30 Burst results for "Conrad Wilson"

'A Death Sentence': US Prisons and COVID-19

All Things Considered

06:35 min | Last week

'A Death Sentence': US Prisons and COVID-19

"People are some of the most vulnerable took over 19 since March, researchers say more than 1600. People in jails and prisons have died of the disease, and tens of thousands have been infected. Some states have started to vaccinate people behind bars while others have not. And we're gonna look now at how this is playing out in three states. Alison Cherry is with Colorado Public radio and she joins us from Denver. Conrad Wilson is with Oregon Public Broadcasting, and he's in Portland. Joining us from Boston is dead Backer with W. B. You are good to have all three of you here. Hi. Hi. Hello, Dev. I want to start with you. In Massachusetts. Your state included prisoners in the first phase of its covert 19 vaccine plan. What was the rationale for that? Well, we know that the virus transmits quickly in correctional settings in the risk of contracting the virus and dying from it are much higher inside prisons and jails compared with outside. So in deciding to vaccinate prisoners. Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, a Republican, said that correctional settings are no different from other congregate living situation, such as shelters and group homes where people are living in Copan close quarters and the virus can easily spread. So here's what he said last month when he explained why prisoners were included in the first phase. Our facilities are congregated facilities and we need to make sure that the people who work there and the people who live there because of the possibility of outbreak that that should be a place. We focus early in this exercise. The governor says it's strong public health policy because it's not just vaccinating prisoners. Workers are getting the vaccine to any pointed out. There are lawyers to go in and out of prisons in jail's medical workers, visitors those who provide programming, so the states thinking is that offering vaccines and correctional settings will help prevent the spread in the community. And so far, how is the vaccine rollout going in jails and prisons in Massachusetts officials say it's going smoothly, but it appears that a lot of people are not taking it. Court documents in particular shows that about a third of prisoners in more than half of prison workers have not received the vaccine. Now. That number does not include workers who may have been vaccinated elsewhere. So some correctional facilities are holding vaccine education sessions to encourage people to get the shop. Okay, let's turn now to Oregon More than 40 prison inmates have died after testing positive for covert 19 in that state. So Conrad give us a sense of what's happening with vaccines there now. Almost 7000 inmates have been vaccinated. That's more than half of the state's prison population. Many of those inmates have received their second dose, prison officials say, but vaccinating this many inmates this soon wasn't something Oregon health officials were willing to do on their own. Took litigation from a group of inmates on din order from a federal judge here in Portland. Basically, the inmates argued Oregon's vaccination plan didn't treat them like others living in nursing homes and other congregate care facilities where the vaccine has been administered. Your state representative General Bynum. She's a Democrat and chairs the Oregon House Judiciary Committee. I didn't understand how our adults in custody, we're any different from any other group in a congregant care setting. And I certainly don't believe that a prison sentence is a death sentence. The judge's ruling at the beginning of this month force the state to offer inmates vaccines immediately, So that's why about half of all prison inmates have been vaccinated. Let me jump in here. This is Alison and Denver Advocates here wish that that would have happened in Colorado that court ruling con artist is talking about in Oregon. Is something lawyers here have been trying to use as a tool to get inmates vaccines, and I know there's been a back and forth over this in Colorado. Alison tell us more about what's been happening there. Yeah. Democratic Governor Jared Pulis hasn't prioritized inmates at all. And initially he did in one of the early plans, but then Was called out for that by some prominent conservatives, You know, people saying, Do you want the murderer to get the vaccine before your next door neighbor and he was apparently sensitive to that, and so he removed prisoners from the lists and put them in just the regular population. So in other words, he's making no distinction that these people are in a group setting a 70 year old prisoner would be prioritized. A 70 year old non prisoner and so on. So the majority of prisoners are not being prioritized. I will note that prison staff has been prioritized in those vaccines are being administered now. So tell us more about the pressure that Colorado's governor has been under Well. He's gotten a lot of pushback for his decision to not prioritize inmates for vaccine for getting a vaccine, and he's also been sued. He has thought that lawsuit successfully so far. Rebecca Wallace is an A C l U lawyer, she says. Public health officials have been universal in saying that people in groups heading should be prioritized for a vaccine and governor pull. It has actually not only ignored that guidance but rejected that guidance from his own Colorado Department of Public Health on by think it really stand out because he's such a data driven individual in his other decisions. I'm curious. Early in the pandemic, there was pressure to release inmates to create social distance inside facilities that were often crowded. Have vaccination efforts change those conversations in the states that you're all in? Well in Massachusetts. Despite the early vaccination of prisoners, there has been little movement to release people. The fight over that continues mostly through litigation. There are pending lawsuits, but with so many prisoners getting vaccinated now, it does weaken the argument for big releases. Yeah, and in Colorado. Interestingly, the state's prison population has gone down by a few 1000 people since the start of the pandemic, But state officials attribute that almost 100% to the fact that there were no no criminal jury trials last year at all in 2020, so there's this massive backlog in the States Criminal justice system. So you've brought us three very different stories about policies around vaccinating, incarcerated people in three states that are very different across the country. How does this fit in with what we are seeing across the US nationally, Conrad Well, every state is really dealing with this a little bit differently. And, you know, really, This is another symptom showing a lack of a national strategy. Despite the risks, it's another way of, you know, also showing how inmates are marginalized by society. And this isn't just about those who are incarcerated. In a recent report by the nonpartisan Prison Policy Initiative, researchers found that there were more new cases and counties that have large incarcerated populations.

Massachusetts Alison Cherry Conrad Wilson W. B. Oregon Colorado Oregon Public Broadcasting Charlie Baker Portland General Bynum Oregon House Judiciary Committ Denver Copan Jared Pulis DEV Alison Boston Conrad Rebecca Wallace Colorado Department Of Public
Oregon wildfire under criminal arson investigation, police say

1A

00:52 sec | 6 months ago

Oregon wildfire under criminal arson investigation, police say

"Enforcement authorities in Oregon have opened a criminal investigation into one of the major wildfires burning in that state is Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports. At least one person was killed by the fire and hundreds of homes have been burned. Oregon State police into local police departments are looking into how the Alameda Fire in southern Oregon began as part of an arson investigation. So far, the fire has burned at least 600 homes, mostly in the towns of Phoenix and talent. Hi. O'Mara is the chief of the Ashland Police Department. It involves not only the studying of the fire, but the death of somebody immediately after the fire was set somebody that was killed by the fire. That investigation is criminal and it is ongoing. The numbers of homes, businesses and people lost in the fire raging across Oregon are all expected to increase in the coming days as fires continue to spread in the damages assessed.

Oregon Ashland Police Department Conrad Wilson O'mara Arson Alameda Phoenix
"conrad wilson" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:41 min | 6 months ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from NPR news on trial Snyder in Portland Oregon hundreds of protesters took to the streets. Saturday. For the one hundred today of Racial Justice Protests Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports on police moving to disperse the crowd early in the evening. Cried march towards the Portland Police Bureau. Earlier in the night before police declared a riot police say and postings on social media show a few protesters threw Molotov cocktails that exploded into flames in the street police responded with tear gas in arrests since the killing of George Floyd Minneapolis Portland has seen some of the most consistent protests in the country activists here said, they want fifty million dollars funded from the city's police bureau and reinvested in other community programmes. This weekend's protests come following two deaths last weekend supporter. Aaron J Danielson was shot and killed in downtown Portland on Thursday police killed. Far Left Antifa supporter Michael Right now in Washington state who is wanted Daniels murderer for NPR news I'm Conrad Wilson Portland also more unrest last night in Rochester New York thousands demanded resignations of the city's mayor and police chief over the death of Daniel prude in police custody. Here's NPR's Brian Man marchers gathered on the street were Daniel prude a black man lay in march naked with a hood over his head surrounded by officers Christopher Coles told the crowd people want justice. This is the first time that the world is standing up for black lives. First time when the crowd turned toward Rochester's main police station, a large force of officers used tear gas in a military style vehicle to scout of the protest..

Portland Police Bureau Portland NPR Conrad Wilson Portland Oregon Daniel Rochester Conrad Wilson Aaron J Danielson Snyder George Floyd Brian Man Molotov Christopher Coles Michael Right
Suspect sought in connection of Portland shooting killed by authorities

NPR News Now

00:41 sec | 6 months ago

Suspect sought in connection of Portland shooting killed by authorities

"According to the US marshals service a suspect in the weekend killing of Aaron Danielson as reportedly been killed near. Seattle self-described teeth supporter Michael Rheinau, died hours after telling vice news that he killed Danielson in self defense as Oregon Public Broadcasting Conrad Wilson reports authorities say Rhino, was killed during efforts to take him into custody last night but wealth authorities attempted to contact right now and Thurston County. Washington. There were reports of shots fired and right now was killed according to a law enforcement source was wanted in connection with killing it far-right supporter, Aaron J Danielson as a pro-trump caravan of hundreds of vehicles while and through the city Conrad Wilson in Portland.

Aaron J Danielson Conrad Wilson Michael Rheinau United States Thurston County Seattle Oregon Washington Portland
Portland suspect shot dead by police during arrest

BBC World Service

00:46 sec | 6 months ago

Portland suspect shot dead by police during arrest

"According to multiple law enforcement sources. The suspect in a fatal shooting at a protest in Portland, Oregon, last weekend, is dead as Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports. A man reportedly died after an encounter with officers in Washington State. A judge in Multnomah County, Oregon, issued an arrest warrant for Michael for us right now on Thursday, according to a law enforcement source right now was wanted in connection with the killing in Portland, Oregon on Saturday. Federal authorities attempted to contact right now and Thurston County, Washington. There were reports of shots fired and right now was killed. On Saturday. A far right supporter, Erin J. Danielsson, was killed after a gunshot wound to the chest on the same day as a pro trump caravan of hundreds of vehicles wound through the city. NPR news. I'm Conrad Wilson in

Oregon Conrad Wilson Portland Erin J. Danielsson Multnomah County Thurston County Washington State NPR Washington Michael
Oregon state police arrive in Portland in push to stop riots

Fresh Air

00:27 sec | 7 months ago

Oregon state police arrive in Portland in push to stop riots

"Oregon State police will take the place of federal law enforcement officers guarding the federal courthouse in Portland, Oregon, Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports. The city's police department will work alongside state troopers. During a news conference, Portland police Chief Chuck Leavell criticized a recent City Council resolution that prevents Portland please from working with federal officers. He says it creates a potentially more dangerous scenario. But he also says he hopes the reduction of a federal president's calmed tensions in downtown

Oregon State Police Portland Chuck Leavell Oregon Conrad Wilson Public Broadcasting City Council President Trump
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:08 min | 7 months ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This morning on the morning editions, Rachel Martin and here and now is Tanya Mosley will host they will be joined by senior Washington editor and correspondent Ron Elving congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell. A national correspondent Debbie Elliot, among others. Live coverage starting at 7 30 Coming up right here on member supported VD. Low clouds. Patchy fog partial to Moshe. Mostly sunny skies today sixties to the nineties. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, Federal agents have agreed to back off their effort to contain demonstrations in Portland, Oregon. State's governor says the agents will end their nightly confrontations with protesters. Federal authorities say it's more of a pause. In any case. It's a change in the effort to protect a federal courthouse, which led to almost nightly incidents that intensified protests over racial justice. Oregon Public broadcasting Conrad Wilson has been covering the story there, Conrad Hi, Steve. How do officials plan to secure this federal courthouse instead? So under the deal, Oregon State police they're going to take over defending the federal courthouse. They say that they're going to work with federal law enforcement and the Portland police, and the idea here is to get federal law enforcement to leave while also ensuring the safety of the courthouse. And the people that work there. I mean, these federal officers they don't generally do crowd control. They've made some missteps that have really energized what prior to their arrival were some pretty small protests mean at times, you know, fewer than 100 people or so. For instance, a U. S marshal shot a peaceful protester in the head with a crowd control device, putting a person in the hospital. And then Oregon Public Broadcasting reported on homeland security officers in military style uniforms using marked vehicles to arrest protesters. Yeah, and and your reporting intensified suspicion of the administration's motives. It appeared to many people that they were deliberately stoking conflict. They wanted this confrontation if they wanted chaos, And of course, the president leans into chaos whenever he can. So how did the administration end up agreeing to do something else? We'll came from the state. I mean this week, Oregon Governor Cape Brown spoke with Vice President Mike Pence. And the governor pitched this. This plan to the vice president. Pence got the Department of Homeland Security involved. There were a number of high ranking officials in Portland this week, including the deputy director of the FBI. Before this agreement came together and was announced yesterday. We did hear that agreement from the governor but aren't homeland Security officials saying something just a little different? Acting. Yes, Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Chad Wolf says the surge of federal officers that President Trump sent to Portland is going to stay and see how this unfolds. You know, basically Ken, Oregon State police do what they say they're going to do. The difference, though, is that federal officers are going to be out on the streets in laws. State police can't protect the courthouse. Okay, So let me try to understand how this really changes the situation as you guys have been reporting very effectively. These were small protests, and they seemed to get larger when federal agents got involved in the federal courthouse became much more of a focus of these protests that originally were about local police and racial justice and that sort of thing. What happens now that the federal officers step back? Well, The Trump Administration, you know, has has put this narrative of Portland is a city under siege from protesters mean Trump tweeted that you know if he hadn't deploying federal law enforcement quote, there would be no Portland don't be burned and beaten to the ground. In reality protests have mainly taken place in an area of downtown. The vast majority of protests have been peaceful and focused on racial justice in police violence. The hope is that with federal agents stepping back, will de escalate things and return the focus to conversations between the community. Police in the mayor mean just this week local sight civil rights groups released a list of prop policy proposals and they're really trying to use the momentum of black lives matter to address inequality. Policy proposals instead of confrontation. Conrad thank you very much. You're welcome Steve Conrad Wilson of Oregon Public Broadcasting. Out of Portland is not the only city seeing these kinds of tensions in Seattle. Clashes between protesters and police turned violent last weekend, but Seattle's Democratic mayor, Jenny Durkin, told the Department of Homeland Security she did not want federal agents sent into her city. She later discovered a force was deployed and put on standby. Now they have left. Mayor Durkin spoke with our co host, Rachel Martin, about why she and other mayors feel these federal deployments. Part of a bigger, darker political goal. We have, like any large city. We have public safety challenges. But our public safety challenges have been made significantly worse by this president's actions, in his words, the inner in level of criminal activity that were really deteriorated after the president started tweeting about it, and it was a subject to have Fox coverage every night. So we have seen and I've talked to mayors across the country the same thing when the president actually tweets. There's not my words saying he's targeting City is run by Democrats. He's openly admitted it and tweeted about it. Andi, I think that that is really is a chilling prospect at a president United States would use federal resource is for political purposes. The Department of Justice has said that there is an expansion happening right that all of this deployment of federal agents to a variety of cities. Now we're seeing Chicago Albuquerque, Kansas City now Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland. This is all part of so called Operation legend that this has to do with gun violence, quelling gun violence in these cities helping solve murders. This's the DOJ zone characteristic of what this operation is about. I guess I'm hoping you can clarify for me. Is this operation legend something that's happening? Adjacent, separate from from the agents that had been deployed to Portland. And for a couple of days, at least this standby force to Seattle. I actually think they're using it as camouflage. There are ongoing task force in major cities, the deal with gun violence and with gang violence of other violent crime. We had him in Seattle and I worked on him is us attorney I know I've spoken with the mayor of Chicago in Albuquerque, and they have a strong collaborative approach with federal law enforcement. That it is very rare. If it all federal law enforcement will surge agents to a city to deal with public safety threats that are normally handled by city or state officials. Without talking to or working with local officials. You have described what President Trump is doing as being a political ploy to play his own base ahead of the election into some kind of law and order message..

Portland Oregon president President Trump Vice President Seattle Department of Homeland Securit Rachel Martin Conrad Wilson Mike Pence NPR News Debbie Elliot Steve Inskeep Oregon State Steve Conrad Wilson Washington Tanya Mosley
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:34 min | 7 months ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

"507 This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, Federal agents have agreed to back off their effort to contain demonstrations in Portland, Oregon. State's governor says the agents will end their nightly confrontations with protesters. Federal authorities say it's more of a pause. In any case. It's a change in the effort to protect a federal courthouse, which led to almost nightly incidents that intensified protests over racial justice. Oregon Public Broadcasting Conrad Wilson has been covering this story, either. Conrad Hi, Steve. How do officials plan to secure this federal courthouse instead? So under the deal, Oregon State police they're going to take over defending the federal courthouse. They say that they're going to work with federal law enforcement and the Portland police, and the idea here is to get federal law enforcement to leave will also ensuring the safety of the courthouse. And the people that work there. I mean, these federal officers they don't generally do crowd control. They've made some missteps that have really energized what prior to their arrival were some pretty small protests mean at times, you know, fewer than 100 people or so. For instance, a U. S marshal shot a peaceful protester in the head with a crowd control device, putting the person in the hospital. And then Oregon Public Broadcasting reported on homeland security officers in military style uniforms using marked vehicles to arrest protesters. Yeah, and and your reporting intensified suspicion of the administration's motives. It appeared to many people that they were deliberately stoking conflict. They wanted this confrontation if they wanted chaos, And of course, the president leans into chaos whenever he can. So how did the administration end up agreeing to do something else? We'll came from the state. I mean this week, Oregon Governor Cape Brown spoke with Vice President Mike Pence. And the governor of pitched this. This plan to the vice president. Pence got the Department of Homeland Security involved. There were a number of high ranking officials in Portland this week, including the deputy director of the FBI. Before this agreement came together and was announced yesterday. We did hear that agreement from the governor but aren't homeland Security officials saying something just a little different? Acting. Yes, Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Chad Wolf says the surge of federal officers that President Trump sent to Portland is going to stay and see how this unfolds. You know, basically Ken, Oregon State police do what they say they're going to do. The difference, though, is that federal officers are going to be out on the streets in lost state. Please can't protect the courthouse. Okay, So let me try to understand how this really changes the situation as you guys have been reporting very effectively. These were small protests, and they seemed to get larger when federal agents got involved in the federal courthouse became much more of a focus of these protests that originally were about local police and racial justice and that sort of thing. What happens now that the federal officers step back? Well, The Trump Administration, you know, has has put this narrative of Portland is a city under siege from protesters mean Trump tweeted that you know if he hadn't deployed federal law enforcement quote, there would be no Portland don't be burned and beaten to the ground. In reality protests have mainly taken place in an area of downtown. The vast majority of protests have been peaceful and focused on racial justice and police violence. The hope is that with federal agents stepping back, will de escalate things and return the focus to conversations between the community. Please In the mayor, I mean, just this week local sight. Civil rights groups released a list of prop policy proposals and they're really trying to use the momentum of black lives matter to address inequality. Policy proposals instead of confrontation. Conrad thank you very much. Welcome Steve Conrad Wilson of Oregon Public Broadcasting. Out of Portland is not the only city seeing these kinds of tensions in Seattle. Clashes between protesters and police turned violent last weekend, but Seattle's Democratic mayor, Jenny Durkin, told the Department of Homeland Security she did not want federal agents sent into her city. She later discovered a force was deployed and put on standby. Now they have left. Mayor Durkin spoke with our co host, Rachel Martin, about why she and other mayors feel these federal deployments. Part of a bigger, darker political goal. We have, like any other city. We have public safety challenges. But our public safety challenges have been made significantly worse by this president's actions in his words, the dinner in level of criminal activity. We're really deteriorated after the president started tweeting about it, and it was a subject to have Fox coverage every night. So we have seen and I've talked to mayors across the country the same thing when the president actually tweets, and it's not my words saying he's targeting death City is run by Democrats. He's openly admitted it and tweeted about it. Um And I think that that is really a chilling prospect of a president. United States, which is federal resource is for political purposes. The Department of Justice has said that there is an expansion happening right that all of this the deployment of federal agents to a variety of cities Now we're seeing Chicago Albuquerque, Kansas City now Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland. This is all part of so called Operation legend that this has to do with gun violence, quelling gun violence in these cities helping solve murders. This's the DOJ zone characteristic of what this operation is about. I guess I'm hoping you can clarify for me. Is this operation legend something that's happening? Adjacent, separate from from the agents that had been deployed to Portland. And for a couple of days, at least this standby force to Seattle. I actually think they're using it as camouflage. There are ongoing task force in major cities, the deal with gun violence and with gang violence and other violent crime. We had him in Seattle and I worked on him is U. S attorney I know I've spoken with the mayor of Chicago and Albuquerque, and they have a strong collaborative approach with federal law enforcement. It is very rare. If it all federal law enforcement will surge agents to a city to deal with public safety threats that are normally handled by city or state officials. Without talking to or working with local officials. You have described what President Trump is doing as being a political ploy to play his own base ahead of the election into some kind of law and order message. As as a former U. S attorney for the Western District of Washington is anything he's doing or the federal government at his behest illegal. I think it could be unconstitutional. Under the 11th Amendment. Remember, public safety is generally reserved to the states and to their cities, a subdivision of the states by our Constitution. There's also restrictions on the powers that federal law enforcement have and what they can enforce. They generally cannot room the streets of a city in enforce city or state law. But the other thing I will say, though it is unprecedented for federal authorities to take this level of approach for local jurisdictions in cities and Serge Federal resource is in them to take over public safety duties like arresting people. Police protesters. And I've said it before. I know some people think it's it sounds overdramatic, but to me, it looks like a dry run for martial law. And if we see these kinds of federal agents put into places where there's voting right concerns I'm very concerned about what it could do to suppress the vote in America. Say more about that. You're worried that in places where there might be concerns about whether or not people get access to the polls, right? I mean, if you look at it now, the places that that they're sending these Federal agents are primarily in places where there are significant protests against police violence and for racial equity. And it doesn't take much of a lead to also used those agents to say You're protecting the poles but have federal agents in and around polling places, too. Spite against fraud when really a suppression?.

Portland president Oregon President Trump Conrad Wilson Serge Federal Vice President Seattle Department of Homeland Securit Mike Pence NPR News Jenny Durkin Steve Inskeep Oregon State Chicago Steve Conrad Wilson attorney
Protests intensify in Portland against police, as Trump says local leaders have 'lost control'

The Sunday Show

01:01 min | 8 months ago

Protests intensify in Portland against police, as Trump says local leaders have 'lost control'

"Trump says leaders in Portland, Oregon, have lost control of anarchists and agitators. His tweet comes after hundreds of protesters gathered across Portland last night. For the city's 52nd consecutive night of demonstrations against police violence and racism. Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports. Demonstrators carried signs that read Black lives matter and chanted out of your houses and into the streets After protesters dismantled a fence around the federal courthouse, federal officers emerged. And started to drive protesters away using tear gas and other crowd control devices such as batons, a second group of demonstrators gathered outside the Portland Police Association building in north Portland. Around 11 PM, Protesters broke in and set fire to the building, according to police was quickly extinguished. Large and diverse crowd made one thing clear. Increased actions by federal law enforcement in the past week have only brought more people into the streets.

Portland Portland Police Association Oregon Public Broadcasting Oregon Donald Trump Conrad Wilson
Oregon sues federal agencies for violating protesters' rights

Raul Campos

00:55 sec | 8 months ago

Oregon sues federal agencies for violating protesters' rights

"Department says it is suing several federal agencies for civil rights abuses as Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports State prosecutors plan to open a criminal investigation as well. The federal lawsuit will name the US Department of Homeland Security of the U. S Marshal Service and the Federal Protective Service. In a statement, Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum also announced a criminal investigation with the Multnomah County district attorney into an incident earlier this month. We're a peaceful protester was severely injured. Rosenbloom says the escalation of fear and violence in downtown Portland is driven by federal law enforcement tactics and says she'll ask a federal judge to stop federal police from quote forcibly grabbing Oregonians off our streets. A pending lawsuit comes after Opie be revealed. Federal agents detained peaceful protesters using unmarked vehicles with little explanation or indication of which agency they belong to, or why people are being taken into custody. For NPR

Federal Protective Service Oregon Us Department Of Homeland Secu Rosenbloom Ellen Rosenblum Conrad Wilson Multnomah County U. S Marshal Service NPR Opie Attorney Portland
Denver police ordered to stop using tear gas and rubber bullets on protesters

This American Life

00:56 sec | 9 months ago

Denver police ordered to stop using tear gas and rubber bullets on protesters

"A federal judge in Colorado has issued a temporary restraining order banning police and Denver from using tear gas or rubber bullets on peaceful protesters in Portland Oregon demonstrators have filed a similar lawsuit as Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports the federal civil rights complaint seeks a temporary restraining order to force please from using tear gas in the city one Chavez with the Oregon justice resource center is one of the attorneys bringing the case at least one across the country and that particular Portland police have been responding to people who are grieving and asking for justice with a militarized response Portland mayor Ted Wheeler's office declined to comment on the lawsuit but in a visit to protesters Wheeler suggested a thirty day ban on the gas similar to one announced in Seattle public health officials have warned that using tear gas during the covered nineteen pandemic can lead to coughing which can spread the virus

Colorado Denver Conrad Wilson Ted Wheeler Portland Oregon Chavez Seattle
Judge blocks Trump rule requiring immigrants to prove health insurance

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Judge blocks Trump rule requiring immigrants to prove health insurance

"A federal judge in Oregon issued a nationwide preliminary injunction Tuesday barring the trump administration from requiring immigrants to show proof of health insurance or in public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson has more US District Court judge Michael Simon says requiring immigrants to show proof of health insurance before getting a visa is inconsistent with laws passed by Congress according to the proclamation issued last month by president trump visa seekers must have insurance or prove that they can pay for medical costs the judge says it's up to Congress not the president to decide that policy question adding quote the proclamation was not issued under any properly delegated authority words for the justice department disagreed the administration argued the health insurance requirement is necessary to protect the interests of US taxpayers critics say it would have dealt a serious blow to the family based

Oregon Conrad Wilson Michael Simon Congress President Trump Justice Department Us District Court United States
Abortion Is New Litmus Test for Democratic Attorneys General Group

All Things Considered

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Abortion Is New Litmus Test for Democratic Attorneys General Group

"The democratic attorneys general association has announced new requirements for candidates it will support and twenty twenty Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports at the political group is making reproductive rights a priority it's the first National Party campaign committee to impose a strict abortion litmus test on candidates the new policy outlined by the democratic attorneys general association means it will only financially eight Canada to support the right to accessible shins they will need to demonstrate their commitment to protecting the right to access the portion and actually commit you're protecting reproductive right we're gonna tourney general Ellen Rosenblum as a co chair for the group it can help our democratic candidate next year there are twelve the G. seats up for election including in Oregon where Rosenblum is seeking a third term he says they're looking to pick up democratic attorneys general in states like Indiana and Montana for NPR news I'm covered Wilson in Portland

Conrad Wilson Canada Ellen Rosenblum Oregon Indiana Montana Portland NPR
Judge blocks proposed health care visa restrictions for immigrants

Studio 360

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Judge blocks proposed health care visa restrictions for immigrants

"A federal judge in Oregon is temporarily blocking a trump administration rule requiring prospective immigrants to prove they would have health insurance before applying for visas Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports it would have banned migrants who could not pay for their own health care within thirty days of entering the

Oregon Conrad Wilson Thirty Days
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"New approaches. In southwest. Washington are jail commander, Rick Bishop walk through his overcrowded jail two years ago. He made a controversial decision because of the potential and the risk, we have done away with bedsheets bedsheets could be used by inmates to kill themselves. Instead, the jail gives extra blankets. Their suicide resistant, they're harder to tear up, but the bedsheets had to go because of the potential for harm. And he's speaking from experience between two thousand twelve and two thousand sixteen nine people died by suicide in the jail. In addition to removing sheets, they also installed molded plastic bunks that are harder to tie things on in higher security areas. They also got rid of many traditional doorknobs and shower hooks. And they train their officers about how to better manage mental health crises, but changing just one thing that sheets isn't going to just eliminate jail in custody death problem. It has to be that holistic approach Bishop travels around the country, promoting the changes. He's made in his jail changes. He says have made a difference. The jail is not had a suicide in nearly three years for NPR news. I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland, Texas is now among more than a dozen states that have cracked down on surprise medical bills. Governor Greg, Abbott signed a law late last week. It aims to shield patients prep, huge bills when the insurance company in the hospital can't agree on payment. Ashley Lopez of member station. K U T reports from Austin high school history teacher. Drew Calver life is fairly normal. Now he and his wife Aaron are trying to track down goggles as they get their two young daughters ready for swim lessons. Two years ago drew had a dangerous, heart attack, and even though he had health insurance drew ended up with a one hundred nine thousand dollar Bill from the hospital because the hospital, he went to an Austin was out of network calories wife Aaron says she was shocked because it was an emergency. I guess we never thought something like this could happen to us. And then when it did, we, we understood like people are being exploited the Calvert fought with the hospital Andrews insurance company for months and eventually, turn to the press last summer. Drew story was part of a Bill of the month investigation from NPR in Kaiser health news shortly after his Bill was slashed to just three hundred thirty dollars. Aaron says it was resolved for them. But the conversation kept going for whatever reason people, they could relate to us in, in be scared that maybe could happen to them. Right. Ju- heard the same thing, the doctor that put my Stinson you know, he decided babies about to have a baby. And he was saying that could happen to me, too. Most Americans say they worry a lot about getting a steep hospital Bill. Stacey Pogue is with the center for public policy priorities in Austin polling shows us, that is the top household pocketbook concern for consumers as price, medical Bill, and that's actually pretty shocking state, Senator Kelly Hancock a Republican has been working on this issue for more than a decade. He says this year, the complaints were louder than ever. We wanted to we wanted to try to take the patients get them out of the middle of it, because really it's not their five Hancock says that fight is between the insurance companies on one side and the hospitals. Doctors and labs on the other. He says his other goal was to make sure there was a clear way for both sides to figure stuff out. We want to maintain some level of negotiation between the parties. We, it was just timely the patient out, because frankly, the patient was nothing more than upon Texas law. Now requires both those parties to enter our betray shin when they can't. Agree on a price. Stacey Pogue says she's pretty happy with the new law. It is as strong or stronger than any of the protections in the country. There are only maybe a handful less fewer than fifteen states now that have a comprehensive solution for consumers, and Texas now on that list. But Texas law. Only goes so far. The new law will only shield Texans with state regulated plans from surprise medical bills. However forty percent of plans in Texas are regulated by the federal government. So poke says those Texans can only be protected if congress does something. And I think Texas passing a Bill will really help on that front, Texas is just one of several states that has passed a law like this in twenty nineteen and congress is looking at the problem, but hasn't settled on a solution yet.

Rick Bishop Texas Aaron Stacey Pogue Senator Kelly Hancock NPR Austin hospital Andrews commander Governor Greg, Abbott Washington Stinson Austin high school congress Ashley Lopez Conrad Wilson Portland
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

"To try new approaches. And southwest Washington Clark county jail commander, Rick Bishop walked through his overcrowded jail two years ago. He made a controversial decision because of the potential and the risk, we have done away with bedsheets bedsheets. They could be used by inmates to kill themselves. Instead, the jail gives extra blankets. There's aside resistant, they're harder to tear up, but the bedsheets had to go because of the potential for so harm. And he's speaking from experience between two thousand twelve and two thousand sixteen nine people died by suicide in the jail. In addition to removing sheets, they also installed molded plastic bunks that are harder to tie things on in higher security areas. They also got rid of many traditional doorknobs and shower hooks. And they train their officers about how to better manage mental health crises, but changing just one thing that sheets isn't going to just eliminate a jail in custody death problem. It has to be that holistic approach Bishop travels around the country, promoting the changes. He's made in his jail changes. He says have made a difference. The jail is not had a suicide in nearly three years for NPR news. I'm Conrad Wilson import land, Texas is now among more than a dozen states that have cracked down on surprise medical bills. Governor Greg, Abbott signed a law late last week. It aims to shield patients from huge bills when the insurance company in the hospital can't agree on payment. Actually, Lopez of member station. K U T reports from Austin high school history teacher. Drew covers life is fairly normal. Now he and his wife Aaron are trying to track down goggles as they get their two young daughters ready for swim lessons. But two years ago drew had a dangerous heart attack. And even though he had health insurance drew ended up with a one hundred nine thousand dollar Bill from the hospital because the hospital, he went to an Austin was out of network calories wife Aaron says she was shocked because it was an emergency. I guess we never thought something like this could happen to us. And then when it did, we, we understood like people are being exploited. The Calver is fought with the hospital Andrews insurance company for months and eventually turned to the press last summer. Drew story was part of a Bill of the month investigation from NPR, Kaiser health news shortly after his Bill was slashed to just three hundred thirty dollars. Aaron says it was resolved for them. But the conversation kept going for whatever reason, people just they could relate to us, and in be scared that maybe it could happen to them. Right. Drew heard the same thing the doctor that put my Stinson. Yeah. He decided baby, he's about to have a baby. And he was saying that could happen to me, too. In fact, most Americans say they worry a lot about getting a steep hospital Bill. Stacey Pogue is with the center for public policy priorities in Austin polling shows us, that it is the top household pocketbook concern for consumers as prize medical Bill, and that's actually pretty shocking state, Senator Kelly Hancock a Republican has been working on this issue for more than a decade. He says this year, the complaints were louder than ever. We wanted to things we wanted to try to take the patients get them out of the middle of it, because really it's not their five Hancock says that fight is between the insurance companies on one side and the hospitals. Doctors and labs on the other. He says his other goal was to make sure there was a clear way for both sides to figure stuff out. We want to maintain some level of negotiation between the parties. We just it was just time to get the patient out, because frankly, the patient was nothing more than a pond. Texas is law. Now requ. Wires both those parties to enter our betray shin when they can't agree on a price. Stacey Pogue says she's pretty happy with the new law. It is as strong or stronger than any of the protections in the country. There are only maybe a handful less than fewer than fifteen states now that have a comprehensive solution for consumers, and Texas is now on that list, but Texas law. Only goes so far. The new law will only shield Texans with state regulated plans from surprise medical bills. However forty percent of plans in Texas are regulated by the federal government. So Pogue says those Texans can only be protected if congress does something. And I think Texas passing a Bill will will really help on that front, Texas is just one of several states that has passed a law like this in two thousand nineteen and congress is looking at the problem, but hasn't settled on a solution yet, for NPR news. I'm.

Texas Rick Bishop Drew Washington Clark county jail NPR Stacey Pogue Aaron Austin Senator Kelly Hancock Stinson commander hospital Andrews Governor Greg, Abbott Austin high school Conrad Wilson Lopez congress
"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Jailers to try new approaches. And southwest Washington. Our county jail commander, Rick Bishop walk through his overcrowded jail two years ago, he made a controversial decision because of the potential and the risk, we have done away with bitch. She's bedsheets could be used by inmates to kill themselves. Instead, the jail gives extra blankets. Their suicide resistant, they're harder to tear up, but the bedsheets had to go because of the potential for so harm. And he's speaking from experience between two thousand twelve and twenty sixteen nine people died by suicide in the jail. In addition to removing sheets, they also installed molded plastic bunks that are harder to tie things on in higher security areas. They also got rid of many traditional doorknobs and shower hooks. And they train their officers about how to better manage mental health crises, but changing just one thing that she's isn't going to just eliminate a jail in custody death problem. It has to be that holistic approach Bishop travels around the country, promoting the changes. He's made in his jail changes. He says have made a difference. The jail is not had a suicide in nearly three years for NPR news. I'm Conrad Wilson import land. Texas is now among more than a dozen states that have cracked down on surprise medical bills. Governor Greg, Abbott signed a law late last week. It aims to shield patients from huge bills when the insurance company and the hospital can't agree on payment. Ashley Lopez of member station K UT reports from Austin high school history teacher. Drew Calver is life is fairly normal. Now he and his wife Aaron are trying to track down boggles as they get their two young daughters ready for swim lessons. Two years ago. Drew had a dangerous, heart attack, and even though he had health insurance drew ended up with a one hundred nine thousand dollar Bill from the hospital because the hospital, he went to an Austin was out of network calories wife Aaron says she was shocked because it was an emergency. I guess we never thought something like this could happen to us. And then when it did, we, we understood like people are being exploited. The Calver is fought with the hospital Andrews insurance company for months and eventually, turn to the press last summer. Drew story was part of a Bill of the month investigation from NPR in Kaiser health news shortly after his Bill was slashed to just three hundred thirty dollars. Aaron says it was resolved for them. But the conversation kept going for whatever reason, people just they could relate to us, and in B scared that maybe it could happen to them. Right. Ju- heard the same thing, the doctor that put my Stinson. Yeah. He decided babies about to have a baby. And he was saying they could happen to meet to most Americans say they worry a lot about getting a steep hospital Bill. Stacey Pogue is with the center for public policy priorities in Austin polling shows us, that it is the top household pocketbook concern for consumers as prize medical Bill, and that's actually pretty shocking state, Senator Kelly Hancock a Republican has been working on this issue for more than a decade. He says this year, the complaints were louder than ever. We wanted to things we wouldn't try to take the patients get them out of the middle of it because really it's not their fight. Hancock says that fight is between the insurance companies on one side, and the hospitals doctors and labs on the other. He says his other goal was to make sure there was a clear way for both sides to figure stuff out. We want to maintain some level of negotiation between the parties. We just it was just time to get the patient out, because frankly, the patient was nothing more than a pawn Texas law. Now requ. Acquires. Both those parties to enter our betray shin when they can't agree on a price. Stacey Pogue says she's pretty happy with the new law. It is as strong or stronger than any of the protections in the country. There are only maybe a handful less fewer than fifteen states now that have a comprehensive solution for consumers, and Texas now on that list. But Texas law. Only goes so far. The new law will only shield Texans with state regulated plans from surprise medical bills. However forty percent of plans in Texas are regulated by the federal government. So poke says those Texans can only be protected if congress does something. And I think Texas passing a Bill will will really help on that front, Texas is just one of several states that has passed a law like this in twenty nineteen and congress is looking at the problem, but hasn't settled on a solution yet from PR news. I'm actually Lopez in Austin, and the story comes to us from a reporting partnership.

Drew Calver Texas Rick Bishop Austin Stacey Pogue Senator Kelly Hancock NPR Aaron Ashley Lopez Washington commander Governor Greg, Abbott hospital Andrews congress Conrad Wilson Stinson Austin high school Ju
"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Deserve a nation where our children are safe. Sick people. Get the healthcare they need immigrants are welcomed schools are successful. And it's no longer easier to buy a gun than it is to vote in the Senate. There are three races between Democrats and Republicans that remain still too close to call their in Arizona, Florida and Montana voters in Oregon have rejected efforts to. Appeal the state's decades old sanctuary law as Oregon public broadcasting's? Conrad Wilson reports the law limits, local and state police from enforcing federal immigration policy. Supporters of the law declared victory saying all eyes were in Oregon where the movement for immigrant rights notched a major victory oregonians for immigration reform. The group behind the ballot measure said they were disappointed in the results and don't plan any legislative efforts in the upcoming session. Especially in the weeks that lead up to election day is President Donald Trump did all he could to make immigration central to energizing his base, Oregon sanctuary. Law was signed in one thousand nine hundred seven the race divided the law enforcement community, anecdotally, some voters of color said the ballot measure served as a catalyst to organize canvas. And turn out and vote in this year's midterms for NPR news, I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland. The White House says that President Trump will speak later this morning. The president has been writing on Twitter saying he will discuss quote, our success in the midterms. Exclamation point. You're listening to NPR. This is WNYC in New York. Good morning. I'm Richard Hake. It's eight oh, four fifty two degrees. Fair skies. Expecting cloudiness today with a high near sixty two degrees. Well, it may not have been the countrywide Blue Wave hope for by Democrats. But here in New York, the party made some major wins. Democrats swept all four statewide offices in New York, including the state Senate tips James made history as the first woman, an I African American elected attorney general in New York, it's real leadership is never easy. But it's what this office in the good people of New York deserve. And it is what I'm committed to. So this race is over. And our collective fight for progress begins anew. In Brooklyn democrat, Andrew gone artists. Unseated longtime incumbent Republican mardi Golden State Senate voters in New York City, overwhelmingly passed all three ballot questions to change the city's charter charter the region also played an outsized role in the democratic takeover of the US House Democrats on seat of Republicans in several districts, including in New York's Hudson valley where democrat Antonio Delgado ousted. Freshman Republican Representative John Foucault on Staten Island, democrat max, rose defeated, Dan. Donovan the only Republican member of New York City's congressional delegation after a close race. There was no.

New York City Oregon President Donald Trump Senate Conrad Wilson NPR president Donovan Brooklyn Richard Hake Twitter Arizona US White House Portland Antonio Delgado Andrew
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ryan to Santa's and democratic Tallahassee mayor Andrew Jalen was neck and neck until late in the evening to Santa's had aligned himself closely with President Donald Trump given had run as an unabashed liberal term limits prevented Republican governor, Rick Scott. From seeking reelection. The governor instead side democratic Senator Bill Nelson seat to Santa says victory continues along winning streak for Republicans in Florida. The last time a democrat was elected governor was in nineteen four frontier news, I need green in Orlando. There will be a record ninety women who will serve in the house of representatives next year up from a previous high of eighty four women that will include Virginia Democrat, Jennifer Weston. She ousted one of the most endangered Republican incumbents Representative Barbara Comstock and a victory party, Weston laid out her priorities. Americans deserve a nation where our children are safe. Sick people. Get the healthcare they need immigrants. Are welcome schools are successful. And it's no longer easier to buy a gun than it is to vote in the Senate. There are three races between Democrats and Republicans that remain still too close to call their in Arizona, Florida and Montana voters in Oregon have rejected efforts to repeal. All the states decades old sanctuary law as Oregon public broadcasting's. Conrad Wilson reports the law limits, local and state police from enforcing federal immigration policy. Supporters of the law declared victory saying all eyes were on Oregon where the movement for immigrant rights notched a major victory oregonians for immigration reform. The group behind the ballot measure said they were disappointed in the results and don't plan any legislative efforts in the upcoming session. Especially in the weeks that lead up to election day is President Donald Trump did all he could to make immigration central to energizing his base, Oregon sanctuary. Law was signed in one thousand nine hundred seven the race divided the law enforcement community, anecdotally, some voters of colored said the ballot measure served as a catalyst to organize canvas. And turn out and vote in this year's midterms for NPR news, I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland. The White House says that President Trump will speak later this morning. The president has been writing on Twitter saying he will discuss quote, our success in the midterms. Exclamation point. You're. Listening to NPR. The Catholic church in Guam says it's going to file for bankruptcy protection. This is linked with the Guam archdioceses actions to avoid trials in dozens of lawsuits alleging child sexual abuse by priests. It's also a result of mediation that started earlier this year, the decision to move toward bankruptcy will also set a deadline for victims to come forward to make complaints against the Guam archdiocese reports from Cameroon say dozens of students abducted early Monday from a boarding school in the rest of English. Speaking region have been freed NPR's ofeibea Quist arcton reports the adults kidnapped with them are reportedly still being held Cameroon's information minister says all seventy plus students have been freed but gave no details about the circumstances of their release. The authorities launched a massive search operation after the abduction a dome on Monday the kidnapping in Bamenda Maroons northwest commercial hub came in a troubled region where the. Security forces have clashed with armed separatists seeking independence for the English-speaking. Homeland. They say has been marginalized as he will sworn in for a seventh term Tuesday veteran French-Speaking president Paul Biya wound the separatists to lay down their arms fading, which he said, they face the full force of the law affair, the acquis stopped and NPR news deca, the Florida man accused of sending pipe bombs to prominent Democrats and critics of President Trump has been ordered held without bail in New York. A federal hearing for Caesar sack lasted just ten minutes yesterday. He'll return to court next week. You're listening to NPR support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Twentieth Century, Fox with widows four women decide to pull off a heist to pay back the debt their husbands left behind and the new thriller from the writer of gone girl, and the director of twelve years a slave widows in theaters November sixteenth..

President Donald Trump NPR Oregon president Florida Republicans Conrad Wilson Cameroon Santa Jennifer Weston Senator Bill Nelson Orlando Guam Rick Scott Tallahassee Senate Andrew Jalen Guam archdiocese
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

"Deserve a nation where our children are safe. Sick people. Get the healthcare they need immigrants are welcomed schools are successful. And it's no longer easier to buy a gun than it is to vote in the Senate. There are three races between Democrats and Republicans that remain still too close to call their in Arizona, Florida and Montana voters in Oregon have rejected efforts to repeal the. The state's decades old sanctuary law as Oregon public broadcasting's. Conrad Wilson reports the law limits, local and state police from enforcing federal immigration policy. Supporters of the law declared victory saying all eyes were an Oregon where the movement for immigrant rights notched a major victory oregonians for immigration reform. The group behind the ballot measure said they were disappointed in the results and don't plan any legislative efforts in the upcoming session. Especially in the weeks that lead up to election day is President Donald Trump did all he could to make immigration central to energizing his base, Oregon sanctuary. Law was signed in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven the race divided the law enforcement community, anecdotally, some voters have colored said the ballot measure served as a catalyst to organize canvas. And turn out and vote. This year's midterms brand PR news, I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland. The White House says that President Trump will speak later this morning. The president has been writing on Twitter saying he will discuss quote, our success in the midterms. Exclamation point your list. Listening to NPR. The Catholic church in Guam says it's going to file for bankruptcy protection. This is linked with the Guam archdioceses actions to avoid trials in dozens of lawsuits alleging child sexual abuse by priests. It's also a result of mediation that started earlier this year, the decision to move toward bankruptcy will also set a deadline for victims to come forward to make complaints against the Guam archdiocese reports from Cameroon say dozens of students abducted early Monday from a boarding school in the rest of English. Speaking region have been freed NPR's ofeibea Quist arcton reports the adults kidnapped with them are reportedly still being held Cameroon's information minister says all seventy plus have been freed but gave no details about the circumstances of their release. The authorities launched a massive search operation after the abduction a donor on Monday the kidnapping in Bamenda come ruins northwest commercial hub came in a troubled region. Whether. Security forces have clashed with armed separatists seeking independence for the English-speaking. Homeland. They say has been marginalized as he will sworn in for a seventh term Tuesday veteran French-Speaking president Paul Biya warned the separatists to lay down their arms fading, which he said they face the full force of the law. Ofeibea Quist arcton NPR news decker the Florida man accused of sending pipe bombs to prominent Democrats and critics of President Trump has been ordered held without bail in New York. A federal hearing for Caesar sack lasted just ten minutes.

President Donald Trump president Oregon NPR Conrad Wilson Guam ofeibea Quist Cameroon Florida Guam archdiocese Senate Paul Biya Arizona Twitter Portland kidnapping Caesar
"conrad wilson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on Here & Now

"Thank you so much well back to the other big event coming up, we're spotlighting important ballot issues around the country on Tuesday election day in Oregon voters are already deciding with mailed ballots whether to keep that states decades old sanctuary law as Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports a law that once had bipartisan support isn't seeing that way anymore, and maybe repay. Field Oregon sanctuary. Lob is one of the oldest in the country. It was signed into law more than thirty one years ago. Both Republicans and Democrats voted for the Bill. It was really noncontroversial. Rocky Berea was the democrat and state Representative behind the law. It says no law enforcement agency can use its resources for the sole purpose of detecting or apprehending people whose only violation is being in the country unlawfully. Put simply it limits. Local and state police from enforcing federal immigration policies to be honest. This was not meant to be essentially law. It was meant to protect local city our resources and also to reduce racial. Profiling California's sanctuary law is similar to Oregon's five other states, and hundreds of counties also have a form of sanctuary policy. Now voters in Oregon are being asked if they wanna repeal there's supporters of the law say establish his trust between immigrant communities in law enforcement. They rolled out a series of ads urging oregonians to vote. No on what's known as measure one. Oh five. Current law helps create pride lines for local law enforcement communities that we serve no that we're focused on protecting and serving them. We're not worried about their immigration shoes. That sheriff Mike Reese speaking in an ad. He's the sheriff of Multnomah county where Portland is the county seat law enforcement officials in more liberal and urban parts of the state are lining up against repeal. But half of the state's sheriffs largely from more conservative rural parts of the state want to do away with for long politicians have protected illegal aliens with dangerous sanctuary policies that put Oregon citizens at risk. It's time to.

Oregon Field Oregon sanctuary Mike Reese state Representative Conrad Wilson Rocky Berea Multnomah county Portland California thirty one years
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

"For a second day because technical difficulties poor management and violence kept some Afghans from the poll Saturday to ahead me skeptical that this election will be better than previous ones marked by corruption. Just 'cause responsibility I came here to vote, but I don't believe to give in that. There were counted accurately. The government has announced it's arrested dozens of people including police for fraud interference in the election. The success is seen as crucial to the country's young democracy for NPR news. I'm Jennifer glass in Kabul. This is NPR. More than a thousand Hondurans are leaving a migrant caravan bound for Mexico and the US to return home after being stopped at the Guatemala, Mexico border. Thousands of others have made it into Mexico and are now heading toward the US US immigration and customs enforcement has dramatically reduced its use of federal prisons to house detainees, Oregon, public broadcasting's. Conrad Wilson reports only three ice detainees remain across the five prisons that once held hundreds of immigrants in early June ice announced it was sending up to sixteen hundred immigrant detainees to federal prisons in Texas, Oregon, California, Washington in Arizona. But now a total of only three ice detainees remain there being held inside the federal prison in Sheridan, Oregon. A spokeswoman for ice says it's Yousef federal prisons was a temporary measure Stephen manning is an immigration attorney and represents the. The three remaining ice detainees was.

Mexico US Oregon ice NPR Sheridan Jennifer glass government Kabul Stephen manning Conrad Wilson fraud Yousef attorney Guatemala Texas Arizona California Washington
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

"Unfortunately, we're not yet at the point where mass alerting to everyone cell phone is technically possible. The warning system is supposed to alert when an earthquake is occurring, and then send out warnings that could give people several seconds warning possibly up to a full minute before. Strong shaking starts that's enough. Time to slow down trains. Stop factories hall to surgery or get students under their desks. You're listening to NPR. The death toll from hurricane Michael has increased to twenty nine people. Three more fatalities have been reported in Florida were Michael made landfall last week damage teams are still working to restore full power to several Florida counties and cell phone service is still out in some areas. Oregon's court of appeals is set to hear a case of an African American man convicted by a non unanimous jury as Oregon public broadcasting's. Conrad Wilson reports if the court grants a new trial, it effectively means Oregon would have to abandon its split jury system because it's unconstitutional in two thousand sixteen Olen Williams was convicted of first degree sodomy by a split jury. Meaning there were two jurors who thought Williams was not guilty. Now, he's asking the court of appeals for a new trial like Williams one of those dissenting. Jurors was African American while EM's attorney says Oregon's non unanimous jury system, violates the equal protection clause of the US constitution, the Oregon. Department of Justice argues Williams request for a new trial should be denied because it's not based on newly discovered evidence Orrin allegations of Germans conduct Oregon and Louisiana are the only states that allow non unanimous juries in criminal cases for NPR news. I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland the first of several thousand migrants from Honduras have traveled north through Guatemala. They've reached the border with Mexico. They're headed for the United States. But you wasn't Guatemalan. Authorities have been trying to stop them. President Trump is threatened to cut all you as a to any Central American country that doesn't stop the group of migrants coming I'm korva Coleman. NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Hiscox insurance, providing customized insurance for small and medium businesses. So they can do more and be more. Learn more at age I s c o x dot com or from an agent. Hiscox insurance, encourage courage. This is morning edition on KCRW ahead on morning edition Saudi Arabia's crown Princess coming under increased scrutiny as Turkey and other nations continue to accuse the Saudi government of killing journalists Jamal kashogi allegedly and five of Saudi consulate in Istanbul. What does the war really know about the crown prince Mohammad bin Salman Saudi Arabia's defacto ruler those stories coming up on morning edition..

Oregon Olen Williams NPR Saudi Arabia Conrad Wilson Hiscox Saudi government United States Guatemala hurricane Michael Florida Mexico Department of Justice President Trump Istanbul KCRW Jamal kashogi Michael
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Listening to all things considered from NPR news. Attorneys Oregon say some of the state's juvenile sentencing laws violate the US constitution. That's because of laws that require juveniles convicted of murder to be sentenced to what amounts to mandatory life imprisonment a case going before the state's court of appeals on Friday could push lawmakers to take action Oregon public broadcasting's. Conrad Wilson reports on March twenty six two thousand one Barb Thomas was killed by her teenage son and four of his friends near Redmond Oregon. Police say she was struck in the head with a glass bottle repeatedly. And then shot the teens became known as the Redmond five after killing Thomas. The teen stole Honda coupe and drove for Canada. They were arrested when they tried to cross the border. Justin link was seventeen years old when he and four friends committed aggravated murder. Mark Brown is links attorney Justin did not actually pull the trigger. Still a judge found linked guilty of murder link is appealing his sentence. Before the Oregon court of appeals, not the facts surrounding the case, rather how Oregon's sentences juvenile's are saying this is unconstitutional as applied to all juvenile's. And here's why in two thousand twelve the US supreme court ruled in a case called Miller versus Alabama. The court says it was a violation of the constitution to sentence a juvenile to life without the possibility of parole. If that's the only sentence a judge Reggie can impose in other words there needs to be options on paper Oregon has two options for sentencing juveniles convicted of aggravated murder life without the possibility of parole or a minimum of thirty years in prison after what your sentence may be converted to one with a possibility of parole. That's the sentence that link is serving. But here's the thing that possibility of parole isn't a given. I he has to prove he'll be rehabilitated, then the sentences converted and only then can he apply for parole. Attorney. Mark Brown argues those. Sentences are effectively the same. He says the parole after thirty years is speculative at the time sentencing. They're both life without the possibility of parole. Former Deschutes county district attorney Mike Dugan disagrees his office prosecuted link. I think it's an opportunity for the center to true rehabilitation. So there's a choice there. And it's going to be part of the choice of the of the offender, according to the Oregon department of corrections Twenty-three juveniles are currently serving life sentences for aggravated murder. The case playing out in Oregon falls in line with efforts across the country to make sure juvenile sentencing laws are consistent with the supreme court's interpretation. Heather Renwick is the legal director at the campaign for fair sentencing of youth. She says the supreme court has found when it comes to sentencing juvenile's have different culpability because their brains are not fully developed twenty states across the country now van life without the possibility for parole for juveniles or again is an outlier or sort of falling behind the national news network. It hasn't yet taken legislative action. A bipartisan group of state lawmakers and Oregon is looking to change that Jennifer Williamson is the democratic majority leader in the Oregon house. I would argue that our system currently is unconstitutional under Miller we have to change that in order to be compliant. And because I think it's the right thing to do for Dugan. The former Deschutes county DA it's critical crime victims are part of that conversation. The system needs understand the impact that the crime has. I'm victim. Uh-huh. It's important that they have their voice be heard legislators are taking a broad look at mandatory sentencing laws for juvenile's that have been in place for more than twenty years. Critics say the laws are costly and overly harsh, but the states district attorney's association defense, then saying Oregon's juvenile crime rate is well below the national average for NPR news. I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news in right now, we get bay area. Traffic.

Oregon murder Oregon court of appeals Barb Thomas attorney Mark Brown Oregon department of correctio Conrad Wilson Deschutes county US NPR Redmond Mike Dugan Reggie Miller Justin coupe
"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A federal jury in Oregon has found FBI. Agent w Joseph Astor Rita not guilty of charges related to, the shooting death of a malheur national wildlife, occupation spokesman in two thousand sixteen asteroid was. Accused of lying about who fired when activists lavar finicky I'm was shot and killed during the occupation Conrad Wilson of Oregon public broadcasting was in the courtroom today when the verdict, was read and joins us now hi Conrad IRA explain what asked to Rita was charged with lying about or prosecutors. Say that asteroid have fired twice at finicky and then when he was asked by his supervisors whether. He, shot prosecutors said he lied about it twice. Telling them, he never fired and so that was the basis for. Two counts of making false statements prosecutors say because of those alleged lies, that obstructed Justice today the jury acquitted strata on all three. Counts the FBI was pursuing finicky on that, day so what would, have been the reason to lie. About who shot win Well prosecutors in their closing statements said it, might, have been. About ego they said thereto was part of an elite hostage rescue team it's really competitive international counterterrorism force it's. Very difficult to become a member of it and, so had he fired that day and missed or you know prosecutors said that that. Would have been at the very least an embarrassing thing to admit during. The trial is free to said that really all he ever, wanted to be in life wasn't FBI agent, so missing a shot like that prosecutors argued. Would mean that they could you may have failed at at his job What has the reaction been. So far from anti-government activists to this acquittal Well many of them have already taken to social media. Calling the verdict and injustice on. The Facebook page of Ginette finna come that's the, voice that comes wife people expressed remorse for the loss of her husband but others said that this. Was a conspiracy and that the government was covering. Up for us street even though this case, was decided by a jury so the federal government? Lost this case today what does this mean for the FBI going forward Well yeah the the outcome, helps preserve the FBI's images of integrity in a way, you know one of the most lead agents was acquitted. Of having done anything wrong in this really high profile police shooting at the same time having an agent on. Trial like this isn't good for the agency, for either as for prosecutors in this case. I mean this is just another black high I mean they didn't. Get any convictions in Oregon? After, there are, a couple, of trials and Oregon they got a couple. Of convictions in the second one but the leader of the occupation Ammon Bundy. Ryan, bunny they were all acquitted and it didn't convictions for cliven Bundy in twenty fourteen Nevada stand up with the government so. So really now they've lost this. Case it's it's just a another black eye Conrad, we mentioned you were in the courtroom when the verdict was read what was the scene there well. You know I mean asked to looked really relieved. At the outcome he appeared to be holding, hands with two of the attorneys on either side Him he was seated facing forward just really focused on on the side of the courtroom and after the, jury was dismissed you just stood up in embraced his defense team you had four attorneys working with them on. This case, gave him a big hugs federal. Prosecutors not, surprisingly declined an interview in our press. Conference but in a statement the us attorney for, Oregon Billy Williams said that they were they respect the, jury's verdict and the department of Justice felt that the. Case needed to be brought before a jury asteroid is defense put out a statement and they said you know. Asteroid is a hero who puts out puts, his life on the line every I puts. His life on the line for his country every day and they. Were grateful for the jury? And, I seen, through a, case that they believed never should have been. Brought that's Conrad Wilson of Oregon public broadcasting thanks for joining us today Conrad You're. Welcome.

Oregon FBI Joseph Astor Rita Conrad Wilson Conrad Conrad IRA government federal government Facebook us attorney Ammon Bundy malheur department of Justice cliven Bundy Nevada Ryan Billy Williams
"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Before the chemicals were administered initially he appeared to sigh and say no and then said I just want. To say I'm really sorry and that that's in the US supreme court, denied I request. For a stay this is NPR news from Washington A federal judge is expected to rule later today on whether, the, Brassica can carry out. Its first execution, of a death row inmate in more than twenty years Kerry, dean Moore's to be put, to death for killing two taxi drivers in Omaha in nineteen. Seventy nine the state is scheduled. To use a four drug lethal injection for the first time. One, of, the drugs expires at the end of the month the director of Nebraska's prison system says a delay beyond August would. Likely prevent the execution from being carried out jury deliberations are underway in Oregon in the trial of an FBI agent accused of lying and obstructing Justice, jurors in Portland heard conflicting. Accounts about, a police shooting two years ago that occurred during the occupation of a national. Wildlife, refuge Conrad Wilson with Oregon public, broadcasting. Reports eight shots, were fired at one of, the occupation leaders after he fled a traffic stop this trial is about to those shots that. Are unaccounted for prosecutors say f FBI special agent Joseph Astor Rita fired his. Weapon twice lied about it and later tried to cover it up federal prosecutors told. Jurors that could be certain asked Rita is guilty because of, expert analysis that points to him as the source of the, shots in question as to read is attorneys countered. That none of the more than. Forty witnesses called during the trial saw, the agent fire this trial involving, a member of, an elite FBI counterterrorism team is not good for the agency whether or not has to read it gets convicted. For NPR news I'm, Conrad Wilson in. Portland it's been a down day for stocks in Asia despite new numbers showing stronger growth. In Japan's economy in the latest quarter I'm Dave.

FBI Joseph Astor Rita Conrad Wilson Portland Oregon NPR US Omaha Asia Washington Nebraska director Kerry Japan dean Moore twenty years two years
Malheur wildlife refuge occupation still reverberating as FBI agent goes on trial

Midday on WNYC

01:03 min | 2 years ago

Malheur wildlife refuge occupation still reverberating as FBI agent goes on trial

"Closing. Arguments get underway, today in the trial of an FBI agent accused of, lying about a key moment during the two thousand sixteen occupation of the Meyer. National wildlife refuge Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports prosecutors say the, agent lied about, firing his weapon and tried to cover it up prosecutors say FBI. Special agent, Joseph read a fire two shots during a January two thousand sixteen traffic stop on remote, stretch of highway in eastern Oregon asked to read it as a member of the FBI's elite hostage rescue team and at. The time he was manning a roadblock when occupation spokesman Lavoie phantom drove towards lease and other FBI agents going more than. Seventy miles per, hour before crashing into, a snowbank prosecutors say as to reduce shots. Missed though finicky was killed during the incident by Oregon. State police this week Astra to testified he never shot and despite being. At the, traffic, stop were eight rounds were fired he said he didn't hear any gunfire he said he was wearing ear protection prosecutors have tried to paint asteroid as inexperienced and have questioned his

FBI Paul Manafort Washington NPR Ryan Lucas Oregon Wnyc Fraud United States New York Congressman Chris Collins Alexandria Cossio Cortes New Jersey Prosecutor Rick Gates Greg Andrei Phil Murphy President Trump
California man pleads guilty to terrorism charges

The Movement with Dr. F Keith Slaughter

04:08 min | 2 years ago

California man pleads guilty to terrorism charges

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm, Janine Herbst Russian President Vladimir Putin says his meeting with President Trump on Monday was successful overall and lead to useful agreements but as NPR's Lucian Kim. Reports from, Moscow Putin didn't go into any. Detail on what agreements were reached during. The, summit, in Helsinki. Speaking, of Russian diplomats in the foreign ministry. In Moscow President Putin expressed satisfaction with the summit but. Urged caution going forward Putin said in his words that unnamed political forces in the US are trying to disavow the results of his meeting with Trump who met with. For two hours behind closed doors Putin said those forces are ready, to sacrifice Russian-American relations for their narrow partisan interests NPR's Lucian Kim reporting Meanwhile Russia, is offering US access to twelve Russians. Charged with tampering in the thousand sixteen US election if. Moscow gets, to interrogate a former US ambassador and other American officials as. NPR's Michele Keleman reports The White House acknowledges that President Trump and Putin discussed the idea. During their Helsinki, meeting Putin. Is trying to equate the US investigation into Russian interference to the Kremlin's efforts to punish Bill Browder. A businessman who, lobbies, for sanctions against Russia and Trump seems to be buying into that says former US ambassador Michael McFaul it makes us look weak it makes us look like we're buying into, Putin's conspiratorial fantasies and therefore political, reasons they're chasing Mr. Browder because he is a critic, of the Kremlin and they're chasing me because I'm a critic of the Kremlin a State Department spokesperson says the Russian allegations against McFaul Browder and others. Are absurd, though the White House says Trump. Is still quote working with his team. On, this, Michelle Kellerman. NPR, news the State Department Oregon's public defenders. Filed court documents asking a federal judge to release some. Of the more than one hundred immigration detainees being held at a federal prison near Salem as Oregon Broadcasting's Conrad. Wilson reports the court documents describe inadequate care and poor conditions thoughts of. Suicide hours of confinement and denial of medical care among the complaints outlined by US integration and customs enforcement detainees being held at the federal, Correctional Institution in Sheridan Oregon the immigration detainees arrived at the federal prison roughly seven weeks ago, most are seeking, asylum a declaration filed by the chief. Investigator with the Oregon federal public defender's office said several detainees he and his colleagues. Met with had untreated medical conditions that included quote heart problems a gunshot wound a broken leg rashes allergic reactions and severe sore throats this week and I- spokeswoman said four detainees have been transferred to another facility in Washington state for medical attention from PR news I'm Conrad Wilson less than half an hour to the, opening bell on. Wall Street Wall Street futures are trading lower Dow NASDAQ Edison p. five hundred futures contracts are all down about three tenths of a percent at last check you're listening to NPR. News from Washington from news in, San Francisco good morning I'm Brian watt Twenty-three-year-old Oakland man is pleading guilty to federal terrorism charges but his Alex Emslie reports the move is not part of a plea deal it's. Unique legal strategy to litigate the case at, sentencing Amir synon- oligarchy, was arrested in late twenty sixteen after either allegedly threatened online to bomb a gay club in San Francisco mix poison. With cocaine and distributed at nightclubs and start a wildfire in the East, Bay but, his supporters from, the many communities say, he's simply a naive kid and never planned, to carry out an attack what he said was all complete rubbish he didn't intend to do any of it attorney. Mary McNamara represents oligarchy she says his charges aren't related to his threats instead he's charged with opening a handful of, social media, accounts for alleged ISIS members in the Middle East oligarchy faces a wide range of prison sentences to. Forty seven years A lengthy. Sentencing hearing is. Scheduled for November I'm Alex Emslie k. q. e. news, San Francisco transit officials are. Extending the transfer window for bus and train tickets..

President Putin President Trump NPR United States Alex Emslie Mcfaul Browder Oregon Helsinki Lucian Kim Moscow San Francisco Russia Washington Conrad Wilson State Department White House Michael Mcfaul Janine Herbst
"conrad wilson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on Here & Now

"Judge is set to rule on whether one of the jail's can continue working with ice oregon public broadcasting's conrad wilson reports a high chainlink fence topped with razor wire surrounds the northern oregon regional corrections facility the jail known as nor corp has in the dow's about eighty miles east of portland inside inmates are divided into a series of large open rooms connected by a long tan hallway so this is one of the immigration norms so could see it's no different brian brandenburg is nor kors administrator there's 22 beds back spectators who opendoor format inside the immigration unit to ice detainees watch television both in their prison jumpsuits at its current staffing level norkin hold a little more than two hundred adult inmates that includes ice detainees four neighboring counties combine their resources to pay for the jail sitting at his desk brandenburg explains that the detainees typically come from a 1600 bed private prison ice contracts in tacoma washington the epa capacity makoma facility and so we provide that relief for them if they should go over that number in they do their best to keep our numbers up a little bit across the country ice uses roughly two local jails and prisons to house some thirty eight thousand people detained for possible deportation on any given day nor kors one of two jails in oregon that have agreements with ice to house detainees but some say that violates the state's sanctuary law that's designed to protect immigrants that 1987 oregon law prohibits local police from enforcing federal immigration law or helping federal agents go after people whose only violation is being in the country illegally jail officials say they're not violating the letter of oregon's law yet dozens of public records an interview show they could be skirting the spirit of state law designed to make emigrants feel more at ease is he of using oregon resources for a policy in a practice they think is very dangerous steven manning is an immigration attorney he's representing a group of county taxpayers that fund nor corner they've asked the judge to rule that the jail is in violation of oregon sanctuary law and they want the judge to force nor chord.

conrad wilson dow portland brian brandenburg administrator tacoma oregon immigration law state law steven manning attorney washington epa
"conrad wilson" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Temperatures are expected to drop into the nineties this weekend franckie our news i'm conrad wilson in portland and the united nations the us along with britain france and germany are characterising iran's test of a space launch vehicle last week as destructive and threatening the us has already imposed its own sanctions on half a dozen companies in response to the rocket launch linda facility reports that the four western countries say the launch disregards a un security council resolution in a letter to the security council you as a method nikki haley on behalf of the three allies condemned iran's recent rock test and said that the space launch vehicle could be converted into a ballistic missile capable of carrying a nuclear warhead and she stressed that the world should not permit iran to defy the security council a un resolution which endorsed the two thousand fifteen around nuclear deal also calls on iran not to engage in any ballistic missile efforts designed to deliver nuclear weapons meanwhile iran maintains that it is not violating un measures and vetoholding security council member russia agrees foreign peter newsham lent of sulu in new york attorney general jeff sessions says a senate proposal to limit legal immigration we'll help the us he says it protects the country by setting higher standards for entry to the us and by leading us officials more thoroughly review each applicant sessions is also making the claim that the senate proposal would quote end the unlawful abuse of our public benefits program this is npr.

jeff sessions senate attorney new york peter newsham un security council germany britain npr conrad wilson sulu russia nuclear weapons nikki haley iran france united nations portland