35 Burst results for "Connor Connor Connor Connor"

My Honest Thoughts on Alex Jones

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:06 min | 2 d ago

My Honest Thoughts on Alex Jones

"Alex Jones has been in the news recently. Alex Jones is the founder of InfoWars. He has been smeared by every possible outlet imaginable as being an unfounded conspiracy theorist. Now let me tell you the first exposure I had to Alex Jones. When I was in third or fourth grade, there were these YouTube videos that would be circulating of Alex Jones sneaking into globalist confabs. Remember these videos, Connor, we'd be going up. You're globalist. It was like, wow. Who is this guy? And he had, he had all sorts of, let's say, energy and commitment to exposing what was happening around the world. And so look, Alex, I don't know him personally. I've met him once. He was actually super sweet when I met him. He's not right, a lot of the time. He's also not wrong a lot of the time. Sometimes he allows his passion to carry him into a direction that I think he regrets, but let's be very honest, and this is the one thing I think that people get deeply wrong about Alex Jones. Is that Alex Jones was totally right about Jeffrey Epstein and everyone tried to smear him for it. He just was. He was the only person that was talking about Jeffrey Epstein. He was the only person that was talking about the Lolita express, and now that's all just kind of fact that has now been memory hold. And so look, Alex, you never know what you're gonna get. But he's also an entertainer. You must understand that. Part of his whole shtick is to make it fun and to push boundaries. If there was someone said something to me from Europe and you know what they said, they said, Alex Jones is a uniquely American figure. So what do you mean by that? They said, without a First Amendment, you don't get anyone anywhere close to Alex Jones. I found that to be really interesting. Is that it comes with the bombast that comes with the bravado, but also it comes at sometimes at a deep revelation of truth.

Alex Jones Jeffrey Epstein Infowars Connor Alex Youtube Europe
Eric and James Howard Kunstler Reminisce About the Rabbit Ears Series

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:37 min | Last week

Eric and James Howard Kunstler Reminisce About the Rabbit Ears Series

"To James Howard kunstler, also known as Jim, Jimmy Jimbo. Jimmy Jack. Jim reverend Jimmy. So we were just talking about rabbit ears. So yeah, so in the late 80s, early 90s, I got this job that I've started director of gravity, and I thought, who can I turn to who could write these stories? So you did just great work. And rabbit ears would, so we create this children's book, but then we get top Hollywood names to record them. I think the Davy Crockett was like Nicholas cage. And sacagawea, I don't remember who did that one. I'm pretty sure it was mom's maybelle. I'm almost, I'm almost certain that I don't. It was either mom's maybelle or Sinatra. Either one. One of those two. But then we would get amazing musicians. Garrison keeler. Yeah. Can you use his name now? Is it safe to say garrison? I think he wants his touched a woman's back. When they were taking a photo and he lost his career over that thing. Goodness. Marco Connor, the fabulous Marco Connor, did the music for that. It was quite a fantastic production of video. Well, that's the point is that the rabbit hair stuff was super accurate to one tons of awards. So I had the privilege of writing many of those. And my name is attached to these Grammy Awards for best children's recording 1989 or something like that. I think that one too. Yeah, I know. It's crazy. So but that's kind of like the last time I saw you in person. Was 1991.

Maybelle Jimmy Jimbo Jimmy Jack Jim Reverend Jimmy Marco Connor James Howard Kunstler Garrison Keeler Davy Crockett Nicholas Cage Sacagawea JIM Sinatra Hollywood Grammy Awards
 Biden continues to test positive, has 'return of a loose cough': Doctor

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | Last week

Biden continues to test positive, has 'return of a loose cough': Doctor

"His doctor says President Biden's cough is back as he deals with a rebound case of COVID-19 For a fourth straight day doctor Kevin O'Connor says the president tested positive for the virus in a letter O'Connor says the president feels well and is in good spirits but he notes a bit of a return of a loose cough The president will stay isolated in The White House residence at least through Thursday under CDC guidelines and maybe longer under tougher White House protocols if he keeps testing positive Sagar Meghani Washington

President Biden Kevin O'connor Cough Connor White House CDC Sagar Meghani Washington
Charlie and Blake Masters Discuss Wyoming Voters' Distaste for Cheney

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:09 min | Last week

Charlie and Blake Masters Discuss Wyoming Voters' Distaste for Cheney

"Are you planning to vote for Liz Cheney? Can our cuss? Hey, oh no. Are you planning to support Liz Cheney? Absolutely not. What are your thoughts about Liz Cheney running for a fourth term? Personally, I think she said for three too many, keep in mind in 2020, Donald Trump won about 70% of the vote in Wyoming, so Liz Cheney's work on the January 6th investigation isn't playing so well with many Wyoming voters. She's done us dirty. You gotta get the end of it, clip that up, Ryan and Connor, the end is the best when she's just so like just sweaty and irritated and she's just done with the like I'm just done with this. Your thoughts Blake on Wyoming rejecting Liz Cheney's brother journalist, right? I mean, it's frustrating to go looking for something for hours, not being able to find. Hey, look, a single Liz Cheney supporter. They run in east looking for a sunset, you're not gonna find it. That's like going to a rodeo gathering for a Cheney supporter. You're not gonna find it. I'm not sure what they were expecting, of course, that's hilarious. It's also entirely unsurprising. This is what happens when you sell out your base. When you promise people something and then in Washington, you deliver something else. Turns out people don't like that,

Liz Cheney Wyoming Donald Trump Connor Ryan Blake Cheney Washington
Hoskins' HR in 10th inning lifts Phillies past Pirates 4-2

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last week

Hoskins' HR in 10th inning lifts Phillies past Pirates 4-2

"Rhys Hoskins belted a two run Homer in the top of the tenth pushing the Phillies past the pirates four to two Hoskins capped his four hit night by taking the third pitch he saw from Duane Underwood and depositing it beyond the center field wall His 20th home run gave the fills their third straight win Hoskins also tied the game with an RBI single in the 7th Sir Anthony Dominguez retired the pirates in order to force extra innings and Connor Brockton worked a perfect bottom of the tenth to pick up his first career save Keep Brian Hayes homeward for the bucks I'm Dave ferry

Rhys Hoskins Hoskins Duane Underwood Pirates Homer Phillies Sir Anthony Dominguez Connor Brockton Brian Hayes Dave Ferry
Biden tests negative for COVID-19, ends 'strict isolation'

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden tests negative for COVID-19, ends 'strict isolation'

"President Biden is coming out at his COVID-19 isolation His doctor says the president tested negative last night and again this morning doctor Kevin O'Connor says the president's also finished an antiviral course and does not have a fever given all that O'Connor says the president will end when he calls strict isolation measures He's been working from The White House residence after testing positive for COVID-19 last Thursday Sagar Meghani Washington

President Biden Kevin O'connor Connor Fever Covid White House Sagar Meghani Washington
Victoria and Joe on the Health and Safety of the Supreme Court

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Victoria and Joe on the Health and Safety of the Supreme Court

"Who've been in the arena as former U.S. attorney for the district, people as working on the Senate, how concerned are you for the health and the safety of the institution that is the Supreme Court? I'm very concerned about it and the reason is the president of the United States and the attorney general of the United States have allowed a situation to get out of him because they disagree with the ruling. They have allowed violence to reign. They have allowed threats to become common. They have allowed illegal demonstrations under both federal and state law to occur at the residences of 5 justices. It is absolutely disgraceful that there has been no condemnation. There's been some technical recognition of it. But there should have been immediate condemnation of these demonstrations and the fact is it is only as of yesterday that the Maryland state police put on its website that from now on, anybody who disturbs the peace at the justice's home and stops and doesn't keep walking will be arrested. And there's a situation. Only now. There's a Supreme Court case written by Sandra Day O'Connor. And ironically, it was because people were protesting at the home of an abortion provider. And there was a local ordinance that said you can't an abortion doctor, you got to leave them alone. You can watch the neighborhood, but you can't. And Saturday O'Connor said, this is not a problem. It's perfectly constitutional. Nobody has to listen to threats and shouts in their own residents. So for Maryland and Virginia, governors, both of them Republican. To say, oh, wow, we're not clear on the law. There is just no doubt that the justices are in danger. The physical of the court itself, the building is in danger, and the president and the attorney general and may I say the FBI director as well, have done nothing about it. I

U.S. Supreme Court Maryland State Police Senate Sandra Day O'connor Connor Maryland Virginia FBI
Charlie Describes What It's Like to Be a TV Host

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:56 sec | 3 weeks ago

Charlie Describes What It's Like to Be a TV Host

"Charlie. What is the biggest difference you've noticed since becoming a TV host? The biggest difference, well, thank you, Andrew, for your question. Yeah, so look, I think the biggest difference would have to be, well, first of all, the expanded audience is great in real America's voice, which has been terrific. You just have to also be a little bit more presentable when you're just doing radio, you can kind of just roll in. And also, I've decided to retire the hat. We've decided to retire the hat. And I think it's gotten some great ratings from people, which is good. So yeah, someone just emailed us freedom at Charlie Kirk dot com. They said, yes, no more hat, big fan of that. So, but also I just enjoy it. It's another medium, another piece of another way that we can communicate with our audience, and Connor said, we'll make a commemorative box for you to put it in. Okay, Connor. We'll

Charlie Charlie Kirk Andrew America Connor
What Connor Boyack Discovered With 'America's History 1215-1776'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:37 min | Last month

What Connor Boyack Discovered With 'America's History 1215-1776'

"Left. We're talking to Connor boyack, who is the author of this book. So what is your sense of American history today? As you go through these ideas and you say, what did you discover in a sense, even though you knew a lot of this before? But what did you discover? I think I rediscovered what we've discussed in that is God's hand and the Providence that a lot of the founding fathers recognize this miracle in a lot of ways for the circumstances. I think what had faded for me in years past was the appreciation for how remarkable in the true sense of the word that all of these events where you get used to it. You just, it is what it is. And frankly, let's go set off fireworks and have our barbecue. But when you really is when you see these people going through a can you see someone like Thomas Jefferson, who yes had slaves yet at the same time was bemoaning slavery and trying to figure out ways to move away from it, right? He was a thinker way ahead of his time. We don't appreciate enough the ingenuity and the amazing educated enlightenment of the people who helped form this nation. So what I hope the gift that we're trying to provide families with this book is to say you can appreciate that too. You can understand these ideas and more importantly, they can be empowering to your life today. It's one thing to just read history and say, oh, that was interesting, right? No, we want to empower you to make a better world today, and that's what our goal is with our

Connor Boyack Providence Thomas Jefferson
Author Connor Boyack Discusses the Importance of John Locke

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:20 min | Last month

Author Connor Boyack Discusses the Importance of John Locke

"What was it about John Locke that led him to write what he was writing? I mean, this was he was born in the mid 17th century. So obviously long before most of the founders were born, but what was it about John Locke that led him to write these things that really helped our founders to have the courage to do what they did? John Locke certainly had his own influences. He didn't necessarily innovate all the ideas that he shared. So there were other free market economists in Spanish fathers and classicists and others who had been talking about these ideas. What John Locke amazingly did was to synthesize summarize consolidate and explain very succinctly the ideas of what we now call classical liberalism. So unlock is considered the father of liberalism. Liberalism and its true sense about liberty, not neo or modern liberalism that is really just socialism and communism. But this classical liberalism, the style of the founding fathers, resting on again these pillars of life, liberty and property. So John Locke had his own philosophical mentors and people that he was reading. But he's credited, I think, mostly with really being the person who can explain most succinctly the power of these

John Locke
"connor  " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:21 min | Last month

"connor " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Generation. So let's start there in the book, you talk about John Locke. Give us just an overview and nutshell version of who is this figure and how does John Locke, a philosopher, figure in the development of what we call the United States of America? Yeah, as you point out, he was a philosopher. He was an author. He wrote much of his writings in secret under a pen name or anonymously because what he was writing about would be and was deemed by many to be treasonous in light of being ruled by the king under the British Crown. And so he was writing about these ideas. He has many different essays and books that were very famous. And second to the Bible, his writings were like the most read by the founding fathers. They didn't have the Internet and social media and TikTok and all their ass. They just had stuff to read pamphlets and newspapers and the like, and his ideas spread like wildfire through the colonies. Again, like we were talking about earlier, these unique circumstances where they had been experimenting with self government, trying to figure out how this should work and why the British Crown ruling them was a problem and so forth. And here comes John Locke with the philosophical foundation to give them the support they needed to say, no, what you're doing has moral strength, what you're doing is right. Here's the confidence you can have in taking a few steps further into the darkness and have confidence that what you're doing is the right thing. And so it was a big moral and intellectual support for a lot of the early founding fathers who were taking bold action to have kind of the philosophical intellectual justification for them to stand up to the strongest government in the world. So John Locke basically single handedly shifted the mindset of these colonists to no longer see themselves as subjects of The Crown, but it's free individuals. So he deserves far more credit than any of the social studies books out there are giving him. And more than him, it's the ideas which again, those are the ideas that we can learn from and apply to our world today. That's why we wanted to highlight them in our book to say this stuff matters. We should be reading John Locke still today. Yeah, I mean, it's incredible. When did he live exactly? I know you've got all this stuff in your book here. I'm flipping through. I'm trying to remember, I know he's in the 17th century. Actually, when we come back, we'll have those factors for you. Ladies and gentlemen, we'll be right back. The book we're talking about is a tuttle twins book America's history 1215, 1776. God bless America. We'll be right back. See the curtains hanging in the window in the evening on the Friday night. And lie in The Shining through the window. Let me know everything's all right. You can do what you feel how did America get to be America. Good question. If you want to know the answer, I'm speaking with Connor boyack, who's written a book called America's history, 1215 to 17 76. That's the gestation period of this country. We were just.

John Locke philosophical foundation America Connor boyack
"connor  " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:11 min | Last month

"connor " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Folks, welcome to the Eric metaxas show sponsored by legacy precious metals. There's never been a better time to invest in precious metals, visit legacy p.m. investments dot com that's legacy p.m. investments dot com. Welcome to the Eric metaxas show with your host, Eric the Texas. Happy Independence Day. Folks, happy independence week. God bless America. If you know anything about me, you know that rather late in life, I have come to see the astonishing, almost preposterous blessing that is the United States of America. I've begun to understand it. And I want the world to understand it because America is not a gift for Americans. It's God's idea for the whole world. This idea of liberty and freedom and it's beautiful. And of course, it's a checkered story like all stories. You know, the Bible has a couple of checkered stories in case you're wondering. But we need to know our history and we need a specially especially to teach American history to kids. And when I say teach American history, I mean teach actual history, not kind of like lies and negative stories which are misleading and ultimately wrong, but actually true American history. And along those lines, I've just stumbled on a book, not literally, it's called America's history. It's a tuttle twins series of stories, the author Connor boyack is with me, Connor. Welcome to the program. Thank you, Eric, for having me. I appreciate it. Am I pronouncing your surname slightly correctly? I want to be clear. I am a boy that yaks a lot so boyack is how we say. Connor, boyack, you may be known to a lot of people who are listening in or watching because of the tuttle twins. I'm guessing, yes? Yeah. Yeah, yeah, we've sold millions of copies now and you promoted in the past and Glenn Beck and others. So word is kind of gotten out, which is a really good thing. Well, the tuttle twins tell my audience because the book I'm looking at right here, it says it's a total twin series of stories. It's titled America's history, 1215 to 1776. So folks, if you're tracking, that's a Magna Carta, 1776. Obviously, when we declared independence formally, so this is the first book in the series about America's history, 1215 to 1776. But before we get into the book, America's history, talk a tiny bit about yourself and about the tuttle twins so that people understand what that is. So I'm a product of public school. I really disliked it. I did poorly. I hated history. I hated economics. I didn't enjoy any of that. And it was later in life when I discovered a passion for these topics because I've realized that we teach them completely wrong. Young Connor had to memorize names and dates and facts and formulas and all kinds of things that had no relevance to him. So I didn't care. It was pumping dump and I moved on and I didn't appreciate what I was learning. And so what we've done now in recent years has created a series of books for kids of all ages. We've got toddler books and teen books and all the rest called the tuttle twins. And we've sold millions of copies. Our goal is to help parents talk to their kids about the ideas of freedom in a fun, accessible way through storytelling. No kid likes to learn in a textbook and memorize stuff. All of our books are stories and it's through those stories that we can teach some amazing and some complex and important ideas. Well, I love that. So that's the tuttle twins. And the book that's in front of me on this very special week when we celebrate American independence, which everyone needs to celebrate. Don't just have hot dogs, celebrate American independence. Perhaps by eating hot dogs and blowing off some fireworks..

Eric metaxas America boyack Connor boyack Connor Eric Young Connor Texas Glenn Beck Carta Magna
Donaldson, Carpenter lead Yanks over Red Sox 12-5

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last month

Donaldson, Carpenter lead Yanks over Red Sox 12-5

"The Bronx bombers broke out the bats again in a 12 5 route of the rival Red Sox After hitting a Grand Slam in Thursday's win Josh Donaldson smacked a three run Homer in New York's four run first inning Matt Carpenter added an RBI double and a solo Homer as the AL east leading Yankees increased their lead over the Red Sox to 16 games This is a really good division You know and to have the lead that we do it just assessment to the guys in this room Boston starter Connor siebold gave up 7 runs and two and two thirds innings before leaving with right forearm tightness

Josh Donaldson Bronx Bombers Matt Carpenter Red Sox Homer New York AL Connor Siebold Boston
Morgan Zegers Discusses One of Charlie's Favorite Books

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:44 min | Last month

Morgan Zegers Discusses One of Charlie's Favorite Books

"So there's a book that I read last summer. I spent a whole week at the Claremont institute and this is the book that I encourage everybody to read if you want to really understand what we are living through. It's called the age of entitlement by Christopher Caldwell. I've mentioned this book many times on this program. It's a relatively easy read and what makes this book so incredibly persuasive is that it really doesn't make arguments on the surface. You have to kind of decipher between it because it's kind of written in a historical context. Here's what happened. Here's what we got from it. Here's what happened. Here's what we got from it. Here's what happened. Here's what we got from it. And this book, more than any other book I think really frames modern American neoliberalism in its proper light, which is a total sham and a con. And it shows that a lot of the promises of the Civil Rights Act and the civil rights era actually had the opposite intended effect that we're talking about race more than ever, that we're more focused on the things that the Civil Rights Act were supposed to fix. One of our team members here at turning point USA recently read this book and is enthusiastic about talking about it. It's Morgan ziegler's who hosts freedom papers with turning point USA. Morgan, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Thanks for having me, Charlie. I'm really excited. I loved the book. So walk us through what your take was on the book age of entitlement by Christopher Caldwell. For me, I found it to be illuminating an eye opening, what was your take? I could say the same now. It's kind of funny. I had a friend recommend it to me because I am a bit more radical with looking at recent policies over the last handful of decades in the country. And after I read it, I said, you want to know who would love this? Connor Clegg. And I was going to gift it to him and I told him about it when we were on freedom papers together for turning point. And he said, wait a second, now I have to tell Charlie. So it turns out this is quite the book for a lot of young conservatives and not a lot of people talk about it, which is fascinating. Charlie, what got me is that a lot of these topics just aren't discussed in high school classes in American classrooms. I don't know if you had the same experience, but when I was going to school, a lot of things were just normalized. And so trillions of dollars of debt that we were in at a national level. The Department of Education, all of these concepts were just normalized in our minds, and it took me kind of re-educating myself over the last few years, and especially thanks to turning point to realize that these are all fairly new concepts. Our nation didn't always used to be in this massive level of debt. We didn't have to have these struggles of families needing two incomes to get by and then taking care of the children was done by other people by government services by other men and women that weren't parents. And it really just changed my whole perception on this and I'm just thankful that I found the book. So I tell everybody

Christopher Caldwell Claremont Institute Morgan Ziegler Charlie Kirk Charlie Connor Clegg USA Morgan Department Of Education
"connor  " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:40 min | Last month

"connor " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Have a few minutes left. We're talking to Connor boyack, who is the author of this book. So what is your sense of American history today? As you go through these ideas and you say, you know, what did you discover in a sense, even though you knew a lot of this before? But what did you discover? I think I rediscovered what we've discussed in that is God's hand and the Providence that a lot of the founding fathers recognize this miracle in a lot of ways for the circumstances. I think what had faded for me in years past was the appreciation for how remarkable in the true sense of the word that all of these events where you get used to it. You just, it is what it is. And it's this quote. Let's go set off fireworks and have our barbecue. But when you really start stories, when you see these people going through a can you see someone like Thomas Jefferson, who yes had slaves yet at the same time was bemoaning slavery and trying to figure out ways to move away from it, right? He was a thinker way ahead of his time. We don't appreciate enough the ingenuity and the amazing educated enlightenment of the people who helped form this nation. So what I hope the gift that we're trying to provide families with this book is to say you can appreciate that too. You can understand these ideas and more importantly, they can be empowering to your life today. It's one thing to just read history and say, oh, that was interesting, right? No, we want to empower you to make a better world today, and that's what our goal is with our book. And I do want to say, again, folks, it's hard not to see God's hand in these stories. In the same way when you read the stories in the Bible, you just say, wow, look at God's hand in history. Look at how he moved Moses. I moved Abraham. And there's this story that's working itself out. We don't understand why God did it that way, but he did it that way. And it's beautiful and it's redemptive and it's using broken sinful people like Thomas Jefferson or Ben Franklin or anybody these are people exactly like us and in the end it's beautiful and it's redemptive and it's important that we all know it. So Connor boyack, thank you. The book is titled America's history. It's a total twins book, America's history, and again, let me say, God bless America and Connor, thank you so much for your time. Everybody wants to run takes. Your forget your tickets for a long time. Folks, literally today, over the weekend, this week, we're celebrating the 4th of July. This is the time we celebrate Independence Day. It is one of the most amazing things, 1776. I've written about it in my book if you can keep it. I recommend the book, not because I wrote it. I wrote it to get these ideas out to my fellow Americans. We've got to understand what we have is amazingly beautiful and fragile and important and we need to defend it and fight for it and spread these ideas around the world and certainly spread them in our communities. We need to keep the.

Connor boyack Thomas Jefferson Providence America Ben Franklin Moses Abraham Connor
"connor  " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:20 min | Last month

"connor " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Generation. So let's start there in the book, you talk about John Locke. Give us just an overview and nutshell version of who is this figure, and how does John Locke, a philosopher, figure in the development of what we call the United States of America? Yeah, as you point out, he was a philosopher. He was an author. He wrote much of his writings in secret under a pen name or anonymously because what he was writing about would be and was deemed by many to be treasonous in light of being ruled by the king under the British Crown. And so he was writing about these ideas. He has many different essays and books that were very famous. And second to the Bible, his writings were like the most read by the founding fathers. They didn't have the Internet and social media and TikTok and all their ass. They just had stuff to read pamphlets and newspapers and the like, and his ideas spread like wildfire through the colonies. Again, like we were talking about earlier, these unique circumstances where they had been experimenting with self government, trying to figure out how this should work and why the British Crown ruling them was a problem and so forth. And here comes John Locke with the philosophical foundation to give them the support they needed to say, no, what you're doing has moral strength, what you're doing is right. Here's the confidence you can have in taking a few steps further into the darkness and have confidence that what you're doing is the right thing. And so it was a big moral and intellectual support for a lot of the early founding fathers who were taking bold action to have kind of the philosophical intellectual justification for them to stand up to the strongest government in the world. So John Locke basically single handedly shifted the mindset of these colonists to no longer see themselves as subjects of The Crown, but it's free individuals. So he deserves far more credit than any of the social studies books out there are giving him. And more than him, it's the ideas which again, those are the ideas that we can learn from and apply to our world today. That's why we wanted to highlight them in our book to say this stuff matters. We should be reading John Locke still today. Yeah, I mean, it's incredible. When did he live exactly? I know you've got all this stuff in your book here. I'm flipping through. I'm trying to remember, I know he's in the 17th century. Actually, when we come back, we'll have those facts for you. Ladies and gentlemen, we'll be right back. The book we're talking about is a tuttle twins book America's history 1215, 1776. God bless America. We'll be right back. See the curtains hanging in the wind low in the evening on my Friday night. And lie in The Shining through the window. Let me know everything's all right. You can do what you feel how did America get to be America. Good question. If you want to know the answer, I'm speaking with Connor boyack, who's written a book called America's history 1215 to 17 76. That's the gestation period of this country..

John Locke philosophical foundation America Connor boyack
"connor  " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:58 min | Last month

"connor " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Back. Have you heard of the tuttle twins? Well, now you have, in case you hadn't, and there's a new book out celebrating American independence brand new book called America's history 1215 to 1776. Did you get that? 1215 to 1776. Connor, boyack, the author is kind of what you just shared about how the centuries leading up to 1776. It's impossible if you're a genuine free thinker, not to see what looks like God's Providence. I mean, the idea that there's this continent that there are these problems in Europe that lead people to get on boats that if you centuries earlier, they weren't able to do this, but now they're able to sail across the Atlantic and to form these free societies and to kind of experiment with the idea of freedom. They're too far away for king George or others to bother them, so they have the freedom to mess up, to figure it out, whatever. All of that really seems providential. It's kind of amazing that this was able to happen so that as the decades pass, they begin to get the idea, hey, hey, we think we know how to govern ourselves. We think maybe it's possible we could govern ourselves. What do you say? I mean, it really is almost funny to me how it happened. I think that's right. The circumstances were extremely unique. I also see God's hand in it. And it's why I'm especially concerned about the state of the school system and history education today to have this birth rate, this blessing that's been given to us. And if we are just kind of discarding that or dismissing it or ignoring it, if we're not teaching kids these powerful ideas to appreciate them to understand them to defend them when they're being attacked, then what are we doing? We're trading away the birthright from Massa pottage and here we are in modern America where people don't even understand these ideas. And so for me, as I survey the landscape and I see how far I think we've fallen, how far things have been dumbed down for kids today. To me, it's a red flag. It's a warning. It's shouting from the rooftops to say penance. You need to understand things have gotten bad. They're talking about all kinds of stupid stuff in the schools. We have to take our own initiative and the problem, Eric, that I've experienced over the years of doing the tuttle twins. Is that a lot of these parents who like me are products of the public school from years past, they feel inadequate in their own understanding. They feel like, well, how do I talk to my kids about something I never really learned that well, or what I can do. And so that's why what we're trying to do is to say, hey, mom, hey, dad, no worries. You're going to learn together with your kids. Just read these books. They're fun stories. You'll talk about them. You all learn together. And I want to say, because sometimes I think there are people out there, maybe they've read my history books. So they have some idea about me like, oh, Eric went to Yale. Let me confess, ladies and gentlemen. In case you have some fake idea about who I am, most of what I know today, I came to as an adult. Many years after I graduated high school and college, and you should never be ashamed to learn something today or tomorrow. Don't pretend like, oh, I'm too old. Nonsense. Most of what I learned about America about history, about ideas about God about the Bible, I learned as an adult and I have to tell you, it's in spite of my Yale college education. It's in spite of that that I was able to learn this stuff. And it's in reading books like this book, which looks like it's for kids, whatever. But, you know, you have some stuff in here, for example, about John Locke. And I think everybody should know who that is. I barely know anything about John. There are all kinds of holes in my background, and I confess this because I think we need to learn this together, things have gotten so bad that we all need to get excited about learning now today for our kids for the future.

boyack Massa pottage America Connor king George Providence Atlantic Europe Eric Yale John Locke John
'America's History: 1215-1776' With Author Connor Boyack

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:48 min | Last month

'America's History: 1215-1776' With Author Connor Boyack

"Folks, welcome back. Have you heard of the tuttle twins? Well, now you have, in case you hadn't, and there's a new book out celebrating American independence brand new book called America's history 1215 to 1776. Did you get that? 1215 to 1776. Connor, boyack, the author is kind of what you just shared about how the centuries leading up to 1776. It's impossible if you're a genuine free thinker, not to see what looks like God's Providence. I mean, the idea that there's this continent that there are these problems in Europe that lead people to get on boats that if you centuries earlier, they weren't able to do this, but now they're able to sail across the Atlantic and to form these free societies and to kind of experiment with the idea of freedom. They're too far away for king George or others to bother them, so they have the freedom to mess up, to figure it out, whatever. All of that really seems providential. It's kind of amazing that this was able to happen so that as the decades pass, they begin to get the idea, hey, hey, we think we know how to govern ourselves. We think maybe it's possible we could govern ourselves. What do you say? I mean, it really is almost funny to me how it happened. I think that's right. The circumstances were extremely unique. I also see God's hand in it. And it's why I'm especially concerned about the state of the school system and history education today to have this birth rate, this blessing that's been given to us. And if we are just kind of discarding that or dismissing it or ignoring it, if we're not teaching kids these powerful ideas to appreciate them to understand them to defend them when they're being attacked, then what are we doing? We're trading away the birthright from Massa pottage and here we are in modern America where people don't even understand these ideas. And so for me, as I survey the landscape and I see how far I think we've fallen, how far things have been dumbed down for kids today. To me, it's a red flag. It's a warning. It's shouting from the rooftops to say penance. You need to understand things have gotten bad. They're talking about all kinds of stupid stuff in the schools. We have to take our own initiative and the problem, Eric, that I've experienced over the years of doing the tuttle twins. Is that a lot of these parents who like me are products of the public school from years past, they feel inadequate in their own understanding. They feel like, well, how do I talk to my kids about something I never really learned that well, or what I can do. And so that's why what we're trying to do is to say, hey, mom, hey, dad, no worries. You're going to learn together with your kids. Just read these books. They're fun stories. You'll talk about them. You all learn

Boyack Connor King George Massa Pottage Providence America Atlantic Europe Eric
"connor  " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:19 min | Last month

"connor " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Let's go through this. I mean, you talk about what happened in running meat in 1215. You talk about Marco Polo. But as the years go by, how do these ideas slowly lead us to 1776 to the miracle of 1776? Well, certainly you have the exploration of the pilgrims, the seeking refuge for religious freedom from the persecution they were experiencing. You had a lot of chartered colonies of people for corporate reasons or for freedom reasons coming to America looking to better their lives through hard work and industry. You had a lot of experiment and self government, the colonies were in a lot of ways independently managed because of global circumstances, the French and Indian War, parliament taking a hands off approach. And so you had this very unique set of circumstances that allowed for people for perhaps the first time ever in the world to kind of make their society as they wanted it rather than inheriting old forms and being bogged down by dictatorial decrees. And so that led to a lot of innovation in government and self government. It led to a lot of different declarations and constitutions. And certainly the writings of John Locke and others who were fanning the flames for these principles that you talk about, life, liberty, and property, and helping people understand that they are free individuals, not subjects of The Crown, not citizens of a government. They are free individuals with rights of their own to understand. All these things leading up in the centuries before the revolution, it's why John Adams says that the revolution happened before the first shot was fired at Lexington and Concord and not after what happened after it was just the manifestation of the mindset shift that these people had been going through. We're going to go to a break. We're talking to Connor boyack. The book is America's history 1215 to 1776. We'll be right back. Hey there folks, Eric meta taxes here. As you know, our friend and he's a real friend, Mike lindell has a passion to help everyone get the best sleep of their life, but he didn't stop by simply creating the best pillow. Now Mike has done it again by introducing his my slippers, my slippers, they're unbelievable. I know all about them, but I got to tell you for a limited time you will save $90 on each pair of my slippers. They're expensive. You can save $90. This blowout sale of the year won't last order. Now he's taken over two years to develop them. The mice slippers are designed to wear indoors and out all day long made with my pillow foam and impact gel to help prevent fatigue made with quality leather swayed call one 809 7 8 three O 5 7 use the promo code Eric. Or go to my pillow dot com, click on the radio listeners square and use promo code Eric, the offer will not last long, so order now with promo code Eric at my pillow dot com or call 809 7 8 three O 5 7 809 7 8 three O 5 7. Folks, welcome.

Marco Polo Connor boyack John Locke Eric meta America Mike lindell John Adams Concord Lexington Mike Eric
Connor Boyack: Tuttle Twins Books Empower Kids to Learn the Truth

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:52 sec | Last month

Connor Boyack: Tuttle Twins Books Empower Kids to Learn the Truth

"Okay. And so this book and I said earlier, it's called America's history. It's a total twins book. Are you the creator of the tuttle twins or one of the creators? So I'm the author of the books, and then my partner is the illustrator. So it's the two of us that have been making now. I think about two dozen books. We've got toddler books. We've got like the ABCs of the American Revolution and all these fun little board books. We've got books for teens. So this is the latest in our offering and really what it's all about is to say, schools aren't teaching this stuff anymore. And if they are, they're not teaching it well enough, we got to take matters into our own hands. How do we talk to kids about entrepreneurship and free market economics and property rights and true history? So that's what the total trends is all about for kids of any age, no matter how they like to learn, we're trying to produce resources so that those families are empowered to learn the truth.

America
"connor  " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

10:07 min | Last month

"connor " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"We can't see tomorrow, but we can hear it. And it sounds like a wind farm powering homes across the country. We're bridging to a sustainable energy future, working today to ensure tomorrow is on. Enbridge, life takes energy. Folks, welcome to the Eric metaxas show, sponsored by legacy precious metals. There's never been a better time to invest in precious metals, visit legacy p.m. investments dot com that's legacy p.m. investments dot com. Welcome to the Eric metaxas show with your host, Eric the Texas. Happy Independence Day. Folks, happy independence week. God bless America. If you know anything about me, you know that rather late in life, I have come to see the astonishing, almost preposterous blessing that is the United States of America. I've begun to understand it. And I want the world to understand it because America is not a gift for Americans. It's God's idea for the whole world. This idea of liberty and freedom and it's beautiful. And of course, it's a checkered story like all stories. The Bible has a couple of checkered stories in case you're wondering. But we need to know our history and we need to especially especially to teach American history to kids. And when I say teach American history, I mean teach actual history, not kind of like lies and negative stories which are misleading and ultimately wrong, but actually true American history. And along those lines, I've just stumbled on a book, not literally, it's called America's history. It's a tuttle twins series of stories, the author Connor boyack is with me, Connor. Welcome to the program. Thank you, Eric, for having me. I appreciate it. Am I pronouncing your surname slightly correctly? I want to be clear. I am a boy that yaks a lot, so boyack is how we say. Connor, boyack, you may be known to a lot of people who are listening in or watching because of the tuttle twins. I'm guessing, yes? Yeah. Yeah, yeah, we've sold millions of copies now and you've promoted us in the past and Glenn Beck and others. So word has kind of gotten out, which is a really good thing. Well, the tuttle twins tell my audience because the book I'm looking at right here, it says it's a total twin series of stories. It's titled America's history 1215 to 1776. So folks, if you're tracking, that's a Magna Carta, 1776. Obviously, when we declared independence formally, so this is the first book in the series about America's history, 1215 to 1776. But before we get into the book, America's history, talk a tiny bit about yourself and about the tuttle twins so that people understand what that is. So I'm a product of public school. I really disliked it. I did poorly. I hated history. I hated economics. I didn't enjoy any of that. And it was later in life when I discovered a passion for these topics because I've realized that we teach them completely wrong. Young Connor had to memorize names and dates and facts and formulas and all kinds of things that had no relevance to him. So I didn't care. It was pumping dump and I moved on and I didn't appreciate what I was learning. And so what we've done now in recent years is created a series of books for kids of all ages. We've got toddler books and teen books and all the rest called the tuttle twins. And we've sold millions of copies. Our goal is to help parents talk to their kids about the ideas of freedom in a fun, accessible way through storytelling. No kid likes to learn in a textbook and memorize stuff. All of our books are stories and it's through those stories that we can teach some amazing and some complex and important ideas. Well, I love that. So that's the tuttle twins. And the book that's in front of me on this very special week when we celebrate American independence, which everyone needs to celebrate. Don't just have hot dogs, celebrate American independence. Perhaps by eating hot dogs and blowing off some fireworks. But talk to us about why you chose to write a book, America's history 1215 to 17 76. I think by the way, that's very clever and wonderful, but tell my audience about that. Yeah, of course. Thank you. It started two and a half years ago. I went on Amazon and eBay, and I bought a whole bunch of social studies books for, let's say, grades three through 8. And I wanted to understand how were they talking to kids today about the constitution about the revolution, the Declaration of Independence and all these ideas. So I buy these books, they start flipping through all of them. And the books do a wonderful job at teaching what I'll call the superficial stuff of history. Who said what and when and when was this battle thought and what muskets did they use? What was the quote we're going to memorize from this letter? What these books did a horrible job at in my estimation is teaching substantive history, the ideas, the philosophy, the judeo Christian influence, the Greco Roman influence. I mean, John Adams has this great quote where he says that the real American Revolution happened in the 15 years preceding the first shot being fired at Lexington and Concord. It was the intellectual revolution. It was the ideas. It was John Locke. These books hardly talk about that at all. So we wanted a boat that could teach kids, not just what happened, but why it happened. The ideas of the past. We talk about all the time. I know your viewers know the quote, those who don't learn from the past are doomed to repeat it. The fundamental problem is we're not talking to kids today in a way where they can learn from the past. We're just teaching them about it. And that's how our history education gets done down. It's how we're pumping out socialists out of our high schools. And so we wanted a book that could focus on true history, the ideas of history and in a way that can be applied to our world today. Well, I always say, I just did an interview about one of my own books is atheism dead. And I thought to myself, in the interview, I was saying that when you learn the truth, it's exciting because I think a lot of us maybe we're a little confused and we think, well, who's to say what the truth is and it's complicated and whatever. In many cases, that's not true. In many cases, it's astonishing and it's empowering and beautiful. The story of these ideas that lead to what we call the United States of America. And the ideas themselves are really exciting and when you get it, you think, wow, this is great. How come everybody in the world doesn't have this? And then you start thinking, how come most people in America aren't even aware of this? Because when the ideas start clicking and you understand the genius of what we call American style self government, you think, how come it took so long for the world to get this. And then you kind of think, on the other hand, why did we ever get this? Like, why do we have the gift of liberty? And whatever. And then you inevitably see God's hand in it and so ultimately it's very exciting. So I'm thrilled that you're focusing on the ideas because once you communicate these ideas, because once you get this, you're done. You're not going to un get it because it's powerful. So now this book did you write it? And again, the book is called America's history, Connor boyack is the author. It's an illustrated book looks like a textbook for what? 5th graders or fourth graders or how do you think of this as what kind of a book is this in your mind? Yeah, so I mean, our book, what we're focusing on, really, is a family resource. What we found with our other total trends books is that they go for kids age like 5 to 11, but we've got like 16 year olds reading it. It's beneath them in terms of format, but the ideas are fresh and exciting and presented in an interesting way. We get parents all the time who are like, holy cow, I never learned this stuff in school. You know, I'm learning all kinds of new stuff now. And so this particular book is for kids were saying about age 7 to 13, but really it's for the whole family. It's to say, let's read this together at the dinner table. Let's have a discussion with recognize God's hand and the influence of the Bible on the early founders of the pilgrims and all the rest that created this amazing society, but more importantly, let's have a discussion and we have props in the book to facilitate this to say, how does this apply to our world? Learning from the past is only interesting if we're not letting it be informative of what we should believe and do in our world today. So we want to empower kids and their parents to say, this stuff should motivate you. It should change you. It should empower you. It's about remaking our world today for the better, not just curiously learning about stuff that randomly happened in the past, is to say, what can we do with those ideas in our present to make a better future? And I just want to say before we go to our first break, I've written 30 children's books, and I have learned many of the things that I know today from reading children's books. I didn't read the Narnia chronicles until I was 30 years old. And I learned theology and things from those books, people said, those are kids books. Not really, folks. Anything that you can read, it's for you. If it excites you. And I think people should never adults should never, ever, ever be ashamed to read books that look like they're for young people. I think of my friend Sally Lloyd Jones wrote the Jesus storybook Bible. I can not tell you how many adults the penny dropped and they're like, wow, I never heard this before. That's amazing. Reading it to their three year olds. And so I know that's true of the book that I have in front of me. It's called America's history, a total twins book, Connor boyack is my guest. We'll be.

America Eric metaxas boyack Connor boyack Connor Young Connor Eric Enbridge Carta Glenn Beck Magna Texas John Locke John Adams Concord Lexington eBay Amazon un Sally Lloyd Jones
"connor  " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:30 min | Last month

"connor " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Powerful. So now this book did you write it and again, the book is called America's history, Connor boyack is the author. It's an illustrated book looks like a textbook for what? 5th graders or fourth graders or how do you think of this as what kind of a book is this in your mind? Yeah, so I mean, our book, what we're focusing on really is a family resource. What we found with our other total trends books is that they go for kids age like 5 to 11, but we've got like 16 year olds reading it. It's beneath them in terms of format, but the ideas are fresh and exciting and presented in an interesting way. We get parents all the time who are like, holy cow, I never learned this stuff in school. You know, I'm learning all kinds of new stuff now. And so this particular book is for kids were saying about age 7 to 13, but really it's for the whole family. It's to say, let's read this together at the dinner table. Let's have a discussion with recognize God's hand and the influence of the Bible on the early founders of the pilgrims and all the rest that created this amazing society, but more importantly, let's have a discussion and we're prompts in the book to facilitate this to say, how does this apply to our world, learning from the past is only interesting if we're not letting it be informative of what we should believe and do in our world today. So we want to empower kids and their parents to say, this stuff should motivate you. It should change you. It should empower you. It's about remaking our world today for the better, not just curiously learning about stuff that randomly happened in the past, is to say, what can we do with those ideas in our present to make a better future? And I just want to say before we go to our first break, I've written 30 children's books, and I have learned many of the things that I know today from reading children's books. I didn't read the Narnia chronicles until I was 30 years old. And I learned theology and things from those books. People said, those are kids books. Not really, folks. Anything that you can read it's for you. If it excites you. And I think people should never adults should never, ever, ever be ashamed to read books that look like they're for young people. I think of my friend Sally Lloyd Jones wrote the Jesus storybook Bible. I can not tell you how many adults the penny dropped and they're like, wow, I never heard this before. That's amazing. Reading it to their three year olds. And so I know that's true of the book that I have in front of me. It's called America's history, a total twins book, Connor boyack is my guest. We'll be.

Connor boyack America Sally Lloyd Jones
Connor Boyack Has Written a New Tuttle Twins Children's Book

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:48 min | Last month

Connor Boyack Has Written a New Tuttle Twins Children's Book

"connor  " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:11 min | Last month

"connor " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Folks, welcome to the Eric metaxas show, sponsored by legacy precious metals. There's never been a better time to invest in precious metals, visit legacy p.m. investments dot com that's legacy p.m. investments dot com. Welcome to the Eric metaxas show with your host, Eric the Texas. Happy Independence Day. Folks, happy independence week. God bless America. If you know anything about me, you know that rather late in life, I have come to see the astonishing, almost preposterous blessing that is the United States of America. I've begun to understand it. And I want the world to understand it because America is not a gift for Americans. It's God's idea for the whole world. This idea of liberty and freedom and it's beautiful. And of course, it's a checkered story like all stories. You know, the Bible has a couple of checkered stories in case you're wondering. But we need to know our history and we need a specially especially to teach American history to kids. And when I say teach American history, I mean teach actual history, not kind of like lies and negative stories which are misleading and ultimately wrong, but actually true American history. And along those lines, I've just stumbled on a book, not literally, it's called America's history. It's a tuttle twins series of stories, the author Connor boyack is with me, Connor. Welcome to the program. Thank you, Eric, for having me. I appreciate it. Am I pronouncing your surname slightly correctly? I want to be clear. I am a boy that yaks a lot so boyack is how we say. Connor, boyack, you may be known to a lot of people who are listening in or watching because of the tuttle twins. I'm guessing, yes? Yeah. Yeah, yeah, we've sold millions of copies now and you promoted in the past and Glenn Beck and others. So word is kind of gotten out, which is a really good thing. Well, the tuttle twins tell my audience because the book I'm looking at right here, it says it's a total twin series of stories. It's titled America's history, 1215 to 1776. So folks, if you're tracking, that's a Magna Carta, 1776. Obviously, when we declared independence formally, so this is the first book in the series about America's history, 1215 to 1776. But before we get into the book, America's history, talk a tiny bit about yourself and about the tuttle twins so that people understand what that is. So I'm a product of public school. I really disliked it. I did poorly. I hated history. I hated economics. I didn't enjoy any of that. And it was later in life when I discovered a passion for these topics because I've realized that we teach them completely wrong. Young Connor had to memorize names and dates and facts and formulas and all kinds of things that had no relevance to him. So I didn't care. It was pumping dump and I moved on and I didn't appreciate what I was learning. And so what we've done now in recent years has created a series of books for kids of all ages. We've got toddler books and teen books and all the rest called the tuttle twins. And we've sold millions of copies. Our goal is to help parents talk to their kids about the ideas of freedom in a fun, accessible way through storytelling. No kid likes to learn in a textbook and memorize stuff. All of our books are stories and it's through those stories that we can teach some amazing and some complex and important ideas. Well, I love that. So that's the tuttle twins. And the book that's in front of me on this very special week when we celebrate American independence, which everyone needs to celebrate. Don't just have hot dogs, celebrate American independence. Perhaps by eating hot dogs and blowing off some fireworks..

Eric metaxas America boyack Connor boyack Connor Eric Young Connor Texas Glenn Beck Carta Magna
How Can Parents Remove Woke Orgs From Schools? Pastor John Tells Us

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:11 min | Last month

How Can Parents Remove Woke Orgs From Schools? Pastor John Tells Us

"I'm pure ya mom here with my son tonight. Connor. And I had a question regarding, we've been going to school board meetings for the past two years in puree unified. And a big group of parents and we've got this organization right now called bloom 360 five going on in a lot of the school districts in Arizona. And I wanted to point on it because you talked about what is a man and in this organization, they disguise it as something else where they basically paint boys and men as all bad abusers and that if they're the provider of the home, that's a stereotype. So I guess we're having trouble. How do we get these organizations out of our schools? Besides running for school board, because I'm already doing that, this coming November. So I'm going to get on there and get it out. But I just want to help, I just want parents in the community if they're having these situations where we've got these big organizations or these big companies in our schools, how do we get them out of our schools? Right. And you're speaking about our public schools, correct? Yeah, correct. You know, when Madeline O'Hara fought to remove prayer from school. They had to replace prayer with something. They brought in metal detectors. They brought in cops. They brought in dogs, and they brought in all kinds of things. Here's the reality. When a place has told God that he's not welcome, that place becomes cursed. It's kind of hard for us to expect to have children receive our viewpoints and ideologies in a school system that's postmodern. And a school system that pushes socialism and Marxist ideologies. The best thing for us to do when we see that taking place is to find turning point school. Find dream city school, find a charter school that's not pushing those woke ideologies.

Connor Madeline O'hara Arizona
Tampa Bay Rays' Players Refuse to Wear Pride Patch: Charlie Weighs In

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:21 min | 2 months ago

Tampa Bay Rays' Players Refuse to Wear Pride Patch: Charlie Weighs In

"Zach from calvary chapel, Chino Hills, love cavalry chapel, love Jack kibs. What is your opinion on several Tampa Bay baseball players who refuse to wear the rainbow pride patches on their jerseys during the pride night, their pride night instead sent out of the game. I fully support it. I do. I think that players pushing back against quote unquote pride night is critical. And we must understand that what you might think of as pride night has changed in its meaning. It's no longer about gay and lesbian, acceptance, no, no, no, it's about something much deeper than that, and also something that is much more controversial than that. It can mean now bringing children to drag queen, bars. It can mean chemical castration of children. That this idea of Pride Month has broadened from just like, okay, I suppose tolerance of gay and lesbian people. And the spectrum that moves from tolerance to acceptance, to celebration, to participation. I must give credit to Matt Walsh for that phenomenally brilliant kind of steps is now that you must participate, you must wear the pride patch. And it kind of goes back, okay, Connor, get the Kramer from Seinfeld. You don't want to put the button on from the aids walk. It's one of this great great scenes in television history. Where Kramer, who's kind of an aloof character in Seinfeld, decides to do the aids walk, but he doesn't want to put the button on or the ribbon. He just doesn't want to wear the ribbon, and it kind of is the same sort of thing where he ends up getting kind of attacked by the mob, albeit kind of very similar kind of the Pride Month aids walk mob where they say you don't support gay people because you don't want to wear the ribbon and it's kind of this joke in the show that unfolds into obvious kind of tumultuous hilarity where Kramer is like, no, no, no, I'm with you. I just don't want to wear the ribbon. I just don't want to wear the ribbon. And they say, what do you mean what do I put the ribbon on? And it's like this back and forth and you must participate. You must be part of this. It's not enough that you tolerate us. It's not enough that you accept us. It's not enough that you celebrate us, no, you must

Love Cavalry Chapel Jack Kibs Calvary Chapel Chino Hills Kramer Zach Seinfeld Tampa Bay Matt Walsh Baseball Connor Aids
Amber Athey's Analysis of California's Major Primary Results

The Dan Bongino Show

01:30 min | 2 months ago

Amber Athey's Analysis of California's Major Primary Results

"But do you think what's happening in San Francisco what's happening in Los Angeles The potential bloodbath electorally that I leave the violence for the left there are coming up in 2022 Do you think it's enough to send a seismic shift or is it just going to be a ripple through politics I noticed they had a Tucker had was it David Sachs on last night He's a very good guest and he's like listen I have no faith that this is going to change anything long-term San Francisco We need this to be sustained It has to happen over and over and over again What's your take on that I mean it took two terms of Reagan and a term of George H. W. Bush 12 years before the Democrats were like oh maybe our party sucks and we should run a more Bill Clinton type character instead Yeah I'm still pretty cynical especially when you look at the types of Democrats that are winning the primary campaigns right Like you don't see Connor lands in Joe Manchin's winning That part of the party is pretty much dead and instead you see the squad gaining more and more power So I'm not optimistic at all In fact AOC just had a video that she posted where she was getting mad at other Democrats for saying hey guys maybe we shouldn't use the term black and X because it turns out Hispanic people actually don't like it And appropriating their language and they're not going to vote for us if we do that And she essentially called them selfish and said too bad we need to be inclusive and we're all going to use LatinX So no of course they don't get it

David Sachs San Francisco George H. W. Bush Tucker Los Angeles Reagan Joe Manchin Bill Clinton
"connor  " Discussed on I Said No Gifts!

I Said No Gifts!

04:22 min | 4 months ago

"connor " Discussed on I Said No Gifts!

"Is if I don't have enough time to get out of the way, then do I cherish those few moments of blissful ignorance rather than have a harbinger of the terrible faith that awaits me. So I'm going to say it's a curse because wouldn't I rather enjoy those last few moments before I am mowed down by this vehicle? Rather than have them waste those last few moments with pointless bleeding of the bleating of their horn at me. Why do they get to hold courts and my precious last few seconds? I'm going to say it's a curse. I don't want to hear from my doom before it happens. I just want to experience it. I mean, this is truly an injury on the go if we've ever talked about one. But there are no amount of a thousand expired wellies would bring me no good in the circumstance. Connor wrong. Wrong, it's a gift. It's a gift. I'm thinking about this person who refuses to stop. They are pure sound and speed, they're making noise, they're not making any compromises outside of just filling the night air with a horn. I love this person. I love what they're doing. They've brought this element of violence to the country road. They're looking out for no one but themselves. For all we know, they just love to punch the horn. I can see the point, but I will stand by my choice that I do not want to I do not want to concede my last few moments of peace to their noise vandalism, editorializing in my last seconds of mortal consciousness. Well, I'm sorry. I mean, stand by your point all you want. It's not going to get you any further in the game. Is it still possible for me to win the game? Or am I it's possible you've definitely lost the game, but you can now get a 66% if you get the next two correct. Hey, that's a D, that's a passing grade. We love it. We love a D okay, number two, this is another listener suggestion. Someone named Mackenzie has suggested gift or a curse, TV shows about Vikings. TV shows about Vikings..

Connor Mackenzie Vikings
"connor  " Discussed on I Said No Gifts!

I Said No Gifts!

04:23 min | 4 months ago

"connor " Discussed on I Said No Gifts!

"Gorgeous. I have a feeling that I have a feeling that his lifestyle while unorthodox probably includes a healthy regimen of exercise and proper diet than my own. He's a weirdo, but I can imagine him enjoying sprouts, you know? Oh, of course. And I feel like he's got a lot of running shorts. I feel like he's somebody who's out there early break of dawn running around the city. Also, also, I think we can say fairly confidently that gonzo is most likely a vegan. Oh, a 100%. He loves the chickens. He loves the chickens. There's no way. And once and everything, every other form of meat tastes like chicken, so there's no way that he would do that to Camille. Yeah, a 100%. Look, Connor, I would love to talk about I could probably spend the next hour talking about guns. But I can't do that today. I need to talk to you about something else. What's that? Look, you agreed to be on this podcast a little while ago. I was so happy I thought Connor fantastic as his own podcast, dead eyes, which is wonderful. He obviously knows the scene knows what it means to be a guest, what it means to be a host of a podcast. Absolutely. We'll come on, he'll treat me with the respect I deserve. I will try to do the same and then we'll release the episode and everyone will enjoy it. So I was a little surprised yesterday when I opened my door, thinking I'm going to be recording my podcast, I said, no gifts with Connor tomorrow. And there was a little, a little something there from me. A for me from you, which is now kind of in this bag, kind of a large bag that says celebrate. And so I'm just curious. I don't know what your game is here. I don't know what the plan is for you. Is this a gift for me? I have to say that it is a gift for you..

Connor gonzo Camille
"connor  " Discussed on I Said No Gifts!

I Said No Gifts!

04:23 min | 4 months ago

"connor " Discussed on I Said No Gifts!

"Welcome to I said no gifts I'm bridger Weiner. Ah, you're catching me just moments after setting up some sort of new device audio device computer things going on so I'm at my most relaxed I'm just being easygoing and my heart rate is low and I hope you're in a similarly peaceful place. And so you can enjoy this podcast because I think you're going to have a great time with today's guest who is just fantastic. It's Connor ratliff. Connor, welcome to I said no gifts. Oh, thank you for having me. I'm so I'm so glad to be here. How are you? I'm doing well, you know, on balance in these trying times. I'm holding it together. I feel like the last few weeks have been eventful for you. They've certainly been eventful for me. They've also been very eventful in the world at large. It feels like a very fraught time. Yes. Estranged. It's very, very strange years. Not ideal. But not ideal. That's so that's such a perfect way of putting it. Not ideal. Not my perfect things are not going exactly to my plan. And I don't think the same for anyone else. But I do feel like, look, for you, yes. Your mating Tom Hanks, you're going, I believe, on a cruise. You're doing, you're having at least an isolated, enjoyable time. I've been doing rather well personally in the past couple of weeks. But even that is somewhat overwhelming, you know? Right. You know, my natural state is a little more relaxed. And when too many things are happening, even if they're good things, it can be an overloading of the senses. The system can only handle so much. Yeah. Well, let's start. I feel like you were recently on a cruise. Yes, I was a performer on the joko cruise, which is Jonathan coulton's music and comedy nerd crews. Right, and that what you just said is maybe 1% more than what I know about this cruise. I knew that there was some nerd element. I know Jonathan Colton and there was comedy, but I still can't quite zero in on what this happens on this cruise..

bridger Weiner Connor ratliff Connor Tom Hanks Jonathan coulton Jonathan Colton
"connor  " Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

03:04 min | 4 months ago

"connor " Discussed on WCPT 820

"Connor Hi congressman Here is my request of you We were just talking before you came on the air about microplastics and how it threatens our country and our society our health And in that vein I would like to ask you what's on your radar screen Because we all know that government regulation protects us from such things What is on your radar screen as far as former president Trump's deregulation of our country What do regulations are you looking at to reinstate to protect our health our republic our rights as human beings What are you looking at And Tom my request to you is the same as far as I request that you talk a little bit more about okay Rick I'm going to cut you off there because time is flying by in congressman Connor is not with us for a very long congressman You want to respond to it Well Rick raises a very eloquent point And that is every time I go on an airplane I am thankful that we have regulations I mean the right has made regulations and so there's boogeyman but the reality is regulations is what allows us to get into card safely It's allows us to get into airplane safely We need more regulation on social media So the young people aren't facing depression and two sides We need more regulation to make sure that our environment is safe And Trump had like many Republicans that come in and they cut a lot of these regulations It hurts the environment It hurts workers It hurts children And so we have to be not timid about making the case that regulations are a good thing often for human beings Anthony and Dearborn Michigan you're on the earth congressman condom Here we go I'm Medicare Oh hi Yeah I hear you Here you're fine Go ahead Sorry I heard there was a committee hearing on Medicare for All on Tuesday and I thought I was in the oversight committee It seemed like a strange place for me I would have thought of in the health education committee So I'm wondering why it was there who scheduled it and how and why your leadership doesn't support it because we have videos of Pelosi saying she supported it in the 90s why how that got scheduled if your leadership doesn't support it Well I was on the committee and three I agree ideally should be an energy and commerce but we'll take the hearing where we can get it It was great that we were able to collectively as progressives push to have that hearing and Carolyn baloney held it Not only philosophy president Obama was for single in 2004 before he ran for the presidency And the question I asked during that hearing I made a very simple point that the average American family of four pays a $12,000 tax to private health insurance is average businesses pay a $16,000 tax to private health insurance.

congressman Connor Rick Connor Trump Dearborn depression Anthony Michigan Medicare Carolyn baloney Pelosi Obama
"connor  " Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

03:09 min | 8 months ago

"connor " Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Jordan Davis is not a good matchup against an Alabama team that wants to get the ball out quick and swore the ball around. Against the Michigan team that wants to be more grounded pound. I think that plays into him being on the field more and having a bigger impact on that game. And so having said all that with the front 7 that Georgia has and Michigan not being a prolific passing offense, I think that plays into the Georgia defense getting right. And on top of all that, it's a very proud group of Georgia defenders that know they didn't play their best and are going to be anxious to get out there and prove that, hey, what you saw the first 12 games of the season, that's the difference that we are not the one that showed up against Alabama. So do they have, let's say they beat Michigan, Alabama beat Cincinnati, they're both favored to win. They rematch. What is give me some evidence that says that the game plan Kirby smart can game plan around Bryce young and jamison Williams. Well, I think no mechie is actually a really big factor in that just because obviously Alabama has great younger receivers, but they're not necessarily proven in the same way that John met you was. And so you feel a little bit more comfortable saying, hey, we're going to trust our corners to man up. And obviously we're going to have to do something special with Williams because his speed just makes him so difficult to defend. But I think the no match he makes it a little bit easier to say, I've got to trust Mike or backs to press band coverage and do that and again you came out and you tried to play his own and the numbers with bright young stone defenses all season he has picked them apart. So you've already shown that, okay, we have done this zone sort of attack in terms of trying to limit them. And they just flat out didn't work. So I think from a defensive standpoint, you just have to do it auburn did. And I know it's risky because as our last year in 2020, if you want to play press man coverage against really great receivers in college nowadays, go ahead. More often than not, you're going to lose. And I absolutely do take that play day fact of the 2020 game and now how Georgia went about defensively game planning for 2021. On the offensive side of the ball for Georgia in a rematch, they've got to be better on third down. I think they went 312 of that game and it's got to be better in the red zone. First three quarters, they have four trips in the red zone, ten points. That's just not good enough. Second Ben had an interception in the red zone, get an interception return for a touchdown. I set some beta didn't lose order to that game against Alabama but the problem was he wasn't good enough to bring Georgia back when out when the poll dogs finally started getting some stops there in the second half. Yeah, he didn't cost them the game. He didn't lose to Alabama, but he had an opportunity to win it and couldn't get those to make those plays. So I agree with you there. Connor Riley dog nation. Thank you so much, man. Have a great holiday. We appreciate it. Thanks for giving us some time. Awesome. Thanks, Brad and Merry Christmas to you and all. Yeah, absolutely you too. Connor Riley there for dog nation. Yeah, can't play zone against Bryce young. That is for sure. There's no question about that. The problem is, is then you're playing man to man against jamison Williams. So we'll dive into these matchups a little bit we'll take some calls as well because I do think while Michigan is a very, very worthy adversary to Georgia and to Alabama, I do agree with Connor that the matchups.

Alabama Georgia Jordan Davis Michigan Bryce young jamison Williams Kirby Cincinnati Connor Riley Williams auburn Mike John Ben Brad Connor
"connor  " Discussed on Dateable Podcast

Dateable Podcast

05:48 min | 9 months ago

"connor " Discussed on Dateable Podcast

"And even though there had been time and space between it, I think there was still a part that wondered or thought maybe this person would reenter into my world. Yeah, there was a tenderness there, right? It was like this person had reentered another relationship and Connor was actually coming off of a relationship. And so it was interesting because it was a very there was familiarity to for me in my experience of it. There was familiarity and like, oh, this is really tender and raw. I've been in the situation before where a person can change their mind and go back into a dynamic that they had before. And as Connor was exiting this relationship, for me, there was a sensitivity there. I was like, oh, this is either like my wounding or this is going to be such a beautiful healing opportunity for me. You know, that line is so thin. And it's so heart right. It's like wisdom and discernment and yeah, like our awareness and our ability to have these conversations with each other is oftentimes that difference maker between just being in a pattern versus being in the healing of something that gives us that new ending. I'm grateful that, of course, where our relationship developed into was the healing for me, but there were times in the beginning stages where Connor was definitely pulling me back off the edge a bit because I was like, you know, I know this, you know? This is so familiar for me. And I definitely don't want to experience the same thing over and over and over again. And so yeah, there was definitely a Ron is there even though there had been a lot more space between the ending of my previous relationship than for Connor. So there was this fear of history repeating itself that he was would potentially get back with an ex-girlfriend? Is that kind of what was showing up for you? Yeah, I wasn't sure. That I was going to go back. No, I didn't know that, yeah, I don't know that I was concerned about that. But I think just sort of like you're full availability, right? Got it. Got it. It's like a normal question, right? It's like if somebody's coming out of a relationship, how much time do you normally need after that relationship? Because it was, you know, it was a more long-term relationship that I had done that I had exited. And so there was apprehension on her part. I see. And that makes sense, right? I think that's even if you haven't gotten out of relationship recently. We're constantly wondering how ready and other person is. And sometimes we just don't know. So something you said earlier Connor that made me think, well, that's so true with love comes logistics. So what do you think is the chicken or the egg here?.

Connor Ron
"connor  " Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

Out of Bounds Podcast

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"connor " Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

"Max. You're listening to the pursuit podcast on the outer bones, network, the Audubon's collective. I don't know, Audubon's puts it out, so I gotta wrap them because they wrap me. Episode 20 5. I didn't think I'd get 25 episodes out. I don't know if you guys thought I'd get 25 episodes out. But it works. People dig it, keep leaving your reviews that really helps me. It helps jabber. It's my same shtick. I'm super pumped on this episode because I recorded it at K two headquarters. I never thought I'd go to K two headquarters. That might not be that exciting to some people. But to me, that was, I mean, that was the Mecca of me growing up was K two skis, K two skiing. Obviously line skis, east coast. Brand starting, and then, you know, K two bottom. But long story long, Connor Clayton is my guest. He's the marketing guru behind line skis full tilt. He was on track to go pro. He was essentially pro, plagued by injuries. We talk all about it. And then we dive into what makes line skis line skis and how they keep having more fun every year. And continuing to make really great skis that are fun. Again, let's keyword on fun skiing is fun. But no, they make really great skis. Let's keep really well. But they're playful and they're forgiving and, you know, skiing got way too serious for a really long and Lion skis is always been the driving force and Connor's a young gun. He welcomed me into the headquarters, gave me a little tour. There isn't an eruption because of Garth's jabber had to peak his head in. And I can't have anything nice. But whatever. Episode 25, Connor Clayton, I have to apologize because my audio is a little echoey. Good thing Connor talks more than I do. I'm still learning, especially in person interviews. But it came out rad. My good friend Charlie, charlier and fuller helped me on the audio side kind of dumbed it down a little bit for me. So it's really good. I'm excited. I'm excited about all my episodes. Connor, thank you so much. Line, full tilt. Go look out their new line. They just dropped it, it's amazing. Episode 25, the pursuit. Oh, there we go. All right, Connor, who are you? What do you do, man, you're live on the podcast. We're live. Hi, I'm Connor. I'm the marketing manager at Lion skis and folks up boots today. We're here in Seattle, Washington. Beautiful day, not raining. Well, hopefully it actually does rain because the fires are getting pretty bad. But you want me just to start at the beginning and talk about myself? Yeah, how'd you get here? How did you obviously you're here now? We don't have to go way back, but you grew up east coast. Yeah. Yeah, so I grew up on the east coast. Lived a lot of my life in Ohio before moving to Connecticut and around 5th grade or so. So that's kind of going way back. But lived in Connecticut and majority of my life probably about ten years or so. And that's kind of where I found my love for skiing growing up in Ohio and originally before that I was born in Canada. So I've got hockey in my blood, so a lot of hockey growing up. And that was kind of the thing to do when I was younger in Ohio and then moving to get that going up until it kind of nearing high school kind of junior high high school was always playing hockey on the team. And then just met a couple of buddies who would go skiing at a place called ski sundown, which I lived in simsbury. And sundown was probably about 20, 25 minutes away from my house since very. And small hill, maybe four or 500 foot vertical mainly just two chairlifts, fixed quads, that will take you up all the way to the top, fixed triples actually excuse me. It had night skiing, open till ten p.m., and so I'd skied a little bit back in Ohio. My parents taught me how to ski at perfect north slopes in Indiana. So I was good enough to go with some buddies and go see what kind of get skiing was all about. And I just learned that what they like to do is go through the train park a bunch when I was super young. And so as I kind of got a little bit more and more into skiing, I turned into that kid that everybody hates in terms of going off the sides of the rails and thinking it does a really cool jumps and really fun to do, so I totally did that in 5th and 6th grade. But that's an appropriate test. To be doing that. Yeah, I thought so. That's all looking back at that now. But yeah, as I kept on kind of skiing, I just kept on going with this group of friends and every day after school, we pretty much would just beg our parents to go drive us to ski sundown and drop us off so we could ski until like 9 or ten at night and luckily for us we had some amazing parents who were willing to do that at least two times a week. So I started doing that in between hockey practices and then I just kind of kept on enjoying skiing more and more and more. And then as I got later into junior high, I finally said to my mom dad, I was like, hey, I think I want to focus on skiing a lot more, like I'm really having a lot of fun with this. I think I'm going to stop playing hockey. And my dad being a Canadian his, I think I might have broke his heart a little bit, but I think eventually he got over it and like I said, they're super supportive. So they're willing to let me go that route and really focus on skiing a bit more. And when I say focus at that point, there's just something I really love to do. It's not like I was trying to do anything with it. Of course, I'm like 13 year old kid at that point. Everybody has the ambitions to be a pro skier. So it's like, yeah, I'm gonna totally do that, but. Yeah, but good for you for like knowing you were done with hockey. Yeah. Well, yeah, it's like, you know, if you're balancing two things in the winter when you want to focus on one and you're clearly having more fun doing one over the other than why not just keep doing it and put your full attention to it, right? So yeah, that allowed me to really kind of ramp up how much I was skiing and going into high school, started skiing the park a lot more with my friends. We'd go to ski center on the weekends because I didn't have hockey in the weekends anymore now. And we'd really start hiking rails and trying to learn some tricks watching a bunch of YouTube videos. And we're watching super old like TJ schiller video of how to do a rodeo 5 40 and trying to learn all these tricks and watching all of the pros at the time on YouTube and trying to teach myself how to do a 360 on a jump or anything. And eventually you'd learn and you'd landed the first time and it's just the most amazing feeling that would kind of keep you coming back for more and more and more. So that's just kind of what I ended up doing almost any free time I had throughout high school, I think in my freshman and sophomore year there had three good buddies and we would go to the hill, any chance we'd get and we'd always try to push ourselves to do a front two or learn a front four, try to do our first front swap. And so I really just kind of fell in love with the park scene because at ski sundown, you're either skiing park or you're skiing, you know, 500 foot vertical run that takes 30 seconds, then you're going to have to do that again. So in my eyes, that got boring pretty quick, but the park is always something that I think there's something new and shiny. There's something new you can try. There's something that you can learn. And so that would just open my eyes to this whole entire environment, and I just kind of fell in love with it. And then from there, kind of in my sophomore year of high school, I think I experienced what the green mountains of Vermont are in terms of had one good buddy to everybody's Kurt scholar, Chris frula, and they kind of introduced me to.

skiing Connor Connor Clayton hockey Ohio charlier east coast junior high high school Connecticut Audubon Garth Max simsbury fuller Charlie Seattle Washington TJ schiller
"connor  " Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"connor " Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"Would've power project crude. This is josh. Selig aka settled gate here to introduce you to our next guest connor mcgovern connor. Mcgovern is an american professional football player for the new york jets. Formerly played college. Football at the university of missouri was drafted straight out of college to play for the denver broncos in twenty twenty connor suffered a pretty serious hamstring injury which affected the rest of his plane during the season however he is now back to training and lifting and connor is no stranger to the iron. He's a big proponent of the olympic lifts in strongman training four offensive lineman on a side note connor is also very involved in fundraising in charity. Work for the special needs community. In his hometown of fargo north dakota connor was also heavily involved in the fargo able games. Which is one of the first all inclusive tests functional fitness for the special needs community recently in may of twenty twenty one. The fargo able games was able to raise over million dollars for the special needs community but that is a different story. Hopefully we'll be able to learn more about in today's conversation with our guest. Connor mcgovern didn't have anything to mix mine. So i just. I'd just gave it a swirl when it worked pretty good. Let me just do that. So cause a free so in mind is i'm gonna get to the bottom. It's just going to be all chocolate salt. That's the best this a little bit here and there and then also wham element chocolate salt to the face. You know i i was sometimes. I'm following like a pretty religious carnivore diet. But then i recognize like i drink a lotta coffee and then i also recognize. I eat a lot of stuff that has chocolate like this chocolate salt. So i got more plants. I know what to do with causeway is like is coffee. It's a plant. Oh.

connor Selig aka connor mcgovern connor Mcgovern new york jets university of missouri denver broncos josh Connor mcgovern football Football olympic north dakota fargo