35 Burst results for "Consultant"

Biden Will Withdraw All U.S. Forces From Afghanistan by September 2021

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 3 d ago

Biden Will Withdraw All U.S. Forces From Afghanistan by September 2021

"U. S troops from Afghanistan. CBS News National security consultant Jeff McCloud Ason by the long been a critic of a large U. S. Military president Afghanistan even back when he was vice president, United States under Barack Obama, it opposed the surge of troops by President Obama. Try to rest some kind of military or political success during his administration. The withdrawal is expected to happen by September. 11th 20 years after the terror attacks. This is CBS News.

Jeff Mccloud Afghanistan Cbs News U. Barack Obama President Obama United States
Why Blockchain Remains an Integral Tool in the Food Industry

IT Visionaries

01:46 min | 4 d ago

Why Blockchain Remains an Integral Tool in the Food Industry

"Alicia. Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me all right. Your title is a bit of a tongue twister. Tell me exactly what it is that you do a bear. Yes it is so essentially. I'm more of an internal consultant. And i helped the teams and products apply from an it from a digital strategy from a product supply business team accelerate innovation. So i do that through collaboration through innovation methodologies and through bringing in external partnerships to get minimum viable products so i said along with the product supply. It leadership team and help bring technology to light within the strategy of the crop. Science business unit. Yes so. This is a fascinating domain. I've read a lot information about this. But i don't know of our audience knows just. How much technology is currently involved in bringing in the agriculture agriculture industry You know i've i've heard about technology. In regards to the manufacturing the movement of a you yourself is listed intricacies and complex regulations for international trade. Things you have to solve their you worked on blockchain logistics you've worked on inward processing standards regulatory workflow in different countries. So this is a massive technology undertaking. You could share a little bit about explain. How wise technology so involved in the supply chain for crop science agriculture science. How it basically fold. How do we get. How did we get to this place. Where technology so involved. Oh you know. It's amazing one of the reasons that i was intrigued by this role at there is because agriculture is one of the industries that i haven't worked extensively in but i also knew that there were such advances leaps and bounds and advances in technology and To be able to be part of that just really exciting

Alicia
Selling Confidently Without Being 'Salesy' With Hailey Rowe

She Wins Podcast

01:44 min | Last week

Selling Confidently Without Being 'Salesy' With Hailey Rowe

"You so much for coming on the show. Haley thank you. I'm so excited to be here on the wins. Who so happy to be here. So let's start with your background. How debuts taught to do business yes. So i grew up in well i would say performing. I was a singer and try acting and all these different things and really at a young age i realized the importance of selling yourself really to be honest and in two thousand ten. I knew that i had an interest in helping. People might interest shifted from showbiz to being more around like health and wellness and habit changed and things like that and so i started in the industry in two thousand ten and what i realized. Got my bachelor's degree in entrepreneurship. And what i realized was i wanted to combine my two passions. One was business and marketing and sales mecca. Thing putting yourself out there and then my other passion was really the poaching like transformational coaching. And so i worked at a couple startups in business about marketing to get more experience and then i realized i wanted to do it on my own so i started. Seeing and offering strategies for coaches consultants people like that on how to market themselves how to put themselves out there and and then over the last three years. I've started also doing services for entrepreneurs who want to outsource their marketing themselves. So it's been a real long journey. But i feel like i'm finally you know doing exactly what i meant what i meant to be doing and it's been exciting process.

Haley
Chris Hunniford and Mark Perkins on Trends in Odors and Air Pollutants

Words on Water

01:41 min | Last week

Chris Hunniford and Mark Perkins on Trends in Odors and Air Pollutants

"Always something interesting to talk about when it comes to odor odors and air pollutants joined by two guests for this topic. I have mark perkins. He is president and owner of perkins engineering consultants mark. Thanks for coming on the podcast view. And have chris hannaford. He is chief operating officer with vienna consulting engineers. Chris appreciate you coming on as well travis. Bigger so i'm i'm interested in talking to you. Guys i want to mention that Has its odors air. Pollutants conference april twentieth twenty seconds and a lot of the things we're going to talk about today are going to be part of that that content so we encourage folks to take a look and hopefully join us. What are some of the issues and trends that you all are see and when it comes to odors air pollutants these days. I'm may start off in the no hand off to prison. We would probably have both quite a few answers to that One thing. I see quite a bit lately is becoming a bigger issue in getting new treatment facilities permitted. You don't necessarily a numeric limits like you for effluent for odors and a lot of places some sites Too but But the general public is better educated cases of closer to where plant sites with the and other much more vocals of voters or more front and center topic are becoming more funds that our topic than than they have in the best at least in a lot of places. So receiving emphasized and getting a lot more scrutiny.

Mark Perkins Perkins Engineering Consultant Chris Hannaford Vienna Travis Chris
G. Gordon Liddy, Watergate Mastermind, Has Died at Age 90

Pacifica Evening News

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

G. Gordon Liddy, Watergate Mastermind, Has Died at Age 90

"And a radio talk show host after emerging from prison, died today at the age of 90. His son, Thomas Lady confirmed the death but did not reveal the cause of the event. To say it was not related to covet 19. Lady, a former FBI agent and army veteran, was convicted of conspiracy, burglary and illegal wiretapping for his role in the Watergate burglary, which led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon. Spent four years and four months in prison, including more than 100 days in solitary confinement. Years later, he said, he'd do it again for his president. After his release Lady became a popular, often provocative radio talk show, as you also worked as a security consultant, writer and actor, but he was outspoken and controversial, both as the political operative under Nixon and as a radio personality. Letty recommended assassinating political enemies, Bombing, a left leaning think tank and kidnapping war protesters. His White House colleagues ignored such suggestions. But one of his ventures, the break in at Democratic headquarters at the Watergate building in June of 1972 was approved. The burglary went awry, which led to an investigation a cover up and Nixon's resignation in 1974. Lydia, former FBI agent, An Army veteran, was convicted of conspiracy, burglary and illegal wiretapping for his role in the escapade. It was also convicted of conspiracy in the September 1971 burglary of defense analyst Daniel Ellsberg Psychiatrists who leaked the secret history of the Vietnam War known as the Pentagon papers. Watergate conspirator G. Gordon Liddy dead

Thomas Lady President Richard Nixon FBI Democratic Headquarters Nixon Watergate Building Letty Lady Army White House Lydia Daniel Ellsberg Vietnam Pentagon G. Gordon Liddy
Seattle School Board chooses new board member, approves plan to return to classrooms

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:54 sec | 3 weeks ago

Seattle School Board chooses new board member, approves plan to return to classrooms

"On the Seattle school board, with a vacant position filled yesterday. The update from comas conning Johnson was vacant in January, when former school board member even Mack resigned, calling for state intervention and a full audit of the school board. Erin jury will fill the spot. She was one of three candidates before the board and won unanimous approval. She is a nonprofit organizer and business consultant and will serve District four, which includes Ballard, Magnolia and Queen Anne. Congratulations, directed Jerry You are joining, See how the public schools at a very interesting and critical time. The board also approved a return of elementary students four days a week on a half day schedule some of the morning, others afternoon. Starting April. 5th on the start time has been bumped up because of a bus driver shortage. Fred Podesta, chief operations officer for Seattle schools, elementary schools, and K through eight schools, start at eight A.m. and ended 2 30, the district and union still negotiating a return for middle and high school students. Carleen

Seattle School Board Comas Conning Johnson Jerry You Mack Erin Queen Anne Ballard Fred Podesta Seattle Carleen
Container Ship Stuck in the Suez Canal

All Things Considered

01:57 min | 3 weeks ago

Container Ship Stuck in the Suez Canal

"The Suez Canal, One of the world's vital shipping routes, is blocked by one of the world's biggest cargo ships. This ship the ever given ran aground on the bank of the canal and is blocking it. NPR's Jackie Northam reports on what happened and what it might take to move the enormous ship out of the way. Ever given is an enormous ship about a quarter of a mile long, so navigating it through narrow waters, such as the Suez Canal is a challenge. It's still unclear why, but somehow the bow of the vessel began to drift towards one of the bank's maritime consultant. Battle Keratosis was Karatz. This Marine advisors says the vessel is relatively new, so there shouldn't have been any mechanical issues. A ferocious sandstorm may have played a role. There have been reports that visibility was low at the time and may have impaired the capitals and the crew on the bridge. Their visibility and the ship, which is operated by Taiwan based Evergreen Group ended up across the Suez Canal. Karadzic's says powerful tug boats have been trying to pull the vessel out of the sand bank. They may have to bring other vessels and take off some of the containers off the vessel. They may have to take a ballast water out of the vessel. Another connect the vessel right there and to make it, you know, lift itself from underwater large. Jenson, the CEO of Copenhagen based See Intelligence Consulting, says supply chains were already in disarray caused by a ripple effect from the pandemic. So you have a job or congestion. You have shortages of vessel capacity of shortages of empty containers. There's a myriad of things that are out of kilter will supply chain already distant and some top of it. And that's not good guy plant in with the International Chamber of Shipping, says 12% of global trade passes through the canal and more than 100 ships are now waiting to enter

Suez Canal Jackie Northam Battle Keratosis Karatz Evergreen Group NPR Karadzic See Intelligence Consulting Taiwan Jenson Copenhagen International Chamber Of Shipp
Environmental Consultant Stacey Isaac Berahzer Is All About Water

Breaking Green Ceilings

01:56 min | 3 weeks ago

Environmental Consultant Stacey Isaac Berahzer Is All About Water

"My name is stacey isaac raza. I run a stall environmental. Consulting firm called ibm environmental. We only like released added in september two thousand and two but it's been a funding so far i got into the field of voice against the movie was in my undergraduate degree where i had an internship during the semester and ended up doing what follows the stuff i did. Different things that boost. But or woulda i ended up on everything from yeah into of indexing different streams or what bodies within the us different shopping segments into of the solid With anything different refinements ec had put a designated saddam will not and so that's probably rare relieve loyal insufficiently symptoms. And you also have an interesting background. You're from trinidad. And most people probably don't know much about tim's of its water issues to my kind of giving us a bit of an overview of the water situation there absolutely. I didn't grow up. Include noninvasive tobacco. Which is an island. Republican the caribbean to in small islands in the tropics through a good bit of rainfall but in terms of the island environment awards the russia's off the land pretty quickly storing capturing and storing it for human is is enforced sunday challenge also the high volumes of reform that we have signed in an island environment trindad coupled with developments and develop lines construction on even navas mountain range the the non arranging and of course issues flooding on the last couple of decades

Stacey Isaac Raza IBM EC Saddam Trinidad TIM Caribbean United States Russia Navas Mountain
‘New locals’ at the Jersey Shore couldn’t be happier after moving from Philadelphia, nearby towns

Philadelphia's Morning Answer

03:19 min | 3 weeks ago

‘New locals’ at the Jersey Shore couldn’t be happier after moving from Philadelphia, nearby towns

"Story today. Kind of dovetailing with what Christine and I were talking about. People that have sure properties. You probably you either. Maybe one of these people or you may know somebody like this who have basically just packed up and relocated and move down the shore for the entire of year. Of this pandemic, and I've been doing all their work. Primarily or exclusively down the shore. Ellen Mogul Owns honeys Sitting eat, which is I mean, one of the greatest breakfast I've ever eaten in this town. Not for nothing. I don't know that she would care for my endorsement. I'm just telling you, it's Kind of, uh, Northern Liberties area. I love it. But anyway, these days, it says she's hanging her hat down the shore. Some of her fellow expat neighbors this winter in the beach town of Ventnor included in New York City financial consultant who traded in apartment in Long Island for a house. Three blocks from the ocean. Former band member of the psychedelic Furs who walks a Labradoodle in red canvas sneakers and the Chairman family who's dead. Jimmy admits to feeling a bit self conscious when he showed up to his kid's soccer practice in Margate, wearing the all black Street uniforms of his former home in the Big city. They aren't looking back. As part of a can't miss them influx of new locals. They kept things busy over the winter for appreciative pandemic starve shore businesses. Discovered the calming rhythms of the off season and even learned that heading off the island is properly known, is going off shore. Like to walk the dogs to the edge of the continent, Mogul said the other morning, speaking from a car where she was headed over the bridge into Philadelphia. A year ago. Second home owners were warned to stay away from the off season short towns during a pandemic that was threatening to strain local hospitals. But they didn't listen. Referring to hole up inside beach homes rather than apartments right out the coronavirus lockdown in less populated towns rather than anxious suburbs. Others bought at the shore for the first time, driving up real estate prices and creating a frenzy of bidding wars in Ocean County. Median sales prices in January and February jumped 38.5%. With nearly 500 units sold. That's a jump of 17.2%, according to the stats. Some realized renting. Year round in a short town is a bargain and houses a few blocks from the beach could be bought in some towns with mortgages requiring a fraction of what they were paying the rent in big cities. Once you step off the hamster wheel of New York, says Daniel Yahiko analyst who bought a home in Ventnor with her mortgage, now half what she paid in rent in New York City. And where her sister is also relocating, she says. It's hard to go back to work. Even in Atlantic City, often overlooked coastal real estate booms, has now seen an uptick in prices. You know, for years we've talked about what would bring Atlantic City back. Could it be a pandemic?

Ellen Mogul Ventnor Christine Margate Long Island New York City Big City Jimmy Mogul Soccer Ocean County Philadelphia Daniel Yahiko New York Atlantic City
A Human Connection Saved Best Buy From Dying at the Hands of Amazon

Recode Decode

01:20 min | 3 weeks ago

A Human Connection Saved Best Buy From Dying at the Hands of Amazon

"One of the fascinating case studies. I came across in the course of reading. This book was best. Buy and best buy was supposed to die. Like like amazon was supposed to kill best by many years ago because they sold all the same stuff like big box was going away like best buy was largely dependent on like new. Dvd and video game releases for profits which like went away. So i was sort of interested in how they didn't die. What what they did and it turns out that they moved to a very high touch. Customer service model. They started this in home advisor program. Where for a fee. They would come to your house. You know best. Buy rep. Would take a look at your. You know your your stereo system and your speakers and tell you like which upgrade you needed or like they would be there with you as kind of a personal tech consultant and then they would sell you stuff on the back end but the the human connection was actually what drove the the renaissance of best buy. It was not that. They competed with amazon on price or logistics. But they they did do those things. But the thing that set them apart unlike amazon where everything is done by robots and sort of low-paid human pickers and warehouses. They would actually send someone to your house. Who would talk to. Who would talk you through it and answer your questions.

Amazon
Cuomo's Fourth Accuser, Karen Hinton, Speaks Out

Common Sense with Bill O'Reilly

06:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Cuomo's Fourth Accuser, Karen Hinton, Speaks Out

"About Governor Cuomo. And we have with us here on the show his fourth accuser, Karen, hidden Karen, you seem as we were talking about before the break. Very protective and feel really bad, especially for some of these younger women. Um, you are the same age right as Governor Cuomo. So you thought you you had been experienced in terms of dealing with Politicians and a whole bunch of things. But of course, never anticipated what had happened here. Do you regret that you didn't come forward sooner? Yes, I regret it. Uh, but on the other hand, I Never. There was never an opportunity for me to speak about it because there had not been any other public accusations. And you know, at By the time I had turned 40 I was no longer working for him and didn't work for him again. Um, you know, we weigh moved my husband on my second husband. I boot from Washington to New York. He began working with Governor Cuomo as his director, state operation. And um, and so I wanted to be supportive of Andrew's position as governor of New York and I wanted him to do well and I had unhappy a great deal of respect for many of the programs and policies he's put into place. I mean, the work you did around gay marriage. Was was very moving to me and very important. To this country and the work he's done in Cove it even though he's now facing criticism and rightfully so. His handling of the Because the manipulation of the numbers or the nursing home deaths occurred, whether it was in the hospital of the nursing him. That's very problematic and rightfully so, and we should be concerned about it at the same time. He also has done a very good job of of one of the first governor because it was one of the first hot spot to really take control of the terrible situation and try to turn it around and the death and the case is dropped. And they're continuing to drop now. But do you wish like maybe do you think maybe if I had said something 21 years ago He could have. It could have illuminated his behavior could have stopped his being out late. Do you think we live in it? We live in a country. Even they, uh, you know, it's problematic for the young woman who are coming forward. Now they could end up losing jobs or not getting jobs in the future, and people may want to stay away from them. And so, uh, my decision to do it now we try to stay. You can't speak out. You don't be silent, Speak out and support these women so that they can continue to function and have vibrant Important careers because in 1998 When I'm working for Andrew Cuomo. And then, of course in 2000. This was a time when they've been so much that the board about Bill Clinton's womanizing. And I did not want to find myself in a position where I could lose my my job. I could not get another job. I could lose clients who might hire me as a consultant after I left Hut. Wait. The country was not in a position to try to believe a woman. Did anybody believe Monica Lewinsky at first? Did anybody believe other women from Arkansas who accused Clinton of inappropriate sexual behavior? No. They made fun of them. They called them been those They called him trying apart trash. No. Was I going to Uh, come out and say something about Andrew Cuomo in 2000. No I had anyway, I just decided not to do it for fear that that it would hurt me would hurt my family. And so I just opted not to say anything. Then time passes. And, uh, Andrew, an odd developed a friendship. I'm now married to someone he has known for a long time. Um, So you know I wanted doing I didn't want Oh, Tonto in any way harm that relationship, um, that he Had with my husband, So I just decided to keep it between my husband in May and another friend. That's it. That's what I was going to ask you. You told your husband and you told her friend. Um, did you ever tell? Did you ever talk to the governor and say Hey, what happened? Whether it was, you know the next day or a few years later, Or did he ever say anything to you Apologize even No, no, I wasn't gonna bring it up. I didn't want to have that kind of drama in my life. And, um s O. I just I'm just let let it nothing happened. It's not like he physically abused me in any way he let me leave. And, um and and nothing happened. So I just wanted to leave it there and looking back on it. Should I have done that? I wished More than anything that we lived in this society in 2000 turn of the century that we lived in the society where that type of behavior Would rarely happen when you're dealing with a person you are paying money to for help, and you're in a position of power, but no That's not wasn't the case in 2000 and 21 years later, it's still the case. And, you know, I'm now 62 years old. So you know, I've got I've got a life ahead of me that doesn't really involved. Um, um, Anyone needing to do me favors and get me a job? That sort of thing? These young women who turned the tables on the governor? You know, they put their lives at risk, and that's very courageous. It

Governor Cuomo Karen Andrew Cuomo New York Andrew Washington Monica Lewinsky Bill Clinton Arkansas Clinton
When Currencies Fail: Bitcoin Google Searches in Turkey Rise 400% as Lira Crashes

CoinDesk Podcast Network

07:58 min | 3 weeks ago

When Currencies Fail: Bitcoin Google Searches in Turkey Rise 400% as Lira Crashes

"Let's move to our main discussion and there are really two parts of the story that we're going to cover. The first is the devastating crash of the turkish lira. The second is the response of people in that country who found their money worth dramatically less than it was just a few days before first of all what happened between sunday evening and monday. The turkish lira fell as much as seventeen percent against the dollar ultimately landing around ten percent down. Turkish stocks also crashed the benchmark borsa. Istanbul one hundred stock index was down as much as nine point four percent which is the biggest sell-off since june. Two thousand thirteen. The nasdaq listed shares. Msci turkey efl seventeen point five percent pre market in the us. The cause of all this on early saturday morning. Turkish president aragon unexpectedly fired nasi ball. though central. Bank governor who had been appointed in november at the center of their disagreement was how to approach inflation. So let's step back and actually look at the scenario inherited oddball. He was the third central bank governor in two years in november the year that he came to power the annual inflation rate was fourteen point zero three percent. According to the turkish statistical institute by december it was up to fourteen point six percent now these are just official numbers and some argue that it's actually much higher on november twelfth twenty. Twenty johns hopkins. Economists hanky tweeted everyday. I accurately measure inflation in turkey today. Measure it at thirty five point six one percent this year as opposed to the official number of eleven point eight nine percent after that fourteen point six percent number came out in december. He said that it was actually twenty. Five point eight five percent per year even holding that aside if you just take the official number nearly fifteen percent inflation a year a staggering that means a having of your purchasing power every year and this has been going on for a long time sue from three hours capital tweeted last night fun fact. The reason turkish lira is t. r. l. is because they've already redenominated before due to massive hyperinflation. Let's add a little more color than about the previous year and a half. The central bank had been keeping interest rates low or at least below consumer inflation. And as we've discussed before on this show. Negative real rates mean investors are discouraged from holding that sovereign debt as well as from holding lira or lira-denominated assets. These have been the policies for eighteen months or more and by fall. The currency was at all time. Lows added to. This fire was the way the turkish central bank had been trying to prop up the lira. Selling more than one hundred billion dollars in us foreign reserves in order to keep the lira from completely cratering in the process this destroyed and depleted their foreign exchange reserves and lead them to actually owing more dollars to turkish banks than the central bank actually had determined. Opposition leaders ask for judicial probe into the official reserves as of november. The country looked to be heading to a full on balance of payments crisis. And on top of this there have been major questions around the independence of the central bank from president. Aragon aragon infrequently given the central bank direct monetary policy instructions had dismissed two governors in the previous sixteen months effectively. When we really take a step back. Turkey has been on the see-saw between currency crisis and inflation. On the one hand and massive austerity and growth slowing interest rate hikes. On the other a currency crisis twenty eighteen led to increase interest rates. And by summer of the next year aragona points quote a friend to cut rates by mid-november when oddball came in it was a swing back to the interest rate hikes austerity side of the pendulum. The first act of akbal as he came in was to immediately raise the central banks one week repo rate which is an interbank lending rate from ten point. Two five percent to fifteen percent now. Interestingly this had started to work things were looking more positive from currency perspective at least in early. Twenty twenty one. Daniel call tweeted this morning. The turkey central bank helped make lira one of the best currencies versus the us d- in twenty twenty one curbing money supply growth via rate hikes helping reduce inflation. The turkish lira was up three point zero seven percent from december thirty first twenty twenty two march nineteenth. Twenty twenty one. It had been down twenty percent the year before it also saw something like fourteen to twenty billion of foreign fund inflows into turkish assets over that same period which reversed years of the opposite direction. Basically the interest rate hikes austerity were performing well in the context of global currency markets. But ogbah clearly didn't believe inflation was getting under control to the degree that he wanted to. He raised rates again to seventeen percent and then finally on the thursday before his dismissal raise them much more than expected to full. Nineteen percent and so the pendulum is swinging back again from interest rate hikes and toward at least in the minds of investors runaway inflation. The newly appointed governor saheb cops. Yo glue said that beating. Inflation is the bank's main objective but also said that they're committed to lowering borrowing costs and bolstering growth. Money managers. basically think he's going to be forced to lower interest rates and accept currency depreciation and indeed the other place. This is showing up is in the cost of insuring. Turkey's government debt against default the price of which rose more than fifty percent over the weekend. What's more this move. And the switch. From ball to cops iaglu super reinforces the narrative that central banks lack independence from erdogan. As well casio glue is a party. Loyalist bloomberg's chief emerging markets. Economists said quote the hit to the central bank's credibility and independence can't be overstated to gone has battered the institutions with interventions that have repeatedly financial markets. Were willing to give ball a chance. His successor will find it hard to build that trust again. So let's talk now about the other dimension to this that you might have caught if you were on twitter. Google searches for the term bitcoin in turkey more than quadrupled over the weekend after akbal sacking wise. That happening while one part of it may be the idea that bitcoin provides in inflation hedge and just a different currency to get away from lira volatility. Which by the way all it using bitcoin to get away from volatility where they don't tell you when they're trying to critique bitcoin is that people can stomach more volatility if there's some possibility that those seventeen percents swings or also to the upside as well but the other part of it is that as i mentioned the new governor has said that they are committed to fighting inflation but doesn't want interest rates to be the tool because they messed with growth. What are there other tools then. Bing bing bing capital controls restricting the flows of capital out of lira and lira-denominated assets so one question might be alongside. Google searches is are we. Seeing an increase in exchange activity owner goes pack. A consultant at the bbc turk pro exchange said that there was a spike in volume and that it was four both usd t tether as an alternative to us dollars and bitcoin on btc turk the bitcoin turkish lira pair has the highest volume with the tether turkish lira pair being the second highest now. This situation is going to evolve a lot. And i think on the one hand you have to just heartbroken. For the turkish people who are stuck between the whims and machinations of politicians and global economic flows that they have no control over when it comes to how much this new set of crypto and digital assets can actually help them escape from those pains. I've said numerous times. One of them remarkable things about this moment isn't that bitcoin and digital assets are going to save everyone from the follies of local currency regimes. That's just not realistic yet. What's remarkable is that for the first time ever the entire span of human history. There is a convenient easy permission. 'less ramp from those regimes for those people. Who have the technical know how to do it. The number of people who have that know how is an ever expanding group and that means that bitcoin and digital assets at an x factor to every single currency crisis. From here on

Turkish Statistical Institute Turkey Aragon Aragon Aragona Akbal Msci Daniel Call Aragon
Defense Secretary Austin makes surprise visit to Afghanistan

Jim Strader Outdoors

00:27 sec | 3 weeks ago

Defense Secretary Austin makes surprise visit to Afghanistan

"Secretary Lloyd Austin made a surprise trip to Afghanistan to meet with its leader, CBS News military consultant Jeff McCausland, says Austin is steering clear of the May 1st deadline for a U. S. Troop withdrawal brokered by the previous Trump Administration secretary also went on to say on Twitter. He had made this visit to quote, Listen and learn, And this would inform his just patient in the ongoing review to return what actions that by administration will take over the next few weeks.

Secretary Lloyd Austin Jeff Mccausland Trump Administration Cbs News Afghanistan Austin Twitter
How to Establish Know, Like, and Trust in a Noisy World with Catherine Thompson

Coach's Copilot: Your Online Business Manager Podcast

06:08 min | 3 weeks ago

How to Establish Know, Like, and Trust in a Noisy World with Catherine Thompson

"What the heck is no like entrust. Yeah so i come from a mindset that it's probably one of the most important things to integrate in your business especially if you're a coach or consultant selling a service of some sort but basically it is what we call the stages in which people are are coming across your brand so the no stage being sort about awareness piece Building your brand awareness. The like is Forming that light for who you are what you sell what you're about and then obviously developing not trust for your To make a purchase within your business. Yeah and i know this is going to be a big questions gonna feel like opening a whole can of worms. How does somebody actually start to create like entrust. Yeah so Again thinking of it in sort of a stage. That's kind of how. I explain it to my clients when i'm working with them And thinking about your customer as going through a journey with your business and so the first stage is that no stage. It's that awareness. It's who you are what you do y you do. It and repetition is huge stage in a lot of people get frustrated or they want to with it because they sound like a broken record in their own mind but at the end of the day your audience might be coming across you for the first maybe second time and so that repetition is huge in that stage Really showing like. I said who you are what you do why you do it and then not like stages sort of the next stage along that customer journey that people are moving through with you and that's really developing alight for who you are and what you stand for. So brand's story is a huge thing in this stage and sharing relatable bits about what you do and who you are so that your audience can develop that like for you because they're not gonna invest in you if they don't one no you but then obviously not like you and then the trust stage again. Huge for service. Based businesses coaches consultants is developing at trust. People are never going to invest in you. If they don't trust you and so Doing things like referrals. Recommendations from past clients testimonials are big With your client to build that trust factor so that people can see okay. She's worked with somebody else in this person. These results and i can actually trust that. She'll do the same for me until at trust. Pieces is a big hurdle. A lot of people. It's the last stage before anybody will invest any so you so we're talking about some of this and i know you know i mean one of the things that i love about what you said here was. It feels repetitive. To you but to me a. I hear that is oh my gosh just simplified my workload because i can create the same message over and over again. I don't have to reinvent the wheel every single time totally totally. Yes so and you also mentioned in there. The brand and i can hear my head a lot of coaches or like. But i'm just one person i don't have an organization. Why do i need to have a bran story. Tell me a little bit about how personal story maybe relates to brand story and how this helps with that no like entrusting yes without personal story. relating to that brand story developing sort of the brand store is really the story is one of the strongest ways we formed connection right so if we feel connected to somebody We tend to want to invest in them. Get to know them that sort of thing but knowing that there's a bigger purpose to what they are so not just like i wanna make more money. Give me your money. give me your money. But like they have a bigger purpose right so that why. Why are you doing what you do. What is that purpose. And that's your brand story. Writers like really Liquefying that in your messaging so it doesn't necessarily have to be. I get lots of questions from clients that are like so my supposed to share like where it was born and what high school i went to know. So your personal story. You take bits of your personal story that are going to relate to your audience at the level at which they are when they're looking for the type of service your sally so if you're not you're not going to share maybe where you were born or the high school you went to but maybe you're sharing like a struggle that you overcame Maybe you're sharing like a success story. A part of your journey. So it's not your entire life story that you put down on paper it's bits of it that are gonna be relatable to your audience so that they feel connected to you and your brands were that why why are you doing. They want to invest in a bigger purpose. They don't want to just you know invest in you to give you more money. That sort of thing. It's it's it's knowing that they're investing in a bigger bigger purpose. A bigger movement so to speak. Yeah and you know so with virtual. Lay team you know. I've really kind of embraced the part of my story that drove me to want to give people more time and for the regular listeners. You know out there. My husband and i lost one of our sons. And when you go through an experience like that you understand the value of time probably better than anybody and that has allowed me to have a driving force behind making sure people are using the most out of the time that they have so that relates. That's part of my personal story but it relates to why virtually team was created in the first place. Perfect as what you're talking about. That's what i'm talking about. Yeah so for creatively own Part of mine was working in corporate for fifteen years. Not really living in alignment and not doing the things that actually i love doing Which is hoping small businesses consultants coaches start their own business carved their own half that sort of thing and so that's my wi- right is like to really give people permission to to challenge the norms. Go against what society is telling us that we need to do. And the types of jobs we need to have and that they can actually really create an income doing the things that they

Human Factors on the other side of the world

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

04:55 min | Last month

Human Factors on the other side of the world

"And welcome to this episode of twelve to human factors podcast. I'm nothing slightly. Because i've been playing around with the new gadget and actually be playing the intro before the start of a recording session where normally i'm cutting afterwards This focused is a bit special for me. Because actually it's going to be the third we've ever had a guest and it's a gentleman who used to work with in early career. It's actually real delight to be able to catch up with somebody. So i want you all to cowbridge. Welcome cal thank you now to say yes. It's it's been. It has been way too long. Tallies the director of age of x which is a human factors consultancy based out in new zealand. And that's where he's talking to his Today he's a A member of the human factors ergonomics society of new zealand ways. Also been past president and he's also a fellow of the charge into economic and human factors here in the uk. So thank you very much for making time to chat today. It's absolutely fantastic. It's it's early in the morning for you at the moment. is that right. Nine o'clock nine. That's still in the morning. Yes relaxing get at least it took about organizations. Look at niebuhr tried to work out exactly where we were in the county. I actually had to do maths. Partido my strongest point and the year as well yes. He does not harmful. It's absolute fantastic to catch up so the audience. Could you just give a quick rundown on. What is he doing now. So what you enroll in What do you get up to okay So as far as already said i run a company called hatchbacks limited and saturday with huma practice consultancy. that's based oakland and the Consultants dotted elaborate country. Also complete news in australia and the a lot of the work. A lot of the work that we are doing at the moment is is. i suppose. It's focused if you can imagine a general project lock saad Very much focused on suppose the more often than not test inside of things so So usually we get cold into either test new technology. That's already been deployed which is not ideal obviously o'reilly We may well begin. Possibility and more requirements are suppose requirements looking at gaps analysis. You Kicking off a project. That's g that's generally the the bulk of the The area where we are that being said in congress too much detail by working such project to the where we have been involved victims from taiwan and To some rapid prototype in some testing on in the process now of of just kicking off the final aspect may trial at the new technology. Selectiveness generally what it can be quite varied quite a rarity. Isn't it to pick up the product right from the beginning of which we preach and evangelize about human factors should be throughout. It is still much more rare than than i would like. Yeah yeah so. Before we get into the project you get into all that type of thing we are talking through still through the pandemic. It's still kicking around but also new zealand is being you've done within a very different way too. Many of the other countries you personally you clearly have done. All the countries are you've dealt with it very differently. How you found working through. Code fatty extremely hard. And i don't thing that many of us human factors people using that have an easy ride from its own. I can't speak for everybody personally. And what i found was a lot of projects guts canceled Projects got delayed And that was not necessarily affecting too badly because they had naturally stocked. it's out in some cases. Been an opportunity that was in the pipeline over native really. Was the name on the dotted line in that nine. Never came Really for me. I don't tend to think that we've got work until that names on the doc- lab because of the years that you can think that you've got something and then right at the eleventh hour. Somebody changes the martin. Some corporate decisions might control

Human Factors Ergonomics Socie Huma Practice Consultancy Niebuhr New Zealand Oakland Reilly UK Australia Taiwan Congress Martin
Keepin it 100 with Kirti Dewan from Bugsnag

The First 100 Days

04:26 min | Last month

Keepin it 100 with Kirti Dewan from Bugsnag

"In this episode. Nelson interviewed. cure. T. day one. Vp of marketing at bucks neck. Which as you may have guessed helps fix software. Bugs charity is a veteran of the consulting industry and she understands the difficulty of gaining new clients. But what's what's secret sauce being your authentic self and not afraid of cold prospecting have listen. This hope consulting world really cool. You mentioned that one of the greatest difficulties was at the same time that you have to execute you also have to to do some business development and get some clients and hopefully land a client. That's that's quite large With the duration of the contract as long enough to keep you entertained in happy so that you don't have to hunt right. What advice would you have to someone. Who's in a similar boat was thinking about that. And that's one of their. Maybe i guess the biggest thing is how do i get clients so any any advice to the audience some on the maybe the hardest art about consulting so there are these consultant networks and if you become a part of the network and you are able to specify of company the functionary that you likely working probably certain audience that you like air into more than the out and they do the be for you and they make these opportunities consulting gigs available and then you can apply and they do the matching for you and then if it works out at tell you have your next opportunity so i did about a gun. Remember exactly now is probably do betwee containing projects that way by being barred of these networks. One of my favorite stories from my consulting experience has been that. don't give up on cold calling. It actually works. And i was completely surprised and shocked by when it worked for me and i couldn't believe and that's why to this day. It's one of my favorite stories to. I met someone at a product marketing conference or rather on stage. The said that so and so from this company is has all these job. Openings andering copy lower you know go and say hi and check with that person so when gawk our came about as you can imagine there were four rings of people that were swarming this person right and Before you know it. The person's already latch so did have a look at the jobs. And i said all the all four of food i'm employee positions. What can i do here and just out of a whim. I send linked in and i said hit. I love what you said on stage. I loved her talk. I gotta get a hold of you dance by. You're just totally surrounded. And i know your jobs are for jobs. I cannot apply to any of them. Because i'm conducting an consulting for these reasons however if you need head in any of these areas i'm more than happy to have a jack and response and i had a meeting and it just went from there so always quit for the person who gave me a chance and do the the fact that you know. He responded and he was just so open minded about it. And i think the takeaway from there is do. Just be yourself. just be authentic. You know. I literally wrote the lincoln message as though it was a conversation like you. Nra speaking and that is what it was. Hey here are the facts. But i would. I would love to if you have something. I would love to chat in if you don't have something right now but something down the road if we could just don't form a connection if not and you have any before that will be great but if you don't even have that that's totally fine so just plain speak only genuine and sincere and going to work every single dime right because people have different circumstances as well that didn't work within the parameters within their own jobs and companies but i feel that it it. It does that sometime. People do like to have other pedo.

Nelson NRA Lincoln
Astronauts step outside space station to wrap up work

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | Last month

Astronauts step outside space station to wrap up work

"From the last spacewalk. Two spacewalkers stepped outside the international space station today to complete electrical connections with the European experiment platform and conduct other repairs. CBS News Space Consultant Bill Harwood has more astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins air working outside the International space station to carry out a variety of maintenance task. They're going to relocated ammonia coolant line. They're going to install a new wireless camera transceiver and make a few final connections to a new European experiment platform. They're also round a couple of Ethernet cables for use with the station's external WiFi system to watch video of that space.

Bill Harwood Victor Glover Mike Hopkins International Space Station Cbs News
This newspaper chain pivoted to digital subscriptions, and it's working

The Business of Content

09:51 min | 2 months ago

This newspaper chain pivoted to digital subscriptions, and it's working

"The last fifteen years not been kind to the local news industry with thousands of newspapers either reducing staff or closing down entirely but not all newspapers have been affected equally and some of the hardest hit chains were owned by hedge funds and private equity firms that had no actual interest in investing in journalism. Family owned newspaper. Seemed to have fared better. And that seems to be the case for form. Communications a chain of newspapers and other media outlets situated in the mid west a few years ago. The company's newspapers rolled out a digital subscription model and so far it seems to be performing above expectations. I recently interviewed stephanie. Shorter forums chief digital marketing officer about the gargantuan amount of work that went into this pivot and what strategies resulted in the most success before we jump into the view. I wanna talk about a recent article published on my newsletter. I went deep on the company called blocks group. It started out. As a cryptocurrency events company before launching a thriving podcast network that generates millions of dollars in revenue both founders walk me through how grew the business and their plans to build a crypto focus news organization. There's only one way to read analysis like this and it's by subscribing to my substance newsletter. Go to simon's dot sub stack dot com that simon owen stott sub stacked dot com or. Just google the word. Simon owens and newsletter. Okay onto my interview with stephanie. Hey stephanie thanks for joining us. Yeah thanks so much for having me simon. So you work for immediate chain called forum communications Tell me a little bit about that. Like where is it. What kind of media properties doesn't own. And how long has it been around cell phone. Communications is a family owned media company. We've been around since eighteen seventy eight Were actually located in the upper midwest. So we have properties in north dakota south dakota wisconsin and minnesota Our headquarters is in fargo. North dakota And we have twenty plus print and digital news brands all throughout the midwest as some broadcast and commercial print divisions as well and that's completely family owned as opposed to you know somebody's larger chains that are owned by private equity like this is like a longtime family owned newspaper oil. It's not just newspapers but mainly a newspaper chain. That's exactly right. It's a sixth generation family on media company. So it's been owned or operated by family all throughout its ownership so you were brought in as its first chief digital marketing officer correct like why did they build that role for you. Yeah that's correct so a while. Back a bunch of executives were sitting around a table and really talking about what the future of the company looked like and They knew that they needed to create a digital subscription model. But they weren't exactly sure where to begin and so brought in a consultant who used to work at the new york times and she came in and started to give some advice and she said well first off Where's your marketing department. And they all sort of looked around the room at each other and they said well we don't have one and she's like well that's step one so They followed her advice and they posted a role for chief digital marketing officer. And that's gonna wear my role came to be. And what was your background like you. Didn't you didn't work newspapers before. Did you know this was completely new for me. So i previously worked in the healthcare benefits space. But i was in marketing. Their i was. Vp of marketing for local healthcare benefits company and Really just took a leap of faith after meeting with the the people at the form. Communications office And really loved what i heard about what they wanted to do. And decided to really switch gears with my career and it was really great decision and and basically kind of you know the even though you weren't in media this was about like kind of product tising and and selling something directly to consumers so it's sort of like fit within. Still within your purview. Of of what you knew about right exactly so my previous role Prior to coming to form communications was all about selling a product to consumers and so This really isn't all that different. The the product has changed And what i really like about it. Is i find it a little bit more mission driven a little bit more purposeful and can really get behind the the why of what we're doing and Yeah that's always really appealed to me. Tell me about your first few months in the role. How did you get the lay of the land and begin building strategy for the expansion into the digital subscriptions so i would say the first few months was really like drinking out of a firehose as they say it was being thrown into a lot of new things that i didn't know a whole lot about And so i was really guided by. Just what i did know to be true. Which is everything about how to market something to consumers and the the biggest challenge there is we had previously been giving our content away for free online and now we were heading to this model where we weren't going to be doing that anymore. And so the biggest thing to figure out was how can you move from giving away your content for free to starting to ask people to pay for that content and we decided that the biggest the biggest strategy there is. We need to invest in content. And we need to invest in our products. And so that's what we did. And media's is kind of like a really weird industry that's not like a lot of other industries in the sense that like the people who are building the cord core product. Which is the editorial or kind of weirdly separated from the business side in different ways and they're all kinds of different ethics rules in different stuff like that like. Did you feel like you need to educated on like how media company works as opposed to like pure consumer products company. I did there. There was a little bit a friction at i. Just you know with some of the decisions that you have to make about for instance what you put behind the pay wall. No one when there's an extreme community safety story how do you handle that. From an ethical standpoint you want people to be able to access that kind of content and so a big part of the early days. My role was sitting down with people in the newsroom. Inter division and just understanding how they operate and what decisions they have to make and then how does the pay wall change any of that if if it does so. What are some of the major hurdles that a legacy newspaper chain has to consider that a like a brand new digital site. Like my the one that i run like doesn't have to think about like you had to figure out how to take these princip scrubbers in these legacy systems and and combine them with a paywall which is from a logistical standpoint. That's pretty difficult to do right. It is quite difficult in fact I would say the most challenging piece of all was just the technology component of everything so we had like you said legacy systems and then we needed to integrate that with all of these other systems that were newer so that the email platform the paywall platform obviously and so many other pieces and when we were grappling with all of that we actually secured help from another consultant. Who used to work at nasa. He's really bright. Guy really has a good hand on technology and he helped us draw out. This integration map. And he's drawing all these lines from one platform to another and it just looks like this giant messy web on a sheet of paper and he looks up at all of us and he says this is complicated and you know if the guy from nasa complicated it's complicated and so that was by far the most challenging part and it's never ending. I mean every time we had a new system integration and that's the part that really a keeps us up at night sometimes and did you have to overhaul the whole website or was there just like a way to just put some key. Take some kind of membership or subscription platform and just put it over the website. I wouldn't say we had to overhaul the website but we made the decision that we wanted to because again we were going from this state of giving away our content for free to suddenly asking people to pay for a product that we weren't previously asking them to pay for and so we wanted to make sure that we are improving that product and improving the discover ability of the content. That people wanted And so we decided to before even beginning to implement the paywall. Create a plan for redesigning all of our network of news sites that sort of step one and then from there. We felt good about launching that paywall on top of them and so prior to launching. I'm guessing that you were kind of projecting convey conversion rates like how. How quickly did you hope to acquire new digital subscribers to where it would make up a significant part of your business at least prior to launching. We really didn't know what exactly to expect. you know. we had talked to others in the space and they they had shared stories of pretty decent growth in the first few months but pretty low expectations overall. Just as you grapple with all the challenges of implementing a new model like this and so we just sort of set an arbitrary goal of ten thousand digital subscribers in the first year It wasn't really super scientific. We just felt like that seemed like a reasonable goal for our entire network of sites and then we wound up tripling that in the first year and so we who either really underestimated our goal or we really Did surprisingly well for what we set out to do. But i'm gonna hope it's the second one. Yeah so ten thousand subscribers across twenty different newspapers Seems like a reasonable goal. That you

Stephanie Simon Owen Stott Simon Owens Minnesota Our Headquarters Midwest Simon Fargo North Dakota South Dakota Wisconsin The New York Times Google Nasa GUY
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

07:38 min | 5 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"This is dawn. Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at.

"consultant" Discussed on Noah Kagan Presents

Noah Kagan Presents

07:07 min | 5 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Noah Kagan Presents

"Also special pre show shadow to listener money mar. What does it my man from use of a he left her of you. No has a gift for creating content. That is entertaining and equally actionable. You're the man. I appreciate you in every other one gorgeous listeners. If you wanna shout out in a future episode leader view anywhere online. I check every single one of them. What makes a day great versus nach. Great it's so unfortunate but a lot of my happiness. I find is tied to youtube. You performance and that's just me being honest right if i have a great video my get things are good and you know all the other shit that comes at me you know. Even if it's not amazing it's like no big deal but when views are bad like they have been for the past few months it really is unhealthy. How how much it affects me. I think said today my video is actually doing pretty shitty but my days. Okay because it's thursday. I filmed all the content. That i need for this week. And and friday's are typically my my days where i come out a little bit and just take meetings and calls. Things are good so two things with that Be curious to hear more. So yeah i guess. How do you deal with that. How do you proceed. Especially you're saying it's been months now. They're not hitting the views. Youtube has been really weird for since the whole kobe. Thing hit viewing patterns in habits have very much changed and so people aren't really so concerned about how to look good. You know in terms of what's going on a date or or how to the girls a in like whatever that keep going with them. Because i think that's something that all of us go through. I know what that sumo dot com when we have these days like today. We had a six-figure day. And i'm like you know our company's the best thing in the world and then there's days where revenues down. I'm like well who's getting fired today. You know and it's interesting. How much we let these external out of control things out of our total control really affect our emotions. No it's absolutely true. And that's the thing i mean. Every day i get up and in terms of my videos. There's not a day that iphone. It in i give a hundred and twenty percent china. Make it you know an engaging video. I do the thumb. The i do all the editing. Still so i you know. One hundred percent like hands on my content. It's such a i guess. Part of me as part of my identity at this point that when it doesn't do well. I take it incredibly personal. See as. I don't know how you deal with it because i have a friend. You know antonio santana tonio style. No i think he knows you oh cool. He does a real good job of separating himself from the content in the just the emotions tied to when things. Don't go amazing. But i have not been able to do that yet. It's still really affects me. Because of how much put in. I think i feel you lately. I've been watching other people's interviews in interviewers always the one talking the whole time and i'm like shut up. You brought the guests on for reason. But i wanna feel you man like we put out a video yesterday and it did great and i'm also kirsty. What's great like what means to you and it's just like the rest of the day. I'm kinda i don't even subconsciously. Unaware how much it bothers me for me. I have to remember. It's like keep going like not every rockstar or rapper. Done every songs a banger. And so i kinda keep going with that. And then i think a lot of times. I'm like that. I at least put out what i wanted to put out. You know it still bothers. But yet i remind myself of that like i still did the video i wanted to do for me. There's also the part of the fact that all of my videos are sponsored. Know it is a business. And i know that. If i'm not getting the views or not getting the conversions for for the brands it is going to affect more than just me. It affects the people that work for me. And you know. There's a lot riding on that and riding on the success as well amateurs metric specifically like. What's a great video launch for. You used to be before this covenant and views for mayor down about thirty percent so it used to be so a good video earn average video before would hit one hundred seventy five thousand views in a day twenty four hours and then right it's all relative you know in a in a a good video would do to twenty five to fifty a great video would do three hundred three hundred fifty and so an absolute atrocious video would do under a hundred and so now the average is if it does one hundred ten. That's a good video if it does one hundred fifty. It's great video. And so yeah so you don't have really have an answer. I was hoping you have some wisdom in there about like i go and i have like a blueberry scone and that makes my day better afterwards like is there any wisdom about i exercise a lot. Exercising typically is how. I manage the stress but yeah just go out for a run or walk and listen to music and sort of decompress and realize that you know there's always tomorrow and so you're always like okay that next piece of content tomorrow is gonna crush it. I i know it. There's always tomorrow put out four videos a week. There's always tomorrow you never know when the next one's going to do really well. Can i give you some feedback or just gonna question. Some suggestions said okay. Can i get permission your permission to what. Yeah thanks to know. People give me feedback. I didn't ask for it now. Thank you know no so one for every video you put out. Are you emailing your entire audience. Know the difference when we email out of video versus not emailing out of video is like magnitudes. It's probably between like a normal video if we just put on youtube and pray to the youtube. God's get views it's like a thousand or two thousand videos. It's like a pretty okay video. The video is literally it's in like doubles. It goes from two to five and it's pretty much like all right. We're guaranteed that our audience will see it versus. Now you're kinda subjugated to youtube 's deciding whether you're going to get shown or not in you know you don't wanna be at their mercy. No you don't so just something to think about it. I'm like i just went to your site alpha mta i. I am dot com and as well as in marino dot com. You don't aggressively collect emails there. It seems like a low hanging fruit and then every email or at least twice a week or emails probably can put you back up to two hundred just from your own audience. You're one of the biggest youtubers especially in the image and fashion. How come you don't have a team doing your thumbnails in your editing and your title so we have a team that we built. I mean we're at eighty thousand subs and we do have money from our company up sumo. But i'm kind of surprised that you don't build a team around it. no no. It's the one thing that i really love do. So why would i outsource that. I love the process. I love the filming. I love the editing. I love the thumbnails. Even though it takes time. You know. When i think about sort of how i got started in this because i loved the how close i could get to people so for me. If that's sort of the price. I have to pay you know few hours a day in creating content. 'cause literally i mean. It takes me an hour to film a video. Our to edit you know the thumbnail a guy who helps me on on nails where i i. Just don't have any photoshop skills for three hours in a work. Four days. A week you know. I can build a multi multi multi multimillion dollar business from it. I'll keep doing it. And i enjoy it and so it's the price i pay well. As two things there. I'm just going to highlighting. Such an important point is that a lot of people will outsource things they love. And i'm like well if you love that do it. Then that's awesome. It's honestly a nice reminder from to hear that from you. The second thing that i'm just how many multimillions.

youtube antonio santana
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

03:51 min | 5 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Trainer and business consultant at the shoulder. Group with when people thrive companies thrive podcast. So the last few weeks. And there i say. The last many months have really put into perspective how we respond and react to situations. I've talked before about the difference between fast thinking and slow thinking. The fast thinking is where we re act immediately. It's that lizard brain the amid the la the fight or flight response contrast that with slow thinking. Which is we do our best to not react immediately. We slow down. We think we take everything into consideration and then we might respond or take action. We have to get out of our heads. We spend all this time in our heads. And it's mostly that fast thinking and it gets us into trouble when we are in that fast thinking that constantly responding reacting where is the piece we do not find peace in constant reaction. I believe we find peace in quiet contemplation in not reacting taking our time to thank observe analyse reflect and then take the best action because then we are doing it from that place whatever that place maybe as opposed to. Oh my. gosh this happened. And i have to react like this. I have to send the email. I have to make the phone call. I have to make my stance known. And wow that really does not serve us. There's this concept of be do have as opposed to have do be in that latter concept of have do be. It's if i have everything. I need and desire and i do things i take action accordingly. Then i will be the person i want to be flipped. Sat around to be do have how about i be the person i would like to be. And then i will take action from that place. And then as a result i will have the things situations circumstance people in my life that i desire when we are constantly reacting. That's in that do phase. We need to go to that. Be.

consultant
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

03:42 min | 5 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"This is dawn schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the.

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

04:11 min | 6 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Consultant at the shoulder group with when people thrive companies Thrive podcast. I believe I have talked before about the book The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz. And when I read that book years ago the metaphor, he used stayed with me until this very day probably will for the rest of my life. In his book he talks about how each of us is in our own movie. We are the writer director producer main actor or actress. And everyone else around us and in the world is our Supporting Cast. I love this metaphor because I think it's accurate and I took it a step further and I imagine each of us walking down the street and it's as if we are in our individual separate bubbles of our own movies, so we're walking down the street dead in our own movies playing our own movies writing directing producing them. And each of us is a supporting actor or actress. So that means if I pass you on the street, you are supporting actor or actress in my movie. On the other hand for you. I pass you on the street and I am simply a supporting character in your movie. This is why. We make up a whole lot of stories about things. That person hasn't responded to my email in three days. I must have offended him. He must be mad at me. What a jerk he is and we go on and on and on and on because it's about us in our movie The only reason that somebody would not respond would be because of us. It's all about us and we can't help that because we are in that bubble. Often we find out. Oh something happened. Maybe something good. Like they won a trip to Hawaii or perhaps something bad. Most of the time when they come back to us the truth of what they tell us. Greatly differs from the stories. We've made up in our heads. Those stories we have made up in our heads are a result of the movie. We have running not just in the background, but sometimes in the foreground. Again in our movies. We are the writer director producer and main star. And because the movie is continually running we are continually writing the script. So everything that happens needs to be integrated into the script of our movie human nature. We cannot really dead eliminate that from how we operate in the world. what we can do is be conscious of That we have this movie running in our heads and we are making up stories. We are writing the scripts as a result. Let's go to Advanced movie making class and realize other.

producer Don Miguel Ruiz Consultant writer director Hawaii
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

03:11 min | 6 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"This is Don Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the shooter group with when people thrive companies Thrive podcast. Several weeks ago we were doing one of our bi-weekly strategy meetings with one of our corporate clients leadership team and what came out was how often very overwhelmed and stressed they were they were getting ready to head into their busy as quarter. And of course, this is after months and months of doing business differently because of covid-19. What we heard from them ended up becoming pretty commonplace with most of our clients and it was this phenomenon of life every day feeling like they couldn't get to the things that were really important. They were constantly putting out fires responding to emails or calls phone calls unexpected Zoom meetings along with of course regularly scheduled meetings. They felt like they were spending all day in their email and their slack channels and their teens accounts and never getting anything done. We try to introduce the concept of blocking out time to work on those important projects or that off on the business kind of activity and tasks. Shutting off email and the phones during that time. But it's really hard. When you have this concept or you feel like your clients and customers have this expectation that you are available that you are there and ready to serve that you are approachable that you are responsive. As much as this modern world with all of its technology. Can serve us and be helpful for us. I think what happens is we end up becoming a slave to that very same technology that is supposed to be free us up. Since we have our smartphones with our email on it and our smartphones seem to live next to us all the time. Then we are immediately accessible via email or a phone call or a text or some other direct message. Because we have this amazing technology right here in our phones. How many times does it happen to you? Because it has happened to me multiple times that someone sends me an email and.

Don Schuler consultant
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

03:10 min | 6 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"This is Don Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the shooter group with when people thrive companies Thrive podcast. Several weeks ago we were doing one of our bi-weekly strategy meetings with one of our corporate clients leadership team and what came out was how often very overwhelmed and stressed they were they were getting ready to head into their busy as quarter. And of course, this is after months and months of doing business differently because of covid-19. What we heard from them ended up becoming pretty commonplace with most of our clients and it was this phenomenon of life every day feeling like they couldn't get to the things that were really important. They were constantly putting out fires responding to emails or calls phone calls unexpected Zoom meetings along with of course regularly scheduled meetings. They felt like they were spending all day in their email and their slack channels and their teens accounts and never getting anything done. We try to introduce the concept of blocking out time to work on those important projects or that off on the business kind of activity and tasks. Shutting off email and the phones during that time. But it's really hard. When you have this concept or you feel like your clients and customers have this expectation that you are available that you are there and ready to serve that you are approachable that you are responsive. As much as this modern world with all of its technology. Can serve us and be helpful for us. I think what happens is we end up becoming a slave to that very same technology that is supposed to be free us up. Since we have our smartphones with our email on it and our smartphones seem to live next to us all the time. Then we are immediately accessible via email or a phone call or a text or some other direct message. Because we have this amazing technology right here in our phones. How many times does it happen to you? Because it has happened to me multiple times that someone sends me an email and.

Don Schuler consultant
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

05:57 min | 8 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Don Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the shooter group with the People Thrive Companies Thrive podcast. In the last episode I mentioned that I was feeling at capacity. And it came to a head for me. When I realized, I was really tired of my Home Office. Because, of course, for the last five and a half to six months. Bat. is where I have been working now more networking events, no more onsite client trainings. No more meeting with prospects or clients at a restaurant or a cafe or their office. That was all done in Kaput. When I realized that I was having this issue. There is also the sense of. What can I do about it? Yes I can be more creative and that was the point of that last episode. So if you haven't listened to that, you might want to go take a quick listen. Yes, I can be more creative. and. I'm still feeling it capacity in. A can't focused and not motivated. And that day was not a happy day for me. I feel that I'm very self aware I can usually tell. What's going on with me and why? And that usually helps me create a solution. So that evening. was supposed to be our weekly. Watch something we've seen before. While, I quilt and mark. Organizes something photos, desk drawers, files, etc.. And it's a way to keep projects moving. While were having fun watching something we seen before. I was thinking of the different movies we would watch. Now. You have to understand that mark, I are huge movie fans. We have our favorites we have movies we've watched ten fifteen, twenty times. We quote movies all the time we feel like that's part of our language. Quoting movies has become shorthand which can make life easier and maybe even more fun. So it wasn't as if. Our quilting in organizing night was going to be this onerous thing. Every movie I thought of all of our favorites. I just had this..

mark Don Schuler Home Office consultant
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

03:17 min | 9 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Is dawn, Schuler certified trainer and Business Consultant at the Shaw Group with the people, thrive companies thrive podcast. Today I want to talk about having the hard conversations. The reason we call them hard conversations is because they are hard to have. We don't want to have them. And so many of us avoid. Those conversations. We say things like I hate conflict or I avoid conflict at all cost. And that is true. The fact that there is a cost. First? Let's talk about what some of those hard conversations might be about. You're not doing enough. I'm upset by filling the blank. I don't like what you're doing. I don't like how you're treating me. What you're doing. Is Offensive to others. No usually in response to a request. And of course, probably one of the hardest conversations to have in the workplace anyway is. You're fired. Or we're letting you go. Most of those topics didn't sound pleasant they. Hence we avoid. Conversations. We stuff the feelings. We have around them, which makes it worse? I use the analogy of trying to hold a beach ball. Under the pool, water. If, you can imagine that. You're in a swimming pool. Have one of those cheap thin plastic inflated beach falls. And you're trying to pushing in submerged under the water. Of course what happens? It doesn't just resist being submerged. Eventually. If you let it go, it will explode out of the water. Now that's a fun game to play in the pool. But not so fun a- game with one's emotions. That is what happens when we try to push down our feelings. Either logically. Well that doesn't make sense. Rhino doesn't seem to make sense that I'm feeling this way, or it will get better, or I know they didn't mean it rhino. They don't know any better. Our feelings are just as valid. As the logic king out. Of something that's going on. But when we try to resist them. Submerged them so to speak. They will burst out and explode out.

Schuler Shaw Group Business Consultant
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

04:20 min | 10 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"For the <Speech_Female> entire households <Speech_Female> ability to move <Silence> forward. <Speech_Female> From one <Silence> place to the next. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> As head of a department. <Silence> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> You are. <Speech_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Silence> The people. <Speech_Female> On <Silence> your team. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> On Your Staff <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Will make <Speech_Female> much <Speech_Female> more headway. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> If they are allowed. <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Female> Some <Speech_Female> Room <SpeakerChange> <Silence> to stumble and fall. <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Female> Now. This <Speech_Female> does not mean <Speech_Female> that you're expecting <Speech_Female> them to make mistakes. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> that. You're just <Speech_Female> waiting for <Speech_Female> them to have <Speech_Female> a problem <Speech_Female> to do that. Proverbial <Speech_Female> Stumble <Silence> and fall. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> What it means is <Speech_Female> you step <Silence> back? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And <SpeakerChange> give <Speech_Female> them that space <Speech_Female> <Silence> to figure things out. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> If you want <Speech_Female> them to take initiative, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> you <SpeakerChange> can't <Speech_Female> micromanage <Silence> it. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The other benefit <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> empowering your <Silence> staff. <Speech_Female> <Silence> is also. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> That, they <Speech_Female> could come up with solutions. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> That you <Speech_Female> might <SpeakerChange> not <Silence> have. <Speech_Female> You have <Silence> your way to do it. <Speech_Female> It's <Speech_Female> tried and true. <Speech_Female> You know it gets <Speech_Female> results you need. <Speech_Female> You've got a process. <Speech_Female> You have a system <Speech_Female> fantastic. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> beauty of being <Speech_Female> on a team <Speech_Female> and working with people <Speech_Female> who are different from <Silence> you. <Speech_Female> Is that <Speech_Female> they bring <Speech_Female> at entire <Speech_Female> different skillset <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> experiences <Silence> tools. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And a frame of reference <Speech_Female> that <Silence> you just don't have. <Silence> <Speech_Female> That's <Speech_Female> the beauty of collaboration <Speech_Female> <Silence> and teamwork. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And you lose <Silence> that. <Speech_Female> If <Speech_Female> you don't <Speech_Female> allow <Silence> them. <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> opportunity <Speech_Female> to <Silence> show. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Silence> It's difficult. <Speech_Female> <Silence> I know. <Speech_Female> I want <Speech_Female> things to be <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> as <Speech_Female> on time. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And Perfect <Speech_Female> and free <Speech_Female> of mistakes <Silence> as anyone. <Silence> <Speech_Female> But, <Speech_Female> I, also believe <Silence> in <Speech_Female> the success. <Silence> <Silence> Of People. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> doing whatever <Speech_Female> I can <Speech_Female> whether <Speech_Female> it's as a <Speech_Female> manager and leader in <Silence> my own company. <Speech_Female> Or as <Speech_Female> a consultant and <Speech_Female> strategist for <Silence> other, companies. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> To <Speech_Female> allow <Speech_Female> their <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> to be successful <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> as <Silence> they can be. <Music> <Silence> <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> players are <Speech_Female> only a players. <Speech_Female> If you give <Silence> them the space to <Silence> be. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> You <Speech_Female> can't force someone <Silence> to be a player. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Silence> And as I said <SpeakerChange> before. <Speech_Female> <Silence> You can't. <Speech_Female> Make <Speech_Female> a be player <Speech_Female> being a <Silence> player. <Silence> <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> there are a couple of takeaways. <Silence> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> One just <Speech_Female> to reiterate, make <Speech_Female> sure you <SpeakerChange> have the right <Silence> people that have. <Speech_Female> <Silence> person. <Speech_Female> Well <Speech_Female> suited <Speech_Female> for <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Female> role in <Silence> that role. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Silence> To. <Speech_Female> Micromanaging <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> To <Speech_Female> lowered productivity <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and longer timelines. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I could also <Speech_Female> add. <Speech_Female> Stress <Speech_Female> and dysfunction <Speech_Female> in the workplace. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Silence> Three <Speech_Female> empowerment! <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Leads to <Speech_Female> innovation <Speech_Female> creativity. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Collaboration <Silence> <Speech_Female> And better <Silence> teamwork. <Silence> <Silence> For <Speech_Female> <Silence> Empowerment. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Does not mean perfection. <Speech_Female> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> best leaders <Silence> in our <SpeakerChange> opinion. <Silence> <Speech_Female> Are the <Silence> ones. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Who empower <Speech_Female> their <Silence> people? <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> To do <Silence> the best job possible. <Silence> <Speech_Female> Support <Silence> them as needed. <Silence> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> be champions <SpeakerChange> of their <Silence> success. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female>

consultant
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

03:20 min | 10 months ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Chiller certified trainer and business consultant at the shore group. With the people thrive company size podcast. A few weeks ago, my business partner fellow consultant and has been mark. was on a strategy session with one of our clients. He is a leader of a department. With staff underneath him. And as with most managers and leaders. There are challenges that pop up all the time. Luckily. Our client has us on staff so to speak to help work out some of these challenges. Well the topic of this particular call was. How do you empower your staff? You want them to do their jobs. You want them to do them well. You want them to be able to be self, sufficient and independent. But. How do you really make that happen? A manager's job is two-fold. You have to manage the. Which means you are responsible for their results. You may also have your own duties that are above, and beyond the actual managing of others. So, not only. Do you have your own duties to perform and perform well? But you're also tasked with. Overseeing the your team. Department. Does a good job. Performs well and delivers the results they're supposed to. So part of your job is to make sure that your team in staff department. Gets the results that they're supposed to? How do you make that happen? Well some managers. Go the tyrannical micromanaging out. Where they're poor. Little employees cannot make a move unless it is approved. By their manager. We wholeheartedly believe that is extremely inefficient for one. If. You have to oversee everything. He might as well do it yourself. It's also taking time away from the other job. Duties that you are supposed to be performing. Even more importantly. However is the fact that you are not allowing your people. To have the unity. To shine. To be in their own brilliance. To grow and evolve and develop. That is. One of the roles we believe of great leaders and managers. The you do what ever it is you can do. To make sure..

consultant partner
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Bowl This is Dawn Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the shooter when we talk about employee engagement as a two way street and one of our pieces of the pie is communication what we mean okay that is there needs to be communication from both sides it's not just the manager telling the employees what he expects what the zolt he wants our it's also the employees speaking about the conditions of her workplace of priorities needing more guidance in certain areas or less guidance and and certain other ones it's that two-way dance of communication and feedback and it's both sides so for example we know of young employee who is doing an amazing job in her position she's been in the position for about six months she's even gotten employee of the month for two months once in a row and she feels completely overwhelmed she is stressed she leaves most days feeling like she's a failure because there are so many things left undone on her to do list she's being asked if certain projects have been completed and she's trying to get them completed by the deadline Bayer supposed to be completed the problem is things keep getting piled onto her plate and she's not saying anything part of it is because she expects from herself we all have very high expectations of ourselves don't we that she should is be able to get it all done she could work faster more efficiently she could come up with a better system or a process to get it all done and the fact of the matter is it may not be that she can actually get it all done there's a story of when and my husband mark before we got married but we were an item we were we were a thing we were a couple decided to move from California to Maryland and so he drove out here and his car full of stuff and six months later we flew back out to California to get the rest of us from a storage unit we gave ourselves three days to clean out the storage unit and then drive the Penski truck across the United States from California Maryland we had it all planned out wonderfully well the problem is this job that we had lauded three days to was a five day job and no matter how we sliced it no matter how much harder or longer we worked this five day job was going to take five days not three not four but five at one point probably by day two and a half when we realized we aren't finishing this tomorrow even if we stayed up all night worked around the clock there is no way we can finish it we said well maybe it's a four day job and so we get into day three same thing it really doesn't matter if we work all night long and into the next day day four it's not going to get done it really needs to be a five day job and by the end of the five days we got the entire storage unit cleaned out into the truck it was it was a huge endeavor and while that was not a great experience a lot of stress all of it doesn't matter how I have arranged things or scheduled things to complete particular project this project is going to take as long as it takes an just because I've arbitrarily chosen three days because that's the amount of time I thought we had it was a five day job and it was outside of our control now says we had having that experience taught me I only have so much control over hosting duties enrolls it's actually not possible for her to get it all done.

Dawn Schuler consultant five day three days six months five days two months four day
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"And business consultant at shula the group with the people thrive companies thrive podcast today. I wanna talk about the long game versus the short game and you probably would agree with me that if you had to choose. Are you going for the long haul argue going for sustainability. Are you going for lasting into the future. Are you going for the war. Are you just going for how much you can get now the the battle so to speak etc and you'd probably say yeah going for the long game. It's the long game. What does it really are. Your actions really short game actions or long game actions. Give you an example. There is a local company company whose focus was on providing their service to larger companies and of course there's there's more impact when you are working with larger companies and corporations because then you're reaching more people in that company in that corporation and of course it's more lucrative for the business. That was the focus that was the mission. That was the goal all of the sudden uh-huh this company. Let's call them a._b._c. Widgets decided to go after individuals walls and try to sell their services and product to individual employees with the hopes that the employees would then go to management went to the corporate leadership and say hey wouldn't it be great if you provided this great service and product to all the employees employees to me that completely sir shifted the focus from the long game witches his let's go out and make more of an impact create more revenues be able to spread the word about what we're doing in a much bigger way with our long game versus his onesie tuesay one by one short game and let's look at that if you've got this great product or service and you're going to sell it to company for use of all their employees. Aren't you going to spread the word faster. If that company of say two hundred employees they're using it and then they're telling their friends and then of course those friends could go to their own corporate leadership and say hey that other company has this we want this to but but that word spreads much faster as opposed to john smith buys the product or service and yes maybe maybe he tells five friends or tries to talk to management but that's really slow as opposed to two hundred people who are doing that and i have to say. I was really flabbergasted by that very left. Turn shift in <unk> focus and market and maybe it's because it's easier. It's easier to sell to an individual that individual is going to make that sales decision decision that buying decision probably more quickly and easily then accompany on behalf of its entire workforce and i know now our company the shooter group we work with larger companies corporations and organizations. Is it a longer sale cycle absolutely is it sometimes frustrating to get to the decision makers you betcha but when we they do get in the door and we do sell our services. Are we making a bigger impact absolutely and that's one of the reasons why we keep our eye on the long game now every organization whether it's profit or nonprofit needs to be able to be in the black even a nonprofit. They are still running a business. It just looks a little different friend from a for profit business. Every organization's goal is to have their bottom line being the positive live not in the negative and with that being said then there's the focus on the long game. Sometimes there is a short game because you do need to bring in revenues on a quick basis. You just have to make sure that your short game doesn't completely replace place your long game..

shula consultant john smith
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Wow <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> wow <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> this <Speech_Female> is dawn schuler certified <Speech_Female> trainer and <Speech_Female> business consultant <Speech_Female> at the shooter group <Speech_Female> with the people thrive <Speech_Female> companies thrive <Speech_Female> podcast <Speech_Female> <Silence> in today's <Speech_Female> episode and want <Speech_Female> to talk about <Speech_Female> on boarding <Silence> end <Speech_Female> just like the word <Speech_Female> suggests it <Speech_Female> means what you do <Speech_Female> when you bring <Speech_Female> someone on <Speech_Female> board and <Speech_Female> usually this means eight <Speech_Female> new <SpeakerChange> person <Speech_Female> <Silence> in an organization <Speech_Female> <Silence> on <Speech_Female> boarding shows up <Speech_Female> in two <Speech_Female> different areas <Silence> new new hires <Speech_Female> a <Speech_Female> new customers and clients <Speech_Female> <Silence> today were going <Speech_Female> to focus on <Speech_Female> the importance <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> of on boarding <Speech_Female> a new customer <Speech_Female> at a new client <Speech_Female> <Silence> one of <Speech_Female> the reasons <Speech_Female> i <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> am passionate <Speech_Female> about <Speech_Female> strong <Speech_Female> on boarding process <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> is because <Speech_Female> it is they <Speech_Female> first <Speech_Female> customer service experience <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> that this <Speech_Female> now customer <Speech_Female> no longer eight prospect <Speech_Female> <Silence> has with <Speech_Female> your organization position <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Silence> and that sets <Speech_Female> the tone for <Speech_Female> their experience <Speech_Female> <Silence> an <Speech_Female> there <Speech_Female> retention <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Silence> this is true <SpeakerChange> whether <Speech_Female> you are eight <Speech_Female> profit <Speech_Female> for profit it <Speech_Female> company or <Speech_Female> any non profit <Speech_Female> organization <Speech_Female> so when <Speech_Female> i say customer <Speech_Female> <Silence> replace that with <Speech_Female> whatever word <Speech_Female> is appropriate <Speech_Female> so for example <Speech_Female> if you <Speech_Female> are a nonprofit organization <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and the majority <Speech_Female> of the revenue <Speech_Female> <Silence> depends upon <Speech_Female> donors <Speech_Female> then you're customers <Speech_Female>

consultant dawn schuler
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

13:36 min | 1 year ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the shooter group with the people thrive companies thrive podcast. The following is an interview I did with leeann Pacino, author of the new book sit your way to success, which is all about the psychology of sitting what chair you, choose, whether it be in a sales call a meeting a conference a presentation, even family dinners or entertaining at home. It's a fascinating book. And I think you'll enjoy the conversation, I had with leeann and how you can sit your way to success. Hi, this is dawn Schuler, and I'm here with my very good friend and talented colleague, Lianne, Sheena, who is the author of brand new book, sit your way to success. And I am a huge fan. I've read it twice. It's my bible because now before I go into a meeting, I'm gonna read it, and I think it's something needs to be shared with a world. And I'm really excited to have leeann with me today to tell us more about books, so the aunt woke up, thank you, Don. I appreciate you having me on your podcast absolutes honor, because I've listened to some of your other ones, and I know you always say having the right people in the right seat in which seat, they sit in, in a meeting can make a difference to look lever. You are. Love that love that. You're right. Right. See, I have to tell you this. I was in a meeting couple of weeks ago. I read your book twice, and the way it was set up, I was thinking, okay. I don't like the seats that are available. So I took the best one, according to what you share in, in the book, and, and then we needed to Edwards here. So the cheer that I wanted the seat that I wanted got placed and it was amazing how different I felt sitting in the right seat for the dynamics of that particular meeting. And I thought, oh I can't wait till the end because I just felt Mayan tire energy shift now that I read your book. I know why that is I might have had that same feeling but not really recognize it understood why now I am seeing y so leeann toast a little bit about the book. Why, why might think that this is such a gold mine? What's in it? Well, I the reason I wrote the book I started in tier designs, I've always been in the corporate world helping people with different companies in designing they're office spaces. And of course, every office space is going to have a meeting space of some type, whether it's a conference, a large multipurpose, small, small, conference rooms and private offices. So I I always designed all of that in early on in my career. And especially for designers, they don't teach us. What is what I discovered more input in the book, so, you know, you design these spaces and not ever really you'd think about how they're gonna use them, but not the full purpose, and then I went into sales, and in my company creatively communicate, it's all about how you say it in the reason, being is in sales have gone through a lot of sales training and they don't you know, in the in the process. It's all excellent. They don't teach you how to say it in a specially. How just where you sit in accordance with your prospect can make a difference in your sale and started to learn this through trial in air in the nest studying body, language you learn even more, I thought where is all of this is not in one spot in its things that we do every day in every sales in every meeting, and yet, we do it. Subconsciously unconsciously in it can affect the outcome. So that was kinda reason where what I would mention it to some people like, oh, that's brilliant. Never thought about that, and doing more and more research and just pulling it all together. And putting it in one place. So I've had a lot of fun. Putting it together as well. And it's just things like tell people, you know, sales the arc in science of sales is difficult is can be fun can be frustrating. And when you sit down with a client just where you sit if I can get you twenty percent closer to the close of a sale, then why not pay attention where you sit is if. I think I can get you on the path to success before you ever start your first word in essence. So it's like sitting closer to success. Yes. Oh, I like that. One too can also. That's a great one. So is this primarily just for sales people? No, I pulled together. There's it starts with conference meeting. So if your leader in a company or even a small business owner, you're going to have different conference meetings, and it's, it's one chapter is just on that I have one on sales meetings, and then what about large event meeting? So if you're a speaker, you can utilize a lot of information when you're tending, there's also some key key tips in there. And even if you're a teacher, it's how we present in a room. So there's different research that I found as well that where you sit in a classroom where your student does will have an impact on their learning potential in the retention, and then go into private offices in a lot of people don't realize that their furniture is the non verbal language that before people ever enter their office away. It's arranged enough for it. South gives away their leadership style, unless they heir to the office in heaven. Say, but in most companies that I've worked with over the last thirty plus years. A lot of people have say or they're gonna personalize it so they in their leadership style. They send nonverbal languages again before meeting ever starts, whether it's with an employee or a potential prospect on or potential employee of bender. They're sending these signals and a lot of times, we don't think about what signals or sending and we can do it with the furniture and the way, we're going to meet with the people, and then I go into restaurant meetings, so people still will have some restaurant means if they take a prospect out. And then I just threw a chapter discount have some fun about homemade home entertaining. Is it affects everything of where you sit in accordance in your purpose of your meeting? Absolutely. And enjoy your book. I just I didn't realize that there were so many applications. Right. And, and really I mean now this is in my head, and so it really is effecting time. I said, like, okay, what's the best place? What's the purpose? I think that's one of the brilliant things about your book, is you really delve into what's the purpose of the meeting was the purpose of this as and like you said, what you said, this is how I took it in the tone that you want to convey love by DEA of if you're a manager, and you're having meetings in your office kind of leader, what kind of manager argue and how you are arrangement of, of your office, your setup chairs can either support that or hinder it. And if you're not. Unaware of it can be detrimental yet any. No, you can walk into office politics, if you don't know the office, politics, actually a conference meeting any pending upon size of. I've sold some furniture whether some really large conference room. So typically, they're probably six eight all ten to twelve in that range, there, some that are even larger where you may have twenty to thirty people in a room in some of these large corporations. And, you know, the politics are really shown in bows, Europe, in the DC area and government is still the deep polit political structure is very strong. I'm here in Austin, Texas, and it's interesting all the, the most of the clients. Now call on are more the startups more technology and they, they have their work environment. More typical to what you'd expect Google or Facebook. So it's more that open environment airy collaborative it's a whole different environment. And when I started thirty years ago in Minneapolis with IBM and three m you know, the big Blue's that everything was very structured, and you want that authoritative in von manager. Her and boy, if you got that corner office men, you arrived, and you wanted everyone to mental it out. It's, you know, we have some CEO's, I wanna sit right in the middle of all their employees in its wide open environment. So it's just interesting. The difference and all of that conveys in the culture, I know that you, you understand cultural, the culture of, of different businesses and some, some people thrive in that and some don't and again where they sit in accordance to that can make a difference. For was lifting to you reminded me of a TV show called lie to me, and I think it was on and maybe early to mid two thousands, and I can't think of the, the guy's name that was the main dive he studied, he called micro expressions. He could tell if somebody was was lying or the truth for expressions with one episode where they were, they were dealing with a Japanese company, and he waited as they all came in to see some of those politics dynamics based on where they sat kind of this deference, they might you know, because we're going to defer to the, to the manager the leader in this meeting, and that just made me think of that's Utah, top gang made me think of that particular episode in, in light of me. And it made me think why now I wanna go. Back and watch it. See if there's anything about seating, and placement because what you're saying, as you could observe a room a meeting and based on, perhaps where people unconsciously subconsciously take their seats might reveal something about where they are the pecking order, how they feel is that would you agree with that? I definitely agree with it. And I go into some of that in the book so people can understand some of that. And by the way, I love that show lie to me because the micro expressions as you're talking to try to remember the gentleman who started all that in, in the name is escaping me, 'cause I've done a lot of reading and research on that to any goes into the body language. And so, when you walk into a conference room, you know, if you're the leader in, you're sitting what I call the power position. So at the end of the table, a typical rectangle table, you're gonna be sitting on the short end and you can see everyone and depending upon the length of the table where people sit if they don't have a sign position. Where they sit also reveals a lot on a personality. So you and I are certified in personality science. So we know that the people who say, if they said in the middle of the table, they wanna be amongst their friends. They, you know they're going to be the big team player and that tells us something about their personnel. They don't wanna be out front. They just wanna be the team player and what can't we just all get along? We know. If you have the person who, you know, they're really strong thinker their base more on the facts in the knowledge in they want to observe in. They talk that much 'cause they're more observing in, when there's a point to be made they'll make it if it doesn't make sense, they won't so there if I'm the leader sitting at one end. They're probably going to be sitting towards the other end. They don't need to be by me. They're just gonna kinda listen. They probably they don't need that the strong. I contact and if you have the person who is more out front, we like to call that action person, the, they're more talent. They need to be heard. They're gonna sit closer to the leader. And especially if they want to be the next leader in the company, they're going to be sitting to the right or the left of that person that power position. And then if the if it's someone that is more into organization, and systems, while depending upon their purpose and role of at meeting, they're going to be probably more strategic of where they sit in probably want to sit closer to the leader and be able to support them in that regard or they might. On the other end because what's interesting too, is depending upon your company politics, if you have a, the main leader on one end of the table, and then on the other end, they're supportive now you really have this balance in leadership, and the two can help the meeting flow and depending upon if you want to persuade on new ideas, they can help that in the conference. Meaning is things that maybe you don't think about where you want people to sit, and especially if you know you have someone that is going to be against your idea. You're gonna have opposition. So, you know, I also think of been in city council or in some of those places where, if you if you know, you're gonna have some of that to deal within your meeting while where you strategically sift those people is going to affect the way the outcome is gonna is gonna Kerr because if you haven't defensive in there, they're already fighting against each other. When they sit down before they say a word it's back to sport. Support your end goal. Well so there's not to manipulate. That's not. Necessarily the purpose..

leeann Pacino dawn Schuler Don sales training consultant Lianne Edwards DEA Austin Minneapolis business owner Sheena Kerr Google Europe Texas IBM CEO Utah
"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"consultant" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"This is dawn Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the shooter group with the people thrive companies thrive podcast. A few episodes ago, I talked about the fit between an individual and his or her environment. And in that episode gave several examples of what alignment looks like what misalignment looks like that. There could be a misalignment with the individual in the environment or with the environment and the individual. Well, one of the things that I mentioned is that there are many factors that make up an individual's environment, and that that concept of all the different factors that make up an environment could be a podcast episode unto itself, hence this episode. So when we think about all the different factors that make up one's environment. It's almost an endless list because we I think of an environment as the physical space an individual is in, but it goes far far beyond that from intangible potential factors. So let's start from the inside and work. Our way out I'm going to give you as many examples and concepts as I can. But by no means am I going to name them all. I bet I will miss them. And that you will be able to identify some things that I've missed, but this is just a list of some of the things that that come up in an obvious manner. Some other things that we hear the Shula group. Excel in looking at different factors, different environmental factors, and others. Are just commonsense. So we're going to start from the inside out. So you have an individual and his environment consists of his internal state, whether he feels well or ill what's going on in his mind. Is he distracted is he engaged? And so you look at things like physical health, you look at things like what's going on in his personal life that may be taking up brain space. So his internal environment can cover the Kamat from mental too. To physical within his own body in mind. Now, let's expand a little bit outward and think of him sitting at his desk in a typical standard office while he sitting at his desk. There's the chair there's the desk, there's probably all sorts of equipment. His computer his monitors his phone printer. How far does he have to walk to get to the printer that all is part of the environment as well? Is he comfortable in the chair in which he sitting is the desk at the right height? All of these things contribute to his immediate physical environment outward environment, we should say. And then we look at things at mate make his job easier or maybe not so much easier. Does he have to monitors three mothers have a stand up desk is his computer? Keyboard one that he likes I say that because my daughter just came home for spring break, and she was doing something on my computer in my office. And she said, oh, I hate your keyboard? How do you tape on this? And I feel the same way about my husband, Mark's keyboard? He has one of those divided keyboards. I can't stand it. But those all contribute to that environment right about a mouse is there is an ergonomic mouse. If the person has to use a phone a lot is there a headset to that? The person doesn't have to creek the neck to to hold the phone. Is there a speaker phone what you know, what what are those equipment pieces of the office in how're those on? Then let's expand a little bit out from the desk in the chair and look at what is his office. Is it a partial cubicle wall? Is it an actual office? With Florida's ceiling walls are their windows in this office space is he allowed to have personal items pictures of his family award certificates a plant little Chachi, figurines,

dawn Schuler Mark consultant Shula Florida
"consultant" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"consultant" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Seventy four flu melania and it just took so we served with the marine corps sixty one hundred seventy to any drill instructor and then he became a consultant for apocalypse now and and that got him in the movie stuff and then he was a consultant in eighty seven i guess is when they did full metal jacket by reich as eighty seven i think or knows releasing a seven so maybe it was working with them in eighty six or eighty five and he was a consultant but the different folks that were looking at are using for the drill sergeant sucked and i got two stores the one i originally saw said that in in the course of hiring the marine crudes we interviewed hundreds of guys we line them up all it didn't improvisation of the first meeting with the drill instructor structure oh but here's the thing they kubrick said no i don't want you to be in front of the camera i just want you to be a consultant for us so then he took he he recorded himself on a demo tape having tennis balls thrown at him and then yelling insults income in commands every people and that's what kubrick saw that new change the mindset.

marine corps instructor consultant kubrick tennis