of them Dan. They were twenty, five, thirty, thousand about eighteen months ago there hovering around one hundred, thousand it is my professional investor businessman believe that that's a half a million dollar card in ten years. That's a good return Michael Jordan 's nape when you invest in real estate neighborhoods, cove it. There's Nothing. That can happen at this point with Michael, Jordan outside of. I don't WanNa go there. But like outside of an Oj Simpson like like you're talking about the rarest of rare thing that can do anything to diminish his demand and the supply is non-existent and the demand overall for this art is exploding and I think you're gonna see those things play out which your most valuable card. High. Bought a PSA nine Jackie. Robinson. Nine hundred and forty eight leaf rookie card with another friend we split it how much We we spent hundreds and hundreds of thousands of dollars each and I believe the card now based on what's happened in the market. Last two years could be pushing over a million dollars value because there's only nine of them and I think when you think about what Jackie Robinson represents and we're America is life cycle. It's always been an underpriced card compared to honus Wagner and Babe Ruth and ty COBB and I think we're starting to feel the demand really explode for it but I have a bunch of cards at home that are still in the packs and it's from the nineties you worthless and I do. Because because knowing your career and being such an mirer and this is for everyone who's listening, this was what was happening in the eighties and nineties there was gold rush and everyone said by these things, store them because what was happening the things from the fifties and sixties the mantles the earns the Clemente's word. The problem was people didn't understand how much supply we tops was making millions and cards, and by the way Matt nokes and Eric. So. Eric Davis Wally Joiner, and. Mike Greenwell Ellis. burks did not become tie cobb and Mike Greenwell which then made those cards vulnerable and that's why tell a lot of kids and if your parent of a kid or a kid listening right now. Listen I'm very excited about tyler hero too and I'm super can't wait to watch you know Jason Tatum and Jalen Brown developed a Donovan Mitchell and I'm super excited. But remember this unless you're a top one, hundred icon, your cards are not going to be worth as much as you think, twenty five, Thirty Years Round Kevin Garnett, and Dunkin and Ray Allen are less expensive than some of the rookies now because everyone's projecting what John Rant and An RJ Barrett and Zion are gonNA, do versus understanding who those players were, and that's why I keep saying over and over vintage vintage vintage vintage. That's where the action is. He's Gary Bainer Chuck. He's the CEO of media but most knowing is Gary V on social media a serial. Or Five Time New York Times bestselling author and host of Tea with Gary v every day helping entrepreneurs building grow their businesses during the pandemic..

Basketball Michael Jordan Jason Tatum derrick rose ty COBB Youtube Jackie Robinson Bo Jackson New York Times Gary Bainer Chuck Eric Davis Wally Joiner Oj Simpson Kobe collection Kobe Wilk Chamberlain Gary V Mike Greenwell Ellis. burks tyler Kevin Garnett
[Unedited]  Dario Robleto with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:06 min | 1 year ago

[Unedited] Dario Robleto with Krista Tippett

"Ning and. Welcome back to winter. Someone someone wrote me today instead it's raining feathers. So welcome to the institute. I'm Liz Armstrong. Curator. Of Contemporary Art, and we are very pleased to be hosting the second live interview with Krista Tippett for her show and broadcast of on being. As. Many of you know Christa was here two months ago when she spoke with Hamilton and what was a fascinating and far-reaching conversation they covered everything from spiritual act of art making to the strange intimacy of museums where people can be alone together. The the this interview, and that one we're presented. In conjunction with the exhibition currently on view. In our target wing simply called sacred, which is a series of installations, the probe, the nature of the sacred within a secular multi-faith society. By, juxtaposing works of art from Multiple Times in places, the sacred exhibition invites visitors to explore historic and contemporary. Expressions of the divine, the spiritual, the essential in the beloved and to ponder the words meaning in their personal lives. I want to thank the MIA's affinity collectors, group contemporary art for their support of this program, and for helping us visits from artists such as Hamilton. Dario. And now let me just briefly introduce each of our guests. KRISTA Tippett Enduro. Christie needs little introduction on this stage. She's a peabody award winning broadcaster and New York Times bestselling author WHO's highly acclaim radio program on being fills a huge void in the public discussion of spirituality and faith. She's not afraid to. to discuss the big animating questions of human life from how do we want to live to what does it mean to be human? She and her guests explore meaning ethics and what is sacred miss the political cultural and technological turmoil that is first century life. Dario fo was houston-based artists who's known for his highly original repurposing of rare and archaic materials. Like a DJ sampling music and he just told me tonight, he was a DJ once Doria spins in shapes such unconventional materials as dinosaur fossils, meteorite remnants, hand bones, and hipbones, and pulverized vinyl from vintage records. He's been called materials poet. I think of him as a passionate alchemist who memorialize the past while finding new meaning in the tangled roots its history. He's a maker of extraordinary objects that are meditations on war, love death, spirituality, and healing. It's going to be really interesting to him talk about these objects without seeing them. But you can imagine and then you will see them So I'm really looking forward to this conversation. Please join me in welcoming Chris step and Dario. Thank you lose. It's great to be back at Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Feel like I'm an old timer now. So I welcome you. So, Dr. you grew up in San Antonio I grew up in Oklahoma. It did not snow in March where we came from. I've really been looking forward to this for several months as way I planned it. Thank you. Very much. So if I ask you a about the spiritual and religious background of your childhood, where would you start to think about what that means? San Antonio is maybe Catholic central. In America So it's It's hard not to be around that in San Antonio. My grandfather was a Baptist minister. I didn't grow up around ten so much but his is influence definitely. was there the Beckham ahead? And he was definitely a passionate passionate man. My mother. Religion in the home was not ever really an issue but as. I searched it out on my own. I'd asked my friends I could come to church. Catholic methodist I probably sample every every church. Afraid I had. And? I continually. Even at that early age was was very, very interested. So my childhood it I would say it was very self directed. maybe always within the background knowing that thing about my grandfather, there was still this mysterious thing that I didn't really understand. So, maybe it was fairly field that to the searching.

Dario Fo Peabody Award Krista Tippett San Antonio Contemporary Art Hamilton Liz Armstrong MIA Beckham Christa New York Times Minneapolis Institute Of Arts Doria Catholic Methodist Oklahoma America Chris
Museum of Fine Arts in Boston to buy work from 24 artists

WBZ Morning News

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Museum of Fine Arts in Boston to buy work from 24 artists

"Even as Boston's museum of fine arts remains close curators are busy building out the museum's contemporary art collection the museum is pledging to purchase works by twenty four artists who live in the United States nearly all of the artists will be entering the museum's collection for the first time acquisitions is set to kick off next month starting with the piece of work dedicated to immigrant workers and another honoring the first democratically elected prime minister of the Democratic Republic of

Boston United States Prime Minister Museum Of Fine Arts
New online platform might provide hope for Los Angeles art galleries struggling during COVID-19

All Things Considered

04:08 min | 1 year ago

New online platform might provide hope for Los Angeles art galleries struggling during COVID-19

"It is tough to see art in person when virtually all in person gatherings have been canceled you're relegated to seeing work online which you have to admit isn't really the same thing so what does that mean means art galleries are hurting because sales are way down some of those galleries could even close their doors for good but a new online platform that is the brain child of LA art dealer Jeffrey died chin name you may be familiar with in the art world is offering a glimmer of hope for local galleries and for the artists whose work they exhibit our art insider and greater LA regular contributor Lindsey Preston's Abbas is editor in chief a contemporary art review Los Angeles she's here to talk about it hi Lindsay Hey Steve before we get on to this new platform I guess can you give us a broad overview of what's what's the state of LA art galleries right now are they making any sales at all you know it's honestly a bit of a mixed bag from who I've talked to obviously as you said it not being able to see the working person is making a pretty big impact and and a lot of these exhibitions are kind of on hold or had to close early and a lot of galleries have reported that you know they're having to lay people off and even facing closure there was actually just an LA times article by Caroline Maranda that came out were they surveyed thirty five galleries and twenty five percent said that they might close as a result of this but other galleries I've spoken to are doing okay so it's a bit it's a case by case I'd say I do want to know about this new platform though I mean how is it different from what galleries and some art fairs are already doing online because you know we've seen that you know this this sort of coalescing of of galleries yeah I think when you first hear about it you're like okay what's going to make this different and unique but the really cool things so this was initiated as you said by Jeffrey Deitz who has spaces here in LA and also New York and he kind of had this idea and he quickly assembled an operating committee of about fifteen or so galleries and then they got sixty LA galleries on board so this is really a home grown operation dates you know for industry that sometimes can be a bit competitive it's really inspiring to see them all come together for a joint effort the goal unlike you know art fairs like art Basel or things like that that have gone online is really to support the diversity of of the LA art scene and a range of gallery sizes from tiny you know artist run spaces all the way up to the big guys well look I mean let's talk about this bigger galleries if if everybody's in competition even the small diverse is the the larger ones I mean why is it in their interest to help out the smaller struggling spaces do you think the larger galleries are acknowledging that effort that the small galleries put in to really feed what they're doing so it's almost like it's like the farm system in baseball right like minor league teams like helping out the major league teams right yes we need a sports reference that's perfect yes the smaller galleries often are in this mode of discovering young artists giving them their first shows kind of building their career you know some of these bigger galleries like the Goshen you can't just walk in and ask for a show and if they haven't already heard of you they're not gonna show you you know so it's really key that the small galleries kind of feed into the larger ones and it's really cool that the big ones are acknowledging that the smaller galleries are much more vulnerable in this time and they need to support them right how's it gonna work I mean if you if you see something on the platform that you like can you just buy it I mean do you added to your cart and then check out I believe how it will work as a site will always point back to each gallery's website to kind of close the deal or make the sale also through the site you can then finds that galleries contact and reach out to them directly and the goal is that one is featured on the scholar platform also nearer especially ones were able to kind of go back to galleries again that what's on this platform will near exhibitions that are actually at the gallery

Willow Smith to live in a box for 24 hours as part of 'The Anxiety' art exhibit

The Breakfast Club

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Willow Smith to live in a box for 24 hours as part of 'The Anxiety' art exhibit

"All right Willis Smith has spoken about her anxiety on different episodes of red table talk and now she is planning to bring awareness to that issue to doing a performance art piece at the Los Angeles museum of contemporary art they're teaming up to teaming up with her boyfriend uses in Tyler Cole and they're doing a twenty four hour exhibit it's called the anxiety they're gonna lock themselves inside of a box on display for ABS after a visit is to observe them so that's going to happen for twenty four

Willis Smith Tyler Cole Los Angeles Museum Of Contempo
Ariana Grande Has A Misspelled Japanese Tattoo

The Big Picture

13:05 min | 2 years ago

Ariana Grande Has A Misspelled Japanese Tattoo

"Filmmaker. I think the last thing is. What is it? The article experience is what is the definition of it? Now is it five hundred people in the theater is it a hundred is it fifty is a two people on a Friday night in front of a flat screen to me. It is that's the theatrical experience to me if it's one person. I mean, I think that the experience is the definition of it has changed. It's going to have to that's the world we live. Yeah. And your movie to you you have movie stars. And it has the feeling of kind of like an event movie in some ways from the eighties of the ninety s very sort of mid budget. Hi, Jan rutta, and that we were talking about others movies have disappeared from the Cineplex. And Netflix says obviously making strides to bring a lot of those kinds of movies back. Is there any part of you that will miss the kind of like boxoffice quality around some of this stuff or just sort of the pomp and circumstance that comes with the theatrical. It's to me it's always enjoyable to watch a film in theater or other people are laughing and join in crying, but we live in a world where where the traditional studios have centered much of their energy on Brandon, entertainment and. I'm not judging. That's what they're doing. That's their business model. And I think as you just sorta pointed out they've left behind an enormous narrative entertainment world that many people want and Netflix, God bless them have stepped in. And with great care and love has are fostering Roma. It's my favorite film of the year. Yeah. I I'm going to vote for the award people may not agree. But I feel it is. And I would like to think that when they win the Academy Award. This argument of whether net flicks makes films or not will be put the bed. It's that arguments over they make films they make films that are worthy of any award. That people are giving you this. I'm you know, if Roma wins and other films win, I think in the year two is this not even argument discussion is going to be ancient history, which it should be at this point. There's other aspect of this too. So interesting to me, I feel like there's a new part of the equation with a Netflix movie where I don't know how much of the bird box kind of phenomenon valid, but is it is it relevant to you. If you're movie kind of becomes like a mean or something on the internet that is significant because I feel like one. Felt buzzsaw has a lot of things that people could pull out and could become very memorable moments. But to is that like a new barometer for success in a way, if people have creep are creating content around the story that you've told I certainly I'm aware of the marketing of a film in these days memes. And and things taken from films are part of the marketing, so it's relevant on that way. I would like to see that for Netflix sick. They they entrusted me with some of money. And and and I respect that. And I hope it does. Well for them. I'm not really that interested in it. I hope people like it. I at this point, I'm sort of making movies as much for myself as for other people, and I've sort of turned a corner a little bit for better or worse. Hopefully, I don't stray too far that sounds like a really peaceful place to be in while you know, where it came from. I dive discussed this few times before but I worked on superman lives, which was the debacle of all time. So so epic that they made a documentary about it. I've seen it as fascinating. Right. So I I worked for a year and a half on Soumailla's. And as we getting down the wire they pull the plug two weeks before. A lot of money. But I went into the office. They pull the plug and it was living. My worst nightmare for a year. Like, this was gonna happen. I got my car job down Zanu Monica. I'm sitting on the beach, and I'm just processing everything that just happened over the last year. And I'm and I suddenly realized watching the ways that I could have written the words on the sand and the waves could have just washed away. That's how relevant was. And that was a shocking concept. And then I don't know a half hour later. I'm still singing I thought it doesn't matter. I got something that is process. I this was something I did as much for myself. This was not an invalid thing that just happened. And when I finally stood up its onset, I resolved. I was in at this point doing this as much for myself as for other people in these notions are in velvet buzzsaw the end of valid buzzsaw ends with Jewish John Malkovich. Which is literally what I experienced the idea that there is an outsider artist who's who's who's creating art as a cathartic experience for childhood trauma. Art can be as much for the artist as it can be for the audience. And I think in this film, I was really interested in the relationship between commerce and art in today's world. And the relationship is a very rocky won the quality of a work can't be judged by the number of clicks, reviews or dollar paid. I'm not saying that success diminishes the work. But it didn't no way defines it some. I'm sort of speaking to two different groups are speaking of people monetize art, saying art is more than a commodity assign ever forget that. Because I think sometimes we do. And I'm also speaking artists if you can become a brand you can beat yourself become a brand. God bless you. If that's what you want. That's fine. I don't judge that at all. But I think they're I I look at creativity as sort of a knife edge, and you can blunt it if you're not careful with repetition, and these are themes that are in the film. So I'm sort of I'm throwing ideas at their amidst the satire that you've experienced. Yeah. It's so interesting. I wonder if you have heard from anyone in the art world since you've started showing the film to people and what their reaction to it is. I haven't heard yet. I feel very secure in our research and all the almonds, and I'll tell you last week. I finally watched the price of everything on HBO. I was gonna ask you if you've seen it. I saw it a week ago and everything that these titans in the industry talk about are things that are in our film. I find that. I really asked down in my notes here. I it's so. Eerie how so much of what you are hitting on, you know, essentially, mocking there are people doing in real time in this documentary. It's fascinating. And Jake's character one point says when Toni Collette is asking about money, and where where it's all going in Texas on the money question. It's on everybody's talking about it. And in my research. Everybody is talking about what they're time at the present anything. Everybody knows that something's wrong is somehow it's not like they don't know what I don't think it can be stopped when he can't be stopped the more money the more fuel. It's like trying to stop a bonfire. It's not gonna stop. But people are trying to figure out where it's going. What is it? What does it mean? Does it diminish? Does it do this? It's a very interesting time for contemporary, art, anything. Yeah. I mean, do you see some of the same struggles for yourself as a filmmaker do feel any kind of crunch, even though you're in this peaceful moment, the only the crunch. I feel is is is that I'm an industry, which is which is in a transition phase because of the traditional studios going one way, and Netflix and other people coming in Philly that that's interesting to me it the idea as as as somebody who creates. It's that like I said I'm trying to create more for myself now than for other people. I'm trying to turn my back a little bit on all the noise, and China, I feel that if you create if look night took me a long time, but a night Carl I feel like I've found my voice, whatever my voice is a night crawler. I believe it's enrollment. I believe it's an so I'm just trying to follow my voice, I'm trying to create things that that that are relevant to me. And that brings its own piece it at this point, tell me a little bit about Roman because I don't think that there is enough conversation about it. I think it was a little bit overlooked, even though Denzel was acknowledged. And he's really interesting movie. Really well made what's your sort of? How do you look back on it? Now a few years removed from it on tremendously proud of it for myself and for all the people who worked on particularly for Denzel. I mean, I mean, I discuss this when it was out, but really Roman to me is is the story of the burden of of belief. It's it's it's he's a character. Who's carried a a sort of symbolic cross for so long, and he can't hold it up anymore, and he's going to drop it into me. That is the most of all things we are all going to not meet our standards at some point. And the ultimate message Roman is about redemption. It's it's not about failure. It's about finding a way out of out of something when you can turn when you turn your back on everything you believe in and you suddenly say, oh my God. How could this have happened? Where can you go and forgiving yourself and forgiving circumstances? That is an elevating experience that I was interested in. It's I'm very proud of the film when you're writing does the theme comforters. Does the the idea this setup confide? He always comes. First father is a writer told us from a very early age never bore you cannot bore. So I honestly think the first and foremost job of any artist on some level is to engage you can put slash entertain. But you have to engage people, and I'm looking for vehicles at engaging audience, and that become sort of Christmas trees that I can hang ideas on let me ask you a it struck me as I was watching this movie, you have a real knack for name. Tmz you your character names are very creative in this film in particular, they're sort of really elevated, but we're does stuff like that. Come from. Do you spend a lot of time trying to grab something that will really while people or puts, you know, kind of knocked him off their feet. The idea comes from. I I am an enormous Charles Dickens fan and one of the things I loved about dickens was he saw he saw a name as a vehicle to tell you something about the character. So I could spend a day on a character's name, and I have spent eight is been days on a character's name. I have lists of names. I have files of names, I'm put names one name. And I'm always experimenting looking more Vanderbilt. John Don, Don, reduce your Hayes. I just these these are names that I like, I just love names yen. I find the characters are saying those names frequently in the film, you know, it's so much fun. Not to have to ring out in some way. I find that you miss. That's great Dan couple more questions one. I'm curious. What's the last movie you've seen that you're jealous of I am jealous? Of roma. Yeah. What what was it about that? He is reminded Koran reminded us that there's nothing more dramatic than human small events framed in the right way that threw me there are scenes in Roma that rival any spectacle being made on any budget level. It just I was grossed in that film as it went as anything that I've ever seen. And and these are these are these are deep undercurrents that are not evident. They seem like they shouldn't be so important. But, but when you frame them the way he's framed them, so masterfully they become so powerful. And I just think it's it's it's a reminder of of the of of the potential for drama among people away from spectacle. And I'm only jealous in the sense that I'm not jealous. I I I'm at Meyer that he picked up the mantle and said look people life. This is this is this is really dynamite stuff if you can look at it the right way. Don't forget about it. Do you have a checklist of the kinds of films that you want to be able to make future in your career? None. Do you figure out where to go it all just an idea it just suddenly ideas on these seems really relevant? I have ideas for really dumb broad comedies that that. I once in a while I threatened to do I haven't I should write an action film. I wanna do I have I it's just an idea comes to you. I like I remember watching Slumdog millionaire, and I thought man that writer 'cause I based on a book, I must have been so excited the day. They came up with the idea of the game show quiz that became a vehicle to tell a story in flashback. That's like if I come up with that idea. I just wouldn't. That's just too cool. An idea ideas are have the shapes to them, and and you and if you look at them relevant to us on the you can see them other people can't see them. But but ideas, suddenly just leap out and go look at me, they sort of have structured to them, and and you become on my God. That's just like cool little thing. I could it's like a toy you can play with. So what are you doing next? I'm writing in original spec. Another one set in Los Angeles. At night. God help me at night s another night move in LA thought you would have learned by now. I will you. It's funny shooting at night in LA's fantastic after ten o'clock. There's no traffic. I noticed there were a couple of very good LA moments in in the new film as well. Yeah, we we shot, but I love shooting Elliott night. It's empty it's deserted. It's got this cool energy to it. It's cooler, literally, cooler, it's really interesting wild energy. Let's get dinner. I end every show by asking filmmakers. What's the last? Great thing they've seen. So maybe not that you're jealous of. But just a great thing that you saw I am an enormous fan of Ben Stiller as as gave him down tomorrow. Yeah. Guy was blown away. I I heard that he took two years on it. Then if you're listening, it was a really well spent two years, it's an incredible piece Patricia and Paul and Benito these performances are one of the writing was great to six six or seven parts on the did you see it? I did on the fifth or sixth episode when that thing happens, and you all my God, this was because it structurally, so brilliant to put that they're not in the front where it would have so differently affect. The peace, and I would have been so proud to do that piece. I thought it was remarkable. That's a great answer. I had so much fun watching Belva bus ident-. Thank you. Thank you. I appreciate. Thanks so much, Dan Gilroy. And thank you to you. For listening to this week's episode of the big picture, please tune in next week when we will have a brand new Oscar show that we've dubbed the wife of palooza, Amanda Dobbins, and I finally saw the wife, and we are ready to talk about it. And we have so much to say what we'll see you next Tuesday.

Netflix Los Angeles Roma Writer Jan Rutta Denzel John Malkovich Charles Dickens Ben Stiller Dan Gilroy Academy Award Zanu Monica Soumailla Texas Toni Collette HBO China Oscar
"contemporary art" Discussed on FT Everything Else

FT Everything Else

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on FT Everything Else

"I think it's a good thing because if people off to a means, they've understood it on some level, it means that even if people just see as as combing, as a funny during what have any shaving ace with somebody comedy as positive as well? Like I say, the comedies misery and we don't want that. Comics little so miserable, and I thought it was you had to be, but you not miserable. David. I'm not funny enough to be miserable. I used funny in real life as you are in you. What? Well, I doubt I doubt that everyone must be disappointed by that. The idea of humorous being a cover underlying miseries is his old as the hills, and some of the work in the south London gallery show looks at that night. You go onto news clown. For example, it's not a welcome pot that is meant to make you laugh out loud. Historically, it's really about humor. The subject and a mosque sometimes undergoing misery, melancholy loneliness at such and anger. Well, not happy. David, thank you very much for coming to put cost. The exhibition, not no human in contemporary art is at the south London gallery until the eighteenth of November on On the freeze. the frieze London and freeze moss his fez from to seven where you can see David Tripoli's work. Stephen Friedman. Style and Sally Rooney's novel. Normal

David Tripoli London south London gallery Sally Rooney Stephen Friedman
"contemporary art" Discussed on FT Everything Else

FT Everything Else

04:50 min | 3 years ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on FT Everything Else

"Say no, gay and David. Thank you for joining us not. I'm gonna start with you. Contemporary is often the bust of the joke. People say, things like my five year old could have done that, but those contemporary sense of humor, what it can do and it's true that the contemporary is often the bus of the jokin from one who's worked in the office for several decades. I've had many a conversation with people who do derived contemporary art and defending is possibly jopin. One of my passions rates, it knock knock humor in contemporary. So. So I mean, presume you d think that that can you. Yeah, absolutely. There were a number of artists. Well, huge number. In fact, increasingly through the twentieth century, who use humor as a device in work often to make an underlying point which is not necessarily humorous than it south. If I can you sending postcards of us to parents and LT relatives fears, and I've often felt they were supposed to be off color. I love them. That's why send them. Do you think that ought is especially funny at them. I think we all need to censor humor meant take those are live in the u. k. one has to love the situation of in order to alleviate the stress and misery. At brexit. Brexit. I think post six in the UK. The moment is very frustrating. I guess it said it's a situation that we can immediately nothing about a solution to that is to make them. Mecom and areas works of art long before Brexit. Has your changed? He thinks since twenty sixteen, I couldn't really say. I mean, two years at my life isn't that long. So hard to say. I mean, it's a conversation that I have quite a lot. You know where people say to me. She contemporary out be serious. Can it becoming as well as areas to which I respond? That is perhaps misunderstanding of what the words serious and comic main not antonyms that I mean every other opposite seriousness is maybe incompetent. So dilettantism and the opposite of of comedy is, is misery this room for comedy and this seriousness in the same works. Any message that you wanted to live it somebody's is somehow sweetened a little bit with comedy. There's not a lot I can do about my my voice. I as an author as an artist as it were because it's just just my personality. My default setting is defined, find comedy and things. Visual. Jake's g think the visual is is well placed to make jokes. Is this something that that kind of visual that an object can do well or during painting just speak in a completely different way. To words, it's a different language and something just waiting much about the viewer, adding a commentary to it over now to it. So for example, seal floors, soul, which is a saw, apparently coming up through the floor, having cut almost a full circle. We have able to suspend disbelief somehow long enough to to get the joke and until off. But we know that there isn't somebody on the floor. Kind of stepping into it hesitantly and then Stephan out instead of laughing because, but there's also a sinister aspect of that work as well because you know, maybe somebody's trapped underneath and trying to get out. So I see there were very few one liners in the show and contemporary. That speaks to me most strongly as that which has several layers tuition. I think with Huma a lot of the best dotes do work on different levels. I'm interested in the mechanics of a visual joke about that of the most humor that we recognize standups sitcoms movies, novels the comedy relies heavily on timing and surprise. David, you cannot say this. How do you think that the mechanics of the visual joke different to those of say, a stand up comedian. I think every everything you say existing context. So when you're writing something that's to be read in a book, it's Pop's different from how you write something a wall and the Connery. Maybe you know, you make an object that communicate something is very different from a film that indicate something so. So there's a certain pitch to every media into every context..

Brexit David UK Connery Huma Jake Stephan five year two years
"contemporary art" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"This week's episode of our show monocle on design takes a closer look at the art of restoration how do you give a new lease of life to a structure that was originally built for an entirely different purpose the old fix brewery in downtown athens was once a landmark symbolising the greek capital's industrial aspirants and after years of decay in elected been brought back to life in the form of the national museum of contemporary art which reopened last year venetia rainy reports entering athens's national museum for contemporary art isn't other worldly experience as he leaves behind the oppressive chaos of two major roads you find yourself in a cavernous whole almost nothing but light and space this museum known as ems t in greek is located in a building widely referred to as the former fix brewery after the magnet family who fest built a factory on this site back in the late eighteen hundreds it became a city icon after legendary architect tack his nettles one of the major exponents of post modernism in greece and his colleague margaritas apostollate this designed a bolt new shell for the jumbled industrial complex abandoned in the seventies and half demolished in the ninety s it's fate looked bleak until a temporary exhibition on its ground floor in two thousand but about time the building was til growing of the former fix boo ruin has been abundant for many years katharina koskinen is the museum's director and i think that this addition was sign that this very building would be the permanent home for the new museum and the decision was taken to transform the part the non demolished part of the fixed into the museum of contemporary art so a competition was launched to find the architects with.

athens greece director national museum of contemporar venetia national museum for contempora katharina koskinen museum of contemporary art
Harvard, Bain and Boston discussed on BTV Simulcast

BTV Simulcast

01:41 min | 3 years ago

Harvard, Bain and Boston discussed on BTV Simulcast

"It's really it's really the same issue real estates are more stable assets we've we've had a great team come over to ban capital from harvard has been in top top performer for the last ten years it worked out great for both sides we're very excited about that team and again they're going to be selective they they stick to specific niches that they know about so for example funding biotech a office space dr office space things that have demand and and we'll we'll ask the test of time withstand some of these trade increases excited about teams at bain and excited about certainly teams celtic it's wonderful to have your hand very fortunate i don't think we've ever had a better team of bain and certainly the celtics team is is just a working magic every night and hopefully the magic we'll continue everyone in boston steve how thank you so much for being with us wants of cpu is being capital coach and co owner of the boston celtics now drama among management at tesla continues ceo elon musk announced a thorough reorganization among management in a memo to employees monday he added that tesla was changing its structure to improve communication combined functions and get rid of activities that aren't vital to the success of the company's mission and the news comes after several executives announced the departure in recent months coming up much more from the institute of contemporary art right here in boston moose beat with the museum's chief curator and discuss how art has evolved through technology and if you like bad news check us out on the radio you can listen on the bloomberg radio app dot com and in the us on sirius xm this is bloomberg.

Harvard Bain Boston Boston Celtics Tesla Elon Musk Chief Curator United States Bloomberg Celtics CEO Institute Of Contemporary Art Ten Years
"contemporary art" Discussed on Throwing Shade

Throwing Shade

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on Throwing Shade

"Thing that's a mocha don't museum of contemporary art not guessing contemporary regular maka that my dot com anyway so what were you doing why are we gonna hammered which is free and they had an exhibit all as always free to have those beautiful career that you can work in if you want it's great it's by ucla for those who towns and they had it's over now but this was like a month ago i went and they had this amazing exhibit that i don't know why i didn't tell you about because you would have loved it called radical women and it was a latina feminist of southern california in the succeeds did you see it and i saw the i saw it i don't get to do much it so you can you can go to museum go go to to a a museum museum it's it's free and it you know you're there in the only have you saw i not this weekend i've seen i saw that one before this was the first time to the hammer so i saw this weekend it was so good they have one exhibit that was a guy who would filmed forty four different sunsets and then over at the narration was sort of like the destruction of society as described by lady bunny that was the video it was incredible and then they had another thing of this artist who had sort of recreated there's a syrian prison that the prisoners there it's basically a torture camp they're kept in complete darkness so they learn to cultivate their sense of hearing really well because and the acoustic the prison was built acoustically so that if someone was getting beaten on the fifth floor a mile away you hear it so basically this guy like my apartment complex honey so this artist did all these interviews with these prisoners who had left this president sort of aku.

ucla california museum of contemporary art president
"contemporary art" Discussed on The Big Listen

The Big Listen

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on The Big Listen

"Norman lear i'm usually pretty good at like just saying okay like this is an idea and then extrapolating on it but i'm not getting anything out of this these paintings are all over the place in here squeak goals drips splotches splashes maybe some cigarette butts stuck into it is the so you have to be for like a better word enlighten to understand what is this all about is it about anything and how do you figure out what you're supposed to think or feel about something that seems so random i learned so much while making this podcast and one of the things which is answering your question which is why sometimes a contemporary art ken feel inaccessible is the shift to abstraction an i again i'll i can't speak to this in like dates or whatever but if you go to the met you're seeing for the most part uh images that you can stand in a group of people and we can all agree what we're looking at reading anna of all fruit a group of a bowl of fruit or looking at a um on a none somboon of people in a senior it you know in it's like a classical painting and we can all understand exactly what's going on but when you go into moma there's not a lot of at renault there's a move to obstruction so you can sometimes you can look at paintings and you're like i and i see what this is and you can talk about it but a lot of this stuff is people that are exploring different mediums end yeah abstraction end just singular color and and all the things that we talk about in each episode and so it is like up for grabs what the pieces are a bow and you know if i who someone who went to art school and took classes m still like i dunno where i have so many questions than i can only imagine what someone who didn't even.

Norman lear
"contemporary art" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Contemporary art museum justified the to african art and its in this crazy old grain silo basically it's excellent yeah you know is so is this old industrial building with a bunch of concrete silos all clustered into one building and thomas hetherwick the architect went in and just cut out the middle of it and you walk in and it's this almost it looks like journey alien spaceship so cool look that way and it's just his hair all pretty incredible and the lifts you can see on the on the left this is abc sunday amazing i'm before actually if you wanted to see the all that he'd managed to collect and this is masses of all the measures that it's all from across the whole of the african continent zimbabwean political commentary african american pop art art in there you'd have to go on safari souleymane play a large that you could goats joe concerts had a large you could go to and you could see some of the earth there and he was like i have so very expensive how much are i should put it in one place and you're right it's it's african art is art from the african diaspora so african artists african american artis all around the world and you know the really hasn't been such a huge landmark museum to devoted to this kind of art yet and it's really exciting that it's there and and it's really actually not only changing cape town look the neighborhood around where it is silo museum is is becoming very cool and very help lead teased historic crisis being kind of a triple threat we say you know that's folks aren't aficionados hotel bus design addicts alike i mean there's a lot going on yes it's true there is there we do a whole section about breese street which has kind of a is sort of at the heart of cape town's revitalized central business district and on brie street there's all these great shops great fashion three excess 3s great kitchenware great coffee you know it's got sort.

Contemporary art museum cape town silo museum thomas hetherwick
"contemporary art" Discussed on The Bangkok Podcast | Expat Life In Thailand Via Expats from Canada

The Bangkok Podcast | Expat Life In Thailand Via Expats from Canada

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on The Bangkok Podcast | Expat Life In Thailand Via Expats from Canada

"But before we talk to you about that i wanted to say something about well i want to let you know what really happened before this before to greg in i sat down here he and i recorded an entire episode before this episode right because our patrons love us so much they've asked for more content so we gave them content greg a priebus owed episode yeah that's getting meta a meta metabolic over the place and so that is already out on our patriotic only feed which they can access at patriotic dot com slash bang kok podcast and it seems that were putting more and more content out to our most generous patrons over there that's right not to mention the ridiculous photo of myself with the ridiculous motorcycle helmet that i put on a while ago i'd want to release it publicly the as its two embarrassing it's pretty terrible so i just released it to our dear patrons to give them a little bit of a peek into what i deal with when i get all the back of a motorcycle taxi every morning so all of a special as if you want all the extra episodes and you wanna support us because the only way that this podcast makes any cash for the two of us is by patriarch on dot com patreoncom slash bangkok podcast and sign up two day so we decided to do this show because this is part of our series of hidden or under appreciated jams in bangkok and we are currently sitting at mocha the museum of contemporary art in northern bangkok in the chattha check district knives he was building um a lot of times on bike rides and car rides out to don muang airport.

greg bangkok museum of contemporary art chattha don muang two day
"contemporary art" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"contemporary art" Discussed on KOIL

"And i don't even know how to charge it but i i started piling up all this stuff i know i'm off topic but trump to sow fox everybody is this i don't know what else to say about he's out fox's it makes them look stupid but i i pile up all the old technology some of it by the way i didn't even take out of the box i mean it's original box item and use it oh my god it makes you want to throw up all the money you voiced it and then the cords there should be a cord graveyard where you just so as to make a contemporary art do contemporary peace with just a sculpture of cords were you were you stiffen the cords and you glue them and you and you put found objects in them and make this that's a great idea accord sculpture i have so many courts i have no idea what they go to and i'm definitely afraid of throwing any of them out so i just move them from from house to house to box the box and i think some of these cords are i literally courts from my old msnbc phone that they gave me a ninety ninety eight i ninety eight six plucked digital camera chargers you who knows what they're but what you might find it in that bob emotion overdue well now but then it then you realize the the old digital cameras take much better photos i don't care if they're higher pixels on the on the cell phone my if my camera from my one of my one of my trips to africa my actual nikon camera with film and a telephoto lands i had a cool wide angle lens those photos you can blow up to posters they are the most incredible photos of moving animals like of a cheetah on his way to a key gill i may get a getting it totally frozen in time it is so beautiful and i don't care what when i'm going to africa in july again and i'm not i'm going to have to go anywhere even develop real film anymore i'm going to bring my film camera and continue find out of people still develop real film.

off topic fox digital cameras msnbc digital camera bob africa nikon africa