30 Burst results for "Conrad Wilson"

"conrad wilson" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Portland jail. He now lives with family in Seattle and wears a GPS ankle bracelet. If convicted, the federal charges he faces could mean decades in prison. It's made him reflective about events from as he puts it, three lifetimes ago. Well, certainly people change over time, though What hasn't changed for him is a desire to protect the environment and without elaborating. DB acknowledged that today he wouldn't employ some of the same methods. I feel like a lot of it back, then was quite confrontational. And probably not very productive. Meanwhile, Debbie's lawyer says the case isn't a priority for the government like it once was, In fact, the federal prosecutor assigned to it for the last several years has been moved. That prosecutor is now working on cases from the January 6th riot for NPR news. I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland. Israel's parliament has failed to renew a law that's been hindering Palestinian families for years. The law prevents Palestinians in the occupied West Bank and Gaza from getting citizenship in Israel even after they marry Palestinians inside Israel who have Israeli citizenship. Parliament renews the law periodically, but this time it failed on a tie vote after an all night debate. It was a blow to Prime Minister Naftali Bennett. But the battle isn't over NPR's fat Montana's reports from Jerusalem. By blocking citizenship and residency for Palestinians from the West Bank in Gaza, who Mary Israeli citizens. The law also impacts their access to health insurance and jobs. I think it's one of the worst laws in the Israeli book of flaws, and I hope it will be removed forever. That's Sharon Abraham Weiss. She's the executive director for the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, and says the law was used as collective punishment for Palestinians. Since it was enacted in 2000 and three during the second intifada, when Palestinians were launching attacks in Israel. Supporters of the law say it's necessary for national security and for demographics to preserve Israel as a Jewish nation. But even though most of parliament seems to favor it, the opposition withdrew support in an apparent attempt to destabilize the new coalition. For now, At least it worked out in favor of Palestinians. I was very happy that we made it to the dollar is a Palestinian from the West Bank. He's been married to a Palestinian citizen of Israel for 17 years, and they have two Children together that we achieved. Something was impossible. I think everyone Who helped us But it's unclear if the vote will change the status for thousands of Palestinians who will still have to apply for citizenship and could be turned down Dahlia Scheindlin is in Tel Aviv with the U. S based Century foundation. I mean, it will just mean more work for the interior minister who has to go through the applications one by one, and she could decide to just reject all of them out of hand anyway would almost be the same thing and the Israeli Parliament could still take up the law again and renew it after all. Flat. Montana's NPR NEWS Jerusalem.

Sharon Abraham Weiss Seattle Dahlia Scheindlin Conrad Wilson 17 years Tel Aviv West Bank Debbie 2000 January 6th Association for Civil Rights Jerusalem Gaza Portland NPR Mary thousands two Children today Prime Minister
"conrad wilson" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"He now lives with family in Seattle and wears a GPS ankle bracelet. If convicted, the federal charges he faces could mean decades in prison. It's made him reflective about events from as he puts it, three lifetimes ago. Well, certainly people change over time, though What hasn't changed for him is a desire to protect the environment and without elaborating. DB acknowledge that today he wouldn't employ some of the same methods. I feel like a lot of it back, then was quite confrontational. I'm probably not very productive. Meanwhile, Debbie's lawyer says the case isn't a priority for the government like it once was, In fact, the federal prosecutor assigned to it for the last several years has been moved. That prosecutor is now working on cases from the January 6th riot for NPR news. I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland. Israel's parliament has failed to renew a law that's been hindering Palestinian families for years. The law prevents Palestinians in the occupied West Bank and Gaza from getting citizenship in Israel even after they marry Palestinians inside Israel who have Israeli citizenship. Parliament renews the law periodically, but this time it failed on a tie vote after an all night debate. It was a blow to Prime Minister Naftali Bennett. But the battle isn't over NPR's fat Montana's reports from Jerusalem. By blocking citizenship and residency for Palestinians from the West Bank in Gaza, who Mary Israeli citizens. The law also impacts their access to health insurance and jobs. I think it's one of the worst laws in the Israeli book of flaws, and I hope it will be removed forever. That's Sharon Abraham Weiss. She's the executive director for the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, and says the law was used as collective punishment for Palestinians. Since it was enacted in 2000 and three during the second intifada, when Palestinians were launching attacks in Israel. Supporters of the law say it's necessary for national security and for demographics to preserve Israel as a Jewish nation. But even though most of parliament seems to favor it, the opposition withdrew support in an apparent attempt to destabilize the new coalition. For now, At least it worked out in favor of Palestinians. I was very happy that we made it to. Asadullah is a Palestinian from the West Bank. He's been married to a Palestinian citizen of Israel for 17 years, and they have two Children together that we achieved. Something was impossible. I think everyone Who helped us But it's unclear if the vote will change the status for thousands of Palestinians who will still have to apply for citizenship and could be turned down Dahlia Scheindlin is in Tel Aviv with the U. S based Century foundation. I mean, it will just mean more work for the interior minister who has to go through the applications one by one, and she could decide to just reject all of them out of hand. Anyway, it would almost be the same thing and the Israeli Parliament could still take up the law again and renew it after all. Flat. Montana's NPR NEWS Jerusalem.

Sharon Abraham Weiss Dahlia Scheindlin Seattle Asadullah Conrad Wilson Portland Debbie 17 years West Bank Tel Aviv January 6th 2000 Association for Civil Rights Gaza Jerusalem NPR Mary Prime Minister Century two Children
"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In August Heaven. Foma was arrested during a racial justice demonstration outside the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Building in Portland. Yeah. Prosecutors say Foma sprayed police with bear repellent. So the Justice Department charged him with the felony called civil Disorder. That's forward to Washington, D C January six, where a local Republican party leader from Oregon walked up the steps of the U. S. Capitol. According to the FBI, read Christians. And he calls the attack on the U. S. Capitol chilling what we're witnessing are the individuals at the extremes of the spectrum, either far left to far right. Both Congress passed the Civil Obedience Act in 1968 at the height of the civil rights movement. Among other things, it makes it a crime to interfere with police or firefighters working during civil unrest that blocks commerce or federal government functions. The idea was to stop what those in Congress saw where the transgressions of the civil rights movement of the sixties Lisa hey, is the federal public defender for the District of Oregon. There's overtly racist sentiments by the drafters of the statute. During the last 30 years, the law was used in roughly a dozen cases. But in just the last year between the capital insurrection and racial justice protests, federal prosecutors have used it in more than 125 cases. Someone the Justice Department decided that this is a statue that could be brushed off and revived and hey argues the law is also unconstitutional. The fact that the statutes being used widely Proves really the point of our litigation, which is that this over broad and vague statute can apply to so many circumstances, including innocent conduct that it will kill the exercise of constitutional rights. The Justice Department didn't respond to our request for comment in court documents. Prosecutors say the law is constitutional, and they say it's not racist. Prosecutors argue civil disorder applies to a defendant's conduct, whether it's a racial justice protest or what happened at the U. S. Capitol. The decision quote unquote on this, maybe in the court of public discourse. Margaret Russell is a law professor at Santa Clara University, where she specializes in civil rights and free speech. Russell says the most powerful legal arguments against the civil disorder statute would be that it infringes on the First Amendment, though, she adds, defense attorneys may have another goal in highlighting racist comments made by politicians who supported the law during the civil rights era that the federal defenders and others are pointing out. The origins of this law and the misuse of it and the likely misuse of it here, Then it calls attention to reasons not to use this particular statute to prosecute people. A federal judge in Alabama recently allowed a trial to move forward in which prosecutors used the civil disorder charge, saying it's constitutional Protester in that case was found guilty this week. Defense attorneys say the charge was government overreach. But federal prosecutors no doubt are encouraged as they pursue both racial justice protesters and those involved in the January six siege on the U. S. Capitol. For NPR News. I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland. Secret weapon against climate change might be hiding in sewers. The underground pipes contain excess energy that could heat and cool buildings. The concept is called sewer Heat recovery. One of the largest such projects in the U. S is underway in Denver. Sam Brash of Colorado public radio report..

Margaret Russell Sam Brash Denver FBI Foma Civil Obedience Act Russell Conrad Wilson Oregon Lisa hey Alabama Republican U. S. Capitol U. S more than 125 cases Justice Department Congress Portland Colorado NPR News
'A Death Sentence': US Prisons and COVID-19

All Things Considered

06:35 min | 1 year ago

'A Death Sentence': US Prisons and COVID-19

"People are some of the most vulnerable took over 19 since March, researchers say more than 1600. People in jails and prisons have died of the disease, and tens of thousands have been infected. Some states have started to vaccinate people behind bars while others have not. And we're gonna look now at how this is playing out in three states. Alison Cherry is with Colorado Public radio and she joins us from Denver. Conrad Wilson is with Oregon Public Broadcasting, and he's in Portland. Joining us from Boston is dead Backer with W. B. You are good to have all three of you here. Hi. Hi. Hello, Dev. I want to start with you. In Massachusetts. Your state included prisoners in the first phase of its covert 19 vaccine plan. What was the rationale for that? Well, we know that the virus transmits quickly in correctional settings in the risk of contracting the virus and dying from it are much higher inside prisons and jails compared with outside. So in deciding to vaccinate prisoners. Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, a Republican, said that correctional settings are no different from other congregate living situation, such as shelters and group homes where people are living in Copan close quarters and the virus can easily spread. So here's what he said last month when he explained why prisoners were included in the first phase. Our facilities are congregated facilities and we need to make sure that the people who work there and the people who live there because of the possibility of outbreak that that should be a place. We focus early in this exercise. The governor says it's strong public health policy because it's not just vaccinating prisoners. Workers are getting the vaccine to any pointed out. There are lawyers to go in and out of prisons in jail's medical workers, visitors those who provide programming, so the states thinking is that offering vaccines and correctional settings will help prevent the spread in the community. And so far, how is the vaccine rollout going in jails and prisons in Massachusetts officials say it's going smoothly, but it appears that a lot of people are not taking it. Court documents in particular shows that about a third of prisoners in more than half of prison workers have not received the vaccine. Now. That number does not include workers who may have been vaccinated elsewhere. So some correctional facilities are holding vaccine education sessions to encourage people to get the shop. Okay, let's turn now to Oregon More than 40 prison inmates have died after testing positive for covert 19 in that state. So Conrad give us a sense of what's happening with vaccines there now. Almost 7000 inmates have been vaccinated. That's more than half of the state's prison population. Many of those inmates have received their second dose, prison officials say, but vaccinating this many inmates this soon wasn't something Oregon health officials were willing to do on their own. Took litigation from a group of inmates on din order from a federal judge here in Portland. Basically, the inmates argued Oregon's vaccination plan didn't treat them like others living in nursing homes and other congregate care facilities where the vaccine has been administered. Your state representative General Bynum. She's a Democrat and chairs the Oregon House Judiciary Committee. I didn't understand how our adults in custody, we're any different from any other group in a congregant care setting. And I certainly don't believe that a prison sentence is a death sentence. The judge's ruling at the beginning of this month force the state to offer inmates vaccines immediately, So that's why about half of all prison inmates have been vaccinated. Let me jump in here. This is Alison and Denver Advocates here wish that that would have happened in Colorado that court ruling con artist is talking about in Oregon. Is something lawyers here have been trying to use as a tool to get inmates vaccines, and I know there's been a back and forth over this in Colorado. Alison tell us more about what's been happening there. Yeah. Democratic Governor Jared Pulis hasn't prioritized inmates at all. And initially he did in one of the early plans, but then Was called out for that by some prominent conservatives, You know, people saying, Do you want the murderer to get the vaccine before your next door neighbor and he was apparently sensitive to that, and so he removed prisoners from the lists and put them in just the regular population. So in other words, he's making no distinction that these people are in a group setting a 70 year old prisoner would be prioritized. A 70 year old non prisoner and so on. So the majority of prisoners are not being prioritized. I will note that prison staff has been prioritized in those vaccines are being administered now. So tell us more about the pressure that Colorado's governor has been under Well. He's gotten a lot of pushback for his decision to not prioritize inmates for vaccine for getting a vaccine, and he's also been sued. He has thought that lawsuit successfully so far. Rebecca Wallace is an A C l U lawyer, she says. Public health officials have been universal in saying that people in groups heading should be prioritized for a vaccine and governor pull. It has actually not only ignored that guidance but rejected that guidance from his own Colorado Department of Public Health on by think it really stand out because he's such a data driven individual in his other decisions. I'm curious. Early in the pandemic, there was pressure to release inmates to create social distance inside facilities that were often crowded. Have vaccination efforts change those conversations in the states that you're all in? Well in Massachusetts. Despite the early vaccination of prisoners, there has been little movement to release people. The fight over that continues mostly through litigation. There are pending lawsuits, but with so many prisoners getting vaccinated now, it does weaken the argument for big releases. Yeah, and in Colorado. Interestingly, the state's prison population has gone down by a few 1000 people since the start of the pandemic, But state officials attribute that almost 100% to the fact that there were no no criminal jury trials last year at all in 2020, so there's this massive backlog in the States Criminal justice system. So you've brought us three very different stories about policies around vaccinating, incarcerated people in three states that are very different across the country. How does this fit in with what we are seeing across the US nationally, Conrad Well, every state is really dealing with this a little bit differently. And, you know, really, This is another symptom showing a lack of a national strategy. Despite the risks, it's another way of, you know, also showing how inmates are marginalized by society. And this isn't just about those who are incarcerated. In a recent report by the nonpartisan Prison Policy Initiative, researchers found that there were more new cases and counties that have large incarcerated populations.

Massachusetts Alison Cherry Conrad Wilson W. B. Oregon Colorado Oregon Public Broadcasting Charlie Baker Portland General Bynum Oregon House Judiciary Committ Denver Copan Jared Pulis DEV Alison Boston Conrad Rebecca Wallace Colorado Department Of Public
"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Conrad Wilson in Portland. This's NPR news. Support for NPR comes from W. N. Y C members and from the Chris Key Foundation, expanding opportunities in America's cities through grant making and social investing more a Kreskin, Donna Warg and American Jewish World Service supporting human rights advocates worldwide as they respond to covert 19 and defend democracies Learn more at a J. W s dot org You're listening to morning edition on W II. See, I'm David first. Covert 19 has taken a disproportionate toll on African Americans in New York City and across the country. It's highlighted racial disparities and healthcare, including the need for more black doctors who understand the issue is facing African and African American communities. The Association of American Medical Colleges, says that in 2018 just 5% of practicing physicians identified as African American compared to more than 56%, who identified as white. And 17%, who identified as Asian, Our senior editor for a race and justice Jamie Floyd joins us now with more. Hi, Jamie. Hello, David Jamie. You sat down with two black doctors in New York City to learn more about these disparities..

Oregon wildfire under criminal arson investigation, police say

1A

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

Oregon wildfire under criminal arson investigation, police say

"Enforcement authorities in Oregon have opened a criminal investigation into one of the major wildfires burning in that state is Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports. At least one person was killed by the fire and hundreds of homes have been burned. Oregon State police into local police departments are looking into how the Alameda Fire in southern Oregon began as part of an arson investigation. So far, the fire has burned at least 600 homes, mostly in the towns of Phoenix and talent. Hi. O'Mara is the chief of the Ashland Police Department. It involves not only the studying of the fire, but the death of somebody immediately after the fire was set somebody that was killed by the fire. That investigation is criminal and it is ongoing. The numbers of homes, businesses and people lost in the fire raging across Oregon are all expected to increase in the coming days as fires continue to spread in the damages assessed.

Oregon Ashland Police Department Conrad Wilson O'mara Arson Alameda Phoenix
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It should prepare to distribute a corona virus vaccine by October. I'm Rachel Martin, and I'm no well king. The timing surprise some health officials who aren't expecting a vaccine for several more months. One possible reason for the CDC. Surprisingly fast recommended timeline. There are now three potential cove in 19 vaccines undergoing wide scale testing. Should we get our hopes up? Will ask correspondent Joe Palka It's Friday. September 4th Beyonce is 39 today. And the news is next. Line from NPR news. I'm Corvette Coleman. The US Marshal Service says officers have shot and killed a suspect in Washington state. Michael Forrest Raina ll was wanted in the shooting death of far right activist Erin J. Danielson last Saturday in Portland, Oregon. From Oregon Public Broadcasting, Conrad Wilson says Rhino was killed last night. According to the U. S Marshal service around 7 30. Last evening, they tried to arrest final near Olympia, which is about two hours north of Portland. The marshals say they attempted to peacefully arrest him, but that he had a firearm and threaten the lives of law enforcement officers. The officers, then shot run. L was pronounced dead at the scene. Conrad Wilson reporting the U. S. Marshals do not say if Ronald fired his weapon. Raina was a self described supporter of the leftist Antifa movement. He was killed hours after he took responsibility for the slaying of Danielson in Portland, saying it was in self defense. President Trump is forcefully denying a report that claims he has repeatedly disparaged U. S soldiers and questioned why they would make the sacrifice of fighting or dying in a war. NPR's Scott de tro reports from Latrobe, Pennsylvania, where Trump held a rally last night. The article in the Atlantic is based on several unnamed sources. It walks through several moments where the sources say the president criticized or blame soldiers who died in war or question why anyone would fight in one President allegedly said a cemetery of Americans killed in World War ll was quote filled with losers. President Trump says it's never happened. I would.

President Trump Portland Michael Forrest Raina US Marshal Service Erin J. Danielson Conrad Wilson NPR Rhino Rachel Martin president U. S Marshal Joe Palka Beyonce President Oregon Public Broadcasting CDC Atlantic Oregon
Suspect sought in connection of Portland shooting killed by authorities

NPR News Now

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Suspect sought in connection of Portland shooting killed by authorities

"According to the US marshals service a suspect in the weekend killing of Aaron Danielson as reportedly been killed near. Seattle self-described teeth supporter Michael Rheinau, died hours after telling vice news that he killed Danielson in self defense as Oregon Public Broadcasting Conrad Wilson reports authorities say Rhino, was killed during efforts to take him into custody last night but wealth authorities attempted to contact right now and Thurston County. Washington. There were reports of shots fired and right now was killed according to a law enforcement source was wanted in connection with killing it far-right supporter, Aaron J Danielson as a pro-trump caravan of hundreds of vehicles while and through the city Conrad Wilson in Portland.

Aaron J Danielson Conrad Wilson Michael Rheinau United States Thurston County Seattle Oregon Washington Portland
Portland suspect shot dead by police during arrest

BBC World Service

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Portland suspect shot dead by police during arrest

"According to multiple law enforcement sources. The suspect in a fatal shooting at a protest in Portland, Oregon, last weekend, is dead as Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports. A man reportedly died after an encounter with officers in Washington State. A judge in Multnomah County, Oregon, issued an arrest warrant for Michael for us right now on Thursday, according to a law enforcement source right now was wanted in connection with the killing in Portland, Oregon on Saturday. Federal authorities attempted to contact right now and Thurston County, Washington. There were reports of shots fired and right now was killed. On Saturday. A far right supporter, Erin J. Danielsson, was killed after a gunshot wound to the chest on the same day as a pro trump caravan of hundreds of vehicles wound through the city. NPR news. I'm Conrad Wilson in

Oregon Conrad Wilson Portland Erin J. Danielsson Multnomah County Thurston County Washington State NPR Washington Michael
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"McConnell for KGB. Thank you. Show at 607 on DVD. Join us for cake. VD Science, Richelle, Maria Dylan and Daniel vent and we'll have the report at 6 22. It was hard to watch fire burning through ancient redwood groves recently. But what does fire do to these trees? Science reporter Daniel Vent in says they're more resilient than people might realize. Also an update on Corona virus research focused on treatments using antibodies all ahead at 6 22 and again at 8 22. It's CBD science coming up for you on this Monday, the last day of August. On DVD, public radio. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Let's start with the facts as best we know them of a shooting in Portland, Oregon. The shooting was an escalation after months of protests against police brutality. Local groups organized a caravan of pickup trucks. They are opposed to the protests. Many of the truck's flew trump flags. They planned a route around the city. But some drove downtown and that is where gunfire erupted. One person was killed. And the leader of a far right group called Patriot Prayer, says the person killed was associated with that group. We spoke earlier with Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson, who is covering the story. Conrad. Good morning. Hi, Steve. Really emotional situation. I know, but what facts are confirmed Well, it's not clear whether the shooting was directly tied to conflicts between those in the caravan and racial justice Protesters. There is eyewitness video shot from a distance that appears to capture the shooting. But it doesn't make clear who fired the two shots. And for what reason? The man who was killed has not been named by authorities. But the leader of the regional Far right group Patriot Prayer did tell The Associated Press of the man who was killed was it was a good friend and a supporter. Okay, so we know that much and we just want to be clear. People get upset. I want you to be upset. You listening? We're going to be as factual as we can. What do we know about this caravan? It was just huge. I mean, it stretched out for miles, hundreds and hundreds of vehicles, many decked out in signs and flags supporting President Trump. Some sprayed base from the backs of the trucks and racial justice protesters. There were also a few instances where they drove trucks through counter protesters. Few fights broke out, too. But really, For the most part, things were relatively peaceful on Saturday until about 8 45 in the evening when shots rang out in downtown and police later confirmed that a man was killed. Okay and again. We don't have a lot of confirmation from authorities. But this group Patriot prayer says the person killed was was one of ours. So to speak. What is Patriot prayer? Yeah, you know, since 2016 there have been these far right organizations have held rallies in Portland counter demonstrators. Left wing groups like Antifa have turned out, and for years we've sort of seen these political rallies culminate and end in violence. Patriot Prayer is based in the Portland area. They talk about fighting corruption in the government and civic groups that seek to gain power a CZ they described through division and deception. It began in 2016, and they've rallied for President Trump. Their leader, Joey Gibson, is facing a felony riot charge stemming from a case last year. And another national group we've seen over the years is the proud boys, a self described Western show Venice group that is more widely known. They've also engaged in violence at protests here in Portland, most recently, the weekend before last, there was an open brawl between pro Trump pro police demonstrators, many of whom are armed. And anti fascist counter protesters in downtown Portland. And it's important to note that that brawling went on images went wild for a couple of hours with any response from Portland police so going into this weekend People were on edge, and then we had the events of this weekend. We want note briefly that President Trump leapt on this. He attacked the mayor in an early morning tweet. He also threw in attacks on Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi, who just does a matter of Fact checking will note. We're not in Portland at the time. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler has responded. Let's listen. You've tried to divide us more than any other figure in modern history. And now you want me to stop the violence that you helped create? So there is a national debate here. But what Conrad is the local debate right now? Well, understandably, many people here are unhappy. Just before the news conference, Some groups called on the mayor and the police chief to resign that there have been Constituency of people that have repeated that throughout really these 90 plus days of protests, you know, they say that the police chief of the mayor let the protest get out of control during the last several weeks, which created an environment where the shooting could take place. Conrad. Thanks for the updated for the facts. Welcome Conrad Wilson of Oregon. Public Broadcasting in the United States handled two disasters at once The Gulf Coast region is finding out Corona virus case numbers in some communities in the path of Hurricane Laura were high. When the category four hurricane came ashore. NPR's Kirk signal reports the storm is making service is even harder to get in Orange, Texas, just across the.

Portland President Trump Conrad Wilson Daniel Vent Steve Inskeep Oregon Patriot Prayer NPR News VD Science McConnell Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter KGB Joey Gibson United States NPR Venice Noelle King
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bye at home in quarantine with the country in the grip of multiple crises. Democratic nominee has put forward quite an ambitious agenda, but he wants us to know that he's not driven by ideology or by those on the left of his party. I'm kind of in a position. That NPR wass I'm not comparing myself. Str for real, So it's not like Biden says like that, but it is not requiring ideological. Do you think about it? What? In fact, FDR did was not ideological. It was completely practical. How do we keep America going totally in the tank and staying in attack. Joe Biden on the New Yorker radio hour just ahead. Live from NPR news. I'm Barbara Klein. A man was shot and killed in downtown Portland, Oregon last night is a pro Trump caravan moved through the city and clashed with counter demonstrators. Police are investigating the shooting as a homicide. Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports photos show The man killed, was wearing a patriot prayer hat and war patch in support of police on his shorts. Patriot Prayer is a far right political group that is engaged in violence during past protests in Portland. No one was immediately arrested following the shooting. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler said in a text message that he was aware of the situation and was asking people to remain calm and not add to the tragedy. Earlier Saturday, thousands of people have gathered for a Trump Cruz rally at a suburban mall outside Portland. The shooting happened after tensions gradually escalated throughout the day and into the evening is the caravan slowly moved through the city. For NPR News. I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland. Clean up from Hurricane Laura continues in Louisiana. The storm killed at least 16 people and caused billions of dollars worth of damage. NPR's Kirk Siegler is in Lake Charles, where he says first responders are still combing the wreckage for survivors. Lake Charles, a city of about 80,000, people, from what we've been able to see just looks devastated. Power lines are down. Whole oak trees uprooted some literally crushing houses. First responders. We've been talking Teo at a base say it's still really an active search and rescue operation. At this point, they're flying. Down to some of the lower lying coastal areas and choppers. And then you know, scouring these communities in boats whenever they can making sure you know those who did stay behind are still OK. You know from here anyway, The devastation really looks overwhelming. It's going to be a long recovery ahead. Meanwhile, the Interior Department is reporting crude oil output in the Gulf of Mexico is still down 70% Congressional Democrats say they're outraged by the Trump administration's decision to end face to face briefings on foreign election interference. The administration says the information will be provided in written form. Congressman Raja Krishnamoorthi says the move hampers lawmakers ability to follow up on the latest intelligence report that concludes Russia is actively interfering in U. S elections. The fact that they would you know, prevent further in person briefings means that they want us Not to be able to question career public servants about the intelligence that backs up this assessment of Russian interference press for additional information about it, and quite frankly, ask, how can we do more to combat it? The administration says the move is meant to ensure intelligence isn't politicized or misconstrued. This is NPR. Live from the news. I'm Queen Kim. Firefighters continue to make progress in containing the lightning field wildfires in and around the Bay Area. Thie Ellen, you complex burning in the North Bay is now 56% contained And this easy you incident in San Mateo and Santa Cruz counties is 35% contained. Cal Fire Battalion chief Mark Britton says the cool weather has helped weather cooperated.

Portland NPR News NPR Joe Biden Conrad Wilson Trump administration Democrats Trump Cruz Lake Charles Ted Wheeler Bay Area Congressman Raja Krishnamoorth Kirk Siegler Oregon Public Broadcasting Barbara Klein Oregon Cal Fire Battalion Hurricane Laura America Queen Kim
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

"Morning. Jacob Blakes Family led a march in Kenosha, Wisconsin. This weekend as pressure mounts toehold police accountable for violence there will speak to the city's mayor about what's next. Also 15 years later, the trauma from Hurricane Katrina lingers. And we'll head into the kitchen with the chef who got a little grief when he decided to pursue his passion. I didn't want to follow that traditional route I did to make him happy. I went to college. I try to get a corporate job, but ultimately I was really passionate about food. It's Sunday, August 30th. The news is coming up next. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone. Ah Homicide investigation is underway in Portland, Oregon, after a man was shot and killed downtown. Gunfire erupted as a pro trump caravan of about 600 vehicles moved through the city in a confrontation with black lives matter. Protestors Conrad Wilson of Oregon Public Broadcasting has more Photos show The man killed, was wearing a patriot prayer hat and wore a patch and supportive police on his shorts. Patriot prayers, a far right political group that is engaged in violence during past protests in Portland. No one was immediately arrested. Following the shooting. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler said in a text message that he was aware of the situation and was asking people to remain calm and not add to the tragedy. Earlier Saturday, thousands of people have gathered for a Trump Cruz rally at a suburban mall outside Portland. The shooting happened after tensions gradually escalated throughout the day and into the evening is the caravan slowly moved through the city. For NPR News. I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland in Chicago. Two police officers were shot early this morning in the city's Garfield Park neighborhood. The officers were taken to Stroger Hospital following the shooting and remain in stable condition. Chicago police Superintendent David Brown says the officers were part of a specialized task force Both have two years on their part.

Portland NPR News Conrad Wilson Hurricane Katrina Jacob Blakes Stroger Hospital Ted Wheeler Kenosha Louise Schiavone Trump Cruz Garfield Park Chicago Wisconsin Oregon Public Broadcasting Oregon Superintendent Washington David Brown
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mounts to hold police accountable for violence there will speak to the city's mayor about what's next. Also 15 years later, the trauma from Hurricane Katrina lingers. And we'll head into the kitchen with the chef who got a little grief when he decided to pursue his passion. I didn't want to follow the traditional route I did to make him happy. I went to college. I try to get a corporate job, but ultimately I was really passionate about food. It's Sunday, August 30th. The news is coming up next. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone. Ah Homicide investigation is underway in Portland, Oregon, after a man was shot and killed downtown. Gunfire erupted as a pro trump caravan of about 600 vehicles moved through the city in a confrontation with black lives matter. Protestors Conrad Wilson of Oregon Public Broadcasting has more Photos show The man killed, was wearing a patriot prayer hat and wore a patch and supportive police on his shorts. Patriot prayers, a far right political group that is engaged in violence during past protests in Portland. No one was immediately arrested. Following the shooting. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler said in a text message that he was aware of the situation and was asking people to remain calm and not add to the tragedy. Earlier Saturday, thousands of people have gathered for a Trump Cruz rally at a suburban mall outside Portland. The shooting happened after tensions gradually escalated throughout the day and into the evening as the caravan slowly moved through the city. For NPR News. I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland in Chicago. Two police officers were shot early this morning in the city's Garfield Park neighborhood. The officers were taken to Stroger Hospital following the shooting and remain in stable condition. Chicago police Superintendent David Brown says the officers were part of a specialized task force Both have two years on their part of the Summer mobile citywide team recently formed to address violent crime. A third person who may have been the shooter was also wounded. That person.

Portland NPR News Conrad Wilson Hurricane Katrina Stroger Hospital Ted Wheeler Louise Schiavone Trump Cruz Oregon Public Broadcasting Oregon Chicago Garfield Park Superintendent Washington David Brown
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:52 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ghosts with fresh air today How President Trump his lawyers and Attorney General William Barr outmaneuvered Robert Mueller. We talk with Jeffrey Toobin about his new book, True Crimes and Misdemeanors. The investigation of Donald Trump. It's about how Trump survived the Mueller investigation and impeachment. Toobin will explain why he thinks Mueller failed at his two most important tasks and how that undermined his otherwise remarkable work included in the long list of people to interview our members of Mueller's team and Trump's legal team, two minutes, CNN's chief legal analyst and writes about legal issues for the New Yorker. That's coming up on fresh air first. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. Investigators in Beirut, Lebanon, are apparently focusing on a warehouse storing highly explosive fertilizers. The cause of a massive explosion that flattened buildings blew out windows and left at least 135 people dead and 5000 injured. Their reporter, not a home. Z is in Beirut and says the material appears to have been at the waterfront warehouse for years. They've known about this dangerous material since about 2014. It's thought that it was brought in by a cargo ship that was impounded at the time, which was carrying the same material. On the government has arrested some port workers. They say that whoever caused it will pay a price and that there's going to be accountability. And even though we don't know what actually ignited The explosion and it's being looked at as an accident. It seems that it may have been caused by negligence by officials. Reporter not a home Z. Lebanon has appealed for international help to deal with the aftermath of the explosion yesterday, which left a significant portion of the Lebanese capital damaged. Facebook has removed a post from President Trump for making false claims about the Corona virus. NPR Shannon Bond reports. It's one of the first instances in which the social network is cracked down on the president. Post on President Trump's personal Facebook page included a clip from a Fox news interview. In it, The president said schools should reopen because Children are quote almost immune from this disease. Facebook says the Post violated its policies against harmful misinformation about Cove in 19. Research has shown that while Children tend to get infected with the Corona virus less often and have milder symptoms than adults, kids can still contract it, which means they can spread it to others, and some Children have gotten seriously ill and even died. Yes, but generally takes a hands off approach to post from political figures. With few exceptions. In June, it removed Trump campaign ads that used a Nazi symbol. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco The city of Portland has finds over the security fence erected by federal authorities earlier last month outside the courthouse in downtown Portland have now top more than half a $1,000,000. Organ Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson has more A letter, sent Monday to the General Services Administration says the fines will increase by nearly $50,000 everyday The fence stays up. Portland officials say the fences blocking a bike lane and the federal government hasn't applied for permits. Fight over the fence is the latest dustup between federal law enforcement and the city over the protests last month to Portland Council banned city police officers from communicating with federal law enforcement. Move, the police say creates a dangerous environment during crowd control actions. Protests outside the federal courthouse have dwindled in recent days, but continued elsewhere in the city for NPR News. I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland. Another strong session on Wall Street. Today, the Dow was up 373 points. The NASDAQ rose 57 points the S and P game 21 points today. This is NPR Live from KQED News. I'm terrorist. Siler. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says additional unemployment payments for people who lost their jobs because of Covic are crucial as the country tries to deal with the economic fallout of the pandemic. Politics Reporter K or has details on Pelosi's remarks today. Pelosi spoke about ongoing negotiations over the latest cove in 19 relief package during a virtual event with the Public Policy Institute of California, she said one of the sticking points between Democrats and Republicans is whether to renew the $600 a week federal unemployment benefits on top of state benefits. For people who lost their jobs in the pandemic. Tens of millions of people have filed for unemployment insurance, so really do need the federal government to put that money in the pockets of the American people, Pelosi said. There's also disagreement about additional money for state and local governments. In Sacramento. I'm Katie or the news. The Oakland A's air suing the California Department of Toxic Substances control for failing to regulate an industrial recycling plant. Next to the site in West Oakland, where the team plans to build a new ballpark. A's president Dave Cavil, says the state needs to hold Schnitzer steel accountable. The steel recycler generates materials that air Constantly exceeding the toxicity. Thresholds of hazardous waste it leeches into the soil and groundwater. It blows off site and it catches fire. Five fires since January of 2018. Schnitzer Steel says they've invested more than $30 million emission control projects at the facility. Department of Toxic Substances Control, declined to comment. I'm terrorist Siler in Oakland. This's news support comes from California building trades who believes that poverty and housing can't be solved by driving construction workers into poverty. Support for NPR comes from Heather Start Vega and Paul.

president NPR News Donald Trump reporter Portland Facebook Robert Mueller federal government Schnitzer Steel Oakland Jeffrey Toobin Shannon Bond House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Trump Siler Conrad Wilson Beirut Department of Toxic Substances Lebanon
Oregon state police arrive in Portland in push to stop riots

Fresh Air

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Oregon state police arrive in Portland in push to stop riots

"Oregon State police will take the place of federal law enforcement officers guarding the federal courthouse in Portland, Oregon, Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports. The city's police department will work alongside state troopers. During a news conference, Portland police Chief Chuck Leavell criticized a recent City Council resolution that prevents Portland please from working with federal officers. He says it creates a potentially more dangerous scenario. But he also says he hopes the reduction of a federal president's calmed tensions in downtown

Oregon State Police Portland Chuck Leavell Oregon Conrad Wilson Public Broadcasting City Council President Trump
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:16 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, Federal agents have agreed to back off their effort to contain demonstrations in Portland, Oregon. State's governor says the agents will end their nightly confrontations with protesters. Federal authorities say it's more of a pause. In any case. It's a change in the effort to protect a federal courthouse, which led to almost nightly incidents that intensified protests over racial justice. Oregon Public Broadcasting Conrad Wilson has been covering this story, either. Conrad Hi, Steve. How do officials plan to secure this federal courthouse instead? So under the deal, Oregon State police they're going to take over defending the federal courthouse. They say that they're going to work with federal law enforcement and the Portland police, and the idea here is to get federal law enforcement to leave while also ensuring the safety of the courthouse. And the people that work there. I mean, these federal officers they don't generally do crowd control. They've made some missteps that have really energized what prior to their arrival were some pretty small protests mean at times, you know, fewer than 100 people or so. For instance, a U. S marshal shot a peaceful protester in the head with a crowd control device, putting the person in the hospital. And then Oregon Public Broadcasting reported on homeland security officers in military style uniforms using marked vehicles to arrest protesters. Yeah, and and your reporting intensified suspicion of the administration's motives. It appeared to many people that they were deliberately stoking conflict that they wanted this confrontation that they wanted chaos. And, of course, the president leans into chaos whenever he can. So how did the administration end up agreeing to do something else? We'll came from the state. I mean this week, Oregon Governor Cape Brown spoke with Vice President Mike Pence and the governor of pitched this. This plan to the vice president. Pence got the Department of Homeland Security involved. There were a number of high ranking officials in Portland this week, including the deputy director of the FBI. Before this agreement came together and was announced yesterday. We did hear that agreement from the governor but aren't Homeland Security officials saying something just a little different? Acting. Yes, Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Chad Wolf says the surge of federal officers that President Trump sent to Portland is going to stay and see how this unfolds. You know, basically Ken, Oregon State police do what they say they're going to do. The difference, though, is that federal officers are going to be out on the streets in laws. State police can't protect the courthouse. Okay, So let me try to understand how this really changes the situation as you guys have been reporting very effectively. These were small protests, and they seemed to get larger when federal agents got involved in the federal courthouse became much more of a focus of these protests that originally were about local police and racial justice and that sort of thing. What happens now that the federal officers step back? Well, The Trump Administration, you know, has has put this narrative of Portland is a city under siege from protesters mean Trump tweeted that you know if he hadn't deployed federal law enforcement quote, there would be no Portland don't be burned and beaten to the ground. In reality protests have mainly taken place in an area of downtown. The vast majority of protests have been peaceful and focused on racial justice in police violence. The hope is that with federal agents stepping back, you will de escalate things and return the focus to conversations between the community. Please In the mayor, I mean, just this week local sight. Civil rights groups released a list of prop policy proposals and they're really trying to use the momentum of black lives matter to address inequality. Policy proposals instead of confrontation. Conrad thank you very much. Welcome Steve Conrad Wilson of Oregon Public Broadcasting. It's a Portland is not the only city seeing these kinds of tensions in Seattle. Clashes between protesters and police turned violent last weekend, but Seattle's Democratic mayor, Jenny Durkin, told the Department of Homeland Security she did not want federal agents sent into her city. She later discovered a force was deployed and put on standby. Now they have left. Mayor Durkin spoke with our co host, Rachel Martin, about why she and other mayors feel these federal deployments. Part of a bigger, darker political goal. We have, like any other city. We have public safety challenges. But our public safety challenges have been made significantly worse by this president's actions in his words, the dinner in level of criminal activity. That really deteriorated after the president started tweeting about it, and it was a subject to have Fox coverage every night. So we have seen and I've talked to mayors across the country the same thing when the president actually tweets, and it's not my words saying he's targeting death City is run by Democrats. He's openly admitted it and tweeted about it. Um And I think that that is really a chilling prospect at a president United States would use federal resource is for political purposes. The Department of Justice has said that there is an expansion happening right that all of this the deployment of federal agents to a variety of cities Now we're seeing Chicago Albuquerque, Kansas City now Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland. This is all part of so called Operation legend that this has to do with gun violence, quelling gun violence in these cities helping solve murders. This's the DOJ zone characteristic of what this operation is about. I guess I'm hoping you can clarify for me. Is this operation legend something that's happening? Adjacent, separate from from the agents that had been deployed to Portland. And for a couple of days, at least this standby force to Seattle. I actually think they're using it as camouflage. There are ongoing task force in major cities, the deal with gun violence and with gang violence and other violent crime. We had him in Seattle and I worked on him is U. S attorney I know I've spoken with the mayor of Chicago and Albuquerque, and they have a strong collaborative approach with federal law enforcement. That it is very rare. If it all federal law enforcement will surge agents to a city to deal with public safety threats that are normally handled by city or state officials. Without talking to or working with local officials. You have described what President Trump is doing as being a political ploy to play his own base ahead of the election into some kind of law and order message. As as a former U. S attorney for the Western District of Washington is anything he's doing or the federal government at his behest illegal. I think it could be unconstitutional. Under the 11th Amendment. Remember, public safety is generally reserved to the states and to their cities, a subdivision of the states by our Constitution. There's also restrictions on the powers that federal law enforcement have and what they can enforce. They generally cannot roam the streets of a city in enforce city or state law. But the other thing I will say, though it is unprecedented for federal authorities to take this level of approach for local jurisdictions in cities and Serge Federal resource is in them to take over public safety duties, like arresting people. Police protesters and I've said it before. I know some people think it's it's hands over dramatic, but to me, it looks like a dry run for martial law. And if we see these kinds of federal agents put into places where there's revoting right concerns, I'm very concerned about what it could do to suppress the vote in America. Say more about that. You're worried that in places where there might be concerns about whether or not people get access to the polls Right? I mean, if you look at it now, the places that that they're sending these, uh, Federal agents are primarily in places where there are significant protests against police violence and for racial equity, And it doesn't take much of a lead to also use those agents to say you're protecting the poles. But have federal agents in and around polling places to spite against fraud. When really a suppression? I think we need a very clear commitment in advance of the election that general law enforcement are not going to be used as some kind of super police. In key battleground states in around you places. You've been talking with different mayor's around the country. Your counterparts in different states. Is that the kind of thing that has come up in conversation with them it has come up. I will tell you were focused day to day on dealing with the crisis in our city. But this kind of action when we feel happening in so many cities across your country, it gives all of us a grave concern is where it is country. Jenny Durkan is the mayor of Seattle. We appreciate your time. Thank you for having me..

Portland Oregon president President Trump Seattle Conrad Wilson Serge Federal Department of Homeland Securit Vice President NPR News Mike Pence Chicago Steve Inskeep attorney Jenny Durkin
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:08 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This morning on the morning editions, Rachel Martin and here and now is Tanya Mosley will host they will be joined by senior Washington editor and correspondent Ron Elving congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell. A national correspondent Debbie Elliot, among others. Live coverage starting at 7 30 Coming up right here on member supported VD. Low clouds. Patchy fog partial to Moshe. Mostly sunny skies today sixties to the nineties. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, Federal agents have agreed to back off their effort to contain demonstrations in Portland, Oregon. State's governor says the agents will end their nightly confrontations with protesters. Federal authorities say it's more of a pause. In any case. It's a change in the effort to protect a federal courthouse, which led to almost nightly incidents that intensified protests over racial justice. Oregon Public broadcasting Conrad Wilson has been covering the story there, Conrad Hi, Steve. How do officials plan to secure this federal courthouse instead? So under the deal, Oregon State police they're going to take over defending the federal courthouse. They say that they're going to work with federal law enforcement and the Portland police, and the idea here is to get federal law enforcement to leave while also ensuring the safety of the courthouse. And the people that work there. I mean, these federal officers they don't generally do crowd control. They've made some missteps that have really energized what prior to their arrival were some pretty small protests mean at times, you know, fewer than 100 people or so. For instance, a U. S marshal shot a peaceful protester in the head with a crowd control device, putting a person in the hospital. And then Oregon Public Broadcasting reported on homeland security officers in military style uniforms using marked vehicles to arrest protesters. Yeah, and and your reporting intensified suspicion of the administration's motives. It appeared to many people that they were deliberately stoking conflict. They wanted this confrontation if they wanted chaos, And of course, the president leans into chaos whenever he can. So how did the administration end up agreeing to do something else? We'll came from the state. I mean this week, Oregon Governor Cape Brown spoke with Vice President Mike Pence. And the governor pitched this. This plan to the vice president. Pence got the Department of Homeland Security involved. There were a number of high ranking officials in Portland this week, including the deputy director of the FBI. Before this agreement came together and was announced yesterday. We did hear that agreement from the governor but aren't homeland Security officials saying something just a little different? Acting. Yes, Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Chad Wolf says the surge of federal officers that President Trump sent to Portland is going to stay and see how this unfolds. You know, basically Ken, Oregon State police do what they say they're going to do. The difference, though, is that federal officers are going to be out on the streets in laws. State police can't protect the courthouse. Okay, So let me try to understand how this really changes the situation as you guys have been reporting very effectively. These were small protests, and they seemed to get larger when federal agents got involved in the federal courthouse became much more of a focus of these protests that originally were about local police and racial justice and that sort of thing. What happens now that the federal officers step back? Well, The Trump Administration, you know, has has put this narrative of Portland is a city under siege from protesters mean Trump tweeted that you know if he hadn't deploying federal law enforcement quote, there would be no Portland don't be burned and beaten to the ground. In reality protests have mainly taken place in an area of downtown. The vast majority of protests have been peaceful and focused on racial justice in police violence. The hope is that with federal agents stepping back, will de escalate things and return the focus to conversations between the community. Police in the mayor mean just this week local sight civil rights groups released a list of prop policy proposals and they're really trying to use the momentum of black lives matter to address inequality. Policy proposals instead of confrontation. Conrad thank you very much. You're welcome Steve Conrad Wilson of Oregon Public Broadcasting. Out of Portland is not the only city seeing these kinds of tensions in Seattle. Clashes between protesters and police turned violent last weekend, but Seattle's Democratic mayor, Jenny Durkin, told the Department of Homeland Security she did not want federal agents sent into her city. She later discovered a force was deployed and put on standby. Now they have left. Mayor Durkin spoke with our co host, Rachel Martin, about why she and other mayors feel these federal deployments. Part of a bigger, darker political goal. We have, like any large city. We have public safety challenges. But our public safety challenges have been made significantly worse by this president's actions, in his words, the inner in level of criminal activity that were really deteriorated after the president started tweeting about it, and it was a subject to have Fox coverage every night. So we have seen and I've talked to mayors across the country the same thing when the president actually tweets. There's not my words saying he's targeting City is run by Democrats. He's openly admitted it and tweeted about it. Andi, I think that that is really is a chilling prospect at a president United States would use federal resource is for political purposes. The Department of Justice has said that there is an expansion happening right that all of this deployment of federal agents to a variety of cities. Now we're seeing Chicago Albuquerque, Kansas City now Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland. This is all part of so called Operation legend that this has to do with gun violence, quelling gun violence in these cities helping solve murders. This's the DOJ zone characteristic of what this operation is about. I guess I'm hoping you can clarify for me. Is this operation legend something that's happening? Adjacent, separate from from the agents that had been deployed to Portland. And for a couple of days, at least this standby force to Seattle. I actually think they're using it as camouflage. There are ongoing task force in major cities, the deal with gun violence and with gang violence of other violent crime. We had him in Seattle and I worked on him is us attorney I know I've spoken with the mayor of Chicago in Albuquerque, and they have a strong collaborative approach with federal law enforcement. That it is very rare. If it all federal law enforcement will surge agents to a city to deal with public safety threats that are normally handled by city or state officials. Without talking to or working with local officials. You have described what President Trump is doing as being a political ploy to play his own base ahead of the election into some kind of law and order message..

Portland Oregon president President Trump Vice President Seattle Department of Homeland Securit Rachel Martin Conrad Wilson Mike Pence NPR News Debbie Elliot Steve Inskeep Oregon State Steve Conrad Wilson Washington Tanya Mosley
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Dave Mattingly, Oregon's governor, says the deal's been reached with the Trump administration to remove federal law enforcement from downtown Portland. Conrad Wilson with Oregon Public Broadcasting says federal agents have been guarding the federal courthouse from sometimes violent demonstrators amid ongoing protests over racism and police brutality. Under the deal, Oregon State police will take over defending the federal courthouse. They said that they're going to work with federal law enforcement and the Portland police. The idea is to get federal law enforcement to leave, also ensuring the safety of the courthouse and those who work. Their protests in Portland have been occurring nightly for more than two months. Negotiators remain far apart on another Corona virus. Aid bill in Congress. Expanded unemployment benefits officially expired tomorrow. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says masks are now required on the House floor to guard against the Corona virus. The chair expects all members and staff to adhere to this requirement as a sign of respect for the health safety and well being of others present in the chamber and surrounding areas. The mandate comes a day after Republican Congressman Louis Gohmert of Texas tested positive for the Corona virus. Gohmert often has not worn a mask. Amid the pandemic. At least 10 members of Congress have become infected since March. This is NPR news from Washington. Members of Congress say the world's largest technology companies should be regulated because they're now monopolies. NPR's Bobby Allen says the CEOs of four of the largest companies in Silicon Valley spent much of yesterday defending the state of their industries to members of the House subcommittee. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Apple's Tim Cook, Google, Sundar Pichai and Amazon's Jeff Bezos, each other turn in the virtual hot seat, but members of Congress were not persuaded by their appearances, Democratic representative David says Cellini, who chairs the Judiciary Committee's antitrust panel, said laws that applied to industrialists like John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie Need to be updated for the digital age. Today. The men are named Zuckerberg Cook for Chai in basins. Their control of the marketplace allows them to do whatever it takes to crush independent business expand their own power. This must end Sicilian E will release a report in about a month outlining what the first major federal regulations of the tech industry could look like. Bobby Allen. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco NASA Rover is on its way to Mars. The perseverance lifted off from Cape Canaveral in Florida amount 40 minutes ago 554 Engine ignition to.

Congress Portland Bobby Allen Congressman Louis Gohmert Zuckerberg Cook NPR Oregon Public Broadcasting House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Oregon Oregon State Dave Mattingly Cape Canaveral Conrad Wilson Sundar Pichai House subcommittee Mark Zuckerberg
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:34 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

"507 This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, Federal agents have agreed to back off their effort to contain demonstrations in Portland, Oregon. State's governor says the agents will end their nightly confrontations with protesters. Federal authorities say it's more of a pause. In any case. It's a change in the effort to protect a federal courthouse, which led to almost nightly incidents that intensified protests over racial justice. Oregon Public Broadcasting Conrad Wilson has been covering this story, either. Conrad Hi, Steve. How do officials plan to secure this federal courthouse instead? So under the deal, Oregon State police they're going to take over defending the federal courthouse. They say that they're going to work with federal law enforcement and the Portland police, and the idea here is to get federal law enforcement to leave will also ensuring the safety of the courthouse. And the people that work there. I mean, these federal officers they don't generally do crowd control. They've made some missteps that have really energized what prior to their arrival were some pretty small protests mean at times, you know, fewer than 100 people or so. For instance, a U. S marshal shot a peaceful protester in the head with a crowd control device, putting the person in the hospital. And then Oregon Public Broadcasting reported on homeland security officers in military style uniforms using marked vehicles to arrest protesters. Yeah, and and your reporting intensified suspicion of the administration's motives. It appeared to many people that they were deliberately stoking conflict. They wanted this confrontation if they wanted chaos, And of course, the president leans into chaos whenever he can. So how did the administration end up agreeing to do something else? We'll came from the state. I mean this week, Oregon Governor Cape Brown spoke with Vice President Mike Pence. And the governor of pitched this. This plan to the vice president. Pence got the Department of Homeland Security involved. There were a number of high ranking officials in Portland this week, including the deputy director of the FBI. Before this agreement came together and was announced yesterday. We did hear that agreement from the governor but aren't homeland Security officials saying something just a little different? Acting. Yes, Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Chad Wolf says the surge of federal officers that President Trump sent to Portland is going to stay and see how this unfolds. You know, basically Ken, Oregon State police do what they say they're going to do. The difference, though, is that federal officers are going to be out on the streets in lost state. Please can't protect the courthouse. Okay, So let me try to understand how this really changes the situation as you guys have been reporting very effectively. These were small protests, and they seemed to get larger when federal agents got involved in the federal courthouse became much more of a focus of these protests that originally were about local police and racial justice and that sort of thing. What happens now that the federal officers step back? Well, The Trump Administration, you know, has has put this narrative of Portland is a city under siege from protesters mean Trump tweeted that you know if he hadn't deployed federal law enforcement quote, there would be no Portland don't be burned and beaten to the ground. In reality protests have mainly taken place in an area of downtown. The vast majority of protests have been peaceful and focused on racial justice and police violence. The hope is that with federal agents stepping back, will de escalate things and return the focus to conversations between the community. Please In the mayor, I mean, just this week local sight. Civil rights groups released a list of prop policy proposals and they're really trying to use the momentum of black lives matter to address inequality. Policy proposals instead of confrontation. Conrad thank you very much. Welcome Steve Conrad Wilson of Oregon Public Broadcasting. Out of Portland is not the only city seeing these kinds of tensions in Seattle. Clashes between protesters and police turned violent last weekend, but Seattle's Democratic mayor, Jenny Durkin, told the Department of Homeland Security she did not want federal agents sent into her city. She later discovered a force was deployed and put on standby. Now they have left. Mayor Durkin spoke with our co host, Rachel Martin, about why she and other mayors feel these federal deployments. Part of a bigger, darker political goal. We have, like any other city. We have public safety challenges. But our public safety challenges have been made significantly worse by this president's actions in his words, the dinner in level of criminal activity. We're really deteriorated after the president started tweeting about it, and it was a subject to have Fox coverage every night. So we have seen and I've talked to mayors across the country the same thing when the president actually tweets, and it's not my words saying he's targeting death City is run by Democrats. He's openly admitted it and tweeted about it. Um And I think that that is really a chilling prospect of a president. United States, which is federal resource is for political purposes. The Department of Justice has said that there is an expansion happening right that all of this the deployment of federal agents to a variety of cities Now we're seeing Chicago Albuquerque, Kansas City now Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland. This is all part of so called Operation legend that this has to do with gun violence, quelling gun violence in these cities helping solve murders. This's the DOJ zone characteristic of what this operation is about. I guess I'm hoping you can clarify for me. Is this operation legend something that's happening? Adjacent, separate from from the agents that had been deployed to Portland. And for a couple of days, at least this standby force to Seattle. I actually think they're using it as camouflage. There are ongoing task force in major cities, the deal with gun violence and with gang violence and other violent crime. We had him in Seattle and I worked on him is U. S attorney I know I've spoken with the mayor of Chicago and Albuquerque, and they have a strong collaborative approach with federal law enforcement. It is very rare. If it all federal law enforcement will surge agents to a city to deal with public safety threats that are normally handled by city or state officials. Without talking to or working with local officials. You have described what President Trump is doing as being a political ploy to play his own base ahead of the election into some kind of law and order message. As as a former U. S attorney for the Western District of Washington is anything he's doing or the federal government at his behest illegal. I think it could be unconstitutional. Under the 11th Amendment. Remember, public safety is generally reserved to the states and to their cities, a subdivision of the states by our Constitution. There's also restrictions on the powers that federal law enforcement have and what they can enforce. They generally cannot room the streets of a city in enforce city or state law. But the other thing I will say, though it is unprecedented for federal authorities to take this level of approach for local jurisdictions in cities and Serge Federal resource is in them to take over public safety duties like arresting people. Police protesters. And I've said it before. I know some people think it's it sounds overdramatic, but to me, it looks like a dry run for martial law. And if we see these kinds of federal agents put into places where there's voting right concerns I'm very concerned about what it could do to suppress the vote in America. Say more about that. You're worried that in places where there might be concerns about whether or not people get access to the polls, right? I mean, if you look at it now, the places that that they're sending these Federal agents are primarily in places where there are significant protests against police violence and for racial equity. And it doesn't take much of a lead to also used those agents to say You're protecting the poles but have federal agents in and around polling places, too. Spite against fraud when really a suppression?.

Portland president Oregon President Trump Conrad Wilson Serge Federal Vice President Seattle Department of Homeland Securit Mike Pence NPR News Jenny Durkin Steve Inskeep Oregon State Chicago Steve Conrad Wilson attorney
"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:08 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm David Green. Portland's mayor, is calling for a meeting with leadership of the Department of Homeland Security. He wants to discuss a quote ceasefire in the standoff between federal police agents and protesters in his city. But the federal government is deploying Mohr law enforcement agents. They're Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson has more Multiple federal law enforcement sources say they're deploying dozens of additional federal officers to help with nightly protests outside the federal courthouse in downtown Portland. Court documents from last week's show 114 officers from a variety of federal agencies are already on site. Agencies of range from the US marshals to the Federal Protective Service to ice and customs and border protection. At the same time, federal officials acknowledged Oregon public Broadcasting that the deployed force has contributed to the quick escalation with protesters. During a news conference Monday, Oregon U. S attorney Billy Williams said. Since early July, federal officers have made more than 80 arrests and have more than 60 pending criminal cases, mostly misdemeanors. Those of us in the U. S Attorney's office are aware that we are in the midst of a historic civil unrest to two generations of racial injustice and the tragic murder. Of George Floyd. But Williams says federal officers won't leave the courthouse undefended. This building is the solution, not the problem. It absolutely represents everything essential to our system of justice. Early this month protest in Portland had dwindled to less than 100 people at times. Then President Trump's and federal law enforcement to the city is part of an executive order. A U. S marshal shot a protester in the head with a crowd control device and officers with the Department of Homeland Security made overnight arrests using unmarked vehicles. After those incidents, the size of the protest increased dramatically this weekend. Crowds outside the courthouse topped an estimated 5000 people. At one point, federal law enforcement made everything Bigger Portland Protest leader Max Smith has been marching for racial justice ever since the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. The mo mentum is nuts and the feds keep escalating. So far, the federal government's response to protests has led to multiple civil rights lawsuits and the Department of Justice Inspector general investigation. For NPR News. I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland. Let's get one perspective on the use of federal agents in Portland Attorney General William Barr is sure to face questions about them as he testifies before Congress today and Jonah Goldberg is following the story. He's editor in chief of the dispatch on a regular guest here, Jonah. Good morning. Morning. Is it surprising that the Trump Administration says so many things are state matters. The pandemic, for example, is a state matter, but fighting protests would be a federal matter. It's not surprising because consistency, ideological or intellectual consistency has not been the watchword of the Trump administration. And I do think that people are to a certain extent. Misunderstanding this there's there's one narrative that says, OK, this is authoritarianism. This is totalitarianism. This is Trump making good on our fears that he was going to be a dictator. And then there's another. The other side, which says, Oh, this is just a Proportionate principal use of force to protect federal buildings, and I think both of those narratives are wrong. I think that this should be understood in the context of what Trump did with the Bible at Lafayette Square. This Is, I consider a fairly outrageous misuse of federal resources for the equivalent of a photo op. This is this is purely politically driven and Um And it's not. It's not the coming of of totalitarian America. It's coming of a really impressive video at a virtual RNC convention. I want to just make sure that I'm clear on this. I mean, there are a lot of facets to this. Our reporter Martin cost you covers. Policing points out there is a federal building in Portland. It does need to be secure. And in recent days, protesters have repeatedly breached the fence around that federal building. It's not like nothing is happening, but it sounds like you feel that it's ah that the administration has kind of taken a cynical opportunity to create more confrontation here. Yeah, I think we basically have a tragedy of the Commons all over the place. Lots of people are asking. Why are conservatives so hypocritical for not opposing the violation of state's rights here? And there's a There's certainly some hypocrisy there. There's also some hypocrisy from Democrats who really don't mind violations of state rights. I mean, the same a lot of the same people who are too crying this Are the same people insisting that Trump Institute a nationwide mask Law, you know, or wanted to see the federalization of the health care industry. In response, the Corona virus there, There's lots of hypocrisy going around. I just don't think it's particularly interesting part. I think the tragedy of the Commons comes in where you have a handful of the Protesters, not all of them to be sure, but you know the rabble rouser types who very much like the escalation in are provoking the Trump Administration and the Trump Administration very much likes the escalation and are provoking. The rabble rousers and you get this sort of race to the bottom of effect, and it's like there are legal and constitutional powers of the president has to protect federal property. He's been lazy and incompetent and invoking them and using them in proportion. He hasn't trained a lot of these people for the jobs that he's sending them into. Because they just want the photo ops. They want the footage of chaos. To fit this in a replay of the American carnage narrative from 2016 Trump needs an existential enemy to run against. In his in his rhetoric, and so in 2018 he tried it and failed with the immigrant caravan coming up, you know that was supposedly going to destroy all of America..

Trump Administration President Trump federal government Portland Federal Protective Service Department of Homeland Securit Oregon Public Broadcasting NPR News George Floyd Conrad Wilson Trump Trump Institute Billy Williams America attorney Steve Inskeep Oregon
Protests intensify in Portland against police, as Trump says local leaders have 'lost control'

The Sunday Show

01:01 min | 2 years ago

Protests intensify in Portland against police, as Trump says local leaders have 'lost control'

"Trump says leaders in Portland, Oregon, have lost control of anarchists and agitators. His tweet comes after hundreds of protesters gathered across Portland last night. For the city's 52nd consecutive night of demonstrations against police violence and racism. Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports. Demonstrators carried signs that read Black lives matter and chanted out of your houses and into the streets After protesters dismantled a fence around the federal courthouse, federal officers emerged. And started to drive protesters away using tear gas and other crowd control devices such as batons, a second group of demonstrators gathered outside the Portland Police Association building in north Portland. Around 11 PM, Protesters broke in and set fire to the building, according to police was quickly extinguished. Large and diverse crowd made one thing clear. Increased actions by federal law enforcement in the past week have only brought more people into the streets.

Portland Portland Police Association Oregon Public Broadcasting Oregon Donald Trump Conrad Wilson
Oregon sues federal agencies for violating protesters' rights

Raul Campos

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Oregon sues federal agencies for violating protesters' rights

"Department says it is suing several federal agencies for civil rights abuses as Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports State prosecutors plan to open a criminal investigation as well. The federal lawsuit will name the US Department of Homeland Security of the U. S Marshal Service and the Federal Protective Service. In a statement, Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum also announced a criminal investigation with the Multnomah County district attorney into an incident earlier this month. We're a peaceful protester was severely injured. Rosenbloom says the escalation of fear and violence in downtown Portland is driven by federal law enforcement tactics and says she'll ask a federal judge to stop federal police from quote forcibly grabbing Oregonians off our streets. A pending lawsuit comes after Opie be revealed. Federal agents detained peaceful protesters using unmarked vehicles with little explanation or indication of which agency they belong to, or why people are being taken into custody. For NPR

Federal Protective Service Oregon Us Department Of Homeland Secu Rosenbloom Ellen Rosenblum Conrad Wilson Multnomah County U. S Marshal Service NPR Opie Attorney Portland
Denver police ordered to stop using tear gas and rubber bullets on protesters

This American Life

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Denver police ordered to stop using tear gas and rubber bullets on protesters

"A federal judge in Colorado has issued a temporary restraining order banning police and Denver from using tear gas or rubber bullets on peaceful protesters in Portland Oregon demonstrators have filed a similar lawsuit as Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports the federal civil rights complaint seeks a temporary restraining order to force please from using tear gas in the city one Chavez with the Oregon justice resource center is one of the attorneys bringing the case at least one across the country and that particular Portland police have been responding to people who are grieving and asking for justice with a militarized response Portland mayor Ted Wheeler's office declined to comment on the lawsuit but in a visit to protesters Wheeler suggested a thirty day ban on the gas similar to one announced in Seattle public health officials have warned that using tear gas during the covered nineteen pandemic can lead to coughing which can spread the virus

Colorado Denver Conrad Wilson Ted Wheeler Portland Oregon Chavez Seattle
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KCRW

"With the latest guidelines from the CDC this is NPR news from Washington president trump is pledging to help the nation's airline industry as it deals with a sharp drop in passengers and travel restrictions later today treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin will meet with Senate Republicans to examine a large economic aid package the trade group representing airlines is asking for more than fifty billion dollars in assistance activists in the Pacific Northwest suing the federal government arguing U. S. immigration and customs enforcement should release detainees because of their risk of contracting the corona virus Conrad Wilson with Oregon public broadcasting reports the lawsuit was filed on behalf of detainees at the northwest detention center in Tacoma Washington for detainees in custody social distancing is impossible or far more challenging making them more susceptible to getting sick I mean it's almost inevitable Matt Adams is the legal director for the northwest immigrant rights project so the question is what can we do about those individuals or who are high risk or even the detention the only way to protect them I didn't figure we use for the contract last week I suspended all social visits at its detention facilities nationwide the agency has said there are no detainees in ice custody with confirmed cases of code nineteen but has also declined to say how many immigration detainees receive tests from PR news I'm Conrad Wilson in Portland I'm Dave Mattingly NPR news in Washington and good morning you're listening to morning edition right here on K. C. R. W. happy St Patrick's day to you coming up keeping away from other people is an important way to slow the spread of the corona virus by distancing yourself you're contributing to a collective action that is not only protecting yourself but protecting others social distancing however can feel isolating and lonely coming up tips on how to cope you're listening to KCRW I'm Larry Parral next time on All Things Considered parents across the country for navigating a Brave New World is the work from home and their children attempt to do the same with their school work some people are refusing to heed warnings to shut down how Texas off roading festival is bucking the trend and even the president from says federal workers can work from home it's not clear if that's actually the case plus local news weather and traffic.

Larry Parral K. C. R. Dave Mattingly Oregon Senate Washington NPR president Texas CDC Portland director Matt Adams Tacoma Washington Conrad Wilson Pacific Northwest Steve Mnuchin
"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"conrad wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Are going to roll with it country because the American people are sick and tired of a president who lives all of the time with the case there that you could build a much broader coalition and the president in the fall interesting that Sanders was already in Texas there what does that tell you just briefly about a strategy going forward the big focus for the Sanders campaign is March third win a third of delegates are at stake they will be competing in South Carolina they say they're going to try and win but it was notable that this week he spent a lot of time in California in Texas the two biggest delegate prizes the campaign's goal according to campaign manager open up a lead on March third never give it back and the fact that there wasn't much clarity with the rest of the field in the vata help Sanders could bite in and booted judge are still fighting for the same voters and that's and our political correspondent Scott Detrow thanks so much sure thing on Friday a jury in Portland Oregon convicted a man of murder and hate crime stemming from a brutal twenty seventeen attack on a light rail train as Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports prosecutors used the attackers on social media postings to show that he was motivated by white supremacist ideology on may twenty six twenty seventeen Jeremy Christian got on a Portland light rail train Christian who's white begin a racist rant directed at two black teens one who was wearing a head job people on the train intervened they were shouting and shoving as passengers tried to get Christian off the train Christian responded by stabbing three men two of them died.

president Sanders Texas South Carolina California Oregon murder Conrad Wilson Jeremy Christian Scott Detrow Portland
Judge blocks Trump rule requiring immigrants to prove health insurance

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

Judge blocks Trump rule requiring immigrants to prove health insurance

"A federal judge in Oregon issued a nationwide preliminary injunction Tuesday barring the trump administration from requiring immigrants to show proof of health insurance or in public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson has more US District Court judge Michael Simon says requiring immigrants to show proof of health insurance before getting a visa is inconsistent with laws passed by Congress according to the proclamation issued last month by president trump visa seekers must have insurance or prove that they can pay for medical costs the judge says it's up to Congress not the president to decide that policy question adding quote the proclamation was not issued under any properly delegated authority words for the justice department disagreed the administration argued the health insurance requirement is necessary to protect the interests of US taxpayers critics say it would have dealt a serious blow to the family based

Oregon Conrad Wilson Michael Simon Congress President Trump Justice Department Us District Court United States
Abortion Is New Litmus Test for Democratic Attorneys General Group

All Things Considered

00:56 sec | 3 years ago

Abortion Is New Litmus Test for Democratic Attorneys General Group

"The democratic attorneys general association has announced new requirements for candidates it will support and twenty twenty Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports at the political group is making reproductive rights a priority it's the first National Party campaign committee to impose a strict abortion litmus test on candidates the new policy outlined by the democratic attorneys general association means it will only financially eight Canada to support the right to accessible shins they will need to demonstrate their commitment to protecting the right to access the portion and actually commit you're protecting reproductive right we're gonna tourney general Ellen Rosenblum as a co chair for the group it can help our democratic candidate next year there are twelve the G. seats up for election including in Oregon where Rosenblum is seeking a third term he says they're looking to pick up democratic attorneys general in states like Indiana and Montana for NPR news I'm covered Wilson in Portland

Conrad Wilson Canada Ellen Rosenblum Oregon Indiana Montana Portland NPR
Judge blocks proposed health care visa restrictions for immigrants

Studio 360

00:19 sec | 3 years ago

Judge blocks proposed health care visa restrictions for immigrants

"A federal judge in Oregon is temporarily blocking a trump administration rule requiring prospective immigrants to prove they would have health insurance before applying for visas Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports it would have banned migrants who could not pay for their own health care within thirty days of entering the

Oregon Conrad Wilson Thirty Days
Malheur wildlife refuge occupation still reverberating as FBI agent goes on trial

Midday on WNYC

01:03 min | 4 years ago

Malheur wildlife refuge occupation still reverberating as FBI agent goes on trial

"Closing. Arguments get underway, today in the trial of an FBI agent accused of, lying about a key moment during the two thousand sixteen occupation of the Meyer. National wildlife refuge Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports prosecutors say the, agent lied about, firing his weapon and tried to cover it up prosecutors say FBI. Special agent, Joseph read a fire two shots during a January two thousand sixteen traffic stop on remote, stretch of highway in eastern Oregon asked to read it as a member of the FBI's elite hostage rescue team and at. The time he was manning a roadblock when occupation spokesman Lavoie phantom drove towards lease and other FBI agents going more than. Seventy miles per, hour before crashing into, a snowbank prosecutors say as to reduce shots. Missed though finicky was killed during the incident by Oregon. State police this week Astra to testified he never shot and despite being. At the, traffic, stop were eight rounds were fired he said he didn't hear any gunfire he said he was wearing ear protection prosecutors have tried to paint asteroid as inexperienced and have questioned his

FBI Paul Manafort Washington NPR Ryan Lucas Oregon Wnyc Fraud United States New York Congressman Chris Collins Alexandria Cossio Cortes New Jersey Prosecutor Rick Gates Greg Andrei Phil Murphy President Trump
California man pleads guilty to terrorism charges

The Movement with Dr. F Keith Slaughter

04:08 min | 4 years ago

California man pleads guilty to terrorism charges

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm, Janine Herbst Russian President Vladimir Putin says his meeting with President Trump on Monday was successful overall and lead to useful agreements but as NPR's Lucian Kim. Reports from, Moscow Putin didn't go into any. Detail on what agreements were reached during. The, summit, in Helsinki. Speaking, of Russian diplomats in the foreign ministry. In Moscow President Putin expressed satisfaction with the summit but. Urged caution going forward Putin said in his words that unnamed political forces in the US are trying to disavow the results of his meeting with Trump who met with. For two hours behind closed doors Putin said those forces are ready, to sacrifice Russian-American relations for their narrow partisan interests NPR's Lucian Kim reporting Meanwhile Russia, is offering US access to twelve Russians. Charged with tampering in the thousand sixteen US election if. Moscow gets, to interrogate a former US ambassador and other American officials as. NPR's Michele Keleman reports The White House acknowledges that President Trump and Putin discussed the idea. During their Helsinki, meeting Putin. Is trying to equate the US investigation into Russian interference to the Kremlin's efforts to punish Bill Browder. A businessman who, lobbies, for sanctions against Russia and Trump seems to be buying into that says former US ambassador Michael McFaul it makes us look weak it makes us look like we're buying into, Putin's conspiratorial fantasies and therefore political, reasons they're chasing Mr. Browder because he is a critic, of the Kremlin and they're chasing me because I'm a critic of the Kremlin a State Department spokesperson says the Russian allegations against McFaul Browder and others. Are absurd, though the White House says Trump. Is still quote working with his team. On, this, Michelle Kellerman. NPR, news the State Department Oregon's public defenders. Filed court documents asking a federal judge to release some. Of the more than one hundred immigration detainees being held at a federal prison near Salem as Oregon Broadcasting's Conrad. Wilson reports the court documents describe inadequate care and poor conditions thoughts of. Suicide hours of confinement and denial of medical care among the complaints outlined by US integration and customs enforcement detainees being held at the federal, Correctional Institution in Sheridan Oregon the immigration detainees arrived at the federal prison roughly seven weeks ago, most are seeking, asylum a declaration filed by the chief. Investigator with the Oregon federal public defender's office said several detainees he and his colleagues. Met with had untreated medical conditions that included quote heart problems a gunshot wound a broken leg rashes allergic reactions and severe sore throats this week and I- spokeswoman said four detainees have been transferred to another facility in Washington state for medical attention from PR news I'm Conrad Wilson less than half an hour to the, opening bell on. Wall Street Wall Street futures are trading lower Dow NASDAQ Edison p. five hundred futures contracts are all down about three tenths of a percent at last check you're listening to NPR. News from Washington from news in, San Francisco good morning I'm Brian watt Twenty-three-year-old Oakland man is pleading guilty to federal terrorism charges but his Alex Emslie reports the move is not part of a plea deal it's. Unique legal strategy to litigate the case at, sentencing Amir synon- oligarchy, was arrested in late twenty sixteen after either allegedly threatened online to bomb a gay club in San Francisco mix poison. With cocaine and distributed at nightclubs and start a wildfire in the East, Bay but, his supporters from, the many communities say, he's simply a naive kid and never planned, to carry out an attack what he said was all complete rubbish he didn't intend to do any of it attorney. Mary McNamara represents oligarchy she says his charges aren't related to his threats instead he's charged with opening a handful of, social media, accounts for alleged ISIS members in the Middle East oligarchy faces a wide range of prison sentences to. Forty seven years A lengthy. Sentencing hearing is. Scheduled for November I'm Alex Emslie k. q. e. news, San Francisco transit officials are. Extending the transfer window for bus and train tickets..

President Putin President Trump NPR United States Alex Emslie Mcfaul Browder Oregon Helsinki Lucian Kim Moscow San Francisco Russia Washington Conrad Wilson State Department White House Michael Mcfaul Janine Herbst