38 Burst results for "Constance"

Fresh update on "constance" discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

03:51 min | 35 min ago

Fresh update on "constance" discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"That's made me very sad. But the teacher who accused me, I did not when I wrote it, but I did reach out to her ten years after it happened when I was in college and going through a lot of therapy because it's still within my heart and I called into yours trying to prove to her. I was like, hey, remember me in 8th grade? I really wrote that, and it was wrong with you to do that to a kid. Like, oh my God. I tried to give her a piece of my mind. It didn't work. The writing essay was much more healing. Yeah, I bet I'm glad that you did that. Yeah. And I wish that mister frizzell was still alive for me to thank him by the time I wrote that and realized that he had passed away unfortunately. It's amazing the gifts. I mean, I hope everybody has a teacher like that. I don't think everybody does, but I certainly had a couple. It's so meaningful that stays with you. Like whatever it is they gave you or they defended. For you or they helped shape stays with you for your whole entire life. Your whole life, yeah. Was writing your book enormously cathartic because there you are actually like to write a book like it's quite something, I think, to tell your stories to open up. Did that feel like it answered some of that in a larger way. For yourself? Yeah, 100% because I might have told that story a million times in therapy. The telling of it versus the putting it down in language makes you think about it in a different way. And it actually makes it kind of more real. It's funny because it's like, sometimes it feels like physical wounds feel more real than emotional wounds because you have the scar to prove it, right? But emotional wounds have just as much of an effect on you. And it's almost feels like putting it down in written language is like the physical proof that it happened to you. And I think that's why it was healing. Because it opens the wound into the physical area so see it. This is the thing that happens. Now that I've put it in language, I can help give it to the time and care it needs to heal. And so it was yes, talk is great. I've been in therapy for like decades and I love it, but writing it down in language is something that is definitely very underrated and with healing. Talking is more cathartic, writing was more healing. Yeah, that's a really good way of putting it, talking as cathartic, writing is healing, yes. Exactly. I was told to journal. It's hard. I was told to journal so often, and it's so hard to do it, but it was actually easy to then go, you know, it's not the journaling. I need to write these hard stories. I need to or I want to try and I think exactly what you're saying. You need a structure to it. Yes. Isn't that interesting that rather than it like calcifying as you say it? I love that idea of words as scar tissue of proof of emotional trauma, even with a small tea or a big team. Yeah. Constants, thank you so much. I so appreciate your time. It's great talking to you. It really is fantastic. Well, thank you. I appreciate that. You can enjoy more of Constance's stories in her new book, making a scene out now. Many questions is hosted and written by me, many driver. Supervising producer, Aaron Kaufman, producer, Morgan lavoy, research assistant Marissa Brown. Original music, Surrey baby, by many driver. Additional music by Aaron Kaufman. Executive produced by me, Minnie Driver. Special thanks to Jim nicolay. We'll Pearson, Addison O'Day. Lisa costella and a unique oppenheim, a. De la pescado, Kate driver and Jason Weinberg and for constantly solicited tech support, Henry driver.

Mister Frizzell Aaron Kaufman Morgan Lavoy Marissa Brown Constance Jim Nicolay Lisa Costella Minnie Driver Surrey De La Pescado Pearson Addison Jason Weinberg Kate Henry
"constance" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

05:35 min | 35 min ago

"constance" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"That's made me very sad. But the teacher who accused me, I did not when I wrote it, but I did reach out to her ten years after it happened when I was in college and going through a lot of therapy because it's still within my heart and I called into yours trying to prove to her. I was like, hey, remember me in 8th grade? I really wrote that, and it was wrong with you to do that to a kid. Like, oh my God. I tried to give her a piece of my mind. It didn't work. The writing essay was much more healing. Yeah, I bet I'm glad that you did that. Yeah. And I wish that mister frizzell was still alive for me to thank him by the time I wrote that and realized that he had passed away unfortunately. It's amazing the gifts. I mean, I hope everybody has a teacher like that. I don't think everybody does, but I certainly had a couple. It's so meaningful that stays with you. Like whatever it is they gave you or they defended. For you or they helped shape stays with you for your whole entire life. Your whole life, yeah. Was writing your book enormously cathartic because there you are actually like to write a book like it's quite something, I think, to tell your stories to open up. Did that feel like it answered some of that in a larger way. For yourself? Yeah, 100% because I might have told that story a million times in therapy. The telling of it versus the putting it down in language makes you think about it in a different way. And it actually makes it kind of more real. It's funny because it's like, sometimes it feels like physical wounds feel more real than emotional wounds because you have the scar to prove it, right? But emotional wounds have just as much of an effect on you. And it's almost feels like putting it down in written language is like the physical proof that it happened to you. And I think that's why it was healing. Because it opens the wound into the physical area so see it. This is the thing that happens. Now that I've put it in language, I can help give it to the time and care it needs to heal. And so it was yes, talk is great. I've been in therapy for like decades and I love it, but writing it down in language is something that is definitely very underrated and with healing. Talking is more cathartic, writing was more healing. Yeah, that's a really good way of putting it, talking as cathartic, writing is healing, yes. Exactly. I was told to journal. It's hard. I was told to journal so often, and it's so hard to do it, but it was actually easy to then go, you know, it's not the journaling. I need to write these hard stories. I need to or I want to try and I think exactly what you're saying. You need a structure to it. Yes. Isn't that interesting that rather than it like calcifying as you say it? I love that idea of words as scar tissue of proof of emotional trauma, even with a small tea or a big team. Yeah. Constants, thank you so much. I so appreciate your time. It's great talking to you. It really is fantastic. Well, thank you. I appreciate that. You can enjoy more of Constance's stories in her new book, making a scene out now. Many questions is hosted and written by me, many driver. Supervising producer, Aaron Kaufman, producer, Morgan lavoy, research assistant Marissa Brown. Original music, Surrey baby, by many driver. Additional music by Aaron Kaufman. Executive produced by me, Minnie Driver. Special thanks to Jim nicolay. We'll Pearson, Addison O'Day. Lisa costella and a unique oppenheim, a. De la pescado, Kate driver and Jason Weinberg and for constantly solicited tech support, Henry driver.

mister frizzell Aaron Kaufman Morgan lavoy Marissa Brown Constance Jim nicolay Lisa costella Minnie Driver Surrey De la pescado Pearson Addison Jason Weinberg Kate Henry
"constance" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:51 min | 40 min ago

"constance" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Last meal? Wow. Probably Japanese chicken curry. It's like a comfort food for me and my mom used to make that like I just even thinking about how she would be like browning the onions and the skillet before making it. I love it, it's so good. Does she teach you how to cook? Nope. You don't cook. I don't cook she taught me a little bit of a little bit. I take it back. She tried to teach me how to cook. I didn't pay attention. Does she teach you younger sister? No, my younger sister is probably the same as me. My older two sisters are much better cooks. And I think she probably taught them better. I feel like the older kids, they have a more thorough experience with everything, right? Because by the younger kids, the parents are like, fuck it. I have a get on with it. I'm exhausted. Yeah, like do whatever you want, who cares? Yeah, exactly. It's funny my son is becoming a better cook now. How old is he? He was 14 yesterday. Oh my God. Yeah, it's bananas. Has it gone by so fast? That. I know, it's crazy. You don't feel you just don't feel any older. I don't feel any older. I don't feel any different. I don't feel any different than I was when I was 26. I mean, I thank God and very different, but I don't feel any different at all from the day that I had a minute it's the weirdest thing. In the new sneakers that I gave him, he is now taller than me. Oh my God, it's amazing. It's crazy. Like, I'm there still going. Do you remember when we did? He's like, yeah, I totally remember that. It was awesome. Now she would go get burgers, and I'm like, oh, I suppose so. And now he takes my hand across the street. Oh my God. Like I'm a little old lady. It's the nicest thing I have to say. How beautiful. He's fantastic. How old is your daughter? She just turned two. Oh my God, she's a baby bird. Oh my God, it's so fun though, just watching her become a person to go from this little nugget who like the other day I gave her my almost empty LaCroix can because if I give her a full one, she'll just dump the whole thing out. And she took it and tried to simp from it. Then she goes, nothing there. Thank you now. This is two year old, you know? She still goes in the corner to announce that she's pooping, you know? Like in her diaper. Oh my God, I love it. I know it's really fun. Nothing there. You can't fool me. There's nothing left in this one. Nothing here. Nothing in this can. I know they do go from being these little drunk blobs. Totally. Just sort of teetering and then suddenly they turn around and they're like, and they're also remembered they're getting the measure of us. That sort of watching and observing and going. Like, I know this person is going to give me absolutely everything. But how can I manipulate the rest? Out of them. Yeah, they're clever. They're clever and smart and we made them. Yeah. And it's our own fault. Hey, it's mini driver. What if you had insights into your genetics that could help you live healthier? How would you use that knowledge to change your life? You can hear me talk with 23andMe CEO Anne wojcicki about how insights from our DNA can affect our health journeys and the new season of the podcast spit from iHeartRadio and 23andMe. This season host baratunde Thurston explores how more and more people are finding out that DNA is more than ancestry. It's a key to understanding your health, your genetic profile can tell you if you are at an increased likelihood for developing a particular condition. Its knowledge that can help you make smarter choices about your health and your lifestyle. And the new season you'll hear me and 22 other podcasters and influencers discuss what genetics taught us about ourselves and how that knowledge can impact the way we live our lives. Listen to my episode out now on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts. The CVS Health commitment to women is here. We know that women's physical, mental and sexual health matters. That's why we're offering new women's health services available 7 days a week. Here, period health matters. So we're reducing prices on CVS Health brand period products by 25% and our goal is to eliminate the tax on period products nationwide because at CVS Health, healthier happens together. Learn more at CVS dot com slash women. Doing household chores can be very time consuming in tedious. And there's nothing more daunting than facing piles of laundry that need to be done. I mean, that can be overwhelming, and that was my last night, and it's pretty much my every other night. If you want to get those larger laundry loads done and get back to your life, try all free, clear mega packs. All free clear mega packs are bigger packs with two times the cleaning ingredients compared to a regular pack so you can tackle any laundry load with confidence. Now all I need is a bigger industrial size washer and dryer. All free clear mega packs are also 100% free of perfumes and dyes and gentle on skin, which is great for any family sensitive skin needs. So the next time that the whole family gets home from a long vacation or the kids get back from summer camp or whatever the situation that has you staring at a giant pile of dirty clothes, just know that all free clear mega packs have your back. They have mine between spit up, Dawson learning how to eat and Jared working at a restaurant. I see those loads. All the time. Today you could purchase all free clear mega packs at your local store. Today and conquer any laundry load. In your life, can you tell me about something that has grown out of a personal disaster? Yeah, you know, I mentioning my book a lot, but because my book is very formative for me and there's a chapter in which I talk about a thing that happened to me in 8th grade that I could never get over the pain of. And I've had objectively worse things happen to me in my life. It was just basically a teacher accusing me of not really writing my term paper and plagiarizing. But it's something that I just could never get over from when I'm 12 to now when I'm 40, still can't get over. But in the process of writing it, I took the time to think about how it also helped me. In a way that's so obvious, right? That I can't believe it took me, you know, almost 30 years to realize because she thought I plagiarized. She didn't have any proof because I didn't plagiarize. So what she did was she went to all my other teachers and made them say to my face. Like, I don't believe you're good enough to have written it. And that was her proof. I know it's gonna make me cry even talking about it now because it was like because you can't find the proof, you know, you're gonna make all the teachers say to my face, you're not good enough, but the only teacher who believes that I was good enough to have written it was my drama teacher. And I'm like, oh my God, how did it take me 30 years to realize that the only teacher? And I didn't use someone to be an actress who believed in me was my drama teacher, and I ended up becoming an actress. I mean, it's like, it's crazy to think about, but that's definitely something that has stuck with me and I didn't realize for 30 years how it has shaped me and helped me in a way that I really appreciate because I was just focusing on the pain of it so much. I'm really sorry that happened. Oh, it's okay. No, it's the worst. It's the word to be accused of something that you didn't do. And to not be able to put that down. That 8th grade teacher and my job teacher, mister frizzle, who believed in me, that really altered my life. Did you talk to your drama teacher about that whole thing? He unfortunately passed away. I looked back for him when I was writing it and I realized it and he passed away. I think he had a heart attack a while ago. So

CVS andMe Anne wojcicki LaCroix Thurston Dawson Jared mister frizzle heart attack
"constance" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

05:16 min | 48 min ago

"constance" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Is going to happen anyway? Because at least then you have both. But I truly wonder because I don't know because I don't talk to him anymore and not because we're on bad terms. We're not, but because it was just like, you know, when you have a connection with somebody that's so deep that even talking to them, re sparks this thing that you can't. You know it's not gonna work out because you tried a million times, so it's just like, all right, this is my kryptonite. So maybe let's just not. But you know, I'll always love him and carry love for him and want nothing but happiness for him. So I do genuinely wonder if he ever suffered over it if his pain protection plan worked or not. I wonder. Wow, I don't know. I wonder in the absence of vulnerability. I don't know. I don't think you can get the full experience of anything without a certain level of vulnerability. I really don't. Yeah. I would say that in like tennis lessons all the way through to love. Yeah. And shopping. There has to be a level of revealing the soft underbelly, I think. Yeah, you have to, it's like the light of the dark, like we said earlier, one doesn't exist without the others. So you have to accept both in order to have the full experience. But he didn't think so. So I wonder. I don't know. I had that with a dude. I had that with a dude and it's so funny. It came around like literally 18 years later of him coming and saying, this is why that happened and he didn't end up with someone that he loved. He ended up with somebody who could accommodate the way in which he wanted to live his life. Yes. And he was like, I never wanted to be in love with you because if I was in love with you, I know I would have hurt you because there was all this other stuff that I couldn't do. I couldn't let it in. Yeah. But there was something about the acknowledging that was satisfying. You know, and me and this guy, he did do that also ten years later after our first breakup. Oh. And so then I was like, oh my God, this is finally the time. And I thought he had changed. But he had changed enough that he could understand that, but fears and ego eventually crept in. And he wasn't able to sustain it. But I'm proud of myself because, you know, I basically like let him break my heart three times over the course of 15 years. Yikes. Every time thinking something would change, but I guess it didn't, I guess history repeats itself, which is why I'm not talking to him ever again because let's not repeat more history, right? Well, and you never run into him? No, no. He lives in New York, first of all. Okay. And we run in very different circles. Great. I think that whole definition of insanity of doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. Sometimes you have to just admit that with people. But it's hard because you always think you want to be able to accommodate change and growth and the idea that that is possible, but I think honestly sometimes it isn't. And also like I could believe that he's changed without having to be there to witness it. Ah, I could think about like, oh, you know what? That's why the answer to your question is I wonder if that's worked out for him. Because I know that he was working on things. And I do wish nothing but the best for him, but I could still hold faith that his life is going to work out in a beautiful way without having to be the one who's around when it works out that way. Because that's part of my ability to change too, right? To not engage in that again. Yeah. Yeah. What quality do you like least about yourself? I could be a little impatient. With people or just in general. With tasks, you know, and I'm just thinking like asking your boyfriend to take out the garbage. That's the thing that should be done when it's asked for not three days later when more garbage is piled up. And then he's like, oh, but I did take it out. And I'm like, yes, three days after I ask you. You know, these very common domestic squabbles, but yeah, sort of like to do list type of things that should seem very ordinary. I get impatient when they're procrastinated upon. Can I ask you because I know that you come from a lot of women in your family? Yes. Do you have four sisters or three or one of four? And one of four. So four girls in my family. So is everybody very different? Or is that something that came from your family of listen? There ain't time. There's too many kids, there's too much stuff to be done, and if I ask you to do something, you better do it right then. I feel like half and half, I feel like two of us are kind of impatient with tasks and the other two are much more relaxed about it. I guess you had to have someone to be impatient with. Yeah, yeah. There's two pairs of us. So it's like my older two sisters are only a year apart. Oh, wow. And myself and my younger sister are only two years apart, and there's a big gap in the middle. So I feel like each pair balances each other out. So in the older pair, there's somebody who is more on task and somebody who's more lax. And then the younger pair, like I'm the extrovert, my little sister is the introvert. We kind of balance each other out as how it worked. That's really cool. I like that. Yeah, me and my sister. Sometimes we switch roles. That's the weird thing. Sometimes I'll be the Taskmaster and Shelby, the supplicant, and then we flip.

tennis New York Shelby
"constance" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:32 min | 53 min ago

"constance" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Talks about that enough. The nurse that was like holding my leg as she was like, it's like you're taking a big poop. She kept saying that as I was pushing. Did you sky got so scared that that was what was going to happen? I was like, I just don't want to poo on the doctor. I don't want to do that whole thing. I accepted that it was going to happen because everybody told me like, you know what? It's going to happen. And I don't know if it happened, obviously, because I had an epidural, and they're not going to tell you that. The doctor's not going to be like, by the way, you should right in front of me. Yeah, it's like, I also shot a baby, man. Like, come on, I'm not shabby. That's not terrible, but I pushed out a baby. Definitely my happiest moment. Because in the aftermath of, oh my God, I got it out. Mixed in with, oh, I have my dear little baby. Yeah, who you've been waiting to meet for like 9 months and she was so like, not that babies can see when they're first born, but she was so in wonder of the world and taking it in and it was just the most beautiful thing to see and to hold her against your skin and like to see that face, this person you've been carrying inside you. I mean, it's truly the happiest ever. It is, right? They told me I was having a girl. The doctor had told me the wrong thing. I was a surprise. I wanted love to be the first word that she heard when she came out. So as I was having the baby and pushing, I was like. Can I push the baby in? And it's a boy and my mother goes, oh my goodness, it's a boy. And I went, what the fuck? That's amazing. So that was the first thing to miss on her. But it is. It's remarkable that they are this is certainly these little aliens. But isn't that the perfect encapsulation of life sometimes is love and what the fuck? I mean, together a 100%. And also happiness, like I was just talking to my friend fern today. We are so obsessed with the idea that happiness is not an adjunct to all the other shit. It's the bit that saves us, but it's often the kind of corridor through all the stuff that doesn't work out. Yeah. The idea of it being untainted that love being untainted by what the fuck is ridiculous. Their part and parcel. They don't exist without each other. And it probably symbiotic and wouldn't exist without the other one. Yeah, it's like life doesn't exist without dark, dark doesn't exist black lights. You got to find gratitude for both things. A 100%. How does that happen though? I feel like in this day and age, they wouldn't see on the ultrasound. Like, oh no, actually we were wrong. This isn't like, that's crazy. Well, it turns out, with all the love in the world and I'm not even going to name check him because I love him. And he still delivering babies. But he was like, the gaffe doctor of all time. He told more people like the gender when they didn't want to know the thing with the thing that was a whole lot of mister magoo ism around my beautiful o-b-gyn. So he told me I was having a girl and then I burst into tears because I don't want to know. Oh, he didn't. And so then he wrote on my chart, never mentioned the gender again, so then at all the other ultrasounds, they could see, but he completely forgot that he'd said it was a gun. They could see that it was a boy, and nobody said anything ever again, until I had the baby. That makes sense. Hey, it's mini driver. What if you had insights into your genetics that could help you live healthier? How would you use that knowledge to change your life? You can hear me talk with 23andMe CEO Anne wojcicki about how insights from our DNA can affect our health journeys and the new season of the podcast spit from iHeartRadio and 23andMe. This season host baratunde Thurston explores how more and more people are finding out that DNA is more than ancestry. It's a key to understanding your health, your genetic profile can tell you if you are at an increased likelihood for developing a particular condition. Its knowledge that can help you make smarter choices about your health and your lifestyle and the new season you'll hear me and 22 other podcasters and influencers discuss what genetics taught us about ourselves and how that knowledge can impact the way we live our lives. Listen to my episode out now on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts. The CVS Health commitment to women is here. We know that women's physical, mental and sexual health matters. That's why we're offering new women's health services available 7 days a week. Here, period health matters. So we're reducing prices on CVS Health brand period products by 25 percent and our goal is to eliminate the tax on period products nationwide because at CVS Health, healthier happens together. Learn more at CVS dot com slash women. Doing household chores can be very time consuming in tedious. And there's nothing more daunting than facing piles of laundry that need to be done. I mean, that can be overwhelming, and that was my last night, and it's pretty much my every other night. If you want to get those larger laundry loads done and get back to your life, try all free, clear mega packs. All free clear mega packs are bigger packs with two times the cleaning ingredients compared to a regular pack so you can tackle any laundry load with confidence. Now all I need is a bigger industrial size washer and dryer. All free clear mega packs are also 100% free of perfumes and dyes and gentle on skin, which is great for any family sensitive skin needs. So the next time that the whole family gets home from a long vacation or the kids get back from summer camp or whatever the situation that has you staring at a giant pile of dirty clothes, just know that all free clear mega packs have your back. They have mine between spit up, Dawson learning how to eat and Jared working at a restaurant. I see those loads. All the time. Today you could purchase all free clear mega packs at your local store. Today and conquer any laundry load. What question would you most like answered? How to fold the fitted sheet? I don't know. I mean, you can have that because I'm with you on that one. I've looked up on the Internet how to do it. And I get there's a way, but it's not really exactly how I would want it to be. It's not neat. I agree with you. And also I don't accept the imperfection. I think we all spend a lot of time trying to accommodate imperfection and we're told that everything is imperfect, which is completely accurate. There's something about a fitted sheet. It feels personal and it also feels just like bad design. And that nobody thought it through and that there were all kinds of ramifications that pissed me off. Yeah. That's one that's a practical one. You know, there's an ex lover of mine who I had a very long love that they are off and on for over a decade. I write about him in my book and the final time we broke up 'cause he broke up that many times. You know, he said he didn't want to commit because he was trying to protect himself from being hurt. And I wonder if that worked out for him. If he suffered over it, because I mostly have a feeling that you can't ever protect yourself from pain without blocking yourself from love. So I have a feeling that they still does suffer over it. So the pain protection plan doesn't work. So if it didn't work, then why not just choose love if pain

andMe Anne wojcicki CVS Thurston Dawson Jared
"constance" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

04:59 min | 1 hr ago

"constance" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"My guest today is actor Constance Wu. Constance has starred in the film's Crazy Rich Asians, hustlers, and the TV series fresh off the boat. She's been included in Time Magazine's list of the hundred most influential people in the world, and she has just had a new book published. Her book, making a scene, is a series of essays that delve into her memories of childhood, young love and heartbreak, and more devastatingly, sexual assault and harassment. It was really interesting reading about her experience of life inside Hollywood, and her stories offer a behind the scenes look at being Asian American in the entertainment industry, and the continuing evolution of her own identity and influence in the public eye. We bonded over a shared love of margaery Williams 1922 book, the velveteen rabbit, and I really, really enjoyed our conversation. What relationship real or fictionalised defines love for you? I write about this in my book. There's a chapter called real love. And it's actually about my pet bunny rabbit. And I'm not saying that my pet bunny rabbit epitomizes real love because I have had greater love affairs than the one with my pet. But in the end, I talk about a section in that children's book, the velveteen rabbit. Oh yeah. Where he talks about what is real and what is real love and it's not about how you're made and the skin horse says something like usually by the time you're real, all your hair has been loved off and your eyes have dropped out and you're really shabby and it hurts sometimes. But it doesn't matter because by the time you're real, that kind of thing doesn't matter. And if somebody thinks that matters, then they just don't understand. That story, I think, really epitomizes real love, velveteen rabbit. I think that was probably the first book that I cried with my mother about. It's beautiful. Gosh, that's such a gentle choice of a definition of love and over book as well. It's funny the wisdom you find in a kid's book. I know. You don't think you've would, but then there's just such moving wisdom and developing rabbit is a perfect example of that. I agree. It's beautiful. I'm really sad. We read that along with this book called the water babies, which is another unfathomably English book that is super, super sad, but you think it's a kids book about kids who would like chimney sweeps. You know in the Victorian era, they would send little children because they were tiny and they could fit up the chimneys and they could clean them out. Oh my God. It was a uniquely British sort of torture small children. Anyway, it's about one of these little chimney sweeps and how he comes down into the bedroom of this girl in the fancy house and becomes her friend and it is about friendship and about love. But of course because it's, I guess it was written in like the 1920s. Like the child he dies in the end. And I remember like closing the book and being like, you can't. This can't be real. Like he can't actually. He can't actually die and my mother was like, yes, he did. Shall we watch Sesame Street? But in a way, this is how children's books are deep because it's like, these are real life things that happen that children are going to have to understand. I mean, I got to read that book, man. Not the water, the water babies. It's cool the water babies, and it's listen. When I say that he dies, he does die because I did a lot of research into the book, but there's this whole world that he goes into underneath the water. And you realize that it's the death process. Right, it's a metaphor. And he finds all these characters and all these people and you realize that the writer was really trying to say that there is freedom and death from the kind of the poverty and oppression of the suffering of human experience. However, as a little child, it's pretty devastating but also I don't know it stayed with me my whole life in the same way those are the two books the velveteen rabbit and the water babies were the two books from my childhood that I will reread them and love them. And there's a reason why they're classics because they were able to just hit that spot in your heart. Exactly. I'm going to go and reread. It's your bunny current. Yes. She's still downstairs right now. She's 9 years old. Funny, does she go to sit with you ever? She does. She comes in my trailer almost every day. In her eye has also dropped out just like developing rabbit. She only has one eye. It didn't drop out. I had to remove it because she had a cataract and like whatever. But it's funny the parallel. Oh my gosh. It is funny the parallels. In Chinese astrology. Are you a rabbit? I wish. No, I'm a dog. What are you? I'm a dog. Really? Yes. Oh, that's funny. So cool. Yeah. But they get on really well with rabbits. Yes, they do. And everybody loves a dog. Who doesn't love a dog? Bad people. Bad people don't like dogs. That's it. I'm sorry.

Constance Wu margaery Williams Constance Time Magazine Hollywood
Fresh update on "constance" discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

00:42 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "constance" discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"My guest today is actor Constance Wu. Constance has starred in the film's Crazy Rich Asians, hustlers, and the TV series fresh off the boat. She's been included in Time Magazine's list of the hundred most influential people in the world, and she has just had a new book published. Her book, making a scene, is a series of essays that delve into her memories of childhood, young love and heartbreak, and more devastatingly, sexual assault and harassment. It was really interesting reading about her experience of life inside Hollywood, and her stories offer a behind the scenes look at being Asian American in the entertainment industry, and the continuing evolution of her own identity and influence in the public eye. We bonded over a shared love of margaery Williams 1922 book, the velveteen rabbit, and I really, really enjoyed our conversation. What relationship real or fictionalised defines love for you? I write about this in my book. There's a chapter called real love. And it's actually about my pet bunny rabbit. And I'm not saying that my pet bunny rabbit epitomizes real love because I have had greater love affairs than the one with my pet. But in the end, I talk about a section in that children's book, the velveteen rabbit. Oh yeah. Where he talks about what is real and what is real love and it's not about how you're made and the skin horse says something like usually by the time you're real, all your hair has been loved off and your eyes have dropped out and you're really shabby and it hurts sometimes. But it doesn't matter because by the time you're real, that kind of thing doesn't matter. And if somebody thinks that matters, then they just don't understand. That story, I think, really epitomizes real love, velveteen rabbit. I think that was probably the first book that I cried with my mother about. It's beautiful. Gosh, that's such a gentle choice of a definition of love and over book as well. It's funny the wisdom you find in a kid's book. I know. You don't think you've would, but then there's just such moving wisdom and developing rabbit is a perfect example of that. I agree. It's beautiful. I'm really sad. We read that along with this book called the water babies, which is another unfathomably English book that is super, super sad, but you think it's a kids book about kids who would like chimney sweeps. You know in the Victorian era, they would send little children because they were tiny and they could fit up the chimneys and they could clean them out. Oh my God. It was a uniquely British sort of torture small children. Anyway, it's about one of these little chimney sweeps and how he comes down into the bedroom of this girl in the fancy house and becomes her friend and it is about friendship and about love. But of course because it's, I guess it was written in like the 1920s. Like the child he dies in the end. And I remember like closing the book and being like, you can't. This can't be real. Like he can't actually. He can't actually die and my mother was like, yes, he did. Shall we watch Sesame Street? But in a way, this is how children's books are deep because it's like, these are real life things that happen that children are going to have to understand. I mean, I got to read that book, man. Not the water, the water babies. It's cool the water babies, and it's listen. When I say that he dies, he does die because I did a lot of research into the book, but there's this whole world that he goes into underneath the water. And you realize that it's the death process. Right, it's a metaphor. And he finds all these characters and all these people and you realize that the writer was really trying to say that there is freedom and death from the kind of the poverty and oppression of the suffering of human experience. However, as a little child, it's pretty devastating but also I don't know it stayed with me my whole life in the same way those are the two books the velveteen rabbit and the water babies were the two books from my childhood that I will reread them and love them. And there's a reason why they're classics because they were able to just hit that spot in your heart. Exactly. I'm going to go and reread. It's your bunny current. Yes. She's still downstairs right now. She's 9 years old. Funny, does she go to sit with you ever? She does. She comes in my trailer almost every day. In her eye has also dropped out just like developing rabbit. She only has one eye. It didn't drop out. I had to remove it because she had a cataract and like whatever. But it's funny the parallel. Oh my gosh. It is funny the parallels. In Chinese astrology. Are you a rabbit? I wish. No, I'm a dog. What are you? I'm a dog. Really? Yes. Oh, that's funny. So cool. Yeah. But they get on really well with rabbits. Yes, they do. And everybody loves a dog. Who doesn't love a dog? Bad people. Bad people don't like dogs. That's it. I'm sorry.

Constance Wu Margaery Williams Constance Time Magazine Hollywood
"constance" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

03:33 min | 1 hr ago

"constance" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Hey, it's mini driver. What if you had insights into your genetics that could help you live healthier? How would you use that knowledge to change your life? You can hear me talk with 23andMe CEO Anne wojcicki about how insights from our DNA can affect our health journeys and the new season of the podcast spit from iHeartRadio and 23andMe. This season host baratunde Thurston explores how DNA isn't just about ancestry. It's a key to understanding your health when the new season you'll hear me and 22 other podcasters and influencers discuss what genetics taught us about ourselves and how that knowledge can impact the way we live our lives. Listen to my episode out now on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts. The economy is crazy right now. All time high inflation very stock market rising home prices and interest rates make your money go further and work harder with a certified financial planner professional from facet wealth, certified financial planner professionals, and fiduciaries. They're legally bound to do what's in your best interest. Facet has a simple flat fee, no hidden charges. There are no commissions. Try facet wealth dot com, TRY, FACT wealth dot com. That's a wealth is an SEC registered investment adviser. This is not an offer to buy your cell security, nor is it investment legal or tax advice. These days, our health feels front and center, with many of us monitoring our symptoms today in hopes of a healthy tomorrow. But what about tomorrow's tomorrow? Forward is focusing on your long-term health by building the world's first long-term doctor. That means smarter preventive care, with biometric monitoring, real-time lab results, and 24/7 access to care and a smarter way to do it. One flat B with no copays. Visit go forward dot com slash iHeart today to join for just $99 a month. Go forward dot com slash iHeart. There's something about a fitted sheet. It feels personal and it also feels just like bad design and that nobody thought it through and that there were all kinds of ramifications that pissed me off. I've looked up on the Internet how to do it and I get there's a way, but it's not really exactly how I would want it to be. It's not neat. Hello, I'm Minnie Driver. Welcome to the mini questions season two. I've always loved priests, questionnaire. It was originally a 19th century parlor game where players would ask each other 35 questions aimed at revealing the other players true nature. It's just the scientific method really in asking different people the same set of questions. You can make observations about which truths appear to be universal. I love this discipline. And it made me wonder, what if these questions were just the jumping off point? What greater depths would be revealed if I asked these questions as conversation starters with thought leaders and trailblazers across all these different disciplines. So I adapted Proust questionnaire and I wrote my own 7 questions that I personally think are pertinent to a person's story. They are. When and where were you happiest? What is the quality you like least about yourself? What relationship real or fictionalised defines love for you? What question would you most like answered? What person place or experience has shaped you the most? What would be your last meal? And can you tell me something in your life that's grown out of a personal disaster? And I've gathered a group of really remarkable people, ones that I am honored and humbled to have had the chance to engage with. You may not hear their answers to all 7 of these questions. We've whittled it down to which questions felt closest to their experience or the most surprising

andMe Anne wojcicki Thurston SEC Minnie Driver
Fresh update on "constance" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "constance" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"The latest on the women's soccer abuse scandal, Jeff plush is currently CEO of USA curling, but he used to lead the national women's soccer league, and USA curling is saying this evening that plush acted in accordance with prioritizing the safety of athletes during his tenure at the soccer league, where an investigation uncovered years of systemic emotional abuse and sexual misconduct. The curling board met this week after a report on the independent investigation into the abuses in women's soccer. The soccer investigation found that plush who was commissioner of the league from 2014 to 2017 was aware of allegations of sexual harassment and coercion against coach Paul Riley, but did not do anything to prevent Riley from continuing to coach in the league. USA Today sports columnist Christine Brennan tells WTO the abuse begins when soccer players are very young. You're a kid and you're good and you want to keep playing and you want to please the coach and the coach is taking advantage. And again, this isn't these aren't my words. These are the words of Sally Yates in this independent report, which everyone should read. If you've got a kid that you love or know and use sports any sport, read this. But yeah, that it just is in the DNA of the sport to keep abusing and yelling emotionally and then it becomes physical abuse including, of course, sexual abuse. And again, what a cesspool for American sports. Former acting U.S. attorney general Sally Yates, who led the soccer investigation, said plush did not respond to requests for an interview. From libraries to recreation centers, a unique public education campaign about domestic violence will feature stories of survivors Kate Ryan reports. The campaign is called walking their shoes and domestic violence survivor, Cheryl Kravitz, shared her story. First, pretend you're wearing a pair of flat shoes. There are flat because you need to be able to run quickly. Why did she have to get away? Because her husband's abuse became worse. His pushes escalated to slaps and then punches. He was always careful not to hit my face. In 2021, 58 marylanders died as a result of domestic violence, 5 in Montgomery county, in Rockville, Kate Ryan, WTO news. Since the Supreme Court ruling in June, taking away the constitutional right to an abortion, leaders in Maryland have been looking for ways to expand access to people, both here in the state and outside. Now that push is getting some help from the feds, HHS has announced reproductive health research grants worth more than $6 million across the country, more than half going to Maryland organizations and the university of Maryland Baltimore. Three quarters of a $1 million in the form of a grant goes to the Baltimore city health department. And then a telehealth company called wisp has launched services in Maryland. That was just a few weeks ago. It joins other groups in the state, offering virtual appointments for medication abortions with pills, mailed or picked up at the drugstore

Soccer Sally Yates Jeff Plush National Women's Soccer League Paul Riley Christine Brennan Kate Ryan Plush WTO Cheryl Kravitz Usa Today Riley USA Maryland U.S. Montgomery County Rockville University Of Maryland Baltimo
Russian forces shell Ukraine's No. 2 city and menace Kyiv

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 7 months ago

Russian forces shell Ukraine's No. 2 city and menace Kyiv

"You cranium forces have offered unexpectedly strong resistance to the Russian military but the question is how long they can keep it up from the Brookings institution's Constance Benson Muller and Pentagon spokesman John Kirby a surprisingly ineffectual Russian attack you gotta hand it to the Ukrainians who have been fighting very hard for their country I think it is important for all of us at this point to not be overly encouraged why do you ineptitude of some of the initial Russian moose the Russians will learn from this Herbie notes Vladimir Putin has kept significant combat power in reserve she still has a lot that he hasn't moved into Ukraine we may well be on the cost on a massive hardening of the Russian attacks Sager mag ani Washington

Constance Benson Muller John Kirby Brookings Institution Pentagon Herbie Vladimir Putin Ukraine Ani Washington
"constance" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:28 min | 8 months ago

"constance" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I want to go back to that disappointment of not being appointed by thurgood Marshall to be his successor. As chief counsel, and what that might have laid the groundwork for, Motley was on a short list to be nominated to sit on the Supreme Court and you've said that President Biden's announcement that he nominated a black woman to the Supreme Court. That could have happened 50 years ago. Did Motley ever express anger or regrets about this or how she was treated during this era. So there are two parts of the story first, Lyndon Johnson initially wanted to appoint consensus baker Motley to the U.S. Court of Appeals to the second circuit. And there was tremendous pushback against this idea, she said, a woman was not wanted on the second circuit and barely wanted on the federal trial court. And she was disappointed in that. She says that thurgood Marshall was disappointed that she did not receive the appointment to the higher court, and yet she went on to the federal district court and her name was reported in the media as being on short list for the Supreme Court. It didn't work out for a number of reasons, including because being the civil rights Queen was a double edged sword. People would say that she couldn't be fair to litigants and discrimination cases. They were actually recusal motions made on this basis. And so she was not happy with any of that. I would not say that she was angry. That was in the way she made her way through the world, but she was disappointed and yet she would be so pleased, I'm sure. In this moment, where a list of African American women is out there and several of them are eminently qualified. And I am pleased that we're at this moment. It's been a long time coming. Tomiko Brown nagin, thank you so much for this book, and thank you for joining us. Thank you. It's been delightful to talk to you about it. Tomiko Brown nagin is the author of civil rights queen, Constance baker Motley and the struggle for equality. She spoke with guest interviewer Tanya Mosley, who's a special correspondent for the NPR show here and now and.

thurgood Marshall Motley President Biden Supreme Court baker Motley U.S. Court of Appeals federal district court Lyndon Johnson Tomiko Brown nagin Constance baker Motley Tanya Mosley NPR
"constance" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:10 min | 8 months ago

"constance" Discussed on Fresh Air

"That's right, they had a what I call an egalitarian marriage well before that was a thing. He supported her, he was a fan of her, he didn't compete with her and he had his own career. He was a real estate broker in Harlem with his own firm, which gave him flexibility to support her. And it's just a great love story. They were together for over 50 years in everyone that I spoke to counted Joel as a key factor in Motley's success. I also will add though that even as she credited her husband with supporting her career, Motley herself said, but he always made more than I did. In terms of his income and she thought that his being the male breadwinner helped to even things out a little bit, which I also think is important to note. He worked in real estate as you said, news articles said that he had graduated from law school, but you write the law school part was not true. What does that fabricated story tell us about? Maybe the gender role dynamics that we're playing out during that time essentially that her husband had to also be as important. Yeah, it is an interesting and I think revealing fact that there was the assumption that he needed to be likely to save face and to conform to expectations about men being important and more accomplished than their wives to say that he had graduated from college and then from law school. And that was not the case. That fib actually sheds light on the way in which throughout her career and particularly so, when she was in politics, Motley was scrutinized. Journalists would ask her about her family, they wanted to know about him about the sun. Essentially, what was going on in that household that she could be playing this commanding role in public life. And so that's the context in which that reality was created. How was she treated by the white lawyers and the people in the court? Well, I tell a number of stories, most of them in the context of her litigation and Mississippi about just how peculiar she was viewed and how disrespectfully she was treated by the white male lawyer who litigated the Mississippi case for the state when Motley was trying the James Meredith case. She realized after she extended her hand to shake his that her hand just stayed out there. He didn't want to shake her hand because he had been taught that blacks were inferior. He refused to call her by her proper name. This is Motley. He would refer to her as her or she, and even one time called her constants, she objected and said to the judge, he needs to not do that, essentially. And thereafter, he referred to her as the New York council. Because he couldn't bring himself to call her by her right name. We're listening to the interview, our guest interviewer, Tanya Moseley recorded with tamiko Brown nagin, author of the new book civil rights queen, Constance baker Motley and the struggle for equality will hear more of the interview after a break, I'm Terry gross, and this is fresh air. Officially, John is a bodyguard in the Colombian prosecutor's office, but in reality, he's the only sign language interpreter in the entire institution. This week on rambler from NPR, when access to justice for.

Motley Harlem Joel Mississippi James Meredith New York council Tanya Moseley tamiko Brown nagin Constance baker Motley Terry gross John NPR
"constance" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:48 min | 8 months ago

"constance" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I'm also really fascinated by the fact that baker Motley grew up in the shadow of Yale University, as you said, her father working for several secret societies as a cook. And yet her lot as a woman during that time meant it wasn't exactly expected that she would even attend college. Absolutely not. In fact, when she told her parents and others in the community that she aspired to be a lawyer, Faye thought that she was crazy. It was a preposterous idea. They said, women don't get anywhere in the law. And of course, their perceptions were based in fact. And she also wanted to struggle for equality. She was an activist, even in her youth, and thus she maintained her aspiration. She managed to attract financial support from a local philanthropist, and she thus was able to attend first fisk and then NYU as an undergraduate, she graduated with a bachelor's in economics and then she went to Columbia law school. How did World War II ease Motley baker's ability to fulfill this dream of attending undergrad in later law school? Sure, it's important story. Well, Motley discusses in her autobiography, how when she arrived at Columbia law school, it was like a ghost town, many of the men who would have been on campus were not there. They were on the war front. And that meant that Columbia, like many other institutions of higher education, were seeking others to fill those seats and that is the context in which Constance baker Motley, as well as people like Bella abzug, found themselves at Columbia law school during World War II. Let's talk a bit about a very important figure in Motley's life, and that's thurgood Marshall. You write that her experience of applying for a job at the NAACP legal defense fund where thurgood Marshall was head counsel, alleviated some pain for baker Motley, the pain of rejection from other firms. What had she experienced before that fateful meeting? Right, when Motley went to an interview at a New York City law firm, she was turned away, essentially the door was closed in her face. The partners did not want to hire a black woman. And the limitations on women's ability to enter the legal practice based on gender are stories that could be told by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sandra Day O'Connor and many others. And in the face of that rejection when she went to the NAACP legal defense fund in 1945 and thurgood Marshall was friendly to her and hired her on the spot. She was delighted. It was a dream job for her, and thus she was always so grateful to thurgood Marshall for giving her a chance. She said that if it had not been for thurgood Marshall, no one ever would have heard of Constance baker Motley. And certainly by hiring her, Motley was doing something that was unusual and incredibly progressive, Motley was for most of her 20 year career at the NAACP legal defense fund, the only woman lawyer, and that is why she was so grateful to Marshall all of her life..

baker Motley Columbia law school Motley thurgood Marshall Motley baker Constance baker Motley Bella abzug Yale University Faye fisk NYU NAACP Columbia Ruth Bader Ginsburg Sandra Day O'Connor New York City NAACP legal defense fund Marshall
"constance" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:49 min | 8 months ago

"constance" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Her new book is called civil rights queen, Constance baker Motley, and the struggle for equality. Here's Tonya. Tamiko welcome to fresh air. I'm delighted to be with you. Thanks for having me. There is a vivid recounting in the book that sets the grounding for Motley's reputation as the civil rights queen. And that's her first experience as a courtroom lawyer in Mississippi, which was the south's most repressive state back in 1949. What was she there litigating and what reception did she receive? Motley was in Jackson, Mississippi litigating a case on behalf of African American school teachers who were subjected to a pay disparity. And as she walked the streets of Jackson and entered the courtroom there, she caused a sensation. Few people had seen a woman lawyer or a black lawyer, and here was this incredible combination of a black woman lawyer. And people were just some were excited. Some were just didn't know what to make of her. And that is the story that I tell in my book about her impact, both as a symbol, but also her substantive impact on the law. Motley saw while she was there, the vestiges of slavery and the ills of segregation. That's how you put it in the book. She couldn't find lodging. She had to sleep in a rooming house for black people, white grocery stores refused to sell food to her. As she was litigating that case, how did that experience shape Motley's view of her role in this fight for civil rights? Well, the reality, Tanya is that Motley experienced some of the same indignities as her client. And so even as she is working as a civil rights lawyer on behalf of a broader black community, she is also working on her own behalf and on behalf of the NAACP, legal defense fund lawyers, many of whom were African American who were seeking to kill Jim Crow. You write about how Motley's foundational upbringing was really important in understanding her perceptions of Mississippi and her work more broadly. Her parents migrated to the U.S. from Nevis, which is a small island in the Caribbean Sea and raised Motley and her siblings in New Haven Connecticut. You're right that her father taught his children that they were superior to black Americans. And you know this view of black immigrants like Motley's father, the view that they had of black Americans. We don't often speak openly about it. Can you describe it? We don't, and yet we should. It's an important part of American history, which illustrates as I concluded my book, it turns out that Caribbean immigrants or immigrants. And in this country, immigrants often seek to define themselves against African American and that is exactly what happened in baker Motley's family. Her father and her mother, her entire family were culturally conservative. They were happy to be a part of the British Empire. They thought of themselves as superior to African Americans, particularly those in the south, whom her father characterized as shiftless and as allowing themselves to be debased by Jim Crow, and what I conclude in the book is that either because of or in spite of her father's mischaracterizations of blacks in the south, Motley became their champion..

Motley Constance baker Motley Tamiko Mississippi Tonya Jackson Jim Crow Tanya NAACP Nevis Caribbean Sea New Haven baker Motley Connecticut U.S. Caribbean
"constance" Discussed on Limitless Mindset

Limitless Mindset

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"constance" Discussed on Limitless Mindset

"He's a fighter pilot. He goes to war. He becomes a billionaire. He he he robs a bank of tremendous amount of gold. He has this. He has these these amazing rants that he goes on to he. He stands up against he up against what he thinks is wrong with the world which is coffee. This is kind of your first upon first or even second reading this book you like he. Can you might understand how he comes across as an aspirational character. As like someone that you'd that you want to be like no. I wouldn't even like to meet a person like him. Okay but you might understand you might understand how how. That's how i took it when you were fourteen years. And and then again i think when i was about twenty seven but the different values down but on on second reading of the book as as r upon further investigation of the book. You see how the guy is really. He's really kind of crazy and and and delusional and we see how he holds values and very very high esteem. But then he doesn't he he really doesn't follow through on the on the values very much in in the grand scope of his life. The values don't really they don't manifest for example. I'll read the final paragraph of the book and the final paragraph of the book is actually a pretty baffling taken in context quote. All this time my heart has told me nothing but to love and protect the message has been strong through the twists and turns and it has never varied to protect and to protect and to protect. I was born to protect the ones i love and may god continue to give me ways to protect and serve them even though they are gone and i remember when i first read the book i actually jumped ahead to the very last page and i read the last page before i had finished the book and i said i thought to myself that paragraph doesn't have that much to do with with the guy like his is his values don't really seem his values are not really to protect. I don't see him doing doing much protecting at all in the book nor nor do you see him really doing much much serving he. He seems to be a real self-serving kind of guy. You know he decides to rob the bank for really for serving kinds of reasons. And that's that's the major inflection point of his life is he's this banker at some a monolithic manhattan institution of high finance. And then. He decides that he's going to rob the bank of billions of dollars worth of gold boy in and he he gives kind of. He gets some flimsy some flimsy reasons for having for having robbed the for having robbed the bank but what we actually see in the book is that he is. He is separated from his first wife. Constance the billions billionaire. And of course so much that he cheated on her with the first female that he sees available.

Constance
We Can’t Trust American Institutions To Protect Us

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:14 min | 1 year ago

We Can’t Trust American Institutions To Protect Us

"Now one of the reasons why we are in such chaotic times because the institutions that we used to trust to say no to the activists and be a bulwark against the radicals have done the exact opposite you see. We need institutions as backstops and constance in times of chaos and disorder in fact chaos and rebellion is the human norm having something that is permanent. Something that is around. The idea of transcendent order is very rare. So nine hundred eighties. Republicanism focused heavily on building up the united states military institution on building up private schools and institution building up corporations and institution. Yet as you look at the landscape in america do you actually trust those institutions. Are they communicators and are they. Are they stalwarts for defending natural rights. Children and passing down values from one generation to the other.

America
"constance" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"constance" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"Don't like we're not we have to but we're not actually smarter than we were fifty years ago. We just have to be quicker. And that makes us wrong or gives us potentially to be long so much more often than i mean not. The people were infallible fifty years ago. But you at least had time to think about it before you said something really really dumb. That was going to get a lot of troubles and also puts all of those things on a microscope tip because it shows like oh. You said this one wrong thing. All of these years ago well we found it. And no one's happy about it and not have case by people have said stuff that it's like okay that was extremely bigoted like by like. Wow that was really awful. I can't believe anyone in their right mind but say that help. So there's sometimes where it's like. Okay but also they were replaying really quick and this was thirty years ago. I mean and i mean i'm a gen xer and i mean if there's one thing that every single person from my generation was thank god. My childhood was not on the internet. Thank god my teen years were not. I didn't have to have that. I got to be stupid and private. You guys have to be stupid in public and and then you know what's interesting is will you bear the consequences for our will the standards for behavior drop as they are dropping his right now. We get away with things that people not us but but but people do things that thirty years ago would have been the end of their career. And now it's okay because drought or standards. It's all everyone forgets about an immediate. Well right. that's the other thing is all you have to do is wait it out and wait for the next person to do something even more egregiously stupid than you did. And your home free. And then we're just moving on. It's great just great. Yeah your book rifle like there were elements of from where i am in it. That really hit on some of those things. I thought that was really interesting and especially in a book that is not about that that it was exploring those sort of games and stuff. That's where you sort of get into the world buildings just having the whole thing in a not at every single thing is going to be explored in depth but any you know the like in the theater if you go to play but you send the audience and you look at the stage. It looks beautiful. You walk around to the back of the stage. it's just plywood held up with some two by fours. There's no pain no anything and that's a little bit. What a book is. Is you as the reader. I want you when you encounter the world for the world of real and full without necessarily having to open all the drawers and there's nothing in this drawer. The store was just for show. So it's a little bit. You know 'cause i always find book slog down and that's the interesting thing was science fiction as it oftentimes in science fiction. They wanna open every drawer. What's in the store. What's in that and then ten page later. They've been through all the drawers and your. Where's the what happened to the story. And so keeping that balance of this because at the end of the day this book is about concepts about khan and everything else was in service to her. I didn't want her to be in service to the world that made any sense. I think that definitely came across. Because a lotta times sci-fi and i love reading about like world building all of the little aspects of different worlds but also that gets really hard to read after awhile. And i sometimes you don't need to know every single detail of this is what phones look like and this is what this looks like and this is what happened five hundred years ago to make this event in and i felt like this book did not get off track world building like an iceberg. Okay ideally to my mind. The reader should only see that little bit that sticking out of water but they should feel the weight the rest of that iceberg under the water. That feeling of like weight and and believability without necessarily having to look at every single inch of that iceberg. Only want us enough. You do the work like i have whole iceberg. I show you a thousand pages of like iceberg notes. And i'm only showed you got enough that you'd be like yes. I that that iceberg is there. If i kept going but it's a tough. It's my editor is. Can we lose a couple pages of this. Because i definitely you want to. You do all this work like. But i've got all this stuff about the iceberg. Like no one cares. Just tell the damn story So it is good daven editor who will sort of like rain author in. Because we're just like. Oh but i did all this work. Let me show you my work. Don't show the work definitely right. Well i think we're out of time here. I just have one last question. Okay well i am in the closing stages of this companion book to chant constants which is called chance it takes place in twenty forty two in california and I'm really excited about the ways that it extends and and continues starring continuing to explore some of the issues that this world has given me to the the play with And i'm really excited about. I'm hoping hoping to be done with it. later this year and fingers crossed. That will see it out sometime late next year But that is all that is all conjectural at this point awesome are i cannot wait when feel free to come back on the shell him on molly. This was back on at everyone. Go and read constance right out. Please do it Very between the lines might name. Is molly sullivan matthew fitzsimmons. Let's all great stories and happily ever after the end. The thank you for listening to read between the lines book. Podcast this episode is hosted by molly. Southgate it is edited by rob southgate and produced by southgate media group. You can get in touch with the show at read between the lines at gmail.com or you can send us voice mail at seven. Eight eight seven nine. Four seven three. That was seven or eight. Eight eight seven nine four seven three. You can also find son. Instagram at read between the lines podcast. Thank you so much for listening.

khan molly sullivan matthew fitzsimmons molly rob southgate constance california southgate media group Southgate Instagram
"constance" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"constance" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"Wary of they finally marketed. As this one thing and now you want to send a different shoebox or are whatever you wanna call it but my publisher was very excited about in. I guess let's do this. Let's go for this and they. They were hugely supportive of it. So that is it really just came from a dumb. Like how could i do it. And everything else was eventually service of that sort of initial idea is really awesome at an ad. Part about publicist is really cool too. Because i know a lot of times with publishers that can also be a contract. Then the author has like you need to write this. Many straight up like thriller mystery books and that leg. But that's that's really mazing. The feel very fortunate. Yeah so do you think that you will write more in this sort of world because show a lotta world's building to get there so we were just wrapping up constants. We were in final development. They'll edits or at and the planet always for being. Just a standalone i. I had this idea. I'd written a five book series. In really i was like i. I don't want to just read series. I'd like to pack a fresh a fresh idea for a while and They were in that end. My publisher said they'd read it and they currently been talking amongst themselves and they said you know we'd really love it if you wanted to write another one of these and i went while. I'm sorry i don't have another one of these like that. Wasn't the plan that that's that's too bad. I mean it'd be really great. You know guilt trip guilt trip guilt trip and What else do you want to do. And i and i sent them some pitches. Something's in about three days later. Gotten a shower amd had an idea for another book. And by the time i got out of it i had the whole thing So i am to my surprise. But i'm actually very for excited about a really. I think it's it's a really interesting extension of the world. I'm writing a companion constance called chance and It is it it is not. I don't know that i'd call it a direct sequel takes place about two years later But i it it does. i'm. I'm really excited about. I really loved the idea for this one so here we are a yes i am. I'm going to extend continue this world. That is so call. I'm not even done with the book yet. i want more like. I'm ready for the next part of this kind of whole story in this world on that out. Actually kind of link talk a little bit more about the world this and what it was like world building in the realm of like our world is like it's not quite dystopia in 'cause i could still see it being the future but like how did you work this so so i i read science fiction. I wouldn't say that i am. A encyclopaedia encyclopedic knowledge of science fiction. My my taste and science fiction has always run to the near future Handmaid's tale or or do our fell k. Dick's work or William gibson sort of something that is similar enough to our own own world Work orange book books books that are sort of are just out of reach at that. You can see us in more so for me. It is i. You know i mean there's a whole world of you know You know far future space empire science fiction that is just never been my mid. That's never drawn me as much. It feels to coup too distant from me to connect with And so i you know. I was interesting to me about. This was as i got into it. I started to think about human cloning. One of the things i discovered was that there are no federal laws in the united states against human cloning Human cloning has done every day in this country In terms of stem cells we duplicate human cells every single day And that is human. Cloning what we don't do is bring that bring that clone and make the make a human a viable human and and deliver a baby that us gone. That is a ethical step that we have heretofore avoid it but there are no federal laws against it and it's sort of a state by state. There are states that absolutely nurse states that that that allow it and they're not always the states that you think they're going to be based on sort of current political and cultural. You know it. It's more varied than you would think. And that idea led me to when when a question on the states thinks about the laws on cloning but is it similar. Were the same as the ones in the book and like how. It's jaas more this in california. I was just wondering whether nerve absolutely fair enough And i was gonna say. I if based on that idea. I was like well. What if you know. Oftentimes in science fiction the new technical technologies that are in the book have been around for a and people. Oh fine cars and you know. No one's all that surprised by the flying car and what was interesting to me was what if we're seeing a new technology that has sort of transformative in revolutionary being introduced to culture. And how is that culture going to respond to it. How accepting of it are they going to be. How how how would we react to something as transformative as that. I thought act to. And when i was a kid In the in the in the early eighties there was the first child that was delivered using in vitro fertilization. Something that's done now in this country millions of times But at the time it was sent shockwaves through america. And some someone very clear or somebody thought they were very clever hauled. That child attest to baby and there was much hand-wringing and what is this. Means you know. Is this really a person is does this. Is this really. What's what what is intended And for a long time. Clone up at a in-vitro relation was treated as as suspect than suspicious and and maybe dangerous and over time. It's sort of become something that we take for granted as a an available technology. So what about cloning. How how would the world of this book be basically company that does human cloning astounded in twenty twenty but doesn't really come to market until twenty thirty to about ten years from now and then by twenty four day it's out and there are going to be all sorts of forces and opinions around it and that was really the basis for the world building was how you know how the ground this in a way that would feel. How would americans react to a.

constance Handmaid William gibson Dick america california
"constance" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"constance" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

"Going on also Recently i heard you know that there is a some operations going up there with know secret agent. I haven't gotten into all of that fee. Quint government agency stop. That's going on. I know there are some authors out there talking about it but apparently that's a thing that might be happening up there and Yeah so there's a lot of interesting stuff here and of course your book goes so much further into this The encyclopedia of moon mysteries secrets conspiracy. Theories anomalies terrestrial 's and mora and of course You know will link to that. Were also linked to your websites Which is i believe isn't an constance the briggs dot com awesome awesome. Hey tell me this. What is the theory that you think is. What's the most outrageous thing you put. Book like of all. The things or concepts victoria briggs dot com. Sorry of all the things that you put in this encyclopedia brooke is there one theory. You almost said you know what i know. It's encyclopedia gonna throw everything. But this story is so insane so out there. I'm not even sure. I want this associated with all the moon mysteries. If there was just one what would it be. well steph. Quite a question man. I'm literally flipping through my my book is there. I mean you know is You know What was i going to say. Howard howard hughes was a howard user. Howard yeah howard uses still hanging out on the moon Omar he's on mars. You know any kind of weird celebrity. Or yeah i don't know elvis elvis's on the moon that's where they moved him when he died. I don't know. I mean how we're gonna get but did you just find now. But there's a lot of weird i what if the weirdest story I heard something about co you know. But i think this person was trying to officiate delay components. I thought can't come on the moon. If not weird yes. I do remember hearing that. What about the city stop. I mean are there rocks that you of all the moon photos that.

"constance" Discussed on Ghost Town

Ghost Town

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"constance" Discussed on Ghost Town

"And if i see if you live in los angeles and i see you on the street with one of those shirts. I'm gonna lose my shit on to be so happy. I might come hug you. Hopefully you're vaccinated. I will be more fine. But you'll find out after the fact or they're like. Why are you hugging me. Figure it out. You're the one saying did a bad blood. Shake it off. Medley medley match. Yeah that's right and my remix a real quick. We got a one and done apple podcasts. Review one what is it. Not one and done like two or three. Oh i thought we're also recording this a little sooner than our because we're going to wine country tomorrow so i'll be instagram with a bucket of wine and my system. If anyone's interested that now be editing. This part right here probably tomorrow. But thank you to anyone. Who's given the apple podcasts review. Appreciate it if you haven't we encourage you to do so. Hello i nope. That's just the name of the computer. Can't talk back helo five stars but this is for you or i love the banter. But i miss hearing about rebecca's dating life if i didn't have an awesome wife and a steady job i would fly to la. Take on a mediocre perhaps borland forgettable date a man can dream that's from germany germ gal germ germ gal jerem gal. Let me tell you about dreams. I have a lotta dreams. And that's none of them. Number one in the in the thing is undertaken date during. Listen to me yeah drop. The wife dropped the life. Get out here. We'll go in to dates will text a little bit afterwards. Tiktok you'll be stuck and lay adjacent pomona riverside whatever you'll have to build it back up you'll build it back up you'll get your wife back you'll beg for her back you'll go back to wherever you came from you'll finally be assembling your life again and text well give it another shot and we're back out here. Drinking vodka sodas together the sweet polluted breeze of la in our hair. Do you have hair hope here. Well i want to tell you something about him. So at the very minimum. I'd be taken out for number. One is either taken out on a mediocre. Mediocre is fine. That's great appreciate that. But i'd be taken out on the date for starters y- jason's rider date writer. Yeah like literally tell you a little bug dreaming. no. I'm just talking about dating to. But i'm in a relationship and it's not as insane as the dates that i went on haven't met. She just keeps sending him money per cell phone bill thing. I don't know why the video cameras work on his phone. He doesn't he. Is computers old. His phone is cracked. I don't want i got one. Blurry photo was once and that you paid for to 'cause otherwise the data the data plan the average plane his dad. Don't you judge me. you.

los angeles five stars tomorrow rebecca instagram three germany two apple one Tiktok One once jerem jason pomona
"constance" Discussed on Ghost Town

Ghost Town

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"constance" Discussed on Ghost Town

"My name is katie belotti. I'm self employed graphic designer and digital storyteller with love for psychology and shaking the dust off of untold stories. Allow me to introduce you to a cocktail of past and present my podcast. They can thin as a spoken diary mixed with tales of people from years past who live their lives and full color. Because as many of us know life isn't a straight line no matter the decade. We're all writing own stories. Finding new ways to shop for ourselves through the thick and the thin so pause the show. You're listening to right. Now grab yourself a martini and go. Subscribe to thick and thin on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you get your podcast. Cheers love so deadly. I'm jason horton. I'm rebecca lieb and this is a ghost town Small group of plots in a cemetery in waterville maine. Six of them are children. Three children under the age of seven three died in nineteen fifty four and the other three in nineteen sixty six. This is the family pot of. Carl and constants fisher. A family tormented by mental illness so much so that constance drowned all of her children in two horrifying increments that took place twelve years apart. We're going to be talking about the constants fisher tragedy today and it is a tragedy that is so this is one of the hard ones. I'll say it's one of the. It's a hard episode. everybody it is. I think it's important to talk about. I think it's important to talk about the context the nature of mental illness especially in this situation. But i'm just putting it out. There is not going to be easy constants. i think saying her name right was a child of adoption. She never knew her biological parents. She was moody kid a handful to her adopted family. She was not really happy growing up. When carlin constance met constance was a seventeen year. Old high school student. And carl was a world war two vet seven years her senior. This kinda felt like maybe an answer to her unhappiness to feeling displaced feeling like she didn't belong after they married nine hundred forty six. Carl got a job working for the maine. Central railroad and constance was a housewife the to live peacefully at thirty one high street in waterville maine and had three kids. Richard daniel and deborah k on march eighth nineteen fifty four. Karl returned home from work and found things silent which was weird. Considering his oldest son almost seven his middle child was five and his small daughter was about a year old. Carl walked through the house. Daniel and deborah's were still laying in their beds swaddled in blankets then. He stepped into the bathroom and saw richard in the tub floating face down. Carl looked frantically for constance. who couldn't find. He called for help and eventually found her. She was their bed unconscious..

katie belotti Daniel deborah k Karl Richard daniel Six deborah five jason horton carl seven years richard constance three kids seventeen year twelve years three carlin constance Carl Three children
Britney Spears' conservatorship, explained

Today, Explained

05:04 min | 1 year ago

Britney Spears' conservatorship, explained

"Justin timberlake publicly apologized to britney spears even though their relationship ended like twenty years ago. The apology has a lot less to do their bygone romance and much more to do the reckoning over how this country treats its famous young women and britney spears has gone from something of a villain in this story to something much more closely resembling a hero. The freebritney movement deserves much of the credit for that transformation. It's a fan driven campaign which hopes to liberate brittany from her conservatorship constance. Grady has been covering free brittany for. Vox so a conservative ship is illegal solution for what happens if you're an adult but you can't make decisions for your life in your best interests. So this is something that is used if you have a mental health condition or brain injury You're developing dementia. And you're unable to care for yourself. So accord will assign someone to do that for you. So britney went under conservatorship in two thousand eight and under the terms of her conservatorship. She's not in control of her finances or business or personal life so for about two years now going back actually to the point that the conservatorship was set in place in two thousand eight but most intensely for the past two years and especially now since the release of be new documentary framing. britney spears. Fans have been speculating. That the conservatorship has left britney spears as a prisoner in her life and that she might need to be rescued. Okay well let's go back to two thousand eight and talk about why britney spears was placed under this conservatorship. If you think back to two thousand eight you might remember that. There was just nonstop goth coverage of britney spears that year relief and in two thousand seven especially as well. They're repoprt ati following her around. All the time would like wait outside her limo when she was going to clubs to take up strict photos of her and then the entire internet would discuss her underwear and she was starting to react back to them. In increasingly bizarre ways she started yelling at the paparazzi in a british accent once he attacked hover car with an umbrella. Please please seed saved her own head up. Which was all photographed by paper off. They're very famous pictures of her sort of grinning and holding up a to her scalp. She went in and out of rehab. A few times that to the pictures were all over teams. The press helps them now and is performed at the emmy in two thousand seven in this kind of infamous performance where she was sleepwalking through it the press discussed whether she was fat now lot there was a lot going on for her. It was not a good year. Fears has lost so she fits under psychiatric hold twice. What does that mean. She is put in a mental hospital and not allowed to leave what happened. I think that one angle of what happened to britney that we have to hit here. Is that the media industries incredibly sexist straight and even more so when she was coming up. There's one subject we didn't discuss. What was that. everyone's talking about it. Well you'll breasts. There is that whole narrative about whether britain a real virgin and that some like ruin adults would ask her at press conferences. And my of virgin. I think especially when she was with justin timberlake and they've never really cared about justin timberlake's virginity because who would. It was just about britney in her schoolgirl uniform. And you know each. She actually a good girl. There was this intense very sexualize focus on her life. That just wasn't there. In quite the same way for her male cohort. No matter how famous they were. It's hard to imagine that that did anything good for her. And then why does the conservative. Come about a month after the second psychiatric hold. Her father says these are not working. Long-term go under a hold. A doctor will say okay. You're fit to live your own life. Now she'll go out and then she'll spiral and it happens again. So he asked the court for emergency temporary conservatorship over brittany the courts. Brandt that order and then it becomes permanent.

Britney Spears Justin Timberlake Britney Grady Brittany Dementia Emmy Britain Brandt
10,000 stores expected to close this year due to COVID-19

All Things Considered

01:35 min | 1 year ago

10,000 stores expected to close this year due to COVID-19

"Major retailers, the report says, are expected to close 10,000 stores this year that is up 14% from the year just ended. But at the same time more than 3300 new stores open last year, and course I predicts another 4000 will open this year. Marketplaces Kimberly Adams has that one. The types of stores that shut down in the pandemic include lots of footwear, clothing and accessory shops. According to course, I research the types of retail that opened discount outlets like Dollar stores. Industries that cater to certain pandemic needs also did all right. I believe the housewares category as all overall in the country has seen tremendous growth from New York to the West Coast. Natasha aim it runs the kitchen supply store Whisk in New York. Her business did better than she expected in 2020. Now as restrictions start to lift. I'm hopeful that people will will keep up their love for cooking and want to spend their money at a store like cars, businesses, small and large, are trying to game out which pandemic changes will be permanent. Constance Hunter, chief economist at KPMG says, at least for those who are on the upside of the case shaped recovery, and I do think this pent up savings is going to lead to higher consumption that we would normally expect. Once we get to the other side of the pandemic, and for businesses that can hold on. Until then, there could be a business boom. Nicole Markey owns Hip City Veg, a chain of fast casual restaurants around Philadelphia and Washington, D. C. By the

Kimberly Adams Natasha Aim Constance Hunter New York West Coast Kpmg Nicole Markey Hip City Veg Philadelphia Washington
NAACP LDF Announces Marshall-Motley Scholars Program

The Takeaway

01:02 min | 1 year ago

NAACP LDF Announces Marshall-Motley Scholars Program

"Of peril but also a time of tremendous possibilities. The head of the end of the Legal Defense and educational Fund says the organization wants a new generation of civil rights lawyers in the South. Now it has a $40 million gift from an anonymous donor to put them through law school. Here's NPR's Carrie Johnson. LDF president, Caroline Eiffel says the scholarships will focus on the place where most of the LDS cases originate. The South is a critical region in this country for civil rights activism. It is still the region where a majority of black people live. The program is named after two LDF alumni late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and Constance Baker Motley, the first black woman to be a federal Judge. The scholarships will cover tuition, room and board and other training. In return, applicants agree to spend at least eight years working on civil rights cases in the South. Eiffel says they're likely to handle voting rights disparities and housing and education and other cases. Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington This

LDF Carrie Johnson Caroline Eiffel Justice Thurgood Marshall Constance Baker Motley NPR Supreme Court Eiffel Washington
Anonymous $40 million gift funding 50 civil rights lawyers

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Anonymous $40 million gift funding 50 civil rights lawyers

"An anonymous donor gives forty million dollars to the N. double ACP legal defense and educational fund to use for scholarships for racial justice law students the LDF says with that money it plans to send fifty students to law school in return they must commit to eight years of racial justice work in the south starting with a two year postgraduate fellowship in the civil rights organization the LDF chose Martin Luther king day to announce the Marshall Molly scholars program named after former Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall and Constance Baker motley as lawyers both played a pivotal role that led to the courts brown V. board of ed ruling outlawing racial segregation in public schools I'm Julie Walker

Acp Legal Defense And Educatio LDF Civil Rights Organization Marshall Molly Constance Baker Motley Martin Luther King Thurgood Marshall Supreme Court Courts Brown V. Board Of Ed Ru Julie Walker
Italy puts over 320 on trial for 'ndrangheta mob ties

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Italy puts over 320 on trial for 'ndrangheta mob ties

"Britannian crime gang is in the dock with hundreds facing charges a trial with more than three hundred twenty dependence has begun in southern Italy again C. N. drunk get to crime syndicate all B. B. the world's richest criminal organization that's quietly amassed power as the Sicilian mafia lost influence expected to take a year the trial is taking place in a specially constructed high security bunker on the sprawling grounds of industrial park in Calabria prosecutors hope the trial will deliver a harsh blow to the mobile organization that's exploited tens of millions of dollars became revenues over decades to extend his crew will reach across Europe and into several Constance I'm Charles the last month

B. B. Italy Calabria Europe Constance Charles
Philadelphia - PA Supreme Court considers Cosby appeal

News, Traffic and Weather

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Philadelphia - PA Supreme Court considers Cosby appeal

"And Bill Cosby's attempt to overturn his sex assault conviction. Maybe she's here in Kentucky. With the story Justices of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court appeared open to a least part of Bill Cosby's plead overturn his 2018 conviction of sexually assaulting Andrea Constant. They questioned the testimony from other women who had accused Cosby of sexual misconduct but whose claims were not part of the criminal charges. One Justice said. You get to the point that it's just too much, and the defendant did not have a fair trial. Prosecutors said on Lee, five of 19 women were actually allowed to testify and they were needed, they said. To corroborate Constance claims she never consented to Cosby. Aaron could her ski ABC NEWS New YORK This is

Bill Cosby Pennsylvania Supreme Court Andrea Constant Kentucky Cosby LEE Constance Aaron Abc News New York
Alamo Drafthouse CEO On Navigating The Pandemic

Recode Decode

09:49 min | 2 years ago

Alamo Drafthouse CEO On Navigating The Pandemic

"Here's shelley taylor. Ceo elon draft. S shelley. taylor. You the alamo draft house. Welcome to decoder. Thank you glad to be here. I was just reading your bio in the backstory here. I i got to start with this. You became the ceo of alamo draft house on april thirtieth. So you have stepped into chaos. I think elmo actually shut down forty one theaters in march. What was this recruiting pitch. Like like they call you and say hey are you interested. Were already in the works. Just it seems like a wild way to become the ceo. Movie theater chain. Yeah it is. It does feel wild but the it was in the works at christmas wintom and i met and started talking and drawn to this incredible brand and this opportunity to you know. Help take something iconic And growing even larger right and then all of a sudden the pandemic and here we are so. We've got this little issue to get through that we can go back to the original plans. What was just the first day. April thirtieth you show up. You got to introduce yourself to ever like there's usually a script right follows. You say something like i. I just wanna listen. There's like the usual stuff. Was it very different this time or did you just come running the little of both right. I mean you talk about like just really wanting to listen and to get to know people. You don't have the advantage of the water cooler in the proximity But at the same time there's nothing like a crisis to create a need for connection and speed to trust and really fortunate that the company and the teammates i've been so welcoming and and willing to just assume good and thompson and wanna move forward versus having to do some of that initial stuff so it was pretty fast and no one's kicked me out where seven munson and i'm still here. Things are going pretty well considering so i always try to ask everybody to begin about. Decision making frameworks before alamo draft house. You will see a large group of planet fitness locations. You were at disney before that. Tell me about your general way of making decisions. How do you think about evaluating your choices and actually make coming to a decision. I think it's a couple of things one is just knowing who and what you are Is the beauty of everywhere. I've worked has had a really clear sense of their purpose and values and the problems that they're trying to solve in this world So always starting with that framework and You know driving from there. I think that one of the things that i took from starbucks and hug valued over the years is that you always put people into that that equation So when you're looking at a decision at the stake holders it's your customers you know it's the people on your team You know having all those all those points of view and then sometimes it is the broader community depending on what the product is. And so i think if you start there and then you put it in a good good dose of data and a good dose of your gut usually. That's a great way to go. I mean that's pretty simple and obviously depending on the complexity of what you bring in or don't bring in but you know it's it really is values and people and direction to other reason. I asked that question is because right. Now you're managing in a crisis where there is a flood of data. You have a very physical plant kind of business. People go to a movie theater and sit down and stay there for a while. How are you managing the influx of covid information. There's a massively disjointed federal and state response there's people who are refusing to wear masters right before he came on new york city closed at schools. Again it feels like there's just a flow of information about the pandemic and how it's going and how we're handling it you say there's a lot of data but the data is a messy. The points of view are messy. How are you just managing that. Yeah that's a great question. And i appreciate. And i really want to reemphasize the lack of coordinated government approach is like crippling the nation. And if there is a message. And i know lots of people are saying this but if there is a message to our government right now It is critical that they have a coordinated approach. And the way that we're approaching a is one you know just my own prayer experience living and working in china and seeing how this has been approached in the past You know helps watching countries that are you know and businesses in countries that are making good. Decisions helps And then we've just been just trying to take a very steady approach. And that is with the information that we do now and that is not constantly changing and some of that is but there are a few constance out. There you know is how can we make our experience as safe as possible from purchasing your ticket to the minute you leave the theater and we haven't wavered from that you know we've done a lot of you know pretty scrappy fast innovation for online ordering Both of tickets and food Eat a how you come into the theater doing the spacing that people. So that six foot distance we had before it was popular You know we said that we were gonna enforce mass for everybody. We thought about our kitchens creating a smaller menu so that we can social distance within our kitchens. How do we not breathe on to touch food. How do we help. People exit the theater. I mean you just name it. We've taken every single precaution that we can and we've gone as far as we could. So we've just said what is the safest ridge of possibility and yes. There's going to be this constant complex information but until there's something that comes in that says differently we're not gonna waiver And and that's suspend our approach. And i don't know with all the variables out there how anyone can do it differently. Is that a set of advisors team members. You needed to build. I feel like most movie theater chain in a lot of like epidemiologists on staff before covid but now all of us are you know we're all looking for the that expertise while looking for those guidelines. Have you built that muscle and that skill evaluate those decisions. Well we do have a really great source of a lot of people who are willing to help us. Whether it's you know our our p. firm ultimately capital gives us a ton of information and advice whether it's you know our our insurance and brokers on that side bringing a ton of advice and then you know we've got strong relationships with University of texas. Ut you know and the information that you can get you know publicly so you know. We've we've probably done with a lot of people do we. Don't have a ton of money right now. Our resources are very skinny. We've had to kind of do it yourself as best as possible. And we'll continue to to probably operate in that method but it comes back to that need for a government approach to this and the government really could be doing a better job at providing clear guidance that does not consistently changed to businesses and quite frankly equitable to businesses equitable. I just small examples in some cities. We're not allowed to open. Are we can open. But we can't serve food yet. The restaurant next door consider food That just doesn't make sense You know in in how you operate you know what's the logic and a simple clear set of criteria that everyone operates off of because part of the problem. Is this the noise and the and the confusion that goes out to the to arc arc our customers. Our you know it safe here. But it's not safe with you and and people can't discern that you know so it really should be agnostic to the business what what is safe. And what's not to the best that we know today right. Yeah asking for a lot probably well. there's new administration. We'll see how it goes us. One of the things about the pandemic that i've heard from many ceo's executives at this is still rated trends that we already saw coming in some cases. Those trends are positive. We've seen a massive celebration in commerce. Ever already saw that coming. We just turn the knob up. There's been a pretty loud conversation for years about the future of movie theaters and some of that is played out in different ways. Like rom coms. Don't really get made by hollywood but every other netflix show is like basically around calm. And so we've just seen the dynamics of the industry change. I've always thought of alamo draft house has being slightly different than your average trig antic chain movie theater you have. Food isn't experience. You're running old movies. People come there as a social event. Do you see it as this is accelerating the trend. That was already coming or you know you started by saying we'll just get back to work when it's over. Do you see this. As as an aberration on the planet you already had for for your company so yes the world is accelerating in many ways. What won't go out of style. His community on social experiences. And so i think while the industry was right for disruption and racine that alamos secret sauce really right is creating. These communal experiences for people bringing the community together to laugh cry gas. Whatever but have fun together and that won't go out of style and so for us it will be going back to the secret sauce of what makes us special

Shelley Taylor Ceo Elon Shelley Munson Alamo Taylor Thompson Starbucks Disney New York City China University Of Texas Confusion Government Netflix Hollywood Racine Alamos
Wisconsin gov. declares new public health emergency amid overwhelmed hospitals

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Wisconsin gov. declares new public health emergency amid overwhelmed hospitals

"Has declared a new public health emergency as a surgeon Cove in 19 cases overwhelms the state's hospital system. LaToya Dennis has details from member station W. W. M in Milwaukee, more than a third of hospitals across the state of Wisconsin are operating at peak capacity and are unable to admit new patients. That's coupled with the fact that hospitals are also dealing with staff shortages as workers are testing positive for the virus or having to quarantine due to exposure was Constance Democratic Governor Tony Evers is mandating that anyone age five or older wear a mask when in an enclosed area with anyone they do not to live with. An earlier mask mandate was set to expire over the weekend. The average number of new daily cases here now stands at more than 6000. That's double what it was a month ago for NPR News. I'm LaToya Dennis in Milwaukee.

Latoya Dennis W. W. M Constance Democratic Governor Milwaukee Wisconsin Npr News
How Investment Advisors Invest Their Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:54 min | 2 years ago

How Investment Advisors Invest Their Money

"Josh bam co riddled wealth management and author of the new book. How i invest money. Welcome to the show. So josh in this book you talk to your fellow. Money managers about how they invest their own money. What they do with it. Is this kind of like asking chefs like what they cook for themselves when they're at home. I think that's a really great analogy. I hadn't i hadn't thought of that. But i like it. I'm gonna steal that steel steel away. So yeah tell me about. Were there any surprises. There were There were a few constance. We heard a lot about index funds of being a building block for portfolios. Yeah you're basically like placing a bet on the stock market going up on the index itself. Going up and this is like one. Oh one investors thing like this does not seem like what pros you know. All the stuff would do. They're like extremely basic but they're basically a good way because what you see is what you get and for better or for worse. You don't have somebody who's trying to beat the stock market and failing and then we heard a lot of people who had made investments that they know mathematically or logically weren't necessary than one of my favorite child is my bob. See right who He's got a couple of decades on me but his his his concept was sometimes the financial investment. That looks the the most illogical makes the most sensible when you incorporate the emotional aspects and he's talking about a beach cottage that he bought that is now where all of the memories of a stanley are made. And it's where he spends time with his grandkids and financially. It's not a good investment will probably not break even on it but that's not the point. What was the craziest thing you heard. I think i was surprised. That howard wounds in he's an angel investor out west. I was surprised that he owns zero bonds. Oh yeah because the banzer like that's sort of like the i guess if we're going to keep our chef analogy. That's like pasta. That is like everybody's got pasta on the menu. I almost think it's even more elemental than that. I almost think it's the water that you boil and rinse vegetables at our best. When we say bonds we're referring to his treasury bonds which are colloquially speaking the risk free asset supposed to be the safest thing yeah we his his entire persona is wrapped up in this idea of just growth as far as the eye can see and he's willing to bear risk and he's ever accomplished in his life has come as a result of bearing risk bearing more risk than others were bear. And so that's that's like an invest an example of an investment philosophy overlaps with the life philosophy. Did you get any sense of of how these investors deal with their money at a moment like this like in a moment of crisis. Because i imagine that is a question. You're getting all the time. If you're going to be a financial adviser to investors and you're gonna be worth anything to to those investors you have to have an investment philosophy. That's long-term in nature and that is built to endure market events economic crises et cetera. You have to get people to believe in what they're invested in if you expect them to hold onto that portfolio through market volatility. Their relationship with their investments is casual and not spiritually and emotionally meaningful. Been it's easy for them to discard those investments. The minute the sledding. It's tough and so. I think one of the biggest trends in the market twenty twenty is on. Es g or environmental social and governance focused investing so these are portfolio's being put together based on the premise that investors want to have their money go to companies. That are doing the right thing doing the right thing in terms of did the environment when we say governance are they treating shareholders fairly. We say social or the promoting women. Are they hiring. People that are non white forty year old males on. Es g is the only category of mutual fund that saw positive infos this year really and the good news is that the millennial generation They care about what they own. They wanna have a connection with their portfolio. So i would say that that that's like one of the the silver linings of this moment in time is that wall street is waking up to the fact that this is a new generation of investor this generation not only didn't panic from volatility volatility actually drew them closer in. Okay josh you heads knew. This question was coming. How do you invest your money. While i'm at one hundred percent crypto so same same so in my 401k as is your retirement invest directly in the same strategies that our clients do on the other end of the spectrum. I'm doing some things. That are a lot riskier than what i would do for clients so outside of my retirement accounts. I'm making veteran vestments. I'm backing friends. Were starting companies so like for me. That's what makes me feel good to be able to support things that i myself believe in people more importantly that i believe in so what is like the most amazing investment. You've made what's the one that got away. The most amazing investment i ever made was in my own company in two thousand thirteen. My partner and i put up fifty thousand dollars. We built the firm that i think could be doing ten million dollars in revenue next year. Wow so the best investment you ever made was in your own having your own business your own entrepreneurial. Venture was there when the gateway well. When i was a teenager. I owned all of the dot. Com stocks is a teenager nineteen. You were like a man. I was like. I don't even know what is doing but definitely investing in stocks earrings at the mall was really does an idiot savant. Because i didn't hold any of them. I had a bunch of stocks that no longer exist. But i also owned amazon. But i didn't hold it like so like all right so i've long since we bought. It said oreo be fine. But like i'm saying you know you say to yourself. How can you really regret that decision. How could you have possibly known of the thirty. Publicly traded dot com companies from nineteen ninety seven nine hundred ninety eight that one of them was going to become as big as important as amazon. And you wouldn't pick amazon by the white. It was a company that sold books bucks. Yeah totally so anyway but like i. Don't i try not to dwell on stuff like that you know. That's that's an argument in favor of indexes on because what happens in an index as the companies that go bankrupt and disappear the smaller. They get the more they shrink shrinking importance in the index. Because they get so small whereas the winners that keep on winning balloon in size within the index One of the best regret minimization tricks. I know of is to at the the index to its work. And had you done that over the last thirty years rather than trying to outsmart the market. You probably did better than ninety nine percent of other investors. Excellent will josh. Thank you so much for talking with me. It's my pleasure. Stacey thank you so much for having me. And i hope

As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:18 min | 2 years ago

As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

"Tons Anita went to the polls yesterday to vote in an election overshadowed by opposition complaints of irregularities such as ballot box, stuffing President John Maga. Fully who is accused of stifling democracy seeks a second term in office alongside fourteen other candidates talk to Dan. Padgett is electoral politics at the university. Of Aberdeen, he specializes in political communication through mass rallies and populist and nationalist ideologies in Tanzania and joins me on the line. Now Don Tanzania's long been thought of in the West is a a haven of stability within east Africa but I mean this isn't necessarily the case and I. I wonder if you could sketch out the political dynamic there, the ruling party's been in power since nineteen sixty one. Yes that's right. It's is the longest ruling party in sub. Saharan Africa. The political dynamic in Tanzania has been one of the ruling Kanzi, CCM's decline over the last fifteen years. Reaching a low point in two thousand fifteen where it where the margin of victory was. The fittest is ever been. Since then President Michel, Foodie, it came to kyle and that's election has led Tanzania. Very shot an increasingly extreme offered Harry. Intern. And we weren't sure how just how? Radical that authoritarian agenda would be and the election this we're just getting results from now suggests that it is as bad as any of us feared as so the opposition allegations of vote rigging, etc do stand up. Well. So. Of course, normally I would turn to international election observers. Attorney to arbitrate these claims to decide which to give credence in which not to give credence. Unfortunately, we can't almost no international election observers. Were invited and those that were invited were. Invited at our so Given that and given the advantage of the opportunity that this creates the ruling party the elections it's hard not to give at least prima facie credence to these opposition claims especially given the the wide range of anecdote to. Video and photographic evidence that I've seen an which which I've been collecting these last twenty four hours, and of course, zipping a social media crackdown various restrictions on the press. Has Been, a crackdown all over and and for the last five years. So in many ways, the the rigging receipt which we've been seeing apparently seeing of the next twenty four hours. Is. Really just the icing on the authoritarian cake. There's extreme. Media Censorship rallies have been banned and consider route the rally. The most important means of communication tends to emotional time about seventy percent of people attend local meetings on a regular basis and attend election campaign rallies they were they were abandoned twenty sixteen and indeed the opposition at large have. Hottest. Struggle underneath. Almost constance. Of States and extra state harassment in includes trumped up court cases but also extrajudicial. So extra state attacks. Unknown assailants that have arrested some abductors killed. And in fact, one of the main challenges has recently returned to the country after recovering from gunshot wounds. That's right. So tenderly series is. Presidential. Candidate is the largest opposition party in Tanzania. and. So that's Experience of being of surviving attempted assassination attempt has has given. US already in very impressive political figure a sort of a sparkle. Some people referred to him as a living miracle. But of course, we don't know the results. Yes. But we all seeing violence particularly in Zanzibar. Zanzibar the autonomous. ARCHEPELAGO's Zanzibar, which is a federally devote area of 'em. Into UK. Has has often seen electoral violence. We saw it in ninety five and two, thousand and thirteen, thousand, five and twenty fifteen and actions by varying degrees. So in in some ways, this is a return to form It's not. The recurrence of violence is is. Seems to be because the opposition has probably one in sensabaugh almost every time. But they've never officially one out one means or another has always been used to not in the that's the that's the the scholarly consensus on. Politics what's different? This time I think is that there's violence on the mainland as well. So this is no longer an issue of contained physical violence in Zanzibar. There have been a series of incidents including. What appears to be an attempt to a to attack the chairman of the leading opposition party on the eve of the elections. So that's one difference the other is considered. No money there is. A. Sporadic protests violence and in return state brutality, police army heavy-handedness in putting down those protests that the protests have often been. Constrained and sporadic because they have not been condoned led. By, by the leaders of the opposition there, there are indications that this could be different this time one of the reasons for that is. The, the rhetoric is different. The leader of the opposition in Zanzibar say amount has been say had has been saying that in the past he's held his supporters back. He's been of restraint, and at this time he he won't urge restraint to newly sue has said that he will. Bring people out onto the streets and consider the state of the opposition behind because it seems like this might be the last stand in a sense that vikings they can make, and so they they don't have that say incentive to hold back this time and say the keep up how to drive the next time. Just finally before we go, do you think that this is part of something that we're seeing across parts of Africa there is a younger demographic. They were all born after independence that not prepared to accept authoritarian rule the just coming to the age where they are protesting we're seeing it in Nigeria within saws and in various other places could this be the the Africans spring. My sense is if there is African spring to come, it will come off and an Wiki will extend. Mexico an authoritarian winter. The trend on that strikes me is that a number of leaders are emerging in an intense Aena in Zambia. In other parts of the consonant, which bear a striking resemblance to this sort of authoritarian. Developmental. Nationalists of is so The there's a young population I are angry. But in fact, I think the trend seems to go the other way. And results. When can we expect those? So the first also are already dripping in and they show. That a series of opposition strongholds, there's places that you would never expect or or at least likely. To expect to go to a to the ruling party are being won by then by margins of three to one, which suggests that the the the rigging. Being worried about maybe taking place typically a Tanzanian election result takes three or four days that was related end and announced especially with the presidential elections but. So far. This is actually has been crisis already.

Tanzania Zanzibar Don Tanzania Saharan Africa East Africa Padgett DAN Aberdeen Anita President Trump John Maga Africa Aena President Michel United States Intern Harry
Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:16 min | 2 years ago

Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Britannica. Today's politicians but most of her life fighting for civil rights, she put her life at risk to change the course of American history, but she's often left out of history books. Let's talk about Constance Baker Motley. Constance Baker Motley was born on September fourteenth nineteen, forty one in new haven connecticut she was one of twelve children born to working class immigrant parents from the West indies. Constance. Was a bright child who grew up attending integrated schools and quickly fell in love with reading. She didn't learn much about black history in school. But what she did learn about civil rights leaders inspired her she decided she wanted to become a lawyer, but constance couldn't afford higher education. She took a job as a maid for a while before moving on to work for the National Youth Administration an organization focused on providing work an educational opportunities for young adults. Constance was giving a speech at a local community center one evening when her oratory skills impressed a wealthy white philanthropist. He, offered to pay for constants college tuition. So in nineteen, forty, one constance began attending college at Fisk University in Nashville. She later wrote that the train ride down to Tennessee was the first time she experienced overt racism and Jim Crow laws after being forced to ride in a broken down segregated train car, it was a perspective changing moment for constance two years into her attendance at Fisk Constance transferred to New York University and finished her bachelor's degree in economics. Then in nineteen, forty, four constance became the first black woman to be accepted to Columbia law school. After graduating from Columbia in nineteen, forty, six constants worked for the NWC peas legal staff under Thurgood. Marshall who later became a court justice over the course of her work at the N. double ACP constance assisted with almost sixty cases that ended up reaching the Supreme Court. She also personally argued ten supreme court cases and one nine. Constance is work integrated multiple southern state universities putting her toe-to-toe with racist governors determined to bar black students from schools. She also helped protect the right to peaceful protests and opened up parks for. Black. Americans. She did all that despite the sexism and racism personally experienced during her legal career. Some judges actually turned their backs on her and refused to hear her speak. But Constance didn't let others biopsies bar her from success. Her work made her a key player in the civil rights movement and she even occasionally represented Dr. Martin? Luther. King Junior. Constance was constantly in danger when she was working in the south racists threatened her life and the lives of other prominent figures in the black community constance was barred from staying in hotels. So she had to stay with local activists, but even that didn't make her feel completely safe her friend Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar. Evers. was murdered his own driveway. So in nineteen, sixty, five constance left her work in the south and moved back to New York City. Shortly thereafter, she became the first black woman to serve in the New York State Senate. She was also elected president of the borough of Manhattan which made her the first woman in that role. During her time as a politician constance focused on raising up under served communities in the city like Harlem and East Harlem in nineteen sixty, six president Lyndon Johnson appointed constance to the US. District Court in the southern district

Constance Baker Motley Fisk Constance Constance District Court Supreme Court Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network New York State Senate Fisk University Columbia Law School New York City West Indies New York University National Youth Administration Connecticut Nashville Mississippi Manhattan Lyndon Johnson
Wisconsin says Foxconn's scaled-back factory won't get tax credits

America's Morning News

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Wisconsin says Foxconn's scaled-back factory won't get tax credits

"In Wisconsin has told Foxconn Technology Group that it won't qualify for billions of dollars in state tax credits unless it strikes a new deal for a scale back factory complex. State officials have told Taiwan based Fox Constance last year that it wouldn't qualify for the tax credits without revisions to the 2017 contract, given that the scope of the envisioned factory has been reduced. President Trump Herald of the original idea As a deal, I should say, is a sign of revitalized American manufacturing. The letter sent Monday from the state to Foxconn set this new factory can't get state tax credits unless the original contract is

Foxconn Technology Group President Trump Herald Fox Constance Wisconsin Taiwan
Cracker Barrel Cracks and Adds Alcohol

Business Wars Daily

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Cracker Barrel Cracks and Adds Alcohol

"Have a few constance miles of highway amidst Turner to and science for cracker barrel restaurants along the way the old country store restaurant is a favorite among travelers after all what's better than some chicken and dumplings or a roast beef bladder before you turn in for the night but if you wanted to beverage stronger than a colo or a hot cup of Joe, well, there you were out of luck no booze at cracker barrel. But twenty twenty has changed so many things in the old country stores Beverage Menu. Appears to be one of them in January the chain tested beer wine and Mama's at Florida restaurants. Then it expanded the offering to make up for lost revenue during the pandemic customer said, the drinks reduced the quote veto vote that's when they choose another restaurant because someone in the group wants a glass of beer or wine with their dinner. CNN reported customers want to unwind over dinner and it looks like alcohol is going to boost the barrels bottom line at roughly six hundred restaurant locations too.

JOE CNN Florida Twenty Twenty
US election: Trump won't commit to peaceful transfer of power

Steve Scaffidi

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

US election: Trump won't commit to peaceful transfer of power

"Rhys Constance senator taking issue with those who believe President Trump will not agree to a peaceful transition. If he were to lose this November, there was a peaceful transfer of power after the election. You have to see what happened, Senator Ron Johnson's take. I do not interpret the president's comments. He's not going to agree with the peaceful transition power if he loses, he's expecting Johnson, calling the president's mail in ballot concerns legitimate, among them postmarks and extended counting back. Won't know who is the next president states for days, weeks after the election, as well as potential voter front, it exists. It's really question how much G Miller tell you. T M J News.

President Trump Senator Ron Johnson Rhys Constance Senator G Miller
Medical tech is the new gold rush for investors during the pandemic

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:11 min | 2 years ago

Medical tech is the new gold rush for investors during the pandemic

"More people are seeing their doctors added distance during the pandemic in this long awaited to telehealth has investors intrigued there was already a boom in biotech investing before covid nineteen hit. But now investors are rushing to put money into all kinds of ways to modernize medicine from Boston W.. G. B. H. Radios Aaron Schachter has more personal. Medical Technology isn't especially new push your fitness further with fitbit charge to a heart rate and fitness wristband that helps you make the most of all day workouts and beyond. And the wearables are just one facet of health tech. The pandemic has shown that much of health care can be delivered at a distance and there's been a boon in telehealth platforms, online fitness classes, and Internet connected devices that are vital signs. Harry LARRIKIN IS CO author of moneyball medicine thriving in the new data driven healthcare market before Cova. Did you really have to look at these things and figure out where the world was GONNA go how fast it was going to go there all of a sudden now you're giving people i. don't WanNa say no choice but now they. Need these things and tech investors want in venture capital entities have invested nearly five and a half billion dollars in medical tech from January through June that's according to rock health a company that helps digital health startups. But there are those urging caution about the direction. These investments take all too. Often the technology has attempted to reengineer the process of care rather than leverage. The most efficient process of Care Jed constance is a healthcare consultant. For example, he says, it took years for the developers of medical records technology to get it right because early versions made it difficult for doctors to Talk to patients and fill in the required computerized forms. Constant says there's a history of companies creating what's flashy instead of what's practical and so the venture capital investor backed efforts have found them to be largely ignorant. There are also concerns that new health technology could exacerbate disparities in healthcare between rich and poor communities doctor. My mom is the former chief innovation officer. At Medicare's innovation center she says that smartwatch are fun but the kinds of devices that help most people stay healthy are often more mundane. Can you develop a tool that will help them track their medications with things? That automatically dispense medication for them and or something that will give their physicians more real time data on which medications they're actually taking according to rock health much of the venture money handed out this year went to companies developing online platforms for more telemedicine, digital pharmacies, fitness classes, and more efficient ways to deliver mental health counseling at a distance that's w. g. b. h. Aaron, chapter, and Boston consulting firm McKinsey says the speed of telehealth adoption everything from video visits to digital records means up to two hundred and fifty billion dollars in healthcare spending could soon be going towards virtual care.

G. B. H. Radios Aaron Schachte Chief Innovation Officer Boston Jed Constance Harry Larrikin Consultant Mckinsey Cova W. G. B. H Medicare
The American Jewish Community and the 2020 US Election

People of the Pod

09:44 min | 2 years ago

The American Jewish Community and the 2020 US Election

"Soifer previously served as national security adviser for Senator Comma Harris now, the Democratic nominee for vice president and Joe Biden's running mate. She joins us now to talk about the role. Jewish. Voters play and how she believes. Democrats addressed. Jewish. Priorities please keep in mind. AJC. Is a five. Oh One C. Three not profit organization AJC neither supports nor opposes candidates for elective office and with that disclaimer Haley welcome thank you so much for having me. So let's start with the basics and Kinda, the horse race aspect of this how much of the American voting population identifies as Jewish? So the Jewish community in terms of the American population is about two percent, but we're actually about three percent of the electorate and we'd play an outsized role in. NHS for three reasons, we voted higher rates. On average Jewish Americans vote at a higher rate than. By about fifteen percents we also where we live correlates with wear our votes tend to matter even more we tend to live in swing states and a third reason which I'm sure we'll get into is that we overwhelmingly support Democrats in our view as Jewish Democrat organization that is especially or in terms of the outsize impact we have. So Haley Bernie Sanders in his speech on Monday addressed the many Democrats who really wanted him to be the nominee and many of them were Jewish are Jewish many of them have us on Israel, that don't jibe with the very pro Israel aspects of the party, platform. It really sounded like Bernie was calling on Democrats to unify despite their differences and I'm curious how the Party and its leadership have prevented Israel from becoming a wedge issue. Joe Biden has done an exceptional job in unifying the party around these critically important issues, including Israel and the platform that's been adopted at this convention exemplifies what is overwhelming democratic support for the US Israel relationship. Ebeidi s support a full funding for military. And Support of the STOORIKHEL alliance, it's the view of the majority of members of Congress that is the democratic mainstream media. So you emphasize what a majority of Democrats you certainly we've had concerns over the years about Ilan Omar had to leave. Is that kind of who you're thinking about when you say a majority of Democrats feel this way I should have said an over overwhelming majority you mentioned. Two. Members, of Congress, we currently between the House and the Senate head of over two hundred and seventy. So between those two members of Congress who we agree do not share our views on Israel and we've spoken out against them going back to before they were even elected. But between the two of them to over two seventy, we're talking about less than one percent of the Democratic members of Congress. They are very outspoken though they have expressed views with which we disagree and we've made that clear and that's why we're not supporting their re election and we don't share their views but luckily, their views are not shared by our party either look at the platform I mean the platform is the views of our candidate and the views of our Party and the platform could not be more clear in. Its support of Israel, what I the states to watch in this upcoming election and in which of those states could the Jewish vote really make a difference. When we look in elections, we always look at the last election as a baseline and we know that had Donald Trump not one Florida and either Michigan or Pennsylvania. He would not be president today and in those three states Florida Michigan and Pennsylvania. The Jewish vote alone could made up those margins. So when we looked to twenty twenty in this election, we are looking at the Jewish vote in those critically important states, my home state of Michigan Donald. Trump won by just ten, thousand, seven, hundred, and four votes. That margin could be overcome by the Jewish student population of Michigan in Michigan state a low. We are looking at the Jewish vote in those three critically important states but also states like Arizona and Colorado and Georgia, which in addition to being presidential swing states are going to be critically important in terms of the control of the Senate. Are you saying that the Jews in those swing states voted Republican or didn't vote at all did shoes in those swing states voted we know that Jewish voters do turn out and in twenty sixteen, it was no different than in previous elections choose turned out. But. We also know bat they turned out in support of Hillary. Clinton at about seventy two percents. If you look at the two thousand eighteen midterms Jewish voters supported Democrats at seventy nine percents. So we saw an increase, we believe that in twenty twenty, those numbers can continue to go up in terms of Jewish support for Democrats. So now we'll talk with your Republican counterpart on next week's episode. But from your vantage point, you said that most Jews identify with the Democratic Party why is that? So, choose have historically for decades defied overwhelmingly with the Democrats, the values that Jews hold dear tend to be those aligned with the policies supported by Democrats. So when it comes to domestic policies such as access to affordable healthcare and education ED and gun safety and ensuring that we are country welcoming the stranger and not enacting cruel and discriminatory policies toward immigrants and refugees. These are all key issues driving the Jewish vote. On those issues and more, that's where Jewish voters align with Democrats when it comes to foreign policy is well, we know that support of Israel is an issue that is important of course to Jewish voters and Mrs. Issue Where Democrats to our squarely aligned with the priority of Jewish voters, which is the support of the strong US Israel relationship, and in this election, we have a new issue. So all of those things have been constance. New issue in this election that is impacting the Jewish, vote in Support of Democrats and that is our rising insecurity as a community. We have seen an unprecedented rise in anti-semitic attacks targeting our community including the horrific attacks in Pittsburgh and Powei we know that seventy three percent of Jews feel less secure than they did years ago and over half of US blame. Donald Trump for that and that's because we've seen him embolden anti-semites white nationalist just last night he tweeted out support for an extremist group Hugh a non that has peddled conspiracy theories still on these issues especially when it comes to the security of our community. There's a clear choice in this election and Jewish especially do not believe that Donald Trump has the best interest of our community in mind he has Jewish family members. He's certainly been friendly to Israel is strengthened that relationship. So how does that square? There's no question. He has Jewish family members. He's also married and he's done said many misogynistic things. So that alone does not qualify him as what I would consider to be someone who's been particularly good for the Jewish community I look at the numbers and I look at the unprecedented rise in white nationalist propaganda or anti Semitic attack and the words that. Come out of his mouth better clear signs to anti-semites to racist to bigots that he is their ally whether it is identifying anti-semites white nationalist marching Charlottesville as very fine people or calling the extremists that marched in Michigan with swastikas very good people that was earlier this year or hiring someone recently, Sebastian Gorka who is affiliated with the Nazi party in Hungary? When it comes to Israel. Donald Trump. Has Been Long on symbolism and short on substance. Yes. He moved the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, and we recognize that Jerusalem is, of course, the capital of Israel. But the substance matters and when you look at the record of Joe Biden who with President Obama finalized unprecedented historic thirty eight. DOLLAR AGREEMENT WITH ISRAEL PROVIDING FOR AID for the next ten years, and you look at the security issues that Israel faces. Actually Donald. Trump has not been that great for Israel.

Israel Donald Trump Joe Biden Michigan Party United States Haley Bernie Sanders Congress Senate Democratic Party NHS Soifer Vice President Senator Comma Harris Ilan Omar Stoorikhel Jerusalem Hillary Florida President Trump
"constance" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"constance" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Already a long lasting camp to Las teams the playoff does work it's interesting to me that you you come out of the gate saying that always use the best in the country because I I think Ohio state from what we've seen resume wise and what we seen them do each and every week throughout this college football season states the best team in the country I don't think it's a question I get the love for Joe borough and I get that what they're doing right now we'll keep you updated throughout the SEC championship game right now Ellis you leads fourteen nothing on Georgia early in the second quarter but listen Ohio state's been the best team this season I I feel like L. issues the best story to this point but how states been the best team in in I think no matter what takes place in obviously Ellis you out out to the the good start against the Bulldogs both of those teams are going to be in the college football playoff come set Sunday afternoon tomorrow when all this kinda shakes out don't don't you agree they're both locked in both teams yeah I I believe so and then and so that gets us to the ACC championship game which is later on today with Virginia and Clemson and constant is the one interesting thing with all of this playoff picture conversation because their season they have been so good this year but no one's talked about them and the problem with that though is they haven't really played anybody the ACC isn't that good comparatively to the big ten and the SEC so when you look at what Clinton's done up back to back chan team returning back from a championship with their starting quarterback would d'abo Sweeney with ET and everyone that's back for clients in the way they've won in the last couple weeks by a lot of points in the last four weeks can it's actively they've been just running teams our in the ACC Constance the one team.

Joe borough Georgia Ellis Bulldogs Virginia SEC Clinton Constance Ohio football Clemson d'abo Sweeney ACC four weeks