35 Burst results for "Constantinople"

Who Was Vlad the Impaler

Your Brain on Facts

04:00 min | Last month

Who Was Vlad the Impaler

"A time when I didn't know that Vlad. The Impaler was thought to be the inspiration for Bram Stoker's genre-defining vampire Dracula hop in your home school bus police box or phone booth with aerial antenna and let's go back to 15th century will lakia a region of modern-day Romania. That was then the southern Edge over to the province of Transylvania. Our flad was flat the third glad the second his father was given the nickname dracul by his fellow Crusade nights in the order of the Dragon. They were tasked with defeating the Ottoman Empire will lakia was sandwiched between the Ottomans and Christian Europe and so became the sight of constant bloody conflict without looking it up. I'm going to guess that the order of the Dragon failed since the Ottoman Empire was still standing in nineteen twenty-three. Dracul translated to dragon in Old Romanian. But the modern meeting is more like Devil add an a to the end to denote son of and you've got flat Dracula at age eleven flat and his seven-year-old brother Raju went with their father on a diplomatic Mission into the Ottoman Empire. How'd it go? Not too good. The three were taken hostage their captors told Vlad the second that he could be released if his two sons remained behind home since it was really their only option. He agreed the boys would be held prisoner for five years one account holds that they were tutored in The Art of War science and philosophy. Other accounts say that they were subjected to torture and brutal abuse by the time Vlad the second return to Allah Kiya. He was overthrown in a coup and he and his eldest son murdered shortly. Thereafter Vlad. The third was released with a taste for violence and a vendetta against the Ottomans to regain his family's power and make a name for himself. He threw a banquet for hundreds of members of rival families on the menu was wine meet sweetbreads and gruesome vicious murder off. The guests were stabbed not quite to death then impaled on large spikes. This would become vlad's signature move leading to his moniker Vlad the Impaler, but it wasn't the only arrow in his quiver. Facing an army three times the size of his he ordered his men to infiltrate their territory poison the wells and burn the crops. He also hired disease dead-end to go in and infect the enemy defeated combatants were often treated to disemboweling flaying Alive boiling and of course impalement. Basically, you turn your enemy into a kabob and let them die slowly and just as importantly conspicuously vlad's reputation spread leading to a mixing of Legend in fact like that. He wants took dinner in a veritable Forest of spikes. We do know that in June of 1462. He ordered 20,000 defeated Ottomans to be impaled. It's a scale that's hard to even imagine when the Ott's in Sultan mehmed II Came Upon the Carnage he and his men turned on their heels and fled back to Constantinople. You would think flawed was on the road to Victory but shortly thereafter. He was forced into Exile and imprisoned in Hungary. He took a stab no pun intended on regaining will lakia fifteen years later, but he and his troops were ambushed and killed according to a contemporary

Vlad Dracul Bram Stoker Transylvania Romania Raju Europe Sultan Mehmed Ii OTT Constantinople Hungary
It's the Little Things

Your Brain on Facts

06:39 min | 2 months ago

It's the Little Things

"For want of a nail, the shoe was lost for want of a shoe. The horse was lost for want of a horse. The rider was lost for want of a writer the message was lost for want of the message the battle was lost for want of a battle, the kingdom was lost. Small things can have reverberating effects on history both good and bad. In fourteen fifty three, the great walled city of Constantinople fell it had withstood sieges for eleven hundred years. It had held off fire from the then state of the art cannons for weeks. The Byzantine said even Ford soldiers trying to tunnel under the wall autumn Turks were finally able to overrun the great city because someone left the door open. One of the many gates in the fourteen miles of wall had been left open during the night and the Ottomans flooded in. Killing Constantine the eleventh in the battle and bringing an end to the eastern Roman Empire. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. It was a freezing Christmas night in Trenton. New Jersey during the revolutionary war. The English Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall. Commander. Of a mercenary infantry regiment of fourteen hundred has seen soldiers from Germany sat down to a good supper and an evening of entertainment. He and his men were celebrating their recent victories over George Washington's volunteer army, and of course, the Christmas holiday. Safe from the bitter cold and the pelting sleet inside a wealthy merchants home that they had commandeered. They relaxed safe in the assumption that no one in their right mind would possibly try to cross the Delaware River at night in a blinding winter storm. Someone challenged role to a game of chess, and before long he was deep in tactics and strategy. There was a knock at the door. And exhausted young. Messenger boy came in bearing a note from loyalist farmer. It's important to remember that about a third of colonists still consider themselves to be British and didn't want the revolution. Raw paid the boy little notice took the note and put it in his coat pocket without opening it. That pocketed piece of paper would cost him and the war effort nearly. Two hours earlier and ten miles away. Washington's men had begun being ferried across the icy Delaware. River. It took over ten hours to get all twenty four hundred men over to the New Jersey side. The conditions were so adverse five men froze to death. Then began the arduous march to Trenton in the dark. The plan had been to attack the town from all sides before dawn, but the troops didn't arrive until eight am. During the attack which lasted only an hour forty of the German. Henson's were killed and the remaining thousand surrendered. Colonel was mortally wounded. When his body was found the unopened note warning of Washington's crossing was still in his pocket. If role had read it, he would surely have had his gross of professional soldiers prepared. He allowed his pride and the weather to lull him into thinking his enemy was not a threat. Had he won the battle he may well have killed George Washington James Madison James Monroe John Marshall Aaron Burr and Andrew. Hamilton The. Second, most common premise in alternate history circles behind what if Germany won World War Two is what if the south one the American civil war? Two pieces of paper dropped in a farmer's field almost brought that about. Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Whose statue in the middle of my hometown of Richmond, Virginia has recently been given the historical context. It's so sorely needed. In the form of tons of. Graffiti. Issued Special Order one ninety one during the Maryland campaign before the Battle of Antietam. In the order lead divided his army, delineating the routes and roads to be taken and the timing for the units to reconvene. Adjutant Robert H Chilton penned copies of the letter endorsed them in Lee's name. Staff. Officers distributed the copies to various confederate generals. General Thomas Stonewall Jackson in turn copied the document for one of his subordinates, major general, D H Hill who was to exercise independent command as the rearguard. A Union soldier Corporal Barton W Mitchell of the twenty seven. Th Indiana volunteers found two pieces of paper bundled with three cigars as he marched across a farm in Maryland an area recently vacated by Hill and his men after they had camped there. The order provided the Union army with valuable information, concerning the army of Northern Virginia's movements and campaign plans. Upon receiving lease lost order. Major General George McClellan leading the Union army of the Potomac proclaimed. Here is a piece of paper with which if I cannot whip Bob Ely, I will be willing to go home. He immediately moved his army in hopes of foiling lease battle plans. When Lee heard a copy of special order one, ninety, one was missing he. He knew his scattered army was vulnerable and rushed to reunite his units Antietam Creek near Sharp's Berg. Lee's troops arrived tired hungry and many were sick. The Battle of Antietam, would go down as the bloodiest battle of the American civil war with casualties recorded as twenty, three, thousand dead wounded, which was usually as good as dead or unaccounted for over the course of the half day battle. That's nearly two thousand soldiers in our one every two seconds. When night fell both sides ceased fire together, their dead and wounded. The next day Lee began the painstaking job of moving his ravage troops back Virginia. Here, some scholars argue another solitary decision had far reaching consequences. Despite having the advantage. McClellan. Allowed Lee to retreat without resistance. From his point of view, he'd accomplished his mission by forcing Lee's troops from Maryland and preventing confederate win on union soil. President, Lincoln however thought McClellan missed a great opportunity to potentially end the war three years earlier than it ultimately would.

Robert E. Lee Army Major General George Mcclellan Maryland Union Army New Jersey Trenton Virginia Antietam Constantinople Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall George Washington Ford Delaware River Writer Antietam Creek General Thomas Stonewall Jacks Washington
"constantinople" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:17 min | 3 months ago

"constantinople" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Today's musician was one of the only known women to have composed music during the medieval period she was one of the first medieval composers whose work survives to present day and can be understood and performed by modern musicians. . A brilliant composer poet and him Niagara for her work is still performed regularly in the Orthodox Church, , which includes twenty three of her hymns in its liturgy. . Please welcome casio of Constantinople. . Casio was born around the year eighty, , five and Constantinople to a wealthy family of some influence. . We know little about her early life. . What we do know is that she was considered an exceptionally beautiful and brilliant young woman? ? Casio was first recorded by Byzantine historians as taking part in what was known as the bride show. . This was an event at which Byzantine emperors a royalty would choose a wife from amongst the most eligible women in the empire giving the winning participant Golden Apple as a token of victory. . The bride show that Casio attended thrown for the young soon to be emperor theophilus who was immediately captivated by Casio when Theophilus approached Cassiopeia, , he stated that through a woman came forth the baser things to which casio quickly replied and through a woman came forth the better things. . The office was so taken aback by Cassius biting rebuke that he rejected her in favor of another woman the Adora after losing her chance to become empress of Byzantium Cassius founded an Abbey Eight, forty , three right outside of Constantinople and served as its first abbess. . Many historians have suggested the Cassius move into monastic life was a response to her rejection from the office. . But some modern scholars have revisited that assumption. . And now believe that it was likely a reflection of the intense religious fervor of the day combined with Cassius desire to have access to the books and centers of learning that were part and parcel of Byzantine religious. . Life. . Over the subsequent two decades living at the monastery Cassius spent significant writing spiritual poetry and him no music to accompany her poems. . Though it's unclear where she learned musical composition, , she wrote nearly two hundred and fifty hymns over her lifetime. . Fifty of those, him , still survive twenty three of which continue to be included even today in the liturgy of the Orthodox Church? ? Casio also wrote nearly eight hundred epigrams, , many of which are examples of nomex verse. . Cassius, , most famous him WHO's the him? ? CASSIA is traditionally chanted on holy Wednesday in Orthodox churches around the world. . It's considered one of the hardest Byzantine chance to perform because it requires an incredibly wide vocal range. . Legend has it that the Emperor Theophilus years later wishing to see Casio one more time went to the monastery but was met by her empty cell supposedly, , she was actually hiding in her closet when he saw the him of Cassie on her table halfway finished the office added one line of his own. . The story goes that Casio chose to keep it in his honor and it remains in the him today. . While Theophilus may have maintained affection for Cassiopeia that didn't stop him from persecuting her. . The office was a fierce iconoclast meaning that he completely rejected the use or veneration religious icons iconography in the Byzantine. . Casio on the other hand was a defender of the use of icons for her perceived insolence. . Casio was whipped with a lash. . Still. . She refused to change her mind saying I hate silence when it is time to speak. . Towards the end of her life, , Casio. . Left the Abbey and traveled to Italy for a brief period before eventually settling on the island of Casio's in. . Greece. . She died there sometime between eight, , sixty, , seven, , and eight ninety. . Following her death Casio was canonized by the Orthodox. . Church. . As Saint Cassini also known as Cassini the him NOG

Casio Cassius monastery Cassius Orthodox Church Jenny Kaplan Constantinople Theophilus Cara Dot Com Saint Cassini Niagara Manica manteca weekly CAPLAN Apple Italy facebook Adora Instagram Greece
Musicians: Kassia of Constantinople

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:18 min | 3 months ago

Musicians: Kassia of Constantinople

"Today's musician was one of the only known women to have composed music during the medieval period she was one of the first medieval composers whose work survives to present day and can be understood and performed by modern musicians. A brilliant composer poet and him Niagara for her work is still performed regularly in the Orthodox Church, which includes twenty three of her hymns in its liturgy. Please welcome casio of Constantinople. Casio was born around the year eighty, five and Constantinople to a wealthy family of some influence. We know little about her early life. What we do know is that she was considered an exceptionally beautiful and brilliant young woman? Casio was first recorded by Byzantine historians as taking part in what was known as the bride show. This was an event at which Byzantine emperors a royalty would choose a wife from amongst the most eligible women in the empire giving the winning participant Golden Apple as a token of victory. The bride show that Casio attended thrown for the young soon to be emperor theophilus who was immediately captivated by Casio when Theophilus approached Cassiopeia, he stated that through a woman came forth the baser things to which casio quickly replied and through a woman came forth the better things. The office was so taken aback by Cassius biting rebuke that he rejected her in favor of another woman the Adora after losing her chance to become empress of Byzantium Cassius founded an Abbey Eight, forty three right outside of Constantinople and served as its first abbess. Many historians have suggested the Cassius move into monastic life was a response to her rejection from the office. But some modern scholars have revisited that assumption. And now believe that it was likely a reflection of the intense religious fervor of the day combined with Cassius desire to have access to the books and centers of learning that were part and parcel of Byzantine religious. Life. Over the subsequent two decades living at the monastery Cassius spent significant writing spiritual poetry and him no music to accompany her poems. Though it's unclear where she learned musical composition, she wrote nearly two hundred and fifty hymns over her lifetime. Fifty of those, him still survive twenty three of which continue to be included even today in the liturgy of the Orthodox Church? Casio also wrote nearly eight hundred epigrams, many of which are examples of nomex verse. Cassius, most famous him WHO's the him? CASSIA is traditionally chanted on holy Wednesday in Orthodox churches around the world. It's considered one of the hardest Byzantine chance to perform because it requires an incredibly wide vocal range. Legend has it that the Emperor Theophilus years later wishing to see Casio one more time went to the monastery but was met by her empty cell supposedly, she was actually hiding in her closet when he saw the him of Cassie on her table halfway finished the office added one line of his own. The story goes that Casio chose to keep it in his honor and it remains in the him today. While Theophilus may have maintained affection for Cassiopeia that didn't stop him from persecuting her. The office was a fierce iconoclast meaning that he completely rejected the use or veneration religious icons iconography in the Byzantine. Casio on the other hand was a defender of the use of icons for her perceived insolence. Casio was whipped with a lash. Still. She refused to change her mind saying I hate silence when it is time to speak. Towards the end of her life, Casio. Left the Abbey and traveled to Italy for a brief period before eventually settling on the island of Casio's in. Greece. She died there sometime between eight, sixty, seven, and eight ninety. Following her death Casio was canonized by the Orthodox. Church. As Saint Cassini also known as Cassini the him NOG

Casio Cassius Constantinople Monastery Cassius Orthodox Church Theophilus Niagara Apple Saint Cassini Greece Italy Adora Cassie
The Plague of Justinian I

5 Minutes in Church History

04:20 min | 4 months ago

The Plague of Justinian I

"Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history. On this episode, we're talking about a very dark moment in church history and history the plague of Justinian. The first first let's talk about just in the first he was born in four eighty seven. He came to be Roman emperor in five, twenty seven and he reigned until his death in five sixty three at the time of becoming Roman emperor the barbarian tribes controlled much of what was the Roman Empire The ostrogoths controlled Rome in the boot of Italy that extends down into the Mediterranean Sea the visigoths controlled Spain, the vandals controlled what was formerly North Africa the Roman empire was a fraction and a mere shadow of its former self just Indian ruled from capital at Constantinople. He was determined to bring back the glory that once was the Roman Empire. To do so he would need to launch military campaigns to the east into the Iberian Peninsula to the south and the vandals to the West and the ostrogoths into the north. He had to launch military campaign literally in every direction. And he was very successful after a decade or so of military campaigns warfare. Then in five forty, two Justin faced a new invisible enemy. Well, we'll get to that in a moment first a few more points on just in the first, he is known as giving us the Codex Justinian us it's also sometimes called the Corpus juris civilised. This is the body of civil law. Someone took the time to count it. It's somewhere around the neighborhood one million words. It was a massive rule of law to govern the Roman Empire contains laws on criminal and civil matters on trade, but it also controls laws regarding heresy and Orthodoxy, and even laws regulating paganism. Another thing about just in the first is that he is the creator of the Huggy Sophia he was not the architect though he had significant conversations with the architect and was very influential in the plans but it was under his watch that the Haganah Sophie was built from five, thirty, two to five, thirty seven the old basilica had fallen during riots in that city and just in use the occasion to build what was the biggest church the Roman Empire ever saw its length was two, hundred, sixty, nine feet. Its width was two hundred and forty feet and extended a height of one hundred and eighty feet. It was a massive structure. The HAGIA Sofia. Well, that's just any in the first. Now, briefly on his plague in five, forty to the bubonic plague broke out. This is the your cineas pestis. What came to be known as the black plague. It would come again in the thirteen hundreds and it would manifest throughout the Middle Ages and the time of the reformation. Back in five, forty, two, it is believed to have started in Egypt. This plague then carried on merchant ships too many nations and to three continents. Africa Europe Asia it is credited as the first pandemic in recorded history. It brought all of the efforts of Justinian one to a stop it ended the military campaigns devastated the economy. It ended up killing millions at its height. It would take five thousand lives a day in the city of Constantinople alone. Even. Just any in the first contract. Did it. But he survives one of the stories from that time PRA copious notes of the effect of the plague on the people it caused them to shake off the unrighteousness of their daily lives and practice the duties of religion with diligence but sadly, he also notes. That as soon as they were rid of the disease, they went right back to their old ways. Well, that's just any in the first, and that's the justinian plague five, forty two

Roman Empire Justinian Iberian Peninsula Hagia Sofia Mediterranean Sea Rome Constantinople Spain North Africa Africa Italy Justin Egypt Sophie
Greece condemns Turkey's decision to convert Hagia Sophia into mosque

NPR News Now

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Greece condemns Turkey's decision to convert Hagia Sophia into mosque

"The top leaders of Greece are slamming. Decision to turn the highest Sophia Museum into a Mosque Is considered the greatest example of Byzantine Christian architecture in the World Joanna. Kakissis reports from Athens on Greece's response to Turkey's move. I guess a Fiat. which the Greeks Call I guess of? Yeah was built fifteen hundred years ago as an Orthodox Christian Cathedral Greek Prime Minister Kitty Echoes. Mitsotakis said turning this museum back into a mosque would damage Turkey's relations with Greece in the Western world. The Ottomans converted I. Associate to a mosque and fourteen fifty three when they conquered the. The Byzantine city of Constantinople and changed its name to Istanbul Mustafa Kemal Ataturk who founded modern Turkey, a secular nation ordered idea Sofia's conversion to a museum eighty five years ago for NPR news I'm Joanna Kakissis in

Greece Sophia Museum Turkey Istanbul Mustafa Kemal Ataturk Byzantine Christian Joanna Kakissis Orthodox Christian Cathedral Kitty Echoes Prime Minister Constantinople Athens Sofia NPR Mitsotakis
Turkey reconverts Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into a mosque

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:08 min | 5 months ago

Turkey reconverts Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into a mosque

"Eight acres court is expected to announce today that the conversion of Istanbul's world-famous argue severe into a museum almost ninety years ago, it was awful. The decision would pave the way for the building's Restoration Mosque and we'll represent a victory of sorts for president recipe type one, but it may cause anger elsewhere, including in the Kremlin and UNESCO HQ, joining us on the line now is Hannah Lucinda Smith is stumble correspondent of the. Times Hello Hannigan off new thanks for being with US I. Guess this was what we had perhaps predicted nevertheless. Oh, that's not gonNA. Stop a number of people being pretty disappointed with the outcome. Yeah well. Absolutely I mean affair is such a symbol, not just in Turkey or not just in the region in the whole world at points it was built in the sixth century. It was the biggest cathedral in the world. It was the seat of eastern Crescenzi for more than a Millennium and then it's really been kind of the symbol of the struggle for the soul of Istanbul. I guess when the autumns took control of the city in fourteen, fifty three, they converse into a mosque, and then when Kemal Ataturk the first president of the secular republic. Took over the country he then. Signed an order basically deconsecrated intending into museum in nine, hundred thirty four, and that's the status it. It's hard since then, but it is such a powerful symbol for Muslims. Christians and also for the Turks who are really bondage this idea of a second second they sit. It's kind of one of the ultimate symbols of their secular country. Just when you're out, and about as it sounds like you are indeed right now, is this one of these things where people are talking about it, and it's upsetting people, or is it one of these strange things? Actually seems to be much more stark much more controversial through the prism of I'm in London or etc. People looking on from Moscow which maybe we'll come to in a in a minute it does it excise people out in about. March she stood in the courtyard. Safia right now. It is a few Tori style. It's actually quite quite mean that's mostly because of the current virus pandemic coming normally at this time of year that would be crowded with tourists actually took his most visited tourist attraction, but I think the interesting thing. Is that inside Turkey this debate? That's not new. It's been going on for a couple. Couple, of decades, it's a question that sort of comes around quite six. In fact, you know I've I've been in Turkey for seven years. Now is the ton. This is come up in my time here and so there is this of feeling of fatigue I you know this is just the same policy policy again but I think it's undeniable, the for certain positive the Paul is. Very, much behind prison on the move is part of the society would be seen as. A big victory pick symbolic victory, but I think in terms of the kind of. The opposition to it. A lot of that comes from outside country. As you mentioned that the star obviously the Greek government's in holy. They still see Istanbul Constantinople. This is the as the center of Greek Orthodox also the Russian Orthodox Patriarch earlier this week, voiced his objection and of course UNESCO Ted. This is a world heritage sites listed by UNESCO. That's partly because of the The mosaics that were uncovered once this was ten years. In the nineteen th that is. On. The big questions is of course. If this is ten back into a mosque, what will happen to those mosaics depict Christ pizza version married picked him of the apostles. You know seen in, Islam, FIT Is is not allowed inside mosques. So this is the kind of places where the real objections are coming from, but it's quite interesting I'm you know it's? Really doesn't feel like much. Is happening at the moment here high? Sophie, let's see. We got the announcement in June a couple of hours. That's what we're expecting so. Possibly something will happen after that, but it's kind of. Yeah. It's still the same very peaceful, very unique. Is indeed sort of an eerie call just on some of those other international stakeholders. And he'll be watching on. We mentioned already you mentioned the Russian. Orthodox Patriarch of course. What about the relationship mean does this tell us anything about the relationship between assemble in Moscow more broadly, maybe more politically because there's various other sort of proxy disagreements agreements. There's other places Libya that seemed to sort of muddy. The waters is this. Does this need to be to be viewed in that context in your view? Show, I think the relationship with Russia is actually the one thing that might give president or pause for thought on this now what we see as I said before the Greeks are. Very opposed to this the US. State Department might POMPEII stems as well, but you know that's kind of old hat fred when he doesn't really care about. Stoking rows with Greece and with the US. Because he's got huge amounts of disagreements with those countries anyway, but when it comes to Russia, it's been quite an interesting situation in Russia. Turkey for the past five years on one level as you say in Libya also in Syria they're. Backing opposing forces, but at the same time, the personal relationship between two President Putin has gone incredibly close, and in other ways. Russia has been backing sick. I guess trying to woo. Tick to a certain extent away from its more traditional allies in the West, so we've seen for example side of the one hundred defense system. From Russia Turkey we've seen many many pets meetings in about trade and defense mutual security between. One impeach him now. The question is if this. Decision goes ahead and the conversion goes ahead then how much opposition will come from from the Kremlin? Clearly, the Patriarch Russian Orthodox Patriarch. Expressed his opposition. That's to be expected, but we also know that religion plays a big part in Russian. Politics today, so would it. Would it carry on further? The featured does it were? Would President Putin be the next person's kind of expresses displeasure, and how would that affect the relationship Tweeden's? I stopped really great to speak to you and thanks for reporting for us right from the scene of this Hannah Lucinda Smith In estan standard joining us on the briefing Monaco Twenty Four.

Turkey Russia President Trump President Putin Istanbul Hannah Lucinda Smith United States Patriarch Russian Orthodox Pat Russian Orthodox Patriarch Moscow Libya Restoration Mosque Kemal Ataturk Unesco Hq Crescenzi Istanbul Constantinople London Tori State Department Paul
Predicting the Decade and Distributing Conferences

Talking Machines

09:58 min | 10 months ago

Predicting the Decade and Distributing Conferences

"You are listening to talk machines. I'm Katherine Gorman Neal Learns and I know it's a little bit belated Neil but happy new year. Happy new decade if you believe decades does come from complexity about zero counting depending on. Whether you're a Fortran or C I. I don't know how do you and happy do you decorate. Yeah absolutely and try to see whichever exactly but you know however you counted. It's a nice. It's a nice artificially artificially imposed time to think about what this last unit of time has meant and what is next unit of time might hold so I would love to do the traditional navel-gazing commute period of time kickoff that journalists love to do which is thinking about what we might see in this next unit of time in this next decade. And you know Oh is informed by what we've seen in this last decade. I think that we've seen this kind of reflection right. Now is so important because I think we have seen humongous change not only early in the the research and what has been technically accomplished but the way that the practitioner community works and the implications of that four four things going forward. So what do you think. Neil if you had to choose one sort of hallmark of what you think signals what we can see in the future around how work gets done. I think there's lots of lots of crystal ball gazing about. What kind of work is going to get done? And that's very exciting. I Yeah I think the how that work is going to get done and how we talk about how that work gets done is going to have a huge impact on what problems picked up in solved so it is appropriate that we choose an arbitrary number based on number fingers we have only Chand for period of reflection it makes the universe make sense with tens right. Yeah Yeah I B as being an amazing decade in terms of adoption machine learning techniques. That's absolutely clear and I guess if I look back to twenty ten I don't think I would have full cost tool that. We would be where we are now a common who who says that the things happen slower than you expect in a period of years but a period of decades same false and that seems to play. He's he's something that I I was reading over the holidays. which is the printing press was being developed? The fourteen forty S in mind in Germany by Gutenberg and I think the prince his first Bible in fourteen fifty five by fifteen twenty Martin. Luther is banging things on church. Dole's saying saying he doesn't like the pope anymore and you've got a sensitive the beginning of the reformation of the church which I find extremely interesting vesting when you compare nineteen forties when people building computers in various parts in the world And I it it'll technology to two twenty twenty. It's the same seventy eight year period and first of all it makes me think. Wow actually things happen. Pretty fast with the printing impress and wild things in some sense happen pretty slowly with computers but one of the things that happened with I think the printing press some Some point was initially. It was a tool that was used by churches to print indulgence season. Bibles and things like that. And then it was used for descent and I guess one of the things we can we seen in communication is the increase in social media and it being used in that so really radically changing the way we're having conversations not necessarily all to the good. I think probably would say the same thing about the printing press but but it takes a while to assimilate how to to do these things I think. For example. You can see changes in the way. We're doing politics and that I think he's not he's not I don't I think when people are becoming popular major politicians are becoming popular on social media platforms. I don't think it's because they are sort of spend golly geniuses that know how to conduct population reputation. I just think that there's a coincidence between that politicians personality and way of communicating and things that well on these platforms and that's that's kind of interesting and I think Yet so there's some of that going on and I think we have hope we're going to get. We need to be able to use these tools to do better communication in science as well which I think is really interesting challenge. Yeah and I think that we've we've started to see that right. I don't I I don't know when I mean you know this. I don't know when archive opened up but like I certainly became aware of it And its impact within the last decade decade and then. I think that we've seen so so that to me. Sort of took the the model of or at least the timeline of publication location of academic papers especially for this community which seems to rely so heavily on archive to communicate this information that changed radically but also the journal structure in machine. Learning at least has never been what a traditional journal structure would be like. It's sort of relied at least from my point of view relied more heavily on the main the main flagship conferences. But but now even those main flagship conferences were seeing things like people putting their posters online heavy use of QR codes in posters to like communicate back to the paper. And then also this idea that I think naps is taken up That seemed to be growing in popularity. We saw the meet UPS last year. The idea around decentralisation allegation of these larger points and I think that that Willie roles in neatly and nicely to your idea around like the printing press was a tool for four the well-established to communicate. And then it became as the idea as the technology became democratized became used to express a wider variety including dissenting opinions. And so I wonder if as we see not only the communication but the community the practitioner community become decentralized and reach a wider population and include a larger number of voices if we're knocking to see a larger variety of research questions getting chosen particularly with response to the on the ground questions that people are facing geographically being wider. I don't know does that make sense. What do you think the so many things going on? I guess when people look back at this period you suspect then they they might just say Oh and then all hell broke loose a hun- because actually there's something else that went on win. The printing press was developed at a similar time. The Ottomans Monds I think the second sacked Constantinople and that actually cools A large number of written works to leave Constantinople things. Things have not been known in say Western. You're sorry very European perspective and that sort of gave material for the printing press to welcome and one of the things things that's going on when you talk about ideas and dissemination of ideas. He's also the ideas that came out so people then started re translating the Bible. But in this case it's very complex because when you mentioned archive I see that as an old combination of the old and the new. Because this genuinely if I speak to most people that finding sort of clarification blog posts all software perhaps the most useful thing and driving through their ideas but when it comes to their citations they will cite archive papers but not those blog posts all very often not the software despite the archive papers. It's not having gone through a sort of a more formal peer review process. I think Perot Tom Dietrich how to sort of check many of them to make sure they're on subject great service to the community see but they haven't gone through a sort of formal pair of you yet. Somehow they had artifact which is more tracing back to the the notion of what a written piece of work is and how it should appear as a paper which in some sense is also relatively modern notion. Only two hundred years old. But it's so important important an interesting the what you write this disruption. Going on there's also massive conservatism. In the way we expect to do things it's not like let's revisit everything we think about scientific if it communication and conferences and everything else because in some sense I would say. Many of conferences have become undermined by the status. We place on on getting a paper in that conference. Venue for conferring they have become a status symbol for getting your tenure or students are in a very difficult position because I think they feel. PhD students that they feel that unless they have a few Europe's papers papers or you IRA. I starts papers the they I see la so now now you have to start worrying. Which conferences have I missed an GonNa Win Fund and other really good conferences that I forgot to mention they feel the the pressure to produce these papers because they feel that probably the only mark of success that came up with the new? NFL meeting. which which I thought was a great innovation this Europe so there was a meeting for people that machine learning once? You're on the stand about the community a lot of questions around this and I think that there's a way what I'm slightly worried about. Is The misalignment between those contributing to understanding and those being credited for that contribution it almost seems like back. Once you've got this idea that someone's explained clearly in a blog post you. The archetype is to cite this paper that you've never really read. Don't really understand now now. Of course the idea maybe in that paper and so forth but it's really sucked too sophisticated ecosystem communication now and I think that that's opening up challenges which you see reflected in people talk about

Neil Europe Constantinople Katherine Gorman Neal Chand NFL Dole Luther Perot Tom Dietrich Germany Willie UPS Gutenberg Martin
Beijing is changing, and not necessarily for the better

Correspondents Report

06:06 min | 1 year ago

Beijing is changing, and not necessarily for the better

"Now it's hardly surprising that Beijing City of twenty two million people his constantly changing but sometimes change isn't a good thing this week wake of Beijing bookshop that had become a center for discussions and festivals and ideas announced that it would be shutting down as China correspondent Bill birtles reports it is part of a broader campaign to transform the city walking the streets rates of my neighborhood in Beijing. It's surprising how many places I remember that have now gone especially saying only lived here for the past four. Oh years at straight level modern China China's quickly but to an outsider. That changes Darnell wise. Mike a lot of sense tonight. I'm climbing the wooden stays to the entrance of the bookworm. Every foreigner he knows this place which is part bookshop pot. Cafe I Papa and pop live performance spice. I suspect one of the reasons at Sei. Well Noun is that it's been here for ages. Fourteen fourteen years which in today's Beijing is a long time for a foreign run venue walls of filled filled with both overseas and Chinese titles. People quietly Patra why on keypads while others drink bees and banter portrait's tricks of authors who have given toxic grace the walls i. I visited the bookworm as a language student. In two thousand and night as Beijing was earing up to host the Olympic Games. I was living at a student dorm. Why out in the Northwestern University district to get the subway into the middle of town to graduate? This little pocket of Western intellectualism seemed like a big day out. Two years later I was living in Beijing. Being in the bookworm was a regular Monday night haunt packed to the rafters for Rowdy Pub Trivia since moving back to the capital in two two thousand fifteen. The book was a bit dated. There were so many new cafes now many other venues to go to but none of them have what the bookworm has talks. Discussions Needs National Literary Festival that brings speakers from across China and the wells wells. I hosted a talk by the. ABC's Richard Fidler he earlier this year on the history of Constantinople. A French journalist friend of mine ended a night of stand-up comedy. Here recently. Heck my Chinese colleague was last night for music performance. A Canadian diplomat named Michael. Oh coverage spoke at the literary festival here two years ago. He's better now and these days for being detained without access to lawyers in a state security imprison of Chinese retaliation for Canada arresting a senior Hawaii executive at the US request. That's the bookworm. Applies for events for discussion for ID's little haven for foreigners popular too with some Chinese intellectuals and now it's closing according to the owners it's the lightest victim of Beijing's cleanup campaign. The building had been illegally renovated over the years and now they're being forced to go perhaps stipend somewhere else but in today's China that's far from clear clear rarely has spice discussions and ideas seemed so important. China under president. Xi Jinping is going through an extremely greenlee repressive stage hyper nationalism demands of loyalty to the Communist Party and a tightening of censorship. Is stifling public debate across this country. Recently a foreign journalist I know was told. She couldn't rent an apartment because she's a foreign journalist. The landlord what court having some sort of nationalist fervor wouldn't rent it to her in this environment. I really do wonder who would be willing to rent a space to a bookshop up that encourages open. ID's about a year ago. I was sitting at the bookworm wondering if it would be nixed by Jing. In recent years has been undergoing a wave of gentrification the mayor a block named excite she has been on the warpath against illegal structures. The city is awash with extensions that were never approved. And he's cleaning them up with Gusto. The problem is some of the city's best little restaurants restaurants and bars have been wiped out as a result as I woke back from the bookworm like I passed Jing nineteen forty nine a craft beer burried at bit the dust when the local government shutdown the compound that was in. Luckily it's been able to reopen elsewhere next door the original side side a great French restaurant doctor. She wants to visiting relatives there. But that's going to Lucas achieved Vietnamese place. Five dight some awesome great noodles. That's gone. It was in an illegally built extension and great leap. A pioneer of the city's brewing sane was shut down for zoning raisins but it's now reopened minus the kitchen. It sometimes seems like two steps forward one step back in Beijing. The capital of the world's new emerging superpower is still a poor cousin to Shanghai and Hong Kong as a genuine global city but just as quickly glee as the venues. Close some of them reopen in other places. Hopefully the same happens for the bookworm. This bill birtles in Beijing. correspondent powder the bookworm on the sound

Beijing China China China Jinping Bill Birtles Darnell Mike Richard Fidler Northwestern University Distri ABC Shanghai Jing Canada Michael United States Beijing. Hong Kong Communist Party
The fall of the Berlin Wall

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

09:00 min | 1 year ago

The fall of the Berlin Wall

"So as years ago this Saturday a wall slicing through the heart of Berlin and separating the Soviet controlled east from the British American American and French secured West Foul after twenty eight years. The Iron Curtain had been breached. Thousands of East Germans came across the border. Today perhaps more than one hundred thousand so many that border police lost count and at every border crossing the thousands of West Germans there to say welcome off the second mode will the Potsdam agreement divided control and reconstruction of Germany between the victorious allies and with the British and Americans not willing to hand full control of the capital over to the Soviets the city was similarly a divided but with Berlin residing in the east the agreement men that a Western en clave was born and the west of the city became a potential escape route for eastern defectors east. Germany was losing its best and brightest and flows in charge. Something had to be. He done so in the early hours of the thirteenth of August nineteen sixty one barrier began to be enforced. This story has all the hallmarks of a political story. Still Alive and kicking today at its heart. The Berlin Wall was an immigration issue orbit one of keeping citizens in rather than out we used to be on together's then about twelve thousand years ago. We began to stopping together. As and at that point when static everything everything you have is precious to. You is also static. If you are feeling concerned that somebody else might covet your goods at that point you will defend them and building. Wolves will be part of that. And that's where the wool building started about twelve thousand years ago. It was no point until them. And before that and it has been throughout history whether it's the walls of troy the walls of Jericho Constantinople etc etc and most walls barriers and fences are physical manifestations stations of something much deeper which is the concept of us and then which was true in the time of the Great Wall of China one side barbarians the other side civilization and it's true now of trump's wall they are all these manifestations of division. That's the author author journalist Him Marshall who quite literally wrote the book on walls divided. Why we're living in an age of walls? Chronicles the thousands of miles of fences senses and barriers in our world and how they affect the political landscape too. So how did this particular wall come about the Berlin Wall and the subsequent fence which then fenced off East Germany from West Germany is actually probably a one off in the this will is actually a prison wall to keep people in so they count escape. What is most wolves That we don't want that law over. They're coming over the will to us so it is different in that respect as you get to the late. Nineteen fifty s Germany was divided into zones as one of the losers of the second world. War The problem was that the American can Marshall Plan was already kicking in and the western areas. We're doing much better economically. And so of course people in the Russian sectors sectors of East Berlin voting with their feet and in the years running up to when it was built a couple of million East Germans thought look the standard of life is much better over there and they started moving now. That is a direct challenge to the Russians to the Soviet Union and to the idea of communism because because if it is a physical manifestation is. That's working better for me I'm going that suggests something about your system. So they could not put up with his hemorrhaging. Both at an economical level. All of the workforce but probably more importantly for the Soviet Union and its populations. They can't put up with that because it's a challenge to their concept that our always life is the better way of life for everybody and people supported and so over night one night when the wall and the flow of people was cutoff immediately. I've been in both when the wall existed. But also he hears later and what struck me in the years. I've been since as I find it quite hard to imagine where wasn't people so this is where the war was. This river was a place where people use to try and swim across this dividing line. How complicated indicate it was it to divide a city when you think of our city London how you ever run a fence across the middle of it that would be effective? Well the Russians and East Germans had the advantage of not being directly answerable to their the peoples living there and there were the sectors as you know there was the French control sector British American and there was the Russian control sector so as they had control over that sector and the Americans. The British couldn't say no you can't put at a brick on top of another brick there. They simply walled off their sector unless said they did he overnight. They brought huge concrete slabs in and other things things fencing and they did it overnight but it wasn't politically difficult insofar as the other occupying power bill and didn't have a say in it so obviously go with the contours of the sector. They occupied and that was East Berlin. I mean if it'd been southbound South Bill would now be that buzzword that we have in politics not East Berlin just geographically. That's how far they got the sector that they took for centuries raise walls have been built to keep out invading armies but this was the first wall in all recorded history to keep an entire country from fleeing fleeing into West Berlin is three and a half million before the war was erected if the gods were there guns unsuccessful in keeping people from fleeing that there's the barbed wire if they crossed that that was the wall they reached the top. There was the broken glass and with that a city was divided. Millions of Berlin citizens were now defined by their street address. Peter Miller what is a journalist in East Berlin and the author of nine thousand nine hundred nine Berlin Wall my part in his downfall. Peter told us how he ended up with quite peculiar assignment. I immediately joined Reuters news agency London after finishing university and they sent me straight away after working as a trainee. They sent me to Brussels when I came back to London later about six months and then they say well how up in so it's my job. It's okay I don't Germany level moral and they said well nothing much happens at least seventy days. I'd say a couple of minutes but anyway they put me in there because they'd has the office since easterly separated in nineteen forty nine and a want to give it up because no other non German news agency had enough us on eastern side. The rule. So I I've lived in Paris and lived in Brussels. I thought it was just too good enough for two minutes and slightly disconcerted. I went there and discovered the billion Elian accents and started to pick it up and at the same time had to world. The when I was about to bury I hugged together would be East Germany. which was shook but I ended up there and I found probably one of the exciting places I'd ever be and so there I found myself going through checkpoint quite chilly and finding of flats it Roy says head for study use it was quite doubting? Tell me what was life. Like for a a journalist working in eastbound at the time did you have a sense that you are being watched by the infamous stars e the secret police. It's there's two sides to that question. was that ever since the Russians have done these German Roy shooting in Nineteen fifty-six and he just really accepted it was nothing we could do. Getting cross the Woolworth always dangerous restatements. Who tried to many had been shots and really very so nothing happening city except funding the old dissident who is willing to speak out yes? He took that for granted. Then only after the wolf find became done. We discovered that they started the headed. Twenty nine microphones in the FLACCO. Black I live in which was expected to be a little bit. Quite that many life for foreign journalists in East Berlin was clearly a well. Mona set one for many many in these Ovo life did go on. They wanted to escape and they took risks with their lives and hopes of making it to the West. I am what was seen as freedom.

Berlin Wall East Germany East Berlin Berlin West Berlin Soviet Union Peter Miller Potsdam East Germany. West Germany China Him Marshall ROY Reuters Brussels London Donald Trump
Three Wide, No Cover | Melbourne Cup Runner by Runner Preview

Three Wide No Cover

09:47 min | 1 year ago

Three Wide, No Cover | Melbourne Cup Runner by Runner Preview

"Hello hello and welcome to a very special edition of three while had no cover a Melbourne cap spatial we're going to go through every runner in the rise and fall and you will win out in a rice that stops a nation Russian and more to co host as always went on I'm in the chair and Julian Velazquez in white hot form of the moment if Russia on Saturday you went with Miami Band and Rice to over fleet you are on far at the moment you hit can easily change your on the good as you last election bought we going by but this rice is tough if there's an idea but we're gonNA raw knows all about it and you'll be able to put us in the right direction recently does these group one winning jockey many many times I'll tell you what when you come ad for Melbourne Cup wake what do you do you know you're going to be on TV beat you get rid of the beat and you go clean shy of any loops ten years younger that man is some and Marshall thank you good to have view I in the pigskins tonight especial Melvin competition this is a good feel this is a great field there's stack question marks recognize genuine chances in the Rice Sarah dissecting talking about them and maybe a COUPLA fees for the panels at home as we always liked the play the motorcycles watch this show all the time we're laws that are not always here markle wall will make wall or skipper as we now him macy's full alive and apparently he's got appendicitis and he organized they shouted out he was the driver behind Z.? LOVES BEING ON THE CAMERA LOVES BEING ON TV now apparently appendicitis apparently rushed to hospital but this video always target only twenty four hours ago and show you video on will the background camera legal round the block a man in the back dead who is going to pin this on us now are always the doctor boys I would be looking getting nowhere near the appendix I'll be working towards the leveraging as the light scratching on vets at voice box towel enjoys Dhabi heavy wealth to talk about on Taylor downdraft on Saturday fans wind the Melbourne Cup the Siamese Prince of aerated law she came third in the rice has that changed anything look into the rice it's now seven eight dollars and obviously we've seen through history that you win the Lexus the wholesome the SOB whatever it's called utain to run really well in the Melbourne Cop in the the market seems to gravitate toward you we'll get to that very shortly bought the market did change a little bit off to the barriers or war we're going to get the market up a brand new let's go through the market rocket as it stands at the moment and glass who's coming to five or tim that was a bad I fifty a couple of weeks ago Constantinople touch sevens at had fiend Shit tain bound declares in the cross Cantu the extra kilos this she is surprised by being Il Paradiso having a lot of pundits h. y. the Prince of Erin and move always at either over the table and Raymond Tusk at Nineteen downdraft is the one that came means southern France bits bits two thousand dollars on on the five southern France at twenty one dollars all the way Dan Hunting Horn who won two weeks ago at forty one dollars here it's a big rice guys on the page and there's still some genuine probably live chances there as well toy that we've had since the barrier to that the punishment the most sports bit the favorite mode aglow I told is into six fifty after the barrier draw guy to probably a big advantage for that horse obviously it's good it's about thirty two hundred meters but maybe the guy alleviates it's a couple of those problems with that and the other one was lying there the to the pun is one of the moment for us at sports is there anything out of Sessa die the why the trek plied that you can take in the Melbourne Cup look other than the fact that you are dandruff obviously going really well he's going to be fit we still have these trucks going apply to be honest it was quite wet on Saturday there's GonNa be some rain today on Monday and supposedly drawing we know it's a joint track but he's going to draw on add some confidence seem Flemington because what we saw on Saturday Dhabi is they used the entire tract I didn't just stick to the fence that didn't stick for the day in the middle like I'm Dan wide and we sold melody battle-winning Michael Grand and also fees impact and then towards the end of the day that I wish shifting off and leaving the fence about four horses of a gap to the inside running row also it was a great spread right across the track all wouldn't expect it to be too much I've got to get through it on Melbourne Cup Day and jockeys go to pick their best path so Jewish touched on it a little bit of inclement weather I think it'll just help Flemington because it's such a great draining track they've prepared these track for the full days play on Oregon it was really fair on Saturday more I'm really looking forward to catching up with the hall of fame trying to dive is he's got three runners in the Melbourne Cup and we're going to get him on the final on a little bit lighter so he won't be able to help some throughout the show today I'm looking forward to that is your task done well let let's go through all the runners one by one in Reis Book Order Starting With Number One cross candidate last year obviously a little bit more white penalty the she does a two-horse classy Ohio UCS V8's now with goodell from blue forever because of course Canis Ripa but that's last year that's irrelevant now you go to carry fifty seven and a half doing now you can get thirty two hundred Mehta's after one the Melvin copy he wants him otherwise he went to do boy I wanNA group to their he started two dollars fifty in this ledger most recent run looking Ren fourth I think back in that rice it was a little bit of a worrying run but he has the pay over a lot of these other international forces put it this way Celli police and absolutely gun he's done it before these horses this is done it before he can win the rice he's not my talk for everybody can definitely win the rice is to have been more helpful because I'm going to trust him at Flemington Lymington as a genuine style what we saw last year was that three year old northern hemisphere hemisphere foam come to the fore carried fifty two key allies he was the best background Gripe Gripe profile leading into that rice since then Josie mentioned you want my which was terrific winning out of the thirty two hundred meters so to me that look walk a whole studied improved to travel back tonight in and then he ran out of a full thousand meters he got one point nine links off stratovarius in gripe form rice in the Gold Cup with D. XP just let's be in front of him as well and then he wasn't far why beyond Stratovarius again in the goodwood and then Dayton full links I'll forgive him for that he's had a really good I think he's a better whole this year and net foam and those four runs within twelve months suggest that he's a bit holes that's fifty seven and a half the reason Gordon Moore top four is because I'm going to trust him as the genuine style in the rice think if you've got class law came you can come back drawing a good guy with fifty seven and a half get locked away and he's going to use he's that he's going to be more top four for those reasons I think we're going to see a bit of a patent horses that can win absolutely smell them cap so that is a big number one cross cannock came winless got the number to murder glass obviously after the barrier draw eight fifty six dollars fifty dining line on board came in as well Ken Wayne counting anyway any of that process of six dollars fifty Moran knowing nine dollars fifty but of a winning chance look he wanted to cool field cop I think the inside guy is the positive Damian line is absolutely able when he's a fantastic jockey there is concerns whether it gets thirty two hundred meters stay in that's probably the concern for the Japanese but I think the inside guy allows him to maybe get a bomb and just because up clued up if you can be with four hundred maters guy I've got no daddy can win the rice doubts on the coffee cupping teams if he had every opportunity to win that rice and still on the run high twenty four and a half twelve and a half so it wasn't sensational last four hundred dollars two hundred a pretty moderate Tampa he's got meaningful the Japan and as a guns I think sometimes we can fall into the brains of twenty four hundred a Coffee Cup win locked that didn't right off the roof in terms of figures that was he's I have a twenty four hundred proud of that he was a two-time winner I have a twenty two hundred police phones brain around the mall and a quarter so easy to to brilliant and is he wanted to he's best at fifty-six kilos against genuine thirty two hundred natal's GonNa be strong that you can trust at the end of the rice with that Madam on top four and now he gets the best run but he's going to need the bush guidance it'll suck up beyond side he can use that tune afoot but easy the brain Ho slot the Saudi thinks these talk horses that we've saying come through at the mall and a quarter and right really well and Hoy but just with the fifty six and not being tested beyond twenty four hundred meters of got that question macaroni happy to him on Kenny Win Not yes yes okay number three mass reality twenty six dollars at at the moment Frankie Dettori onboard can't win yes but I just don't know enough about the tone four one hundred twenty three matches up pretty well but time for one hundred twenty three fifty four and a half roy it up there I mean that's a fair wack he's the handicap has got a hold of him there's no doubting that he ran fifty alleged that cross Canada ran fourteen cross Canada Tudo is fifty Master Valley started fifteen does he can win but I've got him into bat twenty one twenty six dollars look I wouldn't be knocked over but he won't be my betting strategy is to he can he can running the top bite for show this horse because he's a genuine style and he's trolling barrier wine he gets a fifty five and a half and he's foolish stratovarius there's a lot of this

Melbourne Julian Velazquez Macy Russia Melvin Miami Band Pigskins Marshall Sarah Thirty Two Hundred Meters Twenty One Twenty Six Dollars Twenty Four Hundred Meters Eight Fifty Six Dollars Four Hundred Dollars Two Thousand Dollars Seven Eight Dollars Twenty One Dollars Twenty Six Dollars Forty One Dollars Twenty Four Hours
Why Doesn't Alcohol Have Nutrition Labels?

BrainStuff

05:30 min | 1 year ago

Why Doesn't Alcohol Have Nutrition Labels?

"Today's episode is brought to you by Oregon. You know, when something goes wrong at home, and you just freak out, I have definitely had my moments especially when it comes to pests ants in the mirror. Nara, cockroaches hanging out around your bubble bath and uninvited rat, a your daughter's birthday party. Don't let pests ruin the moment, get an organ tech out to your house tomorrow. Bill, protect your time and your temper. Visit organ dot com slash brain to save fifty dollars on your first general pest service with the promo code pod. Fifty. That's P, O, D, five zero Orkan home is where the bugs aren't. Welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Vogel, bam here if you feel like you can't even consider consuming a candy bar without being confronted with its chlorine content. You're right. The same thing goes for just about every piece of packaged food you see in stores, plus every bottled canned or carton beverage a nutrition facts label depicts detailed info on the amounts of fat sugar. Sodium and more found inside. But while your favorite breakfast, cereals sodas and sandwich fixings are subject. This type of in-your-face transparency, you may have noticed that booze is typically off the hook residing behind fact labels. So what gives the answer lies in the powers that be while the food and Drug administration or FDA regulates the safety of you guessed it food, including non alcoholic beverages? It doesn't govern the alcohol industry that honor belongs to the alcohol and tobacco tax and trade bureau or TB an agency that doesn't require labeling while beer wine and spirits companies aren't league. Alie mandated to print, the nutritional info on their products. Consumer advocates have been calling for the TB to change that. And it has sort of in twenty thirteen the agency made nutrition labels optional for alcohol, but somehow, experts don't feel the move was bold enough Johns Hopkins public health researcher Sarah Blake told vox in two thousand fifteen many adults take in a tremendous amount of calories from alcohol, and they have no idea. She should know her work revealed that the average American regularly consumes four hundred calories a day from alcohol alone. A pint of PA contains about two hundred fifty calories a glass of red wine has about one hundred twenty five and a shot of liquor has about one hundred. The reasons behind the disparity in label requirements between the FDA and t t b goes back to prohibition when the ban on the production and distribution of alcohol in America came to an end congress passed the alcohol administration act of nineteen thirty five which eventually led to the establishment of the t b but its rules around labeling have historically been a bit. Messy substances. The people might be sensitive to, like, sulfites have to be labelled, but other ingredients, do not wines, contain fourteen percent, alcohol, or more have to display alcohol content while wines from seven to fourteen percent. Don't have to list, alcohol content, if they're considered light or table. Oh and wines with less than seven percent alcohol. Those aren't regulated by the TB at all. Those are under the jurisdiction of the FDA, and so they're required to display nutrition facts. Labels confusing. Isn't it? A few brands corona light, Guinness Heineken, and course, light do put calories and some nutrition information though. Not the ingredients on their bottles, or packaging, but it's typically very small print or hard to find you might even have to look on the bottom of the six pack to find it who looks their Bud Light on the other hand began voluntarily including obvious, leibels listing its beers calories fat carbohydrates and protein per serving, as well as other ingredients in February of two thousand nineteen since then and Heiser Bush's added similar labeling to some of its other Bud Light line beers, including Bud Light lime, Bud Light orange, and Bud Light lemon tea change is brewing though. At least in the beer industry industry leaders, including Anheuser Busch Miller Coors, Heineken USA constellation brand beer, division, North American breweries and craft brew lions which together produce more than eighty one percent of the volume of beer, sold in the United States have agreed to voluntarily displayed nutrition facts by twenty twenty. Today's episode was by Michelle Constantinople ski and produced by Tyler clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works ruinous lots of other well labeled topics. Visit our home planet has two forks dot com and for more podcasts from my heart radio, visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts, wherever you listen to your favorite shows. This week on ephemeral. You do the math. I think they're two million plus spreads of our work in the collection. I don't even think about brain can hold them. Any emphasis tough to comprehend it. And we got four thousand every year I didn't really as much. To intellectual passions as a teenager, and they were crossed puzzles, and chess. So I thought I would love to be able to be a Professional Chess player or cross greater for a living. I tried chest but by age fifteen or so was clear. I was not going to be the next Bobby Fisher. So I thought, well, okay. Maybe, maybe I'll be the Bobby Fisher us. Listen to now apple podcasts, the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. And learn more at a federal dot show.

Food And Drug Administration Bud Light TB Iheartradio Bobby Fisher Apple Oregon Bill Guinness Heineken Lauren Vogel Chess Orkan Johns Hopkins Sarah Blake Anheuser Busch Miller Coors Michelle Constantinople Heiser Bush America United States
How Was Andr the Giant Larger than Life?

BrainStuff

06:02 min | 1 year ago

How Was Andr the Giant Larger than Life?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the Capital, One card with Capital, One saver card. You can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new French restaurant and four percent on bowling with your friends. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores, and one percent on all other purchases. Now, when you go out you cash in Capital, One, what's in your wallet terms apply? Welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Vogel bomb here. Fans knew Andre the giant as the eighth wonder of the world, but friends and loved ones had their own designation. We spoke by Email with Benjamin Brown. An archivist for world, wrestling, entertainment, or the WWE. He said, under the giant was and still is affectionately referred to as boss, symbolizing, the respect he commanded and was appropriately given long before the towering icon, became a pop culture, phenomenon under the giant was Andrew SAAF, a French kid who led up somewhat average life until puberty hit born in Grenoble, France in nineteen Forty-six resolve was beautiful baby has older brother and Thuan said an HBO documentary about Andre's life, quote, he was normal his life changing transformation began in his early teens when it became evident that Roussel mauve had to Terry Glenn disorder called acrimoniously the sorter. According to the mayo clinic occurs, when the Patou itary gland produces too much growth hormone during adulthood, causing the bones to increase in size. It typically affects middle aged. Notes, but can happen at any age and what it strikes, still developing kids like it did, and muffs case it can cause a condition called, gigantism, which results in, abnormal increases in height and exaggerated bone growth, Roussel, muffs major physical, transformation occurred in the time between his departure from home at age fourteen to seek employment outside of granola and his first return visit at age nineteen nineteen Eighty-one Sports Illustrated profile reported indeed during the five years young Andre had been estranged from his parents, he'd grown so large that even as mother and father failed at first and even second glance to recognize him or to connect the giant. They had seen on television with the gangly dreamer, who would hide himself to Paris so long before. Of continued to grow by the age of twelve he hit six feet, that's one point eight meters and two hundred and forty pounds or a hundred kilos and rapidly grew from there. So he set his sights on a career that allowed him to use his size to his advantage. Wrestling after training with French champion Frank. Val wa who later became his manager worse enough begin competing under the name zone. Fair in Montreal and monster off in Japan. The young giant began making a name for himself, as a baby-faced colossal, competitor and bell wa introduced him to legendary wrestling promoter and Smick man senior as the founder of the world, wide, wrestling federation, or WWF, which later became the WWE McMahon made a few suggestions to increase Russa muffs. Potential success, including a name change McMahon dubbed, the wrestler, Andre the giant and sent him off to compete around the world. On March twenty sixth nineteen Seventy-three under the giant made has WWF debut at New York City's Madison Square Garden. He went onto wrestle more than three hundred days a year and rose to fame is one of the industry's most respected competitors. Brown said under the giant surpassed the often one dimensional nature of attraction wrestler to become a massive draw wherever he went in the world. Andre was both the leader of the locker room and measuring stick for all those who came after Andre the giant was intelligent multi-lingual an exceptional in ring talent. While the wrestler, success is indisputable his eventual size is up for debate most sources claim. He reached a height of seven feet four inches. That's two point two meters, though, according to biography dot com. He was more likely closer to six feet eleven inches or one point nine meters. It's full size Rousseff weighed about five hundred pounds, that's two hundred and twenty six kilos, the wrestler's unique physicality led to plenty of opportunities outside of the ring, including a memorable role in the nineteen eighty seven film the prince. Bride and resolves love for food and drink was no joke. There are many stories of him drinking more than one hundred beers. In one sitting though, it supposedly wasn't the norm. His best friend Tim white told WWE had go into a restaurant and eat twelve stakes and fifteen lobsters just to quote put on a show and have some laughs. Roussel offer main, too formidable competitor throughout his career taking on titans, like hulk HOGAN, and macho man, Randy savage, but by the early nineteen ninety s the effects of his Akra medically and the massive physical wear and tear of his career had led to severe effects on his health mega is known to cause everything from high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease to spinal cord compression vision loss, resume of grappled with chronic pain, and could no longer endure the rigors of wrestling, he retreated to his North Carolina ranch. But flew home to France at early nineteen Ninety-three when his father passed away, on January twenty seventh nineteen Ninety-three Andre the giant died and asleep congestive heart failure. The wrestler was never married, but he was survived by a daughter Robin. Christianson Russa mauve born in nineteen Seventy-nine under the giant continues to be heralded by wrestling fans as one of the sport's greatest competitors. Brown said this quote is from Tim white Andres best friend who called me while I was writing this, once he befriended, you he was your friend for life. Space episode was written by Michelle Constantinople ski and produced by Tyler click brain stuff is a production with I heart radio. How stuff works for more on this, and lots of other massive topics. Visit our home. Planet has works dot com. And for more podcast iheartradio, I heart radio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by the Capital One saver card earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply.

Andre WWE Roussel Benjamin Brown Christianson Russa Wrestling Capital One France Lauren Vogel Paris Gigantism Patou Itary Gland Mcmahon Apple HBO Sports Illustrated Growth Hormone Grenoble Madison Square Garden Andrew Saaf
"constantinople" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

Atheist Nomads

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"constantinople" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

"So the, the Bishop, the patriarch of Constantinople continue to have this jurisdiction and slowly started losing it, and as new empires would form there'd be political pressure to grant autocephalic subtly to national churches to kind of help keep the peace a little bit. So so they autocephalous means that you have your own patriarch, your own pope, sort of sometimes. Most of them, don't actually have patriarchs. They have Metropolitans, which metropolitan a metropolitan in a in the orthodox world is just a is equivalent to a cardinal in the Catholic world. So pope, it's a Bishop who is higher than just the Bishop and his over a very large important, city and surrounding territory, kind of like an archbishop or or cardinal. Okay. Okay. And so over time more and more countries ended up getting their own orthodox church. So you started eventually got to having the Serbian Orthodox church, the Montenegrin orthodox church the. Greek Orthodox church, get an orthodox church and you get an orthodox. Everybody gets north at ox church. The one that wanted to being really hard was when they got when the Greeks got their own actually got their own independent church because what had happened was it was all finding. Well, when Greece was under the control of the Ottoman empire, because it was all of these Greek Christians under the, the Turkish empires rule when Greece got us independence, from the Ottoman empire. They declared their church independent. One of the reasons was, they wanted to be independent of the, the, the Ottoman empire and part of being independent of the Ottoman empire was being independent of the patriarch who lived inside of the Ottoman empire. Was that the patriarch of Constantinople K? I didn't know that these teen and Ottoman or the same the Ottomans conquered the Byzantine empire and made Constantinople their capital is that when they called it a Stemple? I know not allowed to say that is that what Aaron was get? No. The songs the song's copyright song is copyrighted. The name of the city is not okay. No. The Turks state, eventually name renamed constant in Opal Istanbul. And I hope the song what I'm not sure of is did they rename it earlier. And the western world, just kept calling it Constantinople or did they not get around to renaming it until the Turkish Republic? But yeah, so, but the Byzantine empire Ottoman empire and Turkey, all occupied the same corker, Tori. Okay. All right. All with the same capital. Okay. And the happen in place with the patriarch of Constantinople still being in that capital, the entire time. Okay. The patriarch of Constantinople still lives in stem bull. So it was like, oh, hey, this government collapsed. And here's some other guys, I'm going to suck up to them now. As long as they keep me head of the church. I'm good, right? Yeah. Okay. Now in within Turkey, the most of the most of the Christians in Turkey. Still identify as Greek or Roman a lot of the Christians in. Avant Lebanon Syria and Israel and Palestine, also will identify as Greek or Roman not Arab and. Ethnically thickly religiously religiously orthodox. But ethnically, they have they will often identify as still being Greek or Roman in modern Turkey. The orthodox Christians, there are still under the patriarch of Constantinople who still claims to be the first among equals despite having the smallest orthodox church. In a country where he's under the specially presently with Turkey's. Repressive borderline is, is Llamas. St- regime. Is making it more and more difficult for him to still do his thing. So who, who is it? Do you know what his name is? I don't have the top of my head. Nobody cares. Nobody cares. No. So he thinks he's the pope, but he's not he's the eastern pope is eastern pope nobody cares because basically, how's he not been killed yet? Or they die all the time. Well, I meant killed by the government..

Constantinople Turkish Republic Greek Orthodox church Byzantine empire Ottoman Serbian Orthodox church pope government Greece ox church Catholic world Opal Istanbul Aaron Syria Tori St Israel Palestine
"constantinople" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

Atheist Nomads

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"constantinople" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

"So he got Byzantine and the, the Roman fish. The ship Rome guy got everybody else he got the west so the western empire. And then when the western fire fell the German lands. Oh, okay. Then the Byzantine emperor or the Bishop of Constantinople, then went through, and eventually got outta council was granted authority over the barbarians including the Germans German lands, theoretically would have been the German lands. But where the Germans were was too far away. So is a lot easier to go with. The Slavic barbarians instead of the German bar Burien 's, okay? So slow lazy. So. Yeah. So they started sending missionaries due north into the Balkans and up into eastern Europe and those missionary started. Converting people among the Slavic groups, which eventually got to the Russians, as time progressed, the Byzantine empire started shrinking entering and shrinking, and eventually was destroyed. And at the time that it was conquered by the Ottoman Turks, the patriarch of Constantinople still had a thorny jurisdiction over the same parts of the church that his predecessors had had, when they had the, the emperor's blessing when they had an emperor, and the Russians got their auto subtly. At that time, which in orthodox world, just means the Russian patriarch got to be the Russians got to have their own patriarch as the head of their own church. Get Russian patriarch. Byzantine patriarch, concerts, an OPEL. Yes. I'm trying to. Okay. Yes. Okay. Okay I'm talking about. Yeah. The patriarchs not the city's. Okay. So we got a Russian patriarch, Byzantine patriach, even though he's lost a lot of power at this point, and the Roman they're also would have been Antioch Jerusalem Alexandria, but we're not talking about those. We're talking about them later, not this episode, not this episode. Excellent. Yes, we do not need the holy hand grenade of Antioch. That will come..

Antioch Jerusalem Alexandria Bishop of Constantinople Antioch Constantinople Burien OPEL Rome Europe
"constantinople" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

Atheist Nomads

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"constantinople" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

"And feel the need to do that, with the Helen is areas, the areas that to be assimilated degree culture, which ended up resulting in the scenario where the church in the eastern half of the Roman empire Greek was the language they used and in the western half of the entire they use Latin. Okay. So that's where the initial divide was stars. Great schism. No, no. The science tablet is second, Great Schism that came almost thousand years later. But it's it's what started. It was just the fact it was two languages gives them. At all. Or am I know the Great Schism of ten ninety ten ninety two that we started off this whole series where I'm sorry? I even mentioned it. Oh, okay. No, I'm just I'm tired. So I'm not able to put the dots together at all. Anyway, we got east. So this is eastern orthodox Greek seeking the Greek church versus the Latin Latin church church was the Roman church. I'll popey it was all under the Bishop of Rome, whereas win, who is the pope, his, his primary titles, actually still Bishop of Rome gonna call him pope, right, Hopi. I like popey popey, if you wanna get really familiar with. You can call him Papa if he's old he's, he's poopie, popey, because pope is just the I mean, I think the size Papa that they call them in Latin. In Latin Italian call him banish Chinese Tokyo. I just thought popey, maybe. Pope, we walked into my joint so win to rove into when Constantine moved the capital of the empire after moving of the fire from Rome to Constantinople at the same time that he was. Making the Roman empire officially Christian. And when he did that all the sudden the little village of bison team was no longer just a little village. It became a very important city and where whereas bison team. That was the name of Constantinople before Constantine after himself. She do kit to not to not mentioned in that song. So I got an. History is based, they might be giants concentrating Backley Constantine moved the capital from Rome to present him. And then he named it Constantinople Constantine city since team temple is the suffix in Greek meaning city, so don't call it. Constant Shantha OPEL, just call Constantinople. That's what he called it. Yeah. But it's it's Constantine. City is what we don't know translations for that. That's okay. Yeah. So at that time, the Bishop of by team. Became the Bishop of Constantinople and because it was the new capital. He thought he was more important and started being popey naming the level of a patriarch say an pope ING, oh. Came all popey. Come on and stick with the lingo. I mean it's on theme still. Yeah. Yeah. So then he. So then from that point, the Bishop of Constantinople was the lowest ranking of the patriarchs, he used over and he is over multiple generations, multiple bishops. They started to claim supremacy because they were at the capital of the Roman empire especially after the western empire fell. They continue to claim Premacy because that was the new Rome, that was the, the Bishop in charge of the most important city in Christendom. I get that I totally vote for that. First among equals with the emperor's blessing, and what ended up happening was the Bishop in Rome claimed all the areas that were not under the eastern Roman empire will become the Byzantine empire. Even though officially was always just the room. Empire was commonly is commonly referred to in history as the Byzantine empire. That's what that is. Yeah. Okay. I assumed it was some, I don't know what I thought he's in teen was answer, the, the patriarch of Constantinople had claiming jurisdiction or authority over the entire church, all of Christendom within the Byzantine empire..

Backley Constantine Constantinople Rome Bishop of Constantinople pope Bishop of Rome Papa Roman church Chinese Tokyo Premacy rove thousand years
Should You Be Squatting More?

BrainStuff

06:05 min | 1 year ago

Should You Be Squatting More?

"Today's episode is brought to you by listerine ready tabs small discrete tabs, the transform from a solid to a liquid just to switch and swallow no sink required to get that just brushed clean feeling, and they pack a huge punch up to four hours of fresh breath, and the confidence that goes with it on the go wherever life takes you to a surprise meeting a date you want to freshen up for or just from one event to another try listerine ready tabs today. Find them near the mouthwash. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vocal bomb here. We've all heard the grim news sitting is the new smoking. It's troubling statement to see repeated in the headlines, especially since the average office worker sits for about ten hours every day and net flicks. We love you. But you're not helping not only has excessive sitting been associated with everything from strained muscles to spinal damage, but research has shown prolonged sedentary time is associated with harmful health outcomes, regardless of physical activity, and while we all put our faith into standing, desks as the obvious antidote. It turns out that strategy might be doing more harm than good. There might be a simpler solution that doesn't involve a fancy office accessory or swollen ankles squatting. We spoke with area Matlock, a New York-based nurse practitioner. She said when it comes to the human body spending too much time in any single position has a cost in the west today. We sit a lot. So it would do us good to squat a bit more. Jessica Gilbert, a California based certified personal trainer and group fitness instructor agrees. She said, we should most definitely be squatting more in our everyday lives for many reasons, the first and most important is that most people struggled from inactive, gluteal muscles gluts, and that can cause low back pain pain throw off your posture and affect your everyday workouts. She says that squatting for just thirty seconds. If you times a day can strengthen those inactive muscle groups. So why squatting you might instead one ask why not squatting while you may not typically see people in the United States crouching with bent knees. Butts hovering above their heels, you'll see that pose on the regular in other countries, particularly in places where squat toilets aware, the pan or bowls at floor level are common like throughout Asia, India and Africa, but people in other parts of the world. Also, commonly issued shares to squat win eating talking and just generally hanging out. And while these super low squat you'll see abroad may look much different than these standard issue. Jim move common in the United States. Gilbert says they both have their rightful place and booty building perks. She said a typical Jim squat and squats and other countries are all fairly the same. But the depth range of motion and uses are different. She explained the gym squat will build strength where swatting in daily life can build endurance. Matt look explained that it used to be more common for people all over the world to give birth and use the toilet in a squatting position. She said the less we squat the weaker the muscles that make squatting possible. Become a lot of fitness routines. Yoga practices include squad against your sizes for good reason, squatting increases leg strength and stability gets the blood flowing warms up the body and improves muscle tone without putting excessive pressure on the joints. And while no one really likes to talk about it that toilet thing is important. Hence, the success of the Squatty potty toria Albany, another New York based nurse practitioner and health. Coach said we. We definitely should all be squatting to have a bowel movement when we're in a fully squatted position. It's a more natural position for our colon. When the Victorians came up with the concept of the throne toilet, it was a big step backward for bowel health, but beyond the bathroom. Squatting has a ton of benefits that non-practitioners are missing out on Albany said I also think when we're squatting all the time to do all sorts of things we're engaging. Our core in our back and engaging a series of muscles that the average American is no longer engaging. We're having more back pain than ever before. I don't think it's a one to one correlation. But we're definitely sitting more and commuting more. And it's one part of the picture while it's a good idea to get your squad on more often. It's also important to remember that not all squats are created equal met. Luke said rapid careless squatting can easily lead to back injuries. So it's important to engage the core muscles and keep the back straight when adding squats to your daily routine start with slow movements for one to three minutes and work up to a faster pace and longer duration. Listen, whether you're squeezing more squats in for overall health, and mobility, or you're really looking to build muscle Gilbert has a few takeaway tips. She said always keep the weight of your squats in your heels. Keep your chest up and shoulder blades. Back when you're doing the squat and coming up to the standing position, always squeeze your. But if you're leaning forward or backward, and your squats, you're more likely to injure yourself. So if you're new to working out or just want to improve your squatting technique, I recommend finding a bench and practice the sitting and standing technique even just taking a seat and then standing up fifteen to twenty times in a row once a day can make a difference. It's almost the same idea as the Jim techniques. Today's episode was written by Michelle Constantinople ski and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other well-toned, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. This is April and Cassidy, we're the host of the podcast dressed the history of fashion and this season, we traveled throughout history and around the world to bring you more of the fascinating stories from behind the clothes. We wear we traveled to central Asia tiller all about the resist dyeing technique known as e Kat and to Paris to learn all about the legacy of Christian Dior. We also spoil the history of a whole host of topics from plus size fashion. The clothing choices of colts listening to subscribe on apple podcasts or the iheartradio app or wherever else you get your podcast.

Jessica Gilbert Jim Move United States Asia Gluteal Muscles Albany Matlock California Apple Michelle Constantinople Christian Dior Cassidy Africa Matt Instructor Tyler Clang Paris Luke Squatty India
Planet Money's Podcast 'The Indicator' Tackles History Of Bonds

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:10 min | 1 year ago

Planet Money's Podcast 'The Indicator' Tackles History Of Bonds

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from the UPS store, offering services from shredding to printing to mailbox ING and instead of closing this holiday. The UPS store is doing another ING altogether. Opening the UPS store every ING for small business. And of course, shipping the federal government raised more than a trillion dollars last year with government bonds, a bond is the way the government borrows money. They sell you a bond and promised to pay you back later during this time of enormous federal borrowing at levels that are unusual during good times. We have the back story of bonds their invention was less about financial innovation and more about appeasing a mob. Here's NPR's Stacey Vanik Smith, the planet money indicator podcast government, bonds work like this. You buy let's say hundred dollars worth of thirty year treasury bonds, the government takes that hundred bucks and use it to help pay the highway or contribute to someone's unemployment check or MO the White House lawn and in. Exchange. You get a regular payout. Every year until the thirty years is up at the current rate, you'd get about three bucks a year and thirty years later. You would also get your hundred dollars back so a hundred and ninety bucks in total. It's a pretty slick system, and it all traces back to twelfth century Venice at the time Venice was one of the most important and powerful cities in the world a center for innovation culture and global trade. But Constantinople another middle ages powerhouse decided to make a move on Venice Venice had to respond. The government of Venice needed to build a fleet of ships in kind of a hurry. William gets men is the author of money changes everything. So it basically taxed all the people in Venice, this emergency tax, Venice levied was not your typical tax. The government said it would pay people back for this tax. And the idea was that the Venetian fleet would sail over to Constantinople crush, the enemy's sale home triumphantly with a bunch of booty and pay. Everybody back. It was a complete disaster. The Venetian fleet got hit with the plague thousands of people died and the surviving Venetians came home in defeat. The does the head of Venice had gone out on the sex petition. He did come back. And when the Venetian people saw that he survived. They chased him down the street and executed them. Oh, Venice's governing council was like, oh, they did not have the money to pay back the tax loan, and the mob was not in a mood to be told. No. So they came up with a plan. They said, well, we're gonna pay you every year something like six percent until we can pay you back the bond was born or the prestige. Actually that is what they were called prestige people loved them as a safe investment and governments loved them because they could raise money for big ambitious risky projects. It meant that in some sense cities could punch above their weight. Spain used bonds to help fund shipping expeditions to South America. Holland used. Wants to build dikes bonds helped western European economies grow at the speed. They did and to the scale they did. In fact, says William China which had been leaps and bounds ahead of Europe in terms of wealth and technology started to fall behind partly because of the money raised through government bonds. The Chinese did not have this financing technology. They didn't issue bonds. So Europe takes off compared to China, of course, bonds had their fair share of problems too. I mean, they make it really easy for governments to take on a lot of debt during the financial crisis countries like Portugal, Greece Spain and ironically enough Italy took on way too much debt and got their economies into a lot of trouble even still bond sales continue to be crucial for governments to fund their operations. And it was all things to this. Innovation from Venice in the eleven hundreds. Stacey Vanik Smith NPR news. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

Venice Venice NPR William China Stacey Vanik Smith Constantinople Comcast Spain Europe White House South America Holland Portugal Italy Greece Hundred Dollars Thirty Years Trillion Dollars Six Percent Thirty Year
Independence decree presented to Ukrainian Orthodox bishop

WBBM Programming

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Independence decree presented to Ukrainian Orthodox bishop

"The ecumenical patriarch of Constantinople is presented a decree of independence to the metropolitan. Bishop of the nascent orthodox church of Ukraine in Istanbul today. Patriarch Bartholomew I presented the Tomasi scroll containing the decree in a symbolic ceremony. Sanctifying the Ukrainian churches independence from the Russian Orthodox church. He signed the decree yesterday. The decision is split from the Moscow patriarch chafed after more than three centuries of ties is angered Russia, the Russian churches severed ties with Istanbul. The center of the orthodox world metropolitan at the famous the first who is elected last month. By Ukrainian Orthodox leaders to head. The new church will take the decree to

Orthodox Church Of Ukraine Russian Orthodox Church Patriarch Bartholomew I Istanbul Tomasi Constantinople Moscow Russia Three Centuries
"constantinople" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

09:31 min | 2 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Is the John Batchelor show. Constantinople the Ottoman empire. We see it in American history right away with the US moldy, what was Tripoli in the marine him. What was Commodore Prebble and the constitution and Stephen Decatur that was about the challenge to parts of the Ottoman empire that time at Tripoli or along the north African post coast, but that is part of the reach of the Sultan in Constantinople at the end of the first war that autumn and empire long history of contact with American with America's navy. I mentioned the shores of Tripoli, but I learned from a wonderful new sweeping book about a small piece of Constantinople where the US navy was a critical observer of the chaos of the end of the Ottoman empire. America's Black Sea fleet by Robert shank that Commodore David porter called on the sublime part in Constantinople in the eighteen thirties. And in the eighteen sixties David Farragut was there in the eighteen ninety s Americans observed the contest between the. The Armenians Christians and the Ottoman empire. Some pointing to the massacres that continued into the twentieth century and the American ambassador Henry Morgan thought to Turkey during the first war left eye book, which he he was their thirteen to sixteen in which five chapters are devoted to his observations of the sufferings of the Armenians throughout the Ottoman empire. What we now call Turkey. However, I begin this story with the author by asking about why it is that the US navy following the end of the first war following the verse I treaty following the break-up of the Ottoman empire. Why the US navy dispatched destroyers and navy personnel to Constantinople why because we had not been at war with Turkey. So what are we doing there? Robert, Bob, a very good evening to you. Thank you very much. Your book is extremely carefully written and very politically astute for this period after. The first war. Why did the navy go there? What was the reason given to dispatch although all those sailors good evening to you. Good evening. Good to talk to you. Listen, we we were sending ships to support American interests and Americans who might have been endanger in a deeply in in Anatolia or Asia. Minor the continental Turkey is we call it today. And also because America have been so gripped by what was called has become called the army Nghien genocide the terrible stories of what had happened to the Armenians during the nineteen fifteen nineteen sixteen as reported on by ambassador Morton thought and others. And so they America started the near east relief campaign to help all the survivors of the genocide in deeply in in Armenia, and in many other places of of continental the Turkey and also, of course, Americans had some business interests. Overseas in in the region. And then, of course, missionaries had been in in Turkey from the congregational church before something like almost one hundred years. The US navy has dispatched though, we're not at war with Turkey. And we're not really sharing the spoils of the division of the of the Ottoman empire. The French and the British are extremely prominent we sail into Constantinople, and you paint the picture vividly. This is nineteen twenty twenty one that the remains of Gallipoli and the and the first war are everywhere with wreck ships with possible minds floating around with evidence of pirate havens on the on the shoreline. So this is not a restored Constantinople. Does the navy regarded as a good posting or is this a punishment posting what's the opinion of the sailors large? It depends not they're not always the same. But it was of course, a very romantic very, very. Fabled place. There were a great monuments on the headgear Sophia and many many great mosques on Sunday skyline. There were stories of of historic stories reaching back to Alexander, the great and the and before that the the with the Bosphorus strait and gone into Greece. And so all of that. And then as things that came around. All that. More and more of what the the the shitty was like began coming back story speaking come coming back to the states. And so it was a very very attractive thing for many, sailors. We need to meet the commander of the American flotilla the American ships. His name is Admiral Bristol, and you describe him. He's fifty years old his wife is Helen he described him as as a combination of amiable and stubborn was he regarded as a good commander by the the men in the in the destroyers cruisers. They were they were pretty much point. He was a very strong commander. And so they were on his side by large course, they knew nothing of the circumstances. They were going into and he more and more dominated their points of view. He was an old football player from the Napa since he was awfully awfully awfully genial. But you could assume an aggressive scowl what he wanted to an all did. Yes. You you. You have a wonderful photograph in your book of the Admiral scowling, I I guess he wasn't friendly to cameras, and he was a power that is not on. We don't have anything comparable today. Bob as I read it. He was more powerful than the ambassador and his word was law for not only the navy, but reporting back to Washington, it was that the nature of the navy in those days if you were an Admiral on scene you were God. Well, he was the in fact today facto ambassador, the other solos there were much sport it to impose this wheel up on them. Then they would have been America had not had since the war, although they didn't declare war on Turkey. But he was on scene. And so, and he talked to everybody there and learned everything, and so he was able to tell Washington his point of view and his point of view on more or less dominated in Washington is what was going on there. He was very knowledgeable. I am. Destroyers went throughout the black CHEN and so on and so he was very knowledgeable and all all that he came across right? They made regular calls. And so they were there was no internet. There were no satellites that were no airplanes following in this area. So a navy destroyer making calls in the Black Sea in the GM. That was fresh information. One other information to the Admiral. Yes, one in and then he cables Washington. One other major significant figure is Kamal Mustafa who is he in nineteen nineteen nineteen twenty when the Admiral arise. Well, he writes in nineteen nineteen and canal is the is not long after he gets there canal is set into by the allies into into conduct from Constantinople to continental Turkey to help solve some things the allies wanted to, but he had a different idea. And he starts a revolution. He begins to get people around him. And he begins in the far east of Turkey to to get all the Turks instead of the the Ottoman empire. The old Ottoman empire is falling and begins more and more to subsume all the governmental functions in deep continental Turkey. And he's a challenge to the Sultan. Does bristol. Bristol does Admiral Bristol have an opinion Bristol becomes very positive. Very favorable towards him. If he sees Canales the turkeys, George Washington very early on. He gets this opinion also realizes how powerful he is likely to be and Americans have been there American commissions have visited and the show him one of the generals who American general took exploratory journal says of back and who met the canal says this is no cheap political adventurer. He really does want to make of Turkey a nation in the in the I guess you'd have to say in the place of the old crumbling Ottoman empire. The book is America's Black Sea fleet. Robert shank, the US navy amidst war and revolution nineteen thousand nine hundred nineteen Twenty-three you can you you see the Turkish revolution. Well, the Admiral and the and the American contingent about to get overwhelmed by the Russian revolution to the north of the Black Sea. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. Balance of nature's.

Turkey navy Constantinople America Black Sea John Batchelor Robert shank Admiral Bristol US Tripoli Washington commander David Farragut Bob bristol Commodore Prebble Stephen Decatur Henry Morgan Commodore David porter
Russian Orthodox Church, Ukraine and Russia discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Russian Orthodox Church, Ukraine and Russia discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Worship. Russia's Orthodox church says it will cut all ties to the patriarch in Istanbul, home of the world's spiritual leader of a roughly what three hundred million orthodox Christians. This will do to Ukraine's quest for an independent church will tell me more. I'm joined on the line from Kiev in Ukraine by the journalist in Bates, welcome back to monocle twenty four in. Could you bring us up today about what led to this. Shirl- try their couple hundred years of orthodox history. That's always a little bit difficult to summarize of. But the big point is that Ukraine wanted to have its own independent orthodox church recognized by Constantinople or stem bull is it's usually cold today. The Russian Orthodox church is strongly opposed that as it would reduce their influence in the country, and in the end of the head of the orthodox church will the first amongst equals, came out in support of the cranium church. This is not greeted well either by Russian politicians or by the clergy, and they have decided to break relations with its Istanbul over that decisions and just explained his effect. This is to have the the global church. Russia has an awful lot of Russian Orthodox church has also lots of money, but it also has a lot of power. Sure. I mean, the first thing is that the Russian Orthodox church is the largest denomination of orthodoxy in the world. So in, you know, saying that it will no longer be in communion with Istanbul. It's also saying we are the most important we can go this alone if we need to sort of my way or the highway kind of thing. Now, it looks like Ukraine will probably be the battleground moving forward because there are a lot of Russian Orthodox believers. There's Thomas church connected to Moscow here in Ukraine, but there's also been a lot of change since the war started here in two thousand fourteen under President Putin. You know, many people have argued that the Russian worth texture ch has just become another ministry under the state that it fulfills his policies and his nother way of approaching that. And then Ukraine with stories bowed Russian Orthodox priests, hiding weapons, or even fighting with the separatists in support of Russia. There has been a large push to support Ukrainian church based here. So there's been a large turn. Over and it looks likely that will continue that something that Moscow is not happy about what has been the reaction from the west Mushipe themselves. This is really big politics. In Ukraine, this has been very exciting people felt like they were giving recognition because for Ukrainians this isn't a new church. They look back to the medieval kingdom of Kevin Roose whose recognition by Constantinople was later transfered in the seventeenth century to Moscow. So the that is recognition of their history, their tradition of something coming back to them. So there's been a lot of excitement. But in some ways, it's very hard to say how much of that is religious and how much of that is political or related to general patriotism, because it's a national church that they're hoping to create, not not an official church, but Snell one brain much linked with the cranium state at its borders today. The timing for this given the the churches do have schisms. Regular basis, but we have seen very much coverage in very much many attempts by Russia to exert its authority over Ukraine openly for a little while now, and one always wonders about the timing when Russia decides to stir something up well, in terms of the church issues, it's been interesting because for a number of different meetings, the Russian Orthodox church made it clear that they did not approve this recognition of Ukrainian Orthodox church that they wouldn't attend meetings. They didn't want to be involved. And that was kind of the equivalent of saying, okay, I don't like this discussion. I'm walking out discussions ended discussion continued, and so now they're moving towards this formal recognition.

Russian Orthodox Church Ukraine Russia Ukrainian Orthodox Church Istanbul Moscow Cranium Church Thomas Church Kiev Shirl Bates President Putin Constantinople Kevin Roose Snell Official Hundred Years
Russian Orthodox Church, Ecumenical Patriarchate Of Constantinople and Ukraine discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Russian Orthodox Church, Ecumenical Patriarchate Of Constantinople and Ukraine discussed on Here & Now

"The Russian Orthodox church is breaking ties with the head of the global orthodox community after the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople decided to grant Ukrainian clerics independence from the church in Moscow for the first time in hundreds of years since Russia annexed Crimea from Ukraine in two thousand fourteen calls for the cranium churches. Independence have

Russian Orthodox Church Ecumenical Patriarchate Of Con Ukraine Moscow Crimea
Russian church rebuffs Orthodoxy's leader after Ukraine move

The World

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Russian church rebuffs Orthodoxy's leader after Ukraine move

"Five rescue teams are trying to save residents trapped in their homes and cars reports in the US media say that in an intensification of the trade war between China and the United States. President Trump has instructed his officials to impose tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports Samir Hussein reports from New York US President Donald Trump has told his staff to move forward on a new round of duties on

United States Gaza Israel President Trump New Bern BBC Babbel New York Mateo Salvini Samir Hussein Moscow Ukraine Chemnitz Beijing China Russian Orthodox Church Tom Bateman Constantinople
"constantinople" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on WTVN

"Me tonight. Stephen Lukin Craig Constantinople boats certified financial planners and we're trying to walk our way through annuities. And. Give, you some ideas what's good bad and ugly so you can build. The best financial plan that you helped you succeed so you. Meet your goals so we're kind of up to what's the next little myth that we ought to. Hit here Stephen well if your head. Hasn't exploded yet. I'm gonna. Move onto your lifetime income could go up. After you turn on your your annuity and that's not always the case because what you need to be cautious of is, look at the Proposal and look at the what's the word I'm looking for now I lost Illustration. Illustrated's thank you So, the illustrations of what what kind of returner they showing and nine times, out of ten you you'll see some kind of maybe over exaggerated return based on what. Current markets are doing an example was back, in the late nineties you saw bull market and you could use an illustration of ten percent or, nine percent per year but just think to the last, ten or fifteen years? What's the average return so you got to be cautious of what the stations are showing you because that that guarantee of your lifetime income going up. May. Not, be, true exactly so okay so that's another myth and then the final. Miserable hit right now before we talk a little bit about taxes is your family will. Always get the full we'll, get the death benefit and that's often a big selling point that you. Can buy this, thing when you die your family. Gets a death benefit it's a little. More complicated than that so, as we discussed before, if you're drawing down say nine percent per year from your variable annuity that means at some, point during your lifetime you're gonna pull out more, money. Than is In your account, so guess.

Stephen Lukin Craig Constantin nine percent fifteen years ten percent
"constantinople" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on WTVN

"I'm john sestina with me tonight tony pain and craig constantinople both certified financial planners good evening guys to be here with you john yes sir well we're going to do a fun topic today there's all kinds of stuff going on in the news but will not going to touch that today most of it's good but what we're going to talk about is rearing those young ones that you all have out there you know this is the time of year they're home a lot but i saw a sign when i was driving down the street that said school reopens august fifteenth couldn't believe that when i was young kid it didn't open till after the holiday you know and then of course on the other side of things for memorial day you were going back to school after that too in a lot of schools cut it off there now that's exactly right so well you know you guys are messing it up it's not my fault well that's why we're here though today though you're hoping to impart some of those lessons that now it is summertime your home with the kids they may want that ice cream or perhaps they want that toy go to the pool something like that there's ways that you can we've in some lessons there to perhaps help them for later in life when they make bigger decisions yes sir we're talking about financial planning for your child raising a child to know how to deal about money what money is you know it's amazing that there are a few schools if any the teach money management financial planning at all yeah and so it's up to the parents then hopefully they have learned their lessons and they could begin to pass these onto the children so we're going to go through some stuff hopefully that'll help you with some ideas on how you can teach your child at all ages so well maybe not a toddler you know so dad will have a problem with his little girl has to grow up a little bit but nonetheless her to go through this and it's you know the money habits of people are just so remarkable we see that every day no matter what the age at the the myths that are out there the confusion and the mistakes and so on and so forth so let's go through this and let's talk about the first thing you need to do about money with a child the first thing you gotta do is make sure that you're talking about it it's not as high as most people think that it should be you got to have the conversation you got to let people know kind of what your thoughts are on the money and really those to your kids because they're not going to have a better role model than you as far as how they should be handling their finances exactly right and this is a time that's different from previous generations were they didn't want to talk about money at all especially their own money and i think we did a segment on the older generation passing information to the younger generation adult children as to what they're what they might inherit so this is different this is just talking about it you know it's like so many other things if you talk about it it's you feel more comfortable it doesn't pop out on you know the kid doesn't get scared when he hears the word money right so that's the first thing we want to do so now what do we do with the child so the biggest thing there too is to talk about positive reinforcement terms when it comes to money so talk about things like saving preparing making sure that you have opportunities to share that money that your choices are all based around the money that you make but you have that control not someone else so focusing on the positive side of managing money exactly right so and to that point then so one of those early lessons to really drill down and we're going to talk about it later on two different ways at different phases of childhood to handle this but the idea is early on get the idea of delaying gratification through it's so important that you're not going to get everything at once and if you can started early like you joking there with ted he may be doing this now he's big into behavioral yeah that.

john sestina craig constantinople tony pain
"constantinople" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Now you could make turks do that but turks aren't good at that for the most part they could be but it's not their forte y why force them to do it when you have in your empire people who are used to fighting in infantry tactics all of these christians living in southeastern europe and so they'll be recruited and trained and used and they are the best troops in the 1500s it they're the most technologically advanced they are highly disciplined in an age where it's still a medieval knight in a sword in a horse roaming around the battlefield these guys walked up in rows m schochet a pieces now his one point we didn't talk about and that's constantinople we talk about southeast europe we talked about asia minor we talked about egypt end the middle east we are not talk about constantinople and consensual finally falls and fifteen 1450 three excuse me it's fourteen 53 content it will falls the turks are going to lay siege to the city it is a major endeavor they are going to build some of the largest cannon up to that time in order to help break down those walls these this cannon that was so big you can only fired a couple times a day because it got so hot the metal would melt the metal would would deform and you'd have to actually kind of repair the guns you couldn't fire them too much so what this did what the conquest of constantinople dead whist turn egypt turn egypt turn constantinople.

europe asia constantinople egypt
"constantinople" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Arming a crap out of the kurds in northern syria because they don't like a past actions of kurds in syria visavis the turkish state that's not that's not okay that is not okay ida at at i am i am prokurdish and i tend to be very critical of turkey i'll be i want to be honest with all of you about that and you know i've met melville they can otherwise be you know they could have helped this open up a northern front in the iraq war but they said no by the way for their own domestic political reasons but that's a nother story for another time all right i got to roll who break here uh eight four four nine hundred buck and also don't forget shields high is out today the fall of constantinople i got to roll in who break here uh eight four four nine hundred buck and also don't forget shields high is out today the fall of constantinople part one is the podcast please do subscribe by the way i really love it when we get a new subscribers into the mix there it's a little more i'm taking a little bit more of a conversation will approach to this history will see if you like the storytelling better it's a little less scripted a little more khan off the cuff little more like i did the radio show because that's been some feedback that have gone so we'll try that this time round see how you all like it of a please do share you are the marketing mechanism for shields i there is nothing else it is you listening to the show you downloading it and from the show i'd like to get two hundred thousand though not to be greedy but it's free so please do downloaded um it's on i tuned you can also listen on the iheart app fall constantinople's an incredible story and it's one we should all know and once once we tackle this they'll be part two which i think will be out next monday.

time melville syria radio little iheart constantinople iraq
"constantinople" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Whoa yep in five hundred eighty i i literally didn't know there are that many humans at that point it was remarkable the devasation remember the 1918 influenza everyone i do fifty to one hundred million people died then which is a lot of people about an estimated three to six percent of the global population in the plague of justin ian at least thirteen percent of the global population died and that's without the disease reaching global distribution what if it had that number would be a lot higher so where was limited to mostly the region of like constantinople and like the so the eastern roman empire at the time and it spread a little bit into like north africa and a little bit further into like eastern asia blend it my god in the infected areas the death toll was really high hill god and constantinople during the peak of the epidemic five thousand people died every day i mean that happening in a modern city today would be unbelievable like i i can't there are no words new there really are no there are no words five thousand people a day jill dead there are roughly forty four thousand students at the university yeah total so how many days would it take for everyone to die if five thousand people died in a sop that's too depressing also it's math nine days my just nine days the population loss and result in chaos caused by the plague of justinian may have and probably did contribute to the downfall of the roman empire those like every disease talked about it so far a mob la off.

constantinople jill influenza justin ian north africa nine days thirteen percent six percent
"constantinople" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"So what does this mean this means god doesn't want us to have constantinople this means god is in on the side of odu my its see because here's the problem with you my kids they murdered the writefull khalif alley and more importantly like maybe we could justify you get rid of ali nor my belly but they also murdered because they had too otherwise it could have rebellions all over the place they murdered hassan and hussein the grandsons of mohammed and how does god allah feel about people murdering the grandchildren of his prophet not so good an obviously god has abandoned you maya dhs and that allows a new family the a bassett's to rise now the ambassadors are based at baghdad and they have a whole lot now they're sudanese as well but they have a whole lot of friends were shia especially all those persians out there in iran who have all been getting sh pooped on by do you my it's you might of very arab first so we don't like the burgers in north africa they don't like the persians in persia much less indians darrell like we're the chosen people were the arabs and he abaza's are like you guys don't lie do you my it we don't like you maya dhs the enemy of my.

ali hassan baghdad persia constantinople odu hussein mohammed north africa
"constantinople" Discussed on Only A Game

Only A Game

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on Only A Game

"So justinian raise taxes even on wealthy people and wealthy people do not like being taxed so the citizens of constantinople grew frustrated here's the ancient historian pro copious again not all the blues were willing to follow his leadership but there were plenty who were eager for civil war civil war may not have began at the chariot races but fights regularly broke out in the stands in that brings us to the year five thirty two it's really a powder keg and more happening 532 was that there was a fight in the hippodrome between the partisans of the blues and the greens the local police force which essentially is the imperial god waded in to separate the two sides and there was a tron seven men were sentenced to be hanged the hanging was scheduled for a few days later on the banks of the bosphorus the first five men were successfully executed and then the gallows collapsed as the loss pair were being hanged were not really sure why the gallows suddenly collapsed but the crowd took this is a sign that they wouldn't meant die and they waited in and rescued the two guys one of whom was agreed in one of whom was a blue and they haslem off to sanctuary in and thereby church so you have a situation where for once the blues and the greens in a sense a united against the government and that's really rentals thoughts going to the whole be wrong yes even more horribly wrong because at the next cherry race the partisans of the blues and greens returned to the hippodrome in rather than fight each other they suddenly saw showing.

civil war justinian constantinople haslem
"constantinople" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Reason why he went to spain and got the funds to explore the try to find a direct water route through to asia is because radical islam had taken control of constantinople okay that was in in fourteen ninety two actually 1450 three i'm sorry when the muslims controlled constantinople and so that cut off all overland routes from europe to asia for trade purposes because the muslims controlled part of your so columbus goes to the uh the king and queen of spain and and it was a twofold purpose reich one find a direct water route two eight you're so we could bypass lee moslem control of the overland trade routes and number two go find gold enriches in wealth so we could fight and defeat radical islam and spread christianity throughout the world that is the accurate history christopher columbus was one of the first warriors against radical islam a believe it or not and so that is something that is just it's amazing and of course they want to they accuse accuse him of genocide there couldn't be further from the truth in fact if you look at his writings and i've taken the time to read some of his writings rather than being cruel columbus was mostly benign and his interaction with native populations in the bahamas in a in a word there were deprivations and there was disease that came from europe with them to the local indian population since it wasn't intentional it is an unfortunate consequence when you have people of continents the mid and have not been exposed to these kinds of diseases but columbus strictly told his crew not to do things like murad or rape instead to treat the native people with respect and there are many examples in his writings where he gave instructions to that effect unfortunately most of the crimes against the native american populations columbus wasn't even in the in the land of the time that they occurred so yeah you had some bad ambriz committing bad acts against native populations in the bahamas and elsewhere but this smearing whether native americans of the bahamas uh they were ara walker and look hyon indians is what they recalled yeah those that that occupied the those i woes that part.

constantinople columbus spain christopher columbus bahamas native americans asia europe rape ara walker
"constantinople" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Far east but because of the fall of constantinople in 1450 three to the ottoman turks they were severed from the far east they would have to go go through what is now turkey and the middle east and europe was under the constant threat of conquest and so finding sea routes wasn't just a question of getting incredibly lucrative trading going all that was certainly very important gold spices were incredibly value double at the time but also they were trying to do an end run on the turks on the muslims who by seizing constantinople and 1450 three remember christopher columbus was born in 1450 one had effectively severed the land route between europe and what was the fall our east and the only way to get to the far east via ship would have been around what was the southern tip of africa later became known as the cape of good hope but as anybody with a globe or just a map or a basic understanding of global geography knows that's a really long way too go and this part of the tail i know you are already familiar with its that columbus decided that he was going to find a short cut to the indies but by the end easy actually thought he was going to be getting to japan and china now the italians and more specifically the city of genoa from which we get great salami by the way claim columbus as their own buds early on in his life in his twenties and '30s the most important place for him was portugal now we think of portugal now as that country that you sometimes forget about that is attached to spain but in the middle of the fifteen sen cherie portugal was a major oceangoing power both with aides merchan capacity and its navy it was portuguese ships at initially took the small islands that would be the way stations on the way to the new world of the azores his the canary islands and others that giat out into the atlantic far off the coast of what is now morocco and it was the portuguese who initially landed in west africa and looking for gold and found some of that but also so began the.

constantinople middle east christopher columbus europe genoa columbus cherie portugal africa japan china portugal spain morocco west africa
"constantinople" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"I'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show constantinople the ottoman empire we see it in american history right away with the birth of the us navy watt was tripoli in the marine him what was commodore prebble and the constitution and steven decatur that was about the cia our two parts of the ottoman empire that time at tripoli or along the north african post coast but that is part of the reach of the sultan in constantinople at the end of the first war that ottoman empire a long history of contact with america and with america's navy i mentioned the shores of tripoli but i learned from a wonderful new sweeping book about a small piece of constantinople where the us navy was a critical observer of the chaos of the at the ottoman empire america's black sea fleet by robert shank that commodore david porter called on the sublime port in constantinople in the eighteen 30s and in the 1860s david farragut was there in the 1890s the americans observed the contest between the armenians christians and the ottoman empire allen some pointing to the massacres the continued into the 20th century and the american ambassador henry morgan thought to turkey during the first war left a book of which he he was their thirteen to sixteen in which five chapters are devoted to his observations of the sufferings of the armenians throughout the ottoman empire what we now call turkey however i begin this story with the author by asking about why it is that the us navy following the end of the first war following the versailles treaty following the breakup of the ottoman empire why the us navy dispatched destroyers and navy personnel to constantinople why because we had not been at war with turkey so why are we doing their robert baba a very good evening to you thank you very much.

john batchelor us tripoli commodore prebble constantinople america robert shank henry morgan robert baba steven decatur cia david porter david farragut versailles navy
"constantinople" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"And die anyway there's this history of this cloth the suit gary my think it off with dates back to the fifth or sixth century and a and i'm glad you mentioned the constantinople shroud um and it uh and and the pom and everything which only is found in the holy land that is found on these objects in any way a uh there's been studies of this headcloth when it's full did uh you can see how the neil piercings by chop and they compare it to what's on the shroud so does your guest know anything about let's find out russ yes is uh your uh he was referring to with an excellent with called the who dairy i'm of oviedo which is oviedo spain and it has been there since the early run the fifteen or so so like the early seven history and did uh there does appear to be a strong correlation with the with the with the blood on this clause down now now there is no image on the on the area but there is a pattern of bloodstains as well as as a voters plural fluid now theory behind the dairy um is that this clause about the small about the size of a small bath towels about about twenty by thirty inches and this cloth uh would've would've we've been used to cover jesus as faith after he died but before he was taken down from the cross so in other words it is a tradition and jewish culture at most culture here's to cover the faith of the that and so you know you could imagine you know jesus having given up the ghost these these i've there is got he's got blood coming on its face everywhere stuff coming out of his nose and mouth and eyes are open and and so probably one of.

gary oviedo spain constantinople thirty inches
"constantinople" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"constantinople" Discussed on KTRH

"And die anyway there's this history of this cloth gary thicke it also dates back to the fifth century a and i'm glad you mentioned the constantinople shroud um and it uh and and the bombing and everything which only found in the holy land that is found on these objects in any way a uh there's been studies of this headcloth when it's all did uh you can see how the neil cures scenes spy chop and then compare it to what's on the shroud so does your guest know anything about car right let's find out russ do you know anything about the head shroud yes he's a year of he was referring to with an excellent call it's called the sudaerien daria of oviedo which is oviedo spain and it has been there since the early around the fifteen or so with so like the early seventh century and it uh there does appear to be a strong correlation with the with the with the blood on this clause down now now there is no image on the on the area but there is a pattern of bloodstains as well as as as little floral fluid now the theory behind the hit the area is that this clause about the small about the size of a small bath towels about about twenty by thirty inches and this cloth uh would've would've been used to cover jesus is faith after he died but before he was taken down from the cross so in other words you it is a tradition and jewish culture at most cultures to cover the faith of the dead and so you know if you could imagine you know jesus heavy give update goes i have their got he's got blood coming on his face everywhere the coming out of his nose and mouth and eyes are open and and so probably one of the woman went up to the fury that they may we cover his faith and he said sure yeah go ahead be quick about it and that put a little steps stool up to the crossing rap this cloth around the faith while they're waiting for permission to take the body down and bring it to the to the tomb owned by joe.

russ oviedo spain constantinople neil joe thirty inches