40 Burst results for "Consultant"

Fresh update on "consultant" discussed on Garret Lewis

Garret Lewis

01:20 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "consultant" discussed on Garret Lewis

"All right. How does that make sense? So if you didn't know anything about Mark Kelly, when people tune in and out all the time, some people that really pay attention, Obviously, D'oh. And listen, There's a lot of people that don't again a doctor that I know. Smart guy. I had no clue. About the background of Mark Kelly. No idea. Look, he's busy. He's a doctor. It is what it is. So ah, this is not good. Not good for him. Not good for us. And Republicans should be screaming from the rooftops. I don't watch that much TV. And I know there's some ads. Are they working again? Martha put on her flight suit to say that she was a victim and then a fighter and this other stuff. It's like she always is tone deaf. I mean, China, China is a big deal right now. And she should just run ads saying that her opponent, Mark Kelly, has been doing business with China since 2003. So who who is his mark? Where is his allegiance is his allegiance to China or America? He's even doing business with companies in bed with him and Pema County that censors the Internet. I believe in the free flow of information, but Mark's doing business with a company that censors the Internet. What will he do if he's your senator? Like that would scare the hell out of people wouldn't like that would get the message across. Good thing. I'm not one of those, you know? Consultant's these people consultant. Overpaid hacks. That's what they are. So there you go. That's the latest on Mark Kelly. I have much more Don't go anywhere..

Mark Kelly China Mark Pema County Martha Consultant America
Push to bring coronavirus vaccines to the poor faces trouble

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 2 hrs ago

Push to bring coronavirus vaccines to the poor faces trouble

"An ambitious humanitarian project to deliver corona virus and vaccines to the world's poorest people is facing potential shortages of money cargo planes refrigeration and vaccines themselves it is running into skepticism even from some of those it's intended to help most in one of the biggest obstacles rich countries have locked up most of the world's potential vaccine supply through twenty twenty one and the US and others have refused to join the project called Kobach's Rohit my pioneer public health consultant who previously worked for doctors without borders says a supply of vaccines is not going to be that in the near term and the money also isn't that Kovacs was conceived as a way of giving countries access to coronavirus vaccines regardless of their wealth one of the problems that emerge was at some of the world's wealthiest nations have negotiated their own deals directly with drug companies meaning they don't need to participate in this endeavor after all there is shockingly London

United States Kovacs London Consultant
Fresh update on "consultant" discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:41 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "consultant" discussed on AP News Radio

"An ambitious humanitarian project to deliver corona virus and vaccines to the world's poorest people is facing potential shortages of money cargo planes refrigeration and vaccines themselves it is running into skepticism even from some of those it's intended to help most in 1 of the biggest obstacles rich countries have locked up most of the world's potential vaccine supply through 2021 and the US and others have refused to join the project called Kobach's Rohit my pioneer public health consultant who previously worked for doctors without borders says a supply of vaccines is not going to be that in the near term and the money also isn't that Kovacs was conceived as a way of giving countries access to coronavirus vaccines regardless of their wealth 1 of the problems that emerge was at some of the world's wealthiest nations have negotiated their own deals directly with drug companies meaning they don't need to participate in this endeavor after all there is shockingly London

United States Kovacs London Consultant
Boeing to move all 787 Dreamliner production to South Carolina

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:05 min | 1 d ago

Boeing to move all 787 Dreamliner production to South Carolina

"Report last week suggested Boeing would make the cost cutting move of consolidating its Dreamliner operation by moving it out of Everett is calls Brian Cover tells us a second source is confirming such a move. When the rumors started that Boeing was considering packing up. It's 7 87 Everett operations. The company confirmed it was looking into the possibility We asked analyst Richard Aboulafia with the Teal group at the time. If this was money related, you know, I'm afraid it is three factories, money, money and money. The company's taking a very short term focus here saving costs now, even though Boeing isn't officially confirming at the Wall Street Journal is the publication says Boeing will make the announcement as soon as this week that it will move the entire Dreamliner line to South Carolina, where consolidation will take place. That likely means layoffs here, not just on the line, but four suppliers throughout the region. Aviation consultant Scott Hamilton says the Charleston plant is quote the obvious choice because it's the only plant that builds the seven eight 7-10. It's a non union plant, and it has lower production costs. Brian Calvert Camo News

Boeing Brian Calvert Everett Brian Cover Wall Street Journal Teal Group Richard Aboulafia Analyst South Carolina Charleston Scott Hamilton Consultant
Fresh update on "consultant" discussed on Mindy Diamond on Independence: A Podcast for Financial Advisors Considering Change

Mindy Diamond on Independence: A Podcast for Financial Advisors Considering Change

01:38 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "consultant" discussed on Mindy Diamond on Independence: A Podcast for Financial Advisors Considering Change

"All the Investments have been done that was needed to go where we need to prior. It's amazing. I want to talk a little bit about the your thoughts on building a firm on the one hand you make it sound easy that you have 1,000 clients and you get ten thousand referrals and we get that but not everybody gets there. So if you were talking to a nascent firm owner somebody either now who just bought Just a firm or somebody who was thinking about going independent for the first time. What advice would you give them about how to build the best firm possible? You don't I don't know that I've even the best person to say that cuz you maybe like the last time I did this was twenty years ago and it wasn't even really starting one. It was buying one that at least had, you know, a few dozen clients in frankly. All I've learned is off is probably harder today than back then I mean, think if you're at a brokerage house and you have your own clients and you can leave with those clients, I think this you know with the right consultant and is dead pretty easy deal. I think if you're just popping out into the independent world without having built your own practice somewhere else. I think it's very very difficult. And I think probably I guess Meandering my way one piece of advice. It's very crowded to the point you brought up Mindy at the beginning of this very very very crowded and very competitive now. So carving out a niche is probably the Smart Hub. Way to do it like only working with or really emphasizing one group of people to where you can with a little bit of hard work and luck. You can start to be a bigger player in that little area is probably the quickest path to success. Basically any industry is a good saturated that becomes the way to penetrate later. Yeah, you know, you talk about your choice to have thought a firm as opposed to building from scratch in today's day and age somebody without any assets under management wouldn't even have the opportunity to buy a firm because the market is as crowded and competitive as it is not even a firm as you said creative planning with only tens of millions under management at the time would still have it's you know, it's real pick of the litter in terms of who they wanted to buy them and they would certainly wouldn't choose somebody who didn't come with a book of business or a firm behind them. But from your perspective and even though it's been a long time since you were starting a firm what time? Say to somebody that was already in business and are a firm and that was thinking about gaining access to Capital sources of capital. What would you advise them? If you're starting from scratch? I think you're basically friends and family at that point. I mean there don't know that there is any other way to get access to Capital to starting from scratch without just going to people, you know, I can't imagine a bank or third party of any kind, you know bankrolling that from day one. I mean, don't even think you have choices besides that yeah well and how about a firm and extensor so affirm that's you know, five hundred million or a billion under management that wants to either take some chips off the table as you mentioned or wants to be able get in the game as far as m&a and can't do it without access to Capital. What are their options? And how should they think about when the right time is to begin do that? I think if you're five hundred million, like institutional investors are not going to be interested cuz if you think about what prime Would you like some private-equity wants a platform, you know, they want to buy something where they can talk other people into it, right? They can get other firms and put under it. But in five hundred million, you don't really have an institution you say you kind of have your own your own business and you know, all the clients and it's all about you usually still or a very tiny group of people. So taking chips off the table and a model like that means second part or all of your firm to one of these aggregators like a focus or a high tower or selling all of it to creative planning or a place like that and those become your options to you know, continue to grow and chips off the table and when when should a firm owner begin to think gee maybe it's really time to think about selling I get all these calls all the time from interested parties. When is the right time to begin to think about really entertaining them seriously Well, I think it's really has to do with what are your goals?.

Mindy Consultant
US election 2020: Trump, Biden to face off in presidential debate

Dave Ramsey

00:30 sec | 2 d ago

US election 2020: Trump, Biden to face off in presidential debate

"Than 24 hours away from the first presidential debate between President Donald Trump and the Democratic presidential candidate, Joe Biden Valley political consultant stand Burns, telling Katya This is going to be one of the most viewed presidential debates in history. And with so much anticipation about not only is trump going to behave in the most Trumpian style, bare knuckle, no rules kind of thing. But how is Joe Biden going to do in that hot spotlight? And

Joe Biden President Donald Trump Katya This Burns Consultant
Fresh update on "consultant" discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

01:24 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "consultant" discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"It doesn't grow from those things. It grows from what I've been describing around making those really deep human connections with people where you begin to get discretionary effort from employees in discretionary income from. You you've said that part of the Vision at best buy what you've helped to create is that your employee population is representative of the customers in communities that you serve. Now how does that change from one community to the next because the customers that you serve in the employees that you might have in one community in one city might be very, very different than the makeup of another city? How do you? How do you change that between one store to another location? Yeah so What I would say if it was a matter of I. I don't think I could change it. I. Truly believe my role is to equip leaders to provide resources into be the sort of internal consultant that helps them learn how to do the work that we would describe as. Marrying their communities and making deep connection is with their employees. Because the leader has to do the work of understanding that community or the node in which they're going to operate. As Organization, our leaders have become quite proficient at that though there's still opportunity we're not where we want to be as I was say that both of my non for profit work end of my work. But when you begin to equip leaders. What happens is they actually unit by unit begin to do the work that lifts the overall organization in. So when their intention is I, really want to deeply understand the needs of my customer. And I deeply went to understand how my employees are interacting in community work with the next community in does the value proposition offer the products offered meet those needs I'm you begin to see change if that's the motivation of every leader then you're going to get momentum if there's just a strategy is being pushed by particular person or group my case that'd be. Myself or inclusion diversity team it doesn't work on the has to be something that.

Representative Consultant
Analyzing The NY Times Trump Tax Return Story (In Depth)

Radical Personal Finance

06:12 min | 2 d ago

Analyzing The NY Times Trump Tax Return Story (In Depth)

"The president's taxes long concealed records show trump's chronic losses and years of tax avoidance. I'M GONNA go through this story with you in an extremely detailed way I'm going to give you an overview. Tell you what's in the article was not in the article, and then we'll go through it in a an extremely detailed ways that you can get an idea of Some lessons that you can learn and apply to your own life, and I'll talk to you about what's behind the scenes so that you can feel much more competent when discussing this or really any other kind of of article this article in the New York Times is going to read I. Guess I should say, obviously, it's GONNA re differently depending on the political back on that you come. But it's going to be read very differently based upon whether you have any knowledge or familiarity with tax code in general how taxes work in the United States how business works etc or if you don't and. For that reason, it's really fascinating to look at People's responses to this article because the responses dramatically depending on. I guess somebody's exposure to it. So I, let me give you Joshua's summary of the article begin with Lead The New York Times Obtained Donald Trump tax information extending over more than two decades revealing struggling properties vast right offs an audit battle and hundreds of millions in debt coming due in short the New York Times of tained evidently all of trump's tax returns over the last fifteen years or so including returns from the business organizations that he is involved in. They've evidently analyzed those returns and they basically wanted to make a few basic statements number one. There was no evidence of malfeasance uncovered with regard to Russia or other kinds of of basic Allegations that have been been being made the basic arguments that they that they tried to advance in this article or number one that president trump has lost lots and lots of money over the years and I think that's the probably when the authors were riding trying to say, what do we talk about? They were basically trying to say, well, let's prove that. President trump is not a very good businessman because he's lost lots of money that would be number one with regard to potential areas of misdeeds. They talk extensively about a few basic things. Number one is the use of business losses across the organization including a seventy something million dollar tax deduction that had been claimed for and filed for from A. Number of years ago, talking to that number a little in a little bit consulting fees and also deductions whether deductions are are valid or not. Now I think for the anti-trump crowd. Unfortunately, there's no smoking gun in the taxes and this is hard hard to overstate how important this story is in political terms have been many political consultants who for many years been saying well, if we could just get a hold of the tax returns, then we could prove all of these things about president. Trump's crookedness and all the things that he's done wrong and then we'll. We'll be able to make that case as a slam dunk case that does not seem to be the case or at least if that is the case, the New York Times did not choose to profile anything in this initial story as a financial planner story and I said, Yep okay. That makes sense. Yup that makes sense. No surprise there. Yup. That sense that makes sense. That's make sense. Explain all the details of how. How that is but I don't see this is not a bombshell story for a financial planner and so I think that was that's one thing that's worth pointing out most of the techniques and and things discussed here is exactly what I would understand. In fact, much of what I teach radical personal finance. When I teach tax planning, the techniques are just simply a little bit grander in scale than what a lot of people do but there's not really any fundamental difference that I can see from what president trump has. been doing over the years versus what I teach people to do to save on their taxes. So let's begin and I'm going to give you a detailed analysis and I'm doing this just. So you can think about my brain of how I read articles like this I I'm I'm not I don't have a political horse in the race. I'm not trying to make go on where the other, but it is really interesting to read an article like this and think about the challenge of writing it I'm not. I'm not an anti, New York Times Guy I'm not a Pro New York Times guy probably read and and respect newspapers much more than I do many other many other forms of of news and I think that the Arctic the authors of this of this story. Russ boot Suzanne Craig Mike MacIntyre is the story of their lives right where they've been working hard to get it just right and you see that carefulness in the writing, but we'll still analyze A. Little bit of the land is a little bit of the details along the way through as well. So we begin with a with the lead. Donald J, trump paid seven hundred and fifty dollars in federal income taxes the year he won the presidency in his first year in the White House he paid another seven hundred fifty dollars. He had paid no income taxes at all in ten of the previous fifteen years largely because he reported losing much more money than he made. As the president wages reelection campaign that polls say he is in danger of losing his finances are under stress beset by losses and hundreds of millions of dollars in debt are coming do that he has personally guaranteed also hanging over him as a decade-long audit battle with the Internal Revenue Service over the legitimacy of the seventy two point nine, million dollar tax refund that he claimed and received after declaring huge losses, an adverse ruling could cost him more than one hundred, million dollars. Now in that lead, we see these these themes that I've talked about and I just I give you my reactions to what it says here most of this is designed to have a good news hook, which is true, and that's what a new newspaper should do. It's pretty amazing that somebody who is renowned and purported to be a billionaire would only pay seven hundred fifty dollars in income taxes and to the average person. Who doesn't understand taxes that will sound like a shocking reality. A shocking number

Donald Trump President Trump New York Times United States Pro New York Times Internal Revenue Service Russia Joshua Donald J White House Russ Suzanne Craig Mike Macintyre
Fresh update on "consultant" discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

Startups For the Rest of Us

01:08 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "consultant" discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

"In order to track the new customers they WANNA serve Scottie has been reaching out to the larger teams that are existing customers to ask for testimonials. There's tremendous power in the social proof testimonials and it's an approach. You should explore as early as possible when trying to move into a new segment of the market. That's unfamiliar. With. Your. Company. Lure working on reaching out to some of our teams that we have currently that our customers that we wanted to get success stories from and so we've we've done that we got all three we have three and we just got them all back So we're GONNA get ready to incorporate those onto our site really exciting because now, when these teams that were trying to to come to our site, they won't see you know the solo renew our residential designer they'll see these architecture teams. That are that are using us in finding value and we're also asking those those companies for if we can use their logo on our website and so far. I've gotten a yes from one of them and waiting you're back on the other two. So that's really exciting in getting US one step closer to speaking to those teams I'll just kind of piggyback on that thing I've been working with a consultant that's also an interior architect. She's been kind of helping just craft the messaging and the positioning. Messing? On the website specifically and then will extend that out into the bottom of the funnel type content. But so so along with those new customer success stories, which will have on the website and has assets that we can you know direct traffic to. The website now speaks we think better to the to the ideal customer Avatar that we're shooting for. So that was kind of a success and we continue to tighten that. And make that better and better and add add more content to it's I. Think the one of the reasons why trials are kind of a little bit lower this month is because some of the traffic that we've been getting is probably more geared towards the residential side and they're seeing this new messaging..

United States Scottie Consultant
Washington DC - CBS News transportation safety analyst Mark Rosenker dies at 73 in Alexandria

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 4 d ago

Washington DC - CBS News transportation safety analyst Mark Rosenker dies at 73 in Alexandria

"P. News, a former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, has died. Mark Rosenker, who chaired the country's accident investigation agency, from 2005, to 2009, under President George W. Bush, was 73 Rosenker had brain cancer and died yesterday in Alexandria. He also served as vice chairman of the Washington Metro Rail Safety Commission later is a transportation consultant and safety analyst, including regular contributions to CBS

Chairman Of The National Trans Washington Metro Rail Safety C Vice Chairman Mark Rosenker President George W. Bush Brain Cancer Alexandria CBS Analyst P. News Consultant
Former Texas exam administrator pleads guilty in college scam

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:38 sec | 4 d ago

Former Texas exam administrator pleads guilty in college scam

"The latest guilty plea in the college admissions bribery scheme involves a former entrance exam administrator Fox's Kathleen. Maloney, reports Nikki Williams is a former employee of the Houston Independent School district and. She administered the college entrance exams at the public high school where she worked prosecutors say as part of a scam to help wealthy parents rig their kids test scores, she accepted money from admissions consultant, ric singer in exchange for letting someone else take exams in place of his clients. Children Sing are also pleading guilty in connection with a bribery scheme as well as Mark Redel who secretly took exams for the students

Bribery Nikki Williams Houston Independent School Dis Maloney Administrator FOX Mark Redel Consultant
Former exam administrator pleads guilty in college scam

Noble Capital Radio Hour

00:44 sec | 4 d ago

Former exam administrator pleads guilty in college scam

"Plea in the college admissions bribery scheme involves a former entrance exam administrator. Fox is Kathleen Maloney reports. Nicky Williams is a former employee of the Houston Independent School District, and she administered the college entrance exams at the public High school where she worked, prosecutors say As part of a scam to help wealthy parents rigged their kids test scores. She accepted money from admissions consultant Rick Singer in exchange for letting someone else take exams in place of his client's Children. Singer also pleading guilty in connection with the bribery scheme, as well as Mark Riddell, who Secretly took exams for the students. Definitely Maloney, Fox News and I joke here.

Bribery Nicky Williams Rick Singer Houston Independent School Dis Maloney Mark Riddell FOX Fox News Public High School Administrator Consultant
What Are The Best Probiotics For Children With Diarrhoea

Healthy Eating For Kids

05:47 min | 5 d ago

What Are The Best Probiotics For Children With Diarrhoea

"So, if you've heard a lot about probiotics, but you don't know what they are. They are really live micro organisms so they can be bacteria, but they can also be funky and it sounds really what you might be thinking. Why is it so? Popular if they are live that too. Now, these are actually good friendly bacteria and they do normally live in our dynasty system. So many live in the gut and they can also be found in breast milk. So they are considered to be generally safe to take for adults but also. For Children and in as few if you take them in a certain amount duty to take them in reasonable quantities, then it's store that they could give a health benefit benefit to the child or to the other taking the probiotic supplement, and of course, products that come in drops usually for babies. Then they might come in sachets for children and you can also get them Naga drink, but also capsules and so on. But Dave Begin to focus on. Diarrhea and I wanted to focus on this area because it's one of the best areas dont probiotics have been studied in and I'm talking about clinical trials where there's also been reviews of all of the collection of. Clinical trials and experts now. have. Come together to say, yes, there are specific strains the have been shown by research to say that they can have a role in helping. Manage symptoms of diarrhea now is really important for me to point out before we carry on that if you want to take a robotic or give your child of probiotic to manage diarrhea, then you must always follow the advice off your medical doctor or other healthcare professionals. Of example, if the recommended that you give a specific oral rehydration solution. Awad fluids. Antibiotics and other medications then you must always continue to give those. So the provide providers are not for replacing all of those other important medical treatments. It's more to give a long sided, and of course, if your child has a specific medical condition, then always always run it by your medical team. Before you start to give a property, it's always good to just keep your healthcare. Medical team informed about anything that you're trying. Particularly if your child has a medical condition that sort of. Has An effect on the immune function. So all the probiotics can have benefit on immunity. There are specific strains on that. We're not going to really dive into that today we'll save that for different podcast episode, but there may be some scenarios where your could you consultant, Dr Titian or medical team. Actually hold off of the probiotics at this stage. So thinking about how they really work the way they work is that when you give your child a probiotic supplement, they feed on the fibers offer news called prebiotics that your child eat, and they make lots and lots of short chain acids which helps them feed. It helps them grow and the live in the got, and they can sort of impact on the immune function. They can help prevent the growth of bad bacteria if you like and help the growth of the good bacteria, which will then help with the health outcomes that we wanted to see. So in this case, we want to see Eve giving approach is going to help with diarrhea and the most beneficial effects that we're really going to be talking about his which probiotics are going to help reduce the incidence, but also the severity of the diarrhea at perhaps scene for how for how long your child might have diarrhea four. So the first strain that I want to talk to you about today is one called Lactobacillus Ram noses g g now they have the names they really sound. You'd think what on Earth does that mean but once you start to read a lot more about per ballot you kind of tend to remember these strange but the research shows that this particular strain can reduce the risk of infections and antibiotic. Dahri. So sometimes, you might be prescribe antibiotics to fight other infections, but the side effects of antibiotics is that each child might have diarrhea. So for this instance, you could give a probiotic supplement like lactobacillus from nurses, G G so strain. So just remember if you're looking for a probiotic, the packaging might not say lactobacillus reminisces gee-gee in might have a brand name but this species or the type the scientific name of the probiotic that you want is lactobacillus from noses gee-gee

Diarrhea Dave Begin Awad Consultant Dr Titian EVE
Former exam administrator pleads guilty in college scam

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:39 sec | 5 d ago

Former exam administrator pleads guilty in college scam

"Another guilty plea linked to a college admissions bribery scheme. This one involves a former entrance exam administrator. Nikki Williams is a former employee of the Houston Independent School district, and she administered the college entrance exams public high school where she worked prosecutors say as part of a scam to help wealthy parents rig their kids test scores, she accepted money from admissions consultant, Rick, Singer, exchange for letting someone else take exams in place of his clients. Children Singer also pleading guilty in connection with the bribery scheme as well as Mark Redel. Who secretly took exams for the students Kathleen Maloney Fox News

Bribery Nikki Williams Houston Independent School Dis Kathleen Maloney Administrator Mark Redel Rick Consultant
Thousands of workers are literally stuck at sea

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:29 min | 6 d ago

Thousands of workers are literally stuck at sea

"The CEOS of some of the largest consumer products, companies, Unilever procter, and Gamble Johnson and Johnson are weighing in on what they say is a question of Human Rights on the high seas because of Corona virus measures some three, hundred thousand people who work on commercial vessels you know the kind that carry food and Health, and hygiene products among other things are stuck on their ships unable to leave governments around the world of closed ports, borders, and other travel facilities that allow crew changes and not being able to change crews on these ships is a problem for the health and safety of workers, as well as a pretty good way to clog up supply chains from Washington marketplace's Scott Tong, reports typically commercial ship workers signed contracts of six or ten or twelve months, and when that's up the ship swapped crews at the next port. But whenever they came near the boards, the poor is not allowing any Gano. Bronco Berlin is with the International Transport Workers Federation. He says some workers have been stuck on board for seventeen months in that some ports except products but not people in one case, several ports refuse to take the body of ship worker who died, and then we actually find the way that the body was taken in Singapore, and after fifteen days on board the ship, the issue over work crews is clogging up the supply chain. Tom. Dairy CEO of the Institute for Supply. Management says officials in places like Australia are now starting to ban improperly staff ships from sailing because we're seeing these ships were taken out of circulation as it were. We've seen rates for freight crossing the Pacific. Were than quadruple since June he says, delays are causing fridge and dishwasher shortages in the US and keeping goods moving is critical to the multinational firms that are now pressuring the UN to get involved. The group is the consumer goods forum. In Da Berge Array is director we call face the risk of global relations. Jing. Disrupted and all of this expense of Lucas wellbeing meantime the workers remain mostly invisible says Andrew. Kinsey is marine risk consultant at the user alliens when you go into a store and you look at items on the shelves, their way got to that shelf. Was via. As a consumer, we're blind to it but eighty percent of the goods in the world are delivered by see I'm Scott Tong for

Scott Tong Bronco Berlin International Transport Worker Gamble Johnson TOM Unilever Procter Gano Da Berge Array Institute For Supply Washington Marketplace Kinsey Singapore UN CEO United States Consultant Australia
The coronavirus is mutating — does it matter?

WBZ Midday News

00:37 sec | 6 d ago

The coronavirus is mutating — does it matter?

"Out It's mutating Houston scientists have come out with a study of more than 5000 genetic sequences. Though things may not be as bad as they seem. The question everybody is asking is if the virus is changing. What does that mean about a vaccine? What that means right now is luckily, nothing. The vaccines or to the spike protein. If the spy protein changes significantly, it won't find to the ace to receptor or the receptor uses to get into humans and so obviously won't hurt us in that regard, CBS medical consultant Dr David Vegas Vacation land is open again for Massachusetts residents main, lifting its

Dr David Vegas Houston CBS Consultant Massachusetts
How To Generate High-Value Leads On LinkedIn

Accelerate Your Business Growth

05:31 min | Last week

How To Generate High-Value Leads On LinkedIn

"My guest today is Matt Kark. That is the founder of the virtual edge and CO creator of the rainmaker system. An online marketing system that helps coaches, advisers and consultants get two to five times. Hi I'm sorry. Let me start that over again. Two to five high value leads per day from Lincoln without paying for ads. and His business partner have helped over a thousand businesses in seventeen countries grow exponentially. There's three step approach places human connection at its core paving the way for a new wave of lead generation marketing. Virtual. Edge is a multimillion dollar company and they have helped their clients grow to six and seven figures without paid advertising. Which I find fascinating, which is why wanted out to be here today. So thanks for joining me today, Matt. Thank you for having me on. I'm excited to be here. I am thrilled to have you here and I saw this subject is so fascinating for me because I. Feel like I. See a lot of people doing things incorrectly unlinked in and like especially now that we're in the situation where people can't be face to face. Right. So this you know human connection at its core, it is interesting for me but. I want to start with if you would define what Yael believe is a high value lead. Yeah, brilliant. I love that question because most people Wayne, they say leads and especially on. Lincoln. They talk about connections and they talk about how many potential people you're going to reach out to. But that's not really elite. That's just the beginning part of the process. So for me hide that you lead is somebody that has gone unchecked profile. That has been specifically targeted. You've had a conversation with them and you shared with them. What results you can help people like them achieve they say, yes they're interested in talking and you get an email address himself a number that's what I consider lead. And at somebody that is going to be that's lead first of all but a high value lead is someone that you're selling something to fall. You know at least three thousand dollars. Okay, that's interesting. Okay. So that's sort of the benchmark then. Yeah clean okay. Sell. It fit based on that it feels to me like knowing your ideal client is really really important. So you could differentiate between high value lead someone who just might be a good connection for you yes. So. Will you talk some about I? Mean I'm all about defining your ideal client, but for the listeners, will you talk about why that is so important? Hundred percent and you know like you said I mean it's one of the most important things that you can actually do right and. Getting clear on your ideal client will determine a couple of things if it's like, maybe I can take a step back. If you're trying to target everybody, it's very difficult to create a compelling message to get out into the marketplace. Because you don't know what they want and what they're trying to achieve. So if you get laser focused on an ideal client and instead of Trying to use a shotgun from you know five hundred yards are a thousand yards, use a sniper rifle and you're going off to that one ideal client. You can dive deep into are as a person. Instead of just thinking of them as. A prospect potential clients you dive into who they are as a person. When you do that, it allows you to understand who they are and what they need and what the core things are that they're really excited. And the things that are actually going to be excited about buying and spending money intended conversations, and once you do that, you can then just go and find more people like that. You, see for a lot of people that we work with you know they don't need to have forty fifty clients a month. In fact, most of the people in order to get to six and seven and eight figures, they need three to four clients a month. Right, so it's not like you need a ton of clients to be able to generate massive results. Okay. So I love this idea of getting stuck with they are as a person. And I feel like there's people listening who are thinking. Okay. But. If I'm selling like beat be like consultants that that deal with businesses. Does that still told trial. Absolutely one hundred percent because if you're a consultant and you know mean that's what I do and that's a part of our business and a lot of. The companies that we work with our consultants as well. So even then the most specific, you get around few years targeting and what sort of results you can help them achieve the easier it is to reach these guys. Now the mistake that most people make is they go in and they say their business consultant they'll say I help businesses grow right. Number One. What. Kind of businesses who you talking in the business? What are the big problems they have? What sort of growth can they achieve and what sort of timeframe?

Matt Kark Lincoln Consultant Yael Founder Partner Wayne
What it Means to be "AI Ready" - with Matthew Mattina

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

04:52 min | Last week

What it Means to be "AI Ready" - with Matthew Mattina

"This is Daniel Magellan. You're listening to the and podcast. We speak this week on the topic of. Readiness. What is it look like to truly be ready as an enterprise if you're a consultant, you're selling into enterprises and you want to build a success wave. This client stands in what might need to be worked on or if you are an AI champion within an enterprise, you want to get an understanding of where do we stand how ready are we should be an awfully helpful episode our guest. This Week is Matthew Martina who's the head of The machine learning research lab, A. R. M. A. R. Ramsey multibillion dollar semiconductor and software development company wholly owned by Softbank Softbank One of the biggest venture funds in the world based out in. Japan, and Matthew speaks to us about his criteria and his way of thinking through with Ai Readiness looks like in an enterprise again, if you WANNA a checklist to list of features away to assess take view on your own company or that of your clients. I think at this episode should be awfully helpful. If you're just getting started with deploying a, we have a free guide called beginning with Ai. It's special guy for non technical professional. So if you do not have a technical background, but you still want to understand what is it realistically look like to deploy artificial intelligence were the key factors to understand for a adoption. If you're not the person writing code, you're more focused on the business strategy side. Of things then you'll WANNA download that free pdf brief it's an e. m. e. R. J. dot com slash B e g, and then the number one. So bg like beginning and then the number one that's RJ DOT COM slash bg one that pdf should give you some extra details to layer on top of some of the insights that Matthew provides for us here today. So further ado this is Matthew mcconaughey with arm on the and business podcast So I'll kind of dive in first here on this topic of Ai Readiness and ask you about what you consider to be sort of the core components, the core aspects of Iranian s within the enterprise obviously a lot of moving parts here what comes to mind for you? Yeah. That's a good question I think. One of the core questions is one that I think people sometimes miss with respect to a I is. Now there's the problem that you're trying to solve. Of course, understanding that from the get go is key in pretty much any scientific or engineering discipline, but then with Ai. Knowing how your machine learning or a model actually going to be deployed. So what is that model gonNA run on in the field as it can run on a some kind of a big server in a cloud data center somewhere with no terabytes of memory and an of GPS and processors, or is that model ultimately going to be deployed on some kind of you know very constrained embedded device say you know in a in a o not censor or mobile phone or a car and everything in between? So think what we sometimes see is that a model will be developed by a data scientist or or. application will be developed without a good understanding deployment and where that gets prickly as you've developed this model, it uses you know. Fifty gigabytes of memory and then Lo and behold actually want to deploy it on a constrained device that has you know two hundred and fifty six kilobytes of memory, and now you need to do some surgery. Got It. So readiness here you're talking about you know not only involving the model, but involving sort of what are we going to run it on DC? This is potentially part of the four thought process for companies obviously, not everybody's GonNa have devices. Out in the field, people have security cameras, La- run things on mobile phones you know in in cars or maybe heavy industry the have it on a boat somewhere maybe other folks are just GonNa have stuff up in the cloud but for you, it sounds like maybe that thought process should happen as we're coming up with ideas not sort of after we've developed a great model idea that those have to be married to hardware sort of at the brainstorm phases kind of what you're getting at. That's exactly right as part of the upfront? Planning. Stage of enterprise preparing for a readiness. Yes. Some consideration for. What devices is this actually gonna run on and what are the key characteristics of those devices and and the interesting about it is that like I said, you can build models you know and build ai applications that you know recognize faces and use lots and lots of memory or they can have models at recognize faces and use very little memory. And making that trade off and understanding that that trade off will need to be made between accuracy and memory upfront will save people pain down

Matthew Matthew Martina Matthew Mcconaughey Daniel Magellan Japan Softbank Softbank DC Consultant LO E. M. E. R. Scientist A. R. M. A. R. Ramsey LA
Airlines Are Asking for a Second Bailout. Congress Should Say No.

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:00 min | Last week

Airlines Are Asking for a Second Bailout. Congress Should Say No.

"We begin today with airlines their CEO's and union leaders are begging Congress for an extension to the twenty five, billion dollar industry bailout that was part of the cares act travel demand isn't returning fast enough, and now the industry is warning of a massive wave of layoffs if lawmakers extend funding before October first, but Congress is fighting and. Preoccupied. So where does that leave the airlines and their employees marketplace's Andy Euler reports according to the Trade Group Airlines for America passenger volume is off about sixty five percent from a year ago and airlines are collectively burning through five billion dollars. Each month CEO Nick Kelly says airlines are asking for six months federal help because hopefully by then we will be over the Hump and we will start to have a pickup and travel by next spring. The conditions of the previous bailout protected workers until October First Kalua warns that up to one hundred, thousand airline employees could soon join the ranks of the unemployed and Robert W man, a former airline executive and industry consultant says a second bailout would help the US economy recover faster when the pandemic Wayne's if the industry were to fall into disrepair if it were to fall into. Destructive restructuring during the pandemic, the question would be, what would you have around to help your on the other side? When exactly we get to the other side of the pandemic it's still murky and Federal Nikkei Day Rusia George Mason University says, another twenty five billion dollars is not going to solve the problem. This is justice coning the inevitable as long as the demand doesn't go back up. This is just basically a band-aid patch. She says bankruptcy would be the best option airlines have shown that they can emerge from restructuring healthier, and she says that needs troubled airlines don't pose a major risk to the economy at large. I made Euler

Trade Group Airlines Ceo Nick Kelly Congress CEO Andy Euler Wayne Rusia George Mason University United States Kalua America Robert W Executive Consultant
Operation Warp Speed advisers held investments in COVID vaccine firms, records show

BBC World Service

01:07 min | Last week

Operation Warp Speed advisers held investments in COVID vaccine firms, records show

"Several consultants working on the crash program to develop a Corona virus vaccine had financial ties to companies involved in the cove. It 19 response. That's according to new records released by a House subcommittee, and he presents a potential conflict of interest. NPR. Sidney Lumpkin has details. Operation Warp speed is the Trump Administration's pushed to make a Corona virus vaccine in record time. Its chief scientific adviser is former pharmaceutical executive Moncef Slowey. He has GlaxoSmithKline investments, and he's allowed to hang on to them. That's even though GlaxoSmithKline is receiving $2.1 billion in federal funding to work on a Corona virus vaccine. He called the stock his retirement and promised to donate any excessive profits to the National Institutes of Health. But a House subcommittee released documents Tuesday showing he doesn't have to do that while he's alive. The subcommittee also found three other operation warp speed consultants with potential financial conflicts. Sidney Lumpkin, NPR news in pre market trading, US futures are mixed on Asian stock market shares are higher.

Sidney Lumpkin Moncef Slowey NPR Glaxosmithkline National Institutes Of Health Executive United States
Ever Hire The Right Person For The Wrong Job

voiceFirst careers

04:37 min | Last week

Ever Hire The Right Person For The Wrong Job

"So this is a quick shout out. One things. Look I'm hired a lot of people. You've heard me mention that. I've hired some amazing people in my career. And some. Not. So amazing right. But The ones that stand out in your mind you know when you look back over it. Everybody's got a story right? You have a story, I have a story. I remember some great stories of being hired on some impossible tasks in pulling it off. I I don't recall if I mentioned. I was a consultant at Lexus Nexus. I was hired in as a business analyst. As working for actually software consulting firm. In they got me a role at Lexus Nexus near Dayton Ohio. In there was just an amazing adventure but. During the interviewing process. My immediate superior had another candidate. That he preferred or SOM- told. In the. His boss. was very pleased with the woman who was leaving the role and she was trying to we call backfill. She's trying to back fill her position with me because we worked at the same consulting for. Him The. The boss, the project. The highest level that I was interacting with he looked at my skill set and he said, well, you know, I don't see all the. The seashell Bourne Shell the. UNIX. now called devops, the UNIX system administration, the programming I you know I don't see that strength on. On his resume. In. The person who is trying to get me back filled was like ill, it's here. You know it's Kinda hidden under the covers you know because of this role he can do X. because a y you can do z. kind of thing and was making the argument for me. And, that's that's why you as talent trying to get hired is you have to have a conversation with the hiring manager. It's that simple if you're going through the HR department to get a job. It's it's like you going into fight with your hands tied behind your back as not a fair fight by any means. So. I said all that to say. What can you do if your talent to get hired as you can put your best foot forward? How do you do that? It's not with the resume. You send him a resume its going into an applicant tracking system. I'd say nine out of ten times. If not more, it's almost guarantee in the ATS is Ben Tuned to the point where It's told give me the top three or four candidates for this position. and. If there's any reason to eliminate you say a mommy gap. You. Raisin a kid or apparent gap taking care of a parental unit Keva lemonade yourself. You WanNa, send your linked profile your linked in profile. Your chance to say, Hey, here's what I can do. Here's what I've done. Here's why I'm the best person for that position. and. If you hiring manager look, you need somebody that can hit the ground running right? Hr was put all these lofty ideals into the job requisition. You know we'd like it. If you had a Nobel peace prize would like it. If he had six PhD's, we'd like it if Yada Yada. Yada. In the hiring managers like look I promise the company that might division, my department, my group would produce X. and we're nowhere near there because we're down a man or two or three. Me and being a species not sex. And so. Hiring managers you need to reach out so I can put you in touch with talent. That makes sense for what you're trying to accomplish says making some sense.

Lexus Nexus SOM Dayton Business Analyst HR Ohio Consultant
Catherine Sherlock On Moving From Overwhelmed To Empowered

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

04:23 min | Last week

Catherine Sherlock On Moving From Overwhelmed To Empowered

"Nice Guy Community welcome back. So today we are focused on moving people from overwhelm to empowerment and to make the MAC side of your potential as a person and both as a leader as well. So Catherine Sherlock, she plays on the edge of human potential and focuses on elevating the leadership conversation and leadership from the inside out. So she operates in the realm where many are too afraid or too. Distracted to go elevating lives and leadership in the process I'm really excited to talk to her today. She comes through a source through through Michael Hand I think over at over it barefoot wine. So I'm excited to have you here Catherine welcome to the show. Thank you doug. It's great to be here. So how'd you get hooked up with that with that whole hand guy? Do you remember? you know I think it might have been through Lincoln actually. Wow that's terrific. We and now we kind of we have a good connection. So I really enjoyed talking to him. Michael's come on the show a couple of times and and he and his partner Bonnie Harvey. Of course, everybody knows them from some of the past episodes they started barefoot wines and and turned it into a a eight and a nine figure business and did a great job with that. So you come through a very high source. So Catherine appreciate appreciative that you were here today and thanks for being here and and talk in your topic and your Azzoni of genius today. Hang Stack. It's great to be here. So let's talk a little bit about one of the areas where I think that many entrepreneurs may not focus specifically on, but it's an area that I think that We are remiss if we don't spend some time on it and it's talking about the world of leadership. So can you share maybe before we get into the actual topic for the sake of our our entrepreneurs that are in our community? Can you share what your span on leadership is and how they got to be something that you became an expert in? Yeah, you know I I come come from probably an unusual path I was an environmental and sustainability. Consultant. And I did that for a long time and I have a master's in that area. and. You know. I do have a desire to change the world and impact the world and I guess that's why was in that career to start with. But yet I kept finding that it wasn't wasn't having the impact I, wanted to be having. I wasn't able to open up to conversations. I really wanted to be having and when things came to a point where I had to kind of shift in what it was in my career. I ended up turning conduct my personal life and what I had been doing in my personal life. And that mixed with some new areas like organizational development, which which I moved into as I was in sustainability consulting. Just just need. Gid from from clients. And I started to realize that you know a lot of our challenges start from the inside. And yet we so often focus on especially as leaders in business, we focus on solving them from the outside. And it's not your best leverage point. So before you take a deeper dive into outside versus inside, can you maybe just take a thirty thousand foot approach and maybe what some of the things that we're working on that are maybe Say Wrong and leadership because there's so many different styles of of of leader in types of leaders that are out there and they're so many different ways in which we can lead. But what are you saying is some of the common pitfalls within the realm of Leadership Today Well in leadership development. It's based on trade theory a lot, and that means that somebody goes out and maybe they do some research on some leaders or maybe they just come up with a list of sort of must have characteristics. And then they go in and they say, Hey, these are the must have characteristics i. mean you seen those articles all the time of the year that ten, the twenty the I saw one that was one, hundred and one. Hundred one must have characteristics leader. And I think it's so backwards to who we are and. What actually brings out our best selves our best leadership abilities. it's that trying to adopt something that makes us feel like impostors. Instead of. What I really think that we're. Were meant to do is really deepen into our own personal gifts. And then you connect to then you're not trying to inspire anybody then you're inspired yourself. And your teaching other people how to inspire themselves.

Catherine Sherlock Michael Hand Lincoln Doug Bonnie Harvey Consultant Partner
Carmakers rev up electric truck, SUV production

Climate Cast

06:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Carmakers rev up electric truck, SUV production

"You, see them everywhere nearly fifty percent of all vehicles sold in the US, our sport utility vehicles the International Energy Agency reports SUV's are second only to electric power for the increase in greenhouse gas emissions in the last decade. But there are a new wave of all electric SUV's and trucks is coming and these new vehicles may be more powerful and boasted longer driving range than many of today's gas-powered SUV's trucks. So, how quickly will high tech these take hold in the next decade Chelsea Sexton is an electric car advocate and consultant hi. Chelsea their quick. Sketch here, how close are we to the next wave of electric vehicles and what will their capabilities be? We're going to start to see more of them in the next year or two obviously things are slightly influx with the pandemic but most of the automakers are still trying to be within a few months of their original targets and we're seeing everything from plug in hybrid jeep wrangler with thirty miles of electric range for around town driving and. Gasoline after that, all the way up to f one, fifty and riven with a few hundred miles of expected range and I'm interested in that F one fifty story because that Ford truck is the top selling truck in America I think there were nine hundred thousand f-series trucks sold last year and I see that they're retooling a factory in Michigan to build the first all electric f one fifty. What do we know about that role? Not very much. We're expecting it late twenty, twenty, one, early twenty, twenty, two something to that effect and they've not released really any specs other than videos of hauling trains and things to try to prove that electric vehicles really do have as much more performance than gasoline trucks, what other electric pickups SUV's Few years I'm watching all of them. There still are some open questions about everyone of them in that most vs today of any model have been sold only in California or the carb states owens have mandates requiring evt's there's not that many vehicles that are available across the country, and that will be a huge thing to prove what the trucks regarding who's serious, and WHO's not. That's an open question for folks like Ford, will they make these things in volume and sell them nationwide and really get behind them with the marketing and dealer support or is this going to be more of what we refer to as a compliance car which is basically Will sell as many as we have to in the places we have to, but not really in it with their hearts well, and part of the answer to that might be consumer attitudes. Right? I mean you helped launch an electric vehicle for GM back in the nineties. Have you seen consumer attitudes change in that time and if they changed enough to bring in the truck SUV drivers ironically that generation in the nineties had more trucks than SUV's in it than than small cars everyone knows the ev one that was the one I was involved in but Chevy and Ford made pickups at the time and Honda and Toyota made small SUV's so it's Sort of feels like we're yanking the automakers back toward where they started. There's still a lot of education that's needed. There are lots of people that are not even aware of electric vehicles, but in part that's because they've never seen one and they've never been available and so people can't buy what they don't know as even possible. So there's a lot of education required on that front but the interesting thing about electric vehicles in general is that it is the only example in the history of the automotive industry in which the industry itself has required demand to predate and continually exceeds supply. What. That sounds like is every time you hear it automaker executive say when we see demand for electric cars will start to build them. So it's always been the market polling for from the automakers versus the automakers trying to build their own market for something. So it's a parallel. Yes. Of course, we need to do more education, but we also need to start building things that people can see our else. They're never going to be aware of them in want to buy one. What about the politics of this? How much do you see that playing into the success of the next generation of truckin SUV models I mean we'll some people just not wanNA drive one because of their political beliefs it's possible however. The irony is that there has always been a fair amount of right wing support for electric vehicles because they use domestic energy, they keep more money in the local economy. We're not sending money overseas before an oil, and so it doesn't always get talked about in this administration because the politics kind of ebb and flow depending on the administration but there is a fair amount of conservative support and they're not just sort of this liberal technology that they're made out to be. So all politics tend to be kind of transient and. I've watched it shift back and forth over the years. So I don't expect the current politics will be permanent But at the same time, this has always been if not politically driven certainly policy driven it is those external incentives and mandates that have helped compel with the advocates and market asking for them electric vehicles for twenty five years, and it will probably remain. So for the next several at least are there any other barriers you see to electric truck an SUV sales? The single biggest barrier today is lack of product. The second biggest is lack of marketing and awareness and education and people not being able to buy what they don't know about and the third biggest dealerships across the board with any EV model if dealers aren't comfortable and wanting to sell vs they're not going to be successful at it, and so we can put billions of dollars into those first two things. But at the end of the day, if someone walks into a Ford dealer in his told well now, you'd really rather have the gasoline f one, fifty, not the electric one that one's Kinda goofy. All of that money and effort is wasted what about the pace of change and I know we're focused on electric vehicles today on the transportation emissions but overall with climate emissions I mean you you live in California you've been watching this for decades. We've got these terrible fires in California and Oregon this week are we moving fast enough now? We're not and that is not a widespread enough opinion yet. But regardless of why they come to the table, the best thing we can do is make more options available and attractive. So it doesn't matter if someone is coming to an AV because of climate change or air pollution or any other reason if they're coming for Torque and horsepower I'm fine with that. The goal is to build more of the table as we have more seats at it not be so concerned about why people come and sit down I'm all about the Torque and horsepower Chelsea, Sexton electric-car advocate and consultant. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective on climate cast today. Thank you for crash your party

Chelsea Sexton Ford California Consultant United States International Energy Agency Ford Truck Wrangler GM Chevy America Executive Owens Honda Michigan Toyota Oregon
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

05:57 min | 3 weeks ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Don Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the shooter group with the People Thrive Companies Thrive podcast. In the last episode I mentioned that I was feeling at capacity. And it came to a head for me. When I realized, I was really tired of my Home Office. Because, of course, for the last five and a half to six months. Bat. is where I have been working now more networking events, no more onsite client trainings. No more meeting with prospects or clients at a restaurant or a cafe or their office. That was all done in Kaput. When I realized that I was having this issue. There is also the sense of. What can I do about it? Yes I can be more creative and that was the point of that last episode. So if you haven't listened to that, you might want to go take a quick listen. Yes, I can be more creative. and. I'm still feeling it capacity in. A can't focused and not motivated. And that day was not a happy day for me. I feel that I'm very self aware I can usually tell. What's going on with me and why? And that usually helps me create a solution. So that evening. was supposed to be our weekly. Watch something we've seen before. While, I quilt and mark. Organizes something photos, desk drawers, files, etc.. And it's a way to keep projects moving. While were having fun watching something we seen before. I was thinking of the different movies we would watch. Now. You have to understand that mark, I are huge movie fans. We have our favorites we have movies we've watched ten fifteen, twenty times. We quote movies all the time we feel like that's part of our language. Quoting movies has become shorthand which can make life easier and maybe even more fun. So it wasn't as if. Our quilting in organizing night was going to be this onerous thing. Every movie I thought of all of our favorites. I just had this..

mark Don Schuler Home Office consultant
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

03:17 min | 2 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Is dawn, Schuler certified trainer and Business Consultant at the Shaw Group with the people, thrive companies thrive podcast. Today I want to talk about having the hard conversations. The reason we call them hard conversations is because they are hard to have. We don't want to have them. And so many of us avoid. Those conversations. We say things like I hate conflict or I avoid conflict at all cost. And that is true. The fact that there is a cost. First? Let's talk about what some of those hard conversations might be about. You're not doing enough. I'm upset by filling the blank. I don't like what you're doing. I don't like how you're treating me. What you're doing. Is Offensive to others. No usually in response to a request. And of course, probably one of the hardest conversations to have in the workplace anyway is. You're fired. Or we're letting you go. Most of those topics didn't sound pleasant they. Hence we avoid. Conversations. We stuff the feelings. We have around them, which makes it worse? I use the analogy of trying to hold a beach ball. Under the pool, water. If, you can imagine that. You're in a swimming pool. Have one of those cheap thin plastic inflated beach falls. And you're trying to pushing in submerged under the water. Of course what happens? It doesn't just resist being submerged. Eventually. If you let it go, it will explode out of the water. Now that's a fun game to play in the pool. But not so fun a- game with one's emotions. That is what happens when we try to push down our feelings. Either logically. Well that doesn't make sense. Rhino doesn't seem to make sense that I'm feeling this way, or it will get better, or I know they didn't mean it rhino. They don't know any better. Our feelings are just as valid. As the logic king out. Of something that's going on. But when we try to resist them. Submerged them so to speak. They will burst out and explode out.

Schuler Shaw Group Business Consultant
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

04:20 min | 3 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"For the <Speech_Female> entire households <Speech_Female> ability to move <Silence> forward. <Speech_Female> From one <Silence> place to the next. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> As head of a department. <Silence> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> You are. <Speech_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Silence> The people. <Speech_Female> On <Silence> your team. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> On Your Staff <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Will make <Speech_Female> much <Speech_Female> more headway. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> If they are allowed. <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Female> Some <Speech_Female> Room <SpeakerChange> <Silence> to stumble and fall. <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Female> Now. This <Speech_Female> does not mean <Speech_Female> that you're expecting <Speech_Female> them to make mistakes. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> that. You're just <Speech_Female> waiting for <Speech_Female> them to have <Speech_Female> a problem <Speech_Female> to do that. Proverbial <Speech_Female> Stumble <Silence> and fall. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> What it means is <Speech_Female> you step <Silence> back? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And <SpeakerChange> give <Speech_Female> them that space <Speech_Female> <Silence> to figure things out. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> If you want <Speech_Female> them to take initiative, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> you <SpeakerChange> can't <Speech_Female> micromanage <Silence> it. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The other benefit <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> empowering your <Silence> staff. <Speech_Female> <Silence> is also. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> That, they <Speech_Female> could come up with solutions. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> That you <Speech_Female> might <SpeakerChange> not <Silence> have. <Speech_Female> You have <Silence> your way to do it. <Speech_Female> It's <Speech_Female> tried and true. <Speech_Female> You know it gets <Speech_Female> results you need. <Speech_Female> You've got a process. <Speech_Female> You have a system <Speech_Female> fantastic. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> beauty of being <Speech_Female> on a team <Speech_Female> and working with people <Speech_Female> who are different from <Silence> you. <Speech_Female> Is that <Speech_Female> they bring <Speech_Female> at entire <Speech_Female> different skillset <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> experiences <Silence> tools. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And a frame of reference <Speech_Female> that <Silence> you just don't have. <Silence> <Speech_Female> That's <Speech_Female> the beauty of collaboration <Speech_Female> <Silence> and teamwork. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And you lose <Silence> that. <Speech_Female> If <Speech_Female> you don't <Speech_Female> allow <Silence> them. <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> opportunity <Speech_Female> to <Silence> show. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Silence> It's difficult. <Speech_Female> <Silence> I know. <Speech_Female> I want <Speech_Female> things to be <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> as <Speech_Female> on time. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And Perfect <Speech_Female> and free <Speech_Female> of mistakes <Silence> as anyone. <Silence> <Speech_Female> But, <Speech_Female> I, also believe <Silence> in <Speech_Female> the success. <Silence> <Silence> Of People. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> doing whatever <Speech_Female> I can <Speech_Female> whether <Speech_Female> it's as a <Speech_Female> manager and leader in <Silence> my own company. <Speech_Female> Or as <Speech_Female> a consultant and <Speech_Female> strategist for <Silence> other, companies. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> To <Speech_Female> allow <Speech_Female> their <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> to be successful <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> as <Silence> they can be. <Music> <Silence> <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> players are <Speech_Female> only a players. <Speech_Female> If you give <Silence> them the space to <Silence> be. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> You <Speech_Female> can't force someone <Silence> to be a player. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Silence> And as I said <SpeakerChange> before. <Speech_Female> <Silence> You can't. <Speech_Female> Make <Speech_Female> a be player <Speech_Female> being a <Silence> player. <Silence> <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> there are a couple of takeaways. <Silence> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> One just <Speech_Female> to reiterate, make <Speech_Female> sure you <SpeakerChange> have the right <Silence> people that have. <Speech_Female> <Silence> person. <Speech_Female> Well <Speech_Female> suited <Speech_Female> for <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Female> role in <Silence> that role. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Silence> To. <Speech_Female> Micromanaging <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> To <Speech_Female> lowered productivity <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and longer timelines. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I could also <Speech_Female> add. <Speech_Female> Stress <Speech_Female> and dysfunction <Speech_Female> in the workplace. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Silence> Three <Speech_Female> empowerment! <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Leads to <Speech_Female> innovation <Speech_Female> creativity. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Collaboration <Silence> <Speech_Female> And better <Silence> teamwork. <Silence> <Silence> For <Speech_Female> <Silence> Empowerment. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Does not mean perfection. <Speech_Female> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> best leaders <Silence> in our <SpeakerChange> opinion. <Silence> <Speech_Female> Are the <Silence> ones. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Who empower <Speech_Female> their <Silence> people? <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> To do <Silence> the best job possible. <Silence> <Speech_Female> Support <Silence> them as needed. <Silence> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> be champions <SpeakerChange> of their <Silence> success. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female>

consultant
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

03:20 min | 3 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Chiller certified trainer and business consultant at the shore group. With the people thrive company size podcast. A few weeks ago, my business partner fellow consultant and has been mark. was on a strategy session with one of our clients. He is a leader of a department. With staff underneath him. And as with most managers and leaders. There are challenges that pop up all the time. Luckily. Our client has us on staff so to speak to help work out some of these challenges. Well the topic of this particular call was. How do you empower your staff? You want them to do their jobs. You want them to do them well. You want them to be able to be self, sufficient and independent. But. How do you really make that happen? A manager's job is two-fold. You have to manage the. Which means you are responsible for their results. You may also have your own duties that are above, and beyond the actual managing of others. So, not only. Do you have your own duties to perform and perform well? But you're also tasked with. Overseeing the your team. Department. Does a good job. Performs well and delivers the results they're supposed to. So part of your job is to make sure that your team in staff department. Gets the results that they're supposed to? How do you make that happen? Well some managers. Go the tyrannical micromanaging out. Where they're poor. Little employees cannot make a move unless it is approved. By their manager. We wholeheartedly believe that is extremely inefficient for one. If. You have to oversee everything. He might as well do it yourself. It's also taking time away from the other job. Duties that you are supposed to be performing. Even more importantly. However is the fact that you are not allowing your people. To have the unity. To shine. To be in their own brilliance. To grow and evolve and develop. That is. One of the roles we believe of great leaders and managers. The you do what ever it is you can do. To make sure..

consultant partner
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

06:05 min | 4 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"This is dawn. Shuler certified trainer and business consultant.

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

07:35 min | 5 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Business Consultant at the Shula Group with the people thrived. Companies Thrive podcast. Here at the Shula Group. We are big believers in a strengths based workplace where managers and employees are very aware of their strengths. And also then play to those strengths employee. Engagement statistics talk about how employee engagement goes way up when managers know what their employees strengths are. Were a huge believer. As I've said it makes so much more sense to focus on people's strengths rather than the arduous task of trying to work on a let's call it a weakness because that weakness will never get anywhere close to the level of strength so if you really capitalize upon your strengths and maximize them you are going to catapult much further and higher as a result than if you just do the dumbed down personal professional development arena of This weakness you have is a great growth potential opportunity now it just means we need to be more creative about filling those holes or assigning some of those challenges and quote Unquote Mrs to other people. Let's redefine my role so they don't have to do the thing that requires that particular aspect that you're calling a weakness. This is obviously a conversation. The site pathetic. So yes we believe in a strengths based workplace where individuals capitalize upon their strengths teams. Come together bringing the best of each individual to make that team even stronger that whole idea that the whole is greater than the sum of its individual parts as part of that. Let's focus on our strengths and our two way. Collaborative employee engagement model feedback and communication are very crucial. Let me give you a scenario because this came up for one of our clients and very interesting and I'd love to hear your feedback on it so in this new culture that we're trying to help organizations promote individuals and staff members would say. Hey here's what I did. Here's what I'm good at. I want more projects like these. I want to be able to use my skills and strengths on this. Hey can I do this? The manager says great go for it awesome. That's an ideal world. That is the world that we are trying to help. Our clients move toward well. What happens when a an employee is doing his or her best work really operating in her own zone of genius? She's taking initiative. She's being not a player. She is moving projects along forward. She's looking at what's needed saying. All right let me just jump in and do it. But because her manager is so swamped. There's not the opportunity for one the manager to be able to say. Hey I noticed that you did such and such and to because her manager is so busy and swamped because of whatever circumstances going on. She doesn't feel it's appropriate to say. Oh by the way. Here's this project that we've been working on for a few months. I just took it to the next level and let's look at it now. So here was the challenge that was brought to us. What you do about it. Does she try to carve out time with her manager? Who was swamped? Because he's dealing with other employees who are probably not working in their zone of genius and therefore he's having to undertake some of their work to keep their client's happy he doesn't have the bandwidth or at least. This is the fear. He doesn't have the bandwidth to be able to really appreciate what's happening. There were a couple of fear based scenarios brought to us as consultants by by this employee. That one he would just look at it and say okay. Yeah that's great fine or I can't look at it. Look at it later or two blowing up and saying you know I'm busy. I can't look at this right now and because that might be the attitude if you did look at it than there would be that veneer of overwhelm business stress tension and so that could color. His perception of the stellar work that his direct report did. So what's the answer? So by the way if you're listening to this I want you to after I ask this next question to press the pause button before you hear what we did because I really want to hear from you. Whatever your level is whether you are a middle manager whether you're an executive you're president. Ceo Whatever your status is. I'd love to hear what you think. The right solution is from both the employee side and the manager side because both have their own stuff going on. That's actually what we talk about. In our special report. The five reasons your employees are not engaged and one of them is it got their own stuff going on whether it's personal or business and so your request to look at something is just one of many channels that they're tuned into. That's the problem. What Channel Are you tuned in to? What channel is your manager turned into? What channel is your employees Tuned into.

Shula Group Business Consultant Ceo executive president
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

11:27 min | 5 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Jon Shuler certified trainer and business consultant at the shooter group with the.

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

11:16 min | 9 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"This is Dawn Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the Shula. The group with people thrive companies.

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Bowl This is Dawn Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the shooter when we talk about employee engagement as a two way street and one of our pieces of the pie is communication what we mean okay that is there needs to be communication from both sides it's not just the manager telling the employees what he expects what the zolt he wants our it's also the employees speaking about the conditions of her workplace of priorities needing more guidance in certain areas or less guidance and and certain other ones it's that two-way dance of communication and feedback and it's both sides so for example we know of young employee who is doing an amazing job in her position she's been in the position for about six months she's even gotten employee of the month for two months once in a row and she feels completely overwhelmed she is stressed she leaves most days feeling like she's a failure because there are so many things left undone on her to do list she's being asked if certain projects have been completed and she's trying to get them completed by the deadline Bayer supposed to be completed the problem is things keep getting piled onto her plate and she's not saying anything part of it is because she expects from herself we all have very high expectations of ourselves don't we that she should is be able to get it all done she could work faster more efficiently she could come up with a better system or a process to get it all done and the fact of the matter is it may not be that she can actually get it all done there's a story of when and my husband mark before we got married but we were an item we were we were a thing we were a couple decided to move from California to Maryland and so he drove out here and his car full of stuff and six months later we flew back out to California to get the rest of us from a storage unit we gave ourselves three days to clean out the storage unit and then drive the Penski truck across the United States from California Maryland we had it all planned out wonderfully well the problem is this job that we had lauded three days to was a five day job and no matter how we sliced it no matter how much harder or longer we worked this five day job was going to take five days not three not four but five at one point probably by day two and a half when we realized we aren't finishing this tomorrow even if we stayed up all night worked around the clock there is no way we can finish it we said well maybe it's a four day job and so we get into day three same thing it really doesn't matter if we work all night long and into the next day day four it's not going to get done it really needs to be a five day job and by the end of the five days we got the entire storage unit cleaned out into the truck it was it was a huge endeavor and while that was not a great experience a lot of stress all of it doesn't matter how I have arranged things or scheduled things to complete particular project this project is going to take as long as it takes an just because I've arbitrarily chosen three days because that's the amount of time I thought we had it was a five day job and it was outside of our control now says we had having that experience taught me I only have so much control over hosting duties enrolls it's actually not possible for her to get it all done.

Dawn Schuler consultant five day three days six months five days two months four day
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"And business consultant at shula the group with the people thrive companies thrive podcast today. I wanna talk about the long game versus the short game and you probably would agree with me that if you had to choose. Are you going for the long haul argue going for sustainability. Are you going for lasting into the future. Are you going for the war. Are you just going for how much you can get now the the battle so to speak etc and you'd probably say yeah going for the long game. It's the long game. What does it really are. Your actions really short game actions or long game actions. Give you an example. There is a local company company whose focus was on providing their service to larger companies and of course there's there's more impact when you are working with larger companies and corporations because then you're reaching more people in that company in that corporation and of course it's more lucrative for the business. That was the focus that was the mission. That was the goal all of the sudden uh-huh this company. Let's call them a._b._c. Widgets decided to go after individuals walls and try to sell their services and product to individual employees with the hopes that the employees would then go to management went to the corporate leadership and say hey wouldn't it be great if you provided this great service and product to all the employees employees to me that completely sir shifted the focus from the long game witches his let's go out and make more of an impact create more revenues be able to spread the word about what we're doing in a much bigger way with our long game versus his onesie tuesay one by one short game and let's look at that if you've got this great product or service and you're going to sell it to company for use of all their employees. Aren't you going to spread the word faster. If that company of say two hundred employees they're using it and then they're telling their friends and then of course those friends could go to their own corporate leadership and say hey that other company has this we want this to but but that word spreads much faster as opposed to john smith buys the product or service and yes maybe maybe he tells five friends or tries to talk to management but that's really slow as opposed to two hundred people who are doing that and i have to say. I was really flabbergasted by that very left. Turn shift in <unk> focus and market and maybe it's because it's easier. It's easier to sell to an individual that individual is going to make that sales decision decision that buying decision probably more quickly and easily then accompany on behalf of its entire workforce and i know now our company the shooter group we work with larger companies corporations and organizations. Is it a longer sale cycle absolutely is it sometimes frustrating to get to the decision makers you betcha but when we they do get in the door and we do sell our services. Are we making a bigger impact absolutely and that's one of the reasons why we keep our eye on the long game now every organization whether it's profit or nonprofit needs to be able to be in the black even a nonprofit. They are still running a business. It just looks a little different friend from a for profit business. Every organization's goal is to have their bottom line being the positive live not in the negative and with that being said then there's the focus on the long game. Sometimes there is a short game because you do need to bring in revenues on a quick basis. You just have to make sure that your short game doesn't completely replace place your long game..

shula consultant john smith
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Wow <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> wow <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> this <Speech_Female> is dawn schuler certified <Speech_Female> trainer and <Speech_Female> business consultant <Speech_Female> at the shooter group <Speech_Female> with the people thrive <Speech_Female> companies thrive <Speech_Female> podcast <Speech_Female> <Silence> in today's <Speech_Female> episode and want <Speech_Female> to talk about <Speech_Female> on boarding <Silence> end <Speech_Female> just like the word <Speech_Female> suggests it <Speech_Female> means what you do <Speech_Female> when you bring <Speech_Female> someone on <Speech_Female> board and <Speech_Female> usually this means eight <Speech_Female> new <SpeakerChange> person <Speech_Female> <Silence> in an organization <Speech_Female> <Silence> on <Speech_Female> boarding shows up <Speech_Female> in two <Speech_Female> different areas <Silence> new new hires <Speech_Female> a <Speech_Female> new customers and clients <Speech_Female> <Silence> today were going <Speech_Female> to focus on <Speech_Female> the importance <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> of on boarding <Speech_Female> a new customer <Speech_Female> at a new client <Speech_Female> <Silence> one of <Speech_Female> the reasons <Speech_Female> i <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> am passionate <Speech_Female> about <Speech_Female> strong <Speech_Female> on boarding process <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> is because <Speech_Female> it is they <Speech_Female> first <Speech_Female> customer service experience <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> that this <Speech_Female> now customer <Speech_Female> no longer eight prospect <Speech_Female> <Silence> has with <Speech_Female> your organization position <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Silence> and that sets <Speech_Female> the tone for <Speech_Female> their experience <Speech_Female> <Silence> an <Speech_Female> there <Speech_Female> retention <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Silence> this is true <SpeakerChange> whether <Speech_Female> you are eight <Speech_Female> profit <Speech_Female> for profit it <Speech_Female> company or <Speech_Female> any non profit <Speech_Female> organization <Speech_Female> so when <Speech_Female> i say customer <Speech_Female> <Silence> replace that with <Speech_Female> whatever word <Speech_Female> is appropriate <Speech_Female> so for example <Speech_Female> if you <Speech_Female> are a nonprofit organization <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and the majority <Speech_Female> of the revenue <Speech_Female> <Silence> depends upon <Speech_Female> donors <Speech_Female> then you're customers <Speech_Female>

consultant dawn schuler
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

13:36 min | 1 year ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the shooter group with the people thrive companies thrive podcast. The following is an interview I did with leeann Pacino, author of the new book sit your way to success, which is all about the psychology of sitting what chair you, choose, whether it be in a sales call a meeting a conference a presentation, even family dinners or entertaining at home. It's a fascinating book. And I think you'll enjoy the conversation, I had with leeann and how you can sit your way to success. Hi, this is dawn Schuler, and I'm here with my very good friend and talented colleague, Lianne, Sheena, who is the author of brand new book, sit your way to success. And I am a huge fan. I've read it twice. It's my bible because now before I go into a meeting, I'm gonna read it, and I think it's something needs to be shared with a world. And I'm really excited to have leeann with me today to tell us more about books, so the aunt woke up, thank you, Don. I appreciate you having me on your podcast absolutes honor, because I've listened to some of your other ones, and I know you always say having the right people in the right seat in which seat, they sit in, in a meeting can make a difference to look lever. You are. Love that love that. You're right. Right. See, I have to tell you this. I was in a meeting couple of weeks ago. I read your book twice, and the way it was set up, I was thinking, okay. I don't like the seats that are available. So I took the best one, according to what you share in, in the book, and, and then we needed to Edwards here. So the cheer that I wanted the seat that I wanted got placed and it was amazing how different I felt sitting in the right seat for the dynamics of that particular meeting. And I thought, oh I can't wait till the end because I just felt Mayan tire energy shift now that I read your book. I know why that is I might have had that same feeling but not really recognize it understood why now I am seeing y so leeann toast a little bit about the book. Why, why might think that this is such a gold mine? What's in it? Well, I the reason I wrote the book I started in tier designs, I've always been in the corporate world helping people with different companies in designing they're office spaces. And of course, every office space is going to have a meeting space of some type, whether it's a conference, a large multipurpose, small, small, conference rooms and private offices. So I I always designed all of that in early on in my career. And especially for designers, they don't teach us. What is what I discovered more input in the book, so, you know, you design these spaces and not ever really you'd think about how they're gonna use them, but not the full purpose, and then I went into sales, and in my company creatively communicate, it's all about how you say it in the reason, being is in sales have gone through a lot of sales training and they don't you know, in the in the process. It's all excellent. They don't teach you how to say it in a specially. How just where you sit in accordance with your prospect can make a difference in your sale and started to learn this through trial in air in the nest studying body, language you learn even more, I thought where is all of this is not in one spot in its things that we do every day in every sales in every meeting, and yet, we do it. Subconsciously unconsciously in it can affect the outcome. So that was kinda reason where what I would mention it to some people like, oh, that's brilliant. Never thought about that, and doing more and more research and just pulling it all together. And putting it in one place. So I've had a lot of fun. Putting it together as well. And it's just things like tell people, you know, sales the arc in science of sales is difficult is can be fun can be frustrating. And when you sit down with a client just where you sit if I can get you twenty percent closer to the close of a sale, then why not pay attention where you sit is if. I think I can get you on the path to success before you ever start your first word in essence. So it's like sitting closer to success. Yes. Oh, I like that. One too can also. That's a great one. So is this primarily just for sales people? No, I pulled together. There's it starts with conference meeting. So if your leader in a company or even a small business owner, you're going to have different conference meetings, and it's, it's one chapter is just on that I have one on sales meetings, and then what about large event meeting? So if you're a speaker, you can utilize a lot of information when you're tending, there's also some key key tips in there. And even if you're a teacher, it's how we present in a room. So there's different research that I found as well that where you sit in a classroom where your student does will have an impact on their learning potential in the retention, and then go into private offices in a lot of people don't realize that their furniture is the non verbal language that before people ever enter their office away. It's arranged enough for it. South gives away their leadership style, unless they heir to the office in heaven. Say, but in most companies that I've worked with over the last thirty plus years. A lot of people have say or they're gonna personalize it so they in their leadership style. They send nonverbal languages again before meeting ever starts, whether it's with an employee or a potential prospect on or potential employee of bender. They're sending these signals and a lot of times, we don't think about what signals or sending and we can do it with the furniture and the way, we're going to meet with the people, and then I go into restaurant meetings, so people still will have some restaurant means if they take a prospect out. And then I just threw a chapter discount have some fun about homemade home entertaining. Is it affects everything of where you sit in accordance in your purpose of your meeting? Absolutely. And enjoy your book. I just I didn't realize that there were so many applications. Right. And, and really I mean now this is in my head, and so it really is effecting time. I said, like, okay, what's the best place? What's the purpose? I think that's one of the brilliant things about your book, is you really delve into what's the purpose of the meeting was the purpose of this as and like you said, what you said, this is how I took it in the tone that you want to convey love by DEA of if you're a manager, and you're having meetings in your office kind of leader, what kind of manager argue and how you are arrangement of, of your office, your setup chairs can either support that or hinder it. And if you're not. Unaware of it can be detrimental yet any. No, you can walk into office politics, if you don't know the office, politics, actually a conference meeting any pending upon size of. I've sold some furniture whether some really large conference room. So typically, they're probably six eight all ten to twelve in that range, there, some that are even larger where you may have twenty to thirty people in a room in some of these large corporations. And, you know, the politics are really shown in bows, Europe, in the DC area and government is still the deep polit political structure is very strong. I'm here in Austin, Texas, and it's interesting all the, the most of the clients. Now call on are more the startups more technology and they, they have their work environment. More typical to what you'd expect Google or Facebook. So it's more that open environment airy collaborative it's a whole different environment. And when I started thirty years ago in Minneapolis with IBM and three m you know, the big Blue's that everything was very structured, and you want that authoritative in von manager. Her and boy, if you got that corner office men, you arrived, and you wanted everyone to mental it out. It's, you know, we have some CEO's, I wanna sit right in the middle of all their employees in its wide open environment. So it's just interesting. The difference and all of that conveys in the culture, I know that you, you understand cultural, the culture of, of different businesses and some, some people thrive in that and some don't and again where they sit in accordance to that can make a difference. For was lifting to you reminded me of a TV show called lie to me, and I think it was on and maybe early to mid two thousands, and I can't think of the, the guy's name that was the main dive he studied, he called micro expressions. He could tell if somebody was was lying or the truth for expressions with one episode where they were, they were dealing with a Japanese company, and he waited as they all came in to see some of those politics dynamics based on where they sat kind of this deference, they might you know, because we're going to defer to the, to the manager the leader in this meeting, and that just made me think of that's Utah, top gang made me think of that particular episode in, in light of me. And it made me think why now I wanna go. Back and watch it. See if there's anything about seating, and placement because what you're saying, as you could observe a room a meeting and based on, perhaps where people unconsciously subconsciously take their seats might reveal something about where they are the pecking order, how they feel is that would you agree with that? I definitely agree with it. And I go into some of that in the book so people can understand some of that. And by the way, I love that show lie to me because the micro expressions as you're talking to try to remember the gentleman who started all that in, in the name is escaping me, 'cause I've done a lot of reading and research on that to any goes into the body language. And so, when you walk into a conference room, you know, if you're the leader in, you're sitting what I call the power position. So at the end of the table, a typical rectangle table, you're gonna be sitting on the short end and you can see everyone and depending upon the length of the table where people sit if they don't have a sign position. Where they sit also reveals a lot on a personality. So you and I are certified in personality science. So we know that the people who say, if they said in the middle of the table, they wanna be amongst their friends. They, you know they're going to be the big team player and that tells us something about their personnel. They don't wanna be out front. They just wanna be the team player and what can't we just all get along? We know. If you have the person who, you know, they're really strong thinker their base more on the facts in the knowledge in they want to observe in. They talk that much 'cause they're more observing in, when there's a point to be made they'll make it if it doesn't make sense, they won't so there if I'm the leader sitting at one end. They're probably going to be sitting towards the other end. They don't need to be by me. They're just gonna kinda listen. They probably they don't need that the strong. I contact and if you have the person who is more out front, we like to call that action person, the, they're more talent. They need to be heard. They're gonna sit closer to the leader. And especially if they want to be the next leader in the company, they're going to be sitting to the right or the left of that person that power position. And then if the if it's someone that is more into organization, and systems, while depending upon their purpose and role of at meeting, they're going to be probably more strategic of where they sit in probably want to sit closer to the leader and be able to support them in that regard or they might. On the other end because what's interesting too, is depending upon your company politics, if you have a, the main leader on one end of the table, and then on the other end, they're supportive now you really have this balance in leadership, and the two can help the meeting flow and depending upon if you want to persuade on new ideas, they can help that in the conference. Meaning is things that maybe you don't think about where you want people to sit, and especially if you know you have someone that is going to be against your idea. You're gonna have opposition. So, you know, I also think of been in city council or in some of those places where, if you if you know, you're gonna have some of that to deal within your meeting while where you strategically sift those people is going to affect the way the outcome is gonna is gonna Kerr because if you haven't defensive in there, they're already fighting against each other. When they sit down before they say a word it's back to sport. Support your end goal. Well so there's not to manipulate. That's not. Necessarily the purpose..

leeann Pacino dawn Schuler Don sales training consultant Lianne Edwards DEA Austin Minneapolis business owner Sheena Kerr Google Europe Texas IBM CEO Utah
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

11:58 min | 1 year ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Don Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the Shula group. The people thrive companies thrive podcast. Google is always touted as one of the best most innovative most creative most successful companies as you probably know they make the top of the list of the best companies to work for in terms of employee ratings low employee turnover company culture and other criteria. Part of what sets them apart, I believe, is that innovation that spirit to let's do it the way nobody else does. Let's do something. Nobody's even heard of. So they read a lot of projects in experiments always with that I to innovation. Well, a few years ago, they ran a project called project oxygen to prove the managers weren't really needed that, in fact, they just take up space and breathe air. Maybe that's why it's called project oxygen. I'm not sure. Actually, what they found was that it ended up being a disaster. People felt adrift. They didn't have direction. They didn't have guidance. They weren't expected to and they didn't expect of themselves and they probably didn't have the skills and the tools needed to be innovative in creative, and set their own direction priority and kind of self start. So they scrapped that project and instead focused on. Well, what makes a really good manager, and they came up with the top ten characteristics of the very best managers, along with than what should be expected of managers. So here those top ten characteristics. Number one be a good coach. If you've heard that whole adage, you can give a fish and you'll feed him for a day or you can teach Amanda fish, and then he can fish and be fed for life. Part of that is, is coaching. And what you're doing when you're coaching your investing time you're investing your you're carrying your empathy with your employees because you want them to succeed. You care about their self development. You might be surprised at how important the ability to evolve in grow and develop is important, especially to millennials these days. Coaching is about that. Whole teaching. It's not about doing it for them. It's guiding them. Number two. Second characteristic. That makes a great manager. They empower teams and don't micromanage. Oh my goodness. I mean, you've probably been micromanaged, right? I know I have unfortunately, I've probably also done it a really work at not doing that because one, I don't have time to I need to delegate and three. I want someone else to be able to step up to the plate in perform well and get kudos vehicle to celebrate. And so when you empower the people on your team in your department, in your company as a whole. To do their job and do their job. Well and handsome latitude. That is everything. We actually talk about this in our employee engagement, collaborative model that on the managers in the leader side is empowering. This is another reason why I really liked this project besides the one that failed than the one that. Oh, okay. We'll hear the best characteristics of the best managers that idea of empowerment, because it's so fits in with our own belief system, the third characteristic, is that the best managers, create an inclusive team environment showing concern for success and wellbeing. 'nother some personality types who work better independently. Don't need a lot of collaboration from others, but there are always times when that's needed on that. Best manager is going to be the one who looks at her team of all of its individuals all of its parts. What are the unique qualities of those individuals? And then how can she the manager, the leader bring them altogether for the best effect the best results? When you start looking at people as to what makes them unique and wonderful and their strengths then they start to feel needed in valued for what they're good at. And then when everybody feels that they are. Providing for the whole for the good of the company, go to the department, whatever that team is then. That whole collaborative atmosphere amps right up. Fourth characteristic be productive and results oriented. Another concept that we believe in here at the Schuler group and that we coach and consultant clients through is forward motion. A befo kissing on the solution rather than the problem. Yes, we may need to understand why something occurred. Why something happened? So is to prevent it. But that's part of the solution. Right. How can we prevent this? How do we fix this? How do we make it better? All of that is going to move the organization forward to be productive. And about the results about the solutions, the fifth characteristic of a great manager is to be a good communicator, both sides, listening and sharing information. This is another piece of our collaborative employee engagement model, which is the communication on both sides to give feedback to listen to share for both managers and their subordinates alike. Both pieces are necessary. Listen share share in listen. Sixth characteristic have a clear vision and strategy for the team, we call this the deeper. Why and everything has a deeper? Why, why does this department exist? Why is this project being done? Why did Google do this experiment? What's the vision? What's the strategy? What is the why? Because when people understand it on that deeper level than there's more ownership, there's more ability to be empowered. They care about the results because they've been let in on that vision. The seventh characteristic of a great manager. Is that they support career development and they discuss performance in one of our clients projects? We help them create a brand new employees, valuation system. And one of the things that they wanted to find out was what projects get you excited? What do you want to work on over the next year? And then have check in points along the way on house progress going. How're you doing what support do you need? Because that company was really invested in their employees and staff. Self-development actually was one of their core values in continuous self improvement. Eighth characteristic have the expertise to advise the team. Whether that's technical skills, or whether it's soft skills. You don't have to be the expert and everything. But you also need to be a resource. How do you get this done? What resources do you need? How can we bring them to you? You need to be able to at least be plugged in as a manager to get four your people what they need. The ninth characteristic is collaborate. This, I think is a big piece of very highly connected to that, number three characteristic creating unclear team environment. Because when you do that, and it's a team, it's inclusive in your you're bringing people in understanding their unique strengths and gifts and skills. Then there's the natural result of that is collaboration. Oh, Jim is really good at blah, blah, blah, Jim is a resource to be able to collaborate with in his specific unique area of expertise. And then the tenth characteristic of the very best managers is to be a strong decision maker. One of the reasons why people are heads of departments heads of certain areas in company is because it's that the buck stops here mentality that means they have to make decisions because if you're not making decisions you probably shouldn't be in that leadership managerial roll. That also means you need to have the knowledge in the expertise, the confidence to make decisions. In addition to the humility, and the vulnerability to sometimes get wrong because we're not perfect. And perfection should not be expected. But the confidence to make a decision. And then deal with the consequences, whether positive or negative, that is very, very valued. So what do you think of these ten characteristics? I see these ten characteristics as being a great. Leadership program for managers. You got a ten week program right here. I'm kind of doing tongue in cheek because yes, could you create a program. Sure. You could what's really interesting. Is that in our managers thrive program? We touch on most, if not all these characteristics because we have figured out. What's going to help managers thrive? What's going to help staff thrive? What's going to help company thrive in bit by bit by bit? We're going to do our best to impact the world to create more of a thriving community. Rather than just a surviving community. If you'd like to learn more about our managers thrive program..

Google consultant Jim Don Schuler Shula group Amanda fish Schuler group ten week
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"This is dawn Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the shooter group with the people thrive companies thrive podcast. A few episodes ago, I talked about the fit between an individual and his or her environment. And in that episode gave several examples of what alignment looks like what misalignment looks like that. There could be a misalignment with the individual in the environment or with the environment and the individual. Well, one of the things that I mentioned is that there are many factors that make up an individual's environment, and that that concept of all the different factors that make up an environment could be a podcast episode unto itself, hence this episode. So when we think about all the different factors that make up one's environment. It's almost an endless list because we I think of an environment as the physical space an individual is in, but it goes far far beyond that from intangible potential factors. So let's start from the inside and work. Our way out I'm going to give you as many examples and concepts as I can. But by no means am I going to name them all. I bet I will miss them. And that you will be able to identify some things that I've missed, but this is just a list of some of the things that that come up in an obvious manner. Some other things that we hear the Shula group. Excel in looking at different factors, different environmental factors, and others. Are just commonsense. So we're going to start from the inside out. So you have an individual and his environment consists of his internal state, whether he feels well or ill what's going on in his mind. Is he distracted is he engaged? And so you look at things like physical health, you look at things like what's going on in his personal life that may be taking up brain space. So his internal environment can cover the Kamat from mental too. To physical within his own body in mind. Now, let's expand a little bit outward and think of him sitting at his desk in a typical standard office while he sitting at his desk. There's the chair there's the desk, there's probably all sorts of equipment. His computer his monitors his phone printer. How far does he have to walk to get to the printer that all is part of the environment as well? Is he comfortable in the chair in which he sitting is the desk at the right height? All of these things contribute to his immediate physical environment outward environment, we should say. And then we look at things at mate make his job easier or maybe not so much easier. Does he have to monitors three mothers have a stand up desk is his computer? Keyboard one that he likes I say that because my daughter just came home for spring break, and she was doing something on my computer in my office. And she said, oh, I hate your keyboard? How do you tape on this? And I feel the same way about my husband, Mark's keyboard? He has one of those divided keyboards. I can't stand it. But those all contribute to that environment right about a mouse is there is an ergonomic mouse. If the person has to use a phone a lot is there a headset to that? The person doesn't have to creek the neck to to hold the phone. Is there a speaker phone what you know, what what are those equipment pieces of the office in how're those on? Then let's expand a little bit out from the desk in the chair and look at what is his office. Is it a partial cubicle wall? Is it an actual office? With Florida's ceiling walls are their windows in this office space is he allowed to have personal items pictures of his family award certificates a plant little Chachi, figurines,

dawn Schuler Mark consultant Shula Florida
"consultant" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

Talk Radio WPHT 1210

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"consultant" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

"You probably heard that story the the restaurant wasn't doing that well they can the consultant the consultant they want the consultant you know hang out in the restaurant and give them give them ideas about everything from the lighting to the texture to the type of plates and then another guy came in like you or i would and said what is that smell it stinks in here so it's a great lesson if you're restaurant stinks no one's going to want to eat there because nobody wants to eat someplace that smells gross end of subject and if you check that historically that's why when you go to little italy you'll find a small corner out of the way restaurant that has the same chairs they had in one thousand nine hundred sixty and the same counter and hex sometimes the same waiter or waitresses but it doesn't stink it's pristine it's clean and the food is incredible they didn't need a consultant to come in and say you know i think if you change his counter to grant it you'll get more you'll get more profit everybody gets caught it caught up in that and the problem with that is unless you ask the customer the voter the client the citizen the outsider you're just gonna be loop that repeats the same garbage over and over let's go one more step with basis on why he switched.

consultant italy
"consultant" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"consultant" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Troll pay described parenting should you yourself as a consultant thought was an interesting way to think about it very much we have story woke about by my wife was wipe is educator was helping my son when his middle school with with some assignment n densch is why don't you hand center do it whatever less any sort of frozen in looked at because you didn't remind me and my whole time eight people on negative jumping the middle of kiddo you don't throw momma the bus she's not spot for your this work because it's your work all appearances contrary this is you're you're responsible doing a look at this look e his if you're reading to expect to remind because you was have in my wife is like a lot of this super as she run by kids light my life feels like your life if she if you give it a the time and but just because she can't meet she should and so we just trying to change instead will you you know know would you like help with that and rather than we just change the language from shouldn't you be doing you shouldn't biz why aren't you in that too would you like some help would you like me to look at that anything i can do no data it right well i've never had experience giving advice that adjustable they don't want and having that go well but by conscious in anything i can do to help dinner i got it he knows that i'm always there with about life is there and sometimes he asked for advice in sometimes doesn't in went what have we till's stone we talk schools we have experienced a month ago my wasn't iraq for walk by kid is in these software now at a school dance and he got him by that party after the answer the cool thing is by killing said data iki so this is a new experience for him and we're not for walking he says data got a question instead jacquet what was your question he said some good that already after the dance sit yeah instead what do we do with people drinking up in inside and doing this little victory dance a great dad just ask drinking writing but i tried to play cool but i'm convinced that if i had the last four years since middle school being on about every single homer site he never would have brought that question up today i wanna be health insulted to two bills i wanna be thority so that when has real action she asked mile nice but but it's it's respectful rates in ask why don i'm mice forty not might it's janitor down the throne making him feel like someone else's charges life so this means of this sort of consultant approach to parenting let's say homework as an example or school as an example this could mean we're trying to put the onus on the child to make take control that part of his life this could mean that he doesn't do his homework or he forgets or he doesn't really engage in school how do you as a parent maintain that sort of uninsured presence when you see oh my gosh my kids to one point five gpa and he's about to held for what how how do you manage that part so i i wrote about this idea of pure consultant for the first time thirty years ago and as a response to my clinical practice seeing family after family who would say stuff like got i dread dinnertime because after dinner it's two and a half hours of world war three trying to get my kid to do his homework in it just seemed like such a waste of life and also that what i noticed is that if parents meant eighty energy trying to get the kids who is homework the kit spent twenty and i thought this is nell ping anybody in so what i suggested was that you say to your kid this is this is the title is second chapter of our book is set your kid i love you too much to fight with you about your schoolwork that i'm willing to help you any way i can i believe to get a tutor if we need a tutor me support show thousand percent but i'm not willing to act like my response ability i'm not willing to fight with the all the time with the most precious thing in the university why would i want to have all this stress attention about your frigging homework you know in in our experience is that.

consultant thousand percent thirty years four years
"consultant" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"consultant" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Seventy four flu melania and it just took so we served with the marine corps sixty one hundred seventy to any drill instructor and then he became a consultant for apocalypse now and and that got him in the movie stuff and then he was a consultant in eighty seven i guess is when they did full metal jacket by reich as eighty seven i think or knows releasing a seven so maybe it was working with them in eighty six or eighty five and he was a consultant but the different folks that were looking at are using for the drill sergeant sucked and i got two stores the one i originally saw said that in in the course of hiring the marine crudes we interviewed hundreds of guys we line them up all it didn't improvisation of the first meeting with the drill instructor structure oh but here's the thing they kubrick said no i don't want you to be in front of the camera i just want you to be a consultant for us so then he took he he recorded himself on a demo tape having tennis balls thrown at him and then yelling insults income in commands every people and that's what kubrick saw that new change the mindset.

marine corps instructor consultant kubrick tennis