36 Burst results for "Connor"

Fresh update on "connor" discussed on The Hockey PDOcast

The Hockey PDOcast

00:44 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "connor" discussed on The Hockey PDOcast

"The past couple of years has been legitimately good defensively in terms of not only the impact that he's driving, but the physical way in terms of how he's playing how he gets deep in the zone, wins battles. Takeaways, back checking everything. He's been doing everything you'd like to see to qualify as actually being good defensively to go along with offensively. He was on my selkie ballot last year. Yeah. He wouldn't be if I was voting today for this season. I don't think he's been he hasn't scored enough goals. No, because he hasn't been the same assertive presence game in game out. I know a big part of what's happening with Matthews right now is shooting percentage base, but also a big part of it is very rarely do I tune in and see him being out there. Grabbing the game by the scruff of its neck and just like asserting himself as the best player on the ice, something that I thought he did, game in game out last season and a big reason why I put him on my selkie ballot and had him ahead of Connor McDavid for heart. Before you get mad at me, the players agreed they gave Matthews the Lindsay. There's like revisionist history that the Matthews winning the heart last year was like a terrible call because of what's happened this season or in what McDavid did in the playoffs. The players agreed. Yeah, Matthews won the Lindsay too. Stop it. Anyway, this season, this season I've been left a little cool. I think it's fair to talk about the fact that a quarter of the way through the season, William nylander has been the Maple Leafs best player. Like marner's on this big point streak and Matthews just isn't throwing his fastball. Night and night out. Maybe there's something with the wrist, maybe there's something up. Yeah. But that's true. Like that's been true watching that team play. So I think he's a great two way player.

Matthews Connor Mcdavid Lindsay Mcdavid William Nylander Marner Maple Leafs
McCoy leads Cards past Rams 27-17; Cooper Kupp injured

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last week

McCoy leads Cards past Rams 27-17; Cooper Kupp injured

"Backup quarterback colt McCoy helped lead the Cardinals to a 27 17 road win against the rams making his first start of the season in place of injured Kyler Murray McCoy passed for 238 yards on a touchdown with no turnovers I dug deep and was proud to go out there and play as hard as I can James Connor ran for two scores LA was also missing its starting quarterback Matthew Stafford due to concussion protocol The Super Bowl champs have lost 5 out of 6 and fall to three and 6 on the season Mark Myers englewood California

Kyler Murray Mccoy Colt Mccoy James Connor Cardinals Rams Matthew Stafford LA Mark Myers Englewood California
The latest in sports

AP News Radio

01:58 min | 2 weeks ago

The latest in sports

"AP sports I'm David Shuster we begin in the NBA where Jayson Tatum scored a game high 34 points as Boston defeated Denver one 31 one 12 His night and day the way that we're playing the start of this season compared to the start of last season But whenever we made that change I just feel like we haven't looked back and for the most part we got the same group One or two new guys but they really know how to play the game In New York RJ Barrett scored 30 points for Tom thibodeau as the Knicks down Detroit one 21 one 12 The thing that was different about this game is we still didn't shoot the ball great But I thought we made a lot of plays on selfish place to help get high quality shots Elsewhere Oklahoma City had 8 players in double figure scoring running past Toronto by 19 Memphis had three players over 20 points beating Minnesota one 14 one O three and Golden State got 40 points from Steph Curry one O 6 one O one over Cleveland turning to hockey Washington defeated Tampa Bay as Craig heist reports Darcy Kemper made 28 saves and helped kill off a 5 minute power play in the second period as the capitals beat the lightning 5 to one Sonny Milano had two goals and an assist Anthony mantha Alexi protest and Connor sherry each lit the lamp Kemper missed out on the shutout when Nick permits scored in the third More importantly I think just as a group we came together with the urgency that we really wanted this win and you could see it in our play right from the start and it was nice to see everyone get rewarded College hoops the top 5 teams in the country all in action with number two Gonzaga squeaking out a one point victory at Michigan state Meanwhile number one North Carolina three Houston Ford Kentucky and 5 Baylor all were comfortable winners baseball news the Houston Astros fired their GM James click after he turned down their one year contract to offer and football buffalo quarterback Josh Allen he's questionable for Sunday's game against Minnesota with a sore elbow I'm David Shuster AP sports

Jayson Tatum Rj Barrett David Shuster Steph Curry Tom Thibodeau Craig Heist Darcy Kemper Sonny Milano Anthony Mantha Alexi AP Connor Sherry NBA Knicks Denver Boston Golden State Oklahoma City Detroit Memphis Tampa Bay
Capitals beat Lightning as Kuemper gets best of Bolts again

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

Capitals beat Lightning as Kuemper gets best of Bolts again

"Darcy Kemper made 28 saves and helped kill off a 5 minute power play in the second period as the capitals beat the lightning 5 to one Sonny Milano had two goals and an assist Anthony mantha Alexi protists and Connor sherry each let the lamp Kemper missed out on the shutout when Nick permits scored in the third More importantly I think just as a group we came together with the urgency that we really wanted this win and you could see it in our play right from the start and it was nice to see everyone get rewarded John Carlson had an assist becoming the first caps defenseman to reach 600 points Craig heist Washington

Darcy Kemper Sonny Milano Anthony Mantha Alexi Connor Sherry Kemper Nick John Carlson Craig Heist Washington
McAvoy scores in season debut, Bruins beat skidding Flames

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 weeks ago

McAvoy scores in season debut, Bruins beat skidding Flames

"The bruins are 12 and two after Charlie mcavoy scored the tie breaking goal in a three to one victory against the flames Not how to preseason to get ready so it was a little definitely nervous that I all day to day and excited the good kind of nerves Mac voice snapped a one to one deadlock with one 33 left in the second period David pastrnak had an empty netter and assist for the top team in the Eastern Conference Connor Clifton also scored in Lena's ulmar made 31 saves blanking Calgary after Noah hanifin opened the scoring four 33 into the game The flames went zero for 6 on the power play and fell to O 5 and two in their last 7 games since a 5 in one start I'm Jane ferry

Charlie Mcavoy David Pastrnak Bruins Connor Clifton Noah Hanifin Lena Calgary Jane Ferry
Svechnikov's hat trick carries Hurricanes past Oilers 7-2

AP News Radio

00:26 sec | 2 weeks ago

Svechnikov's hat trick carries Hurricanes past Oilers 7-2

"Andre svechnikov had a hat trick in the hurricane stopped a two game skid by hammering the oiler 7 to two Svechnikov scored once in each period giving him a team high 11 goals already this season His second period goal was the game winner as Carolina picked up its 5th victory in 7 games Jordan Martina congest for foster each had a goal and an assist for the canes Connor McDavid netted his 15th goal of the season and had an assist for Edmonton I'm Jane ferry

Andre Svechnikov Svechnikov Jordan Martina Congest Connor Mcdavid Carolina Edmonton Jane Ferry
Kane cut on wrist by skate blade in Oilers' win vs Lightning

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 weeks ago

Kane cut on wrist by skate blade in Oilers' win vs Lightning

"The oilers scored two power play goals one 58 apart early in the second period of a three two win at Tampa Bay Connor McDavid scored his 14th goal of the season to break a one one tie He later set up Leon draisaitl's knife goal I thought the boys battled hard and just found a way to win I mean that's all it was It's nice to show we can play a little defense Jack Campbell made 35 saves and Edmonton killed off the lightning's 5 power plays Brandon Hagel and Alex killorn scored for the bolts Euler's forward Evander Kane had to be hospitalized after being cut on the left wrist by a skate blade early in the second period I'm Dave fairy

Connor Mcdavid Leon Draisaitl Oilers Tampa Bay Jack Campbell Brandon Hagel Alex Killorn Evander Kane Edmonton Euler Dave Fairy
Draisaitl keys Oilers' four-goal 2nd to beat Penguins 6-3

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last month

Draisaitl keys Oilers' four-goal 2nd to beat Penguins 6-3

"Connor McDavid's Euler's beat Sidney Crosby's penguin 6 to three in a showcase matchup of perhaps the NHL's two biggest stars Crosby scored his fourth goal of the season as Pittsburgh jumped to a three one lead two minutes into the second period but Edmonton surged back to score four straight goals for a 5 three lead by the end of the period McDavid didn't score a point but it's heralded teammate Lee and Dreyse had a goal into his sis Notice he proud of the group the way we responded in the second and third but we shouldn't we shouldn't have to rally back from two or three goals that we get The loss was the penguins first in regulation time this season I'm Tom Miriam

Connor Mcdavid Euler Sidney Crosby Dreyse Crosby NHL Mcdavid Pittsburgh Edmonton LEE Penguins Tom Miriam
Boeing crashes: Passengers' families deemed crime victims

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

Boeing crashes: Passengers' families deemed crime victims

"A federal judge in Fort Worth Texas says the relatives of those killed in the crashes of two Boeing 7 37 max jets are crime victims Federal district judge Reed O'Connor ruled that the relatives of people killed in the crashes of two Boeing 7 37 max planes are crime victims under federal law and should have been told about private negotiations over a January 2021 settlement that spared Boeing from criminal prosecution O'Connor wrote but for Boeing's criminal conspiracy to defraud the FAA 346 people would not have lost their lives in the crashes Some of the relatives are pushing to overturn the government's $2.5 billion agreement with Boeing The first crash in Indonesia in October 2018 killed 189 people Another crash 5 months later in Ethiopia killing 157 I'm Tim McGuire

Boeing Reed O'connor Fort Worth Texas Connor FAA Government Indonesia Ethiopia Tim Mcguire
Scheifele scores 2 as Jets beat Rangers 4-1

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last month

Scheifele scores 2 as Jets beat Rangers 4-1

"In a one one tie late in the third period fourth liner Sam gagne banged home a rebound that sent the home crowd into a frenzy giving the jets a lead they would not relinquish The 33 year old says he was thrilled to get the chance to make a difference late in the game We want to be a team that can throw anyone over the boards and have success and regardless of what your role is or how much you're planning on a given night You got to find ways to contribute Mark's likely scored twice at the win for the jets Kyle Connor added an empty netter while Connor hellebuyck was brilliant in goal with 40 stops The lone goal from the rangers coming off the stick of dryden hunt Christian O'Malley Winnipeg

Sam Gagne Jets Kyle Connor Connor Hellebuyck Mark Rangers Winnipeg
NC shooting claims mom, veteran, matriarch, officer and teen

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

NC shooting claims mom, veteran, matriarch, officer and teen

"Police in Raleigh North Carolina investigating 5 fatal shootings allegedly by 15 year old I Norman hall police say the teen killed two people in the streets and then fled toward a walking trail where he opened fire killing three more people and wounding two others The victims were of different races and ranged in age from 16 to their late 50s among them is 52 year old Nicole Connors the matriarch of her extended family Her husband Tracy Howard still finds it difficult to comprehend carnage caused by the young suspect This can't believe this can't believe it was him especially With a shotgun dean as hospitalized in critical condition police say no motive has been determined I Norman hall

Norman Hall Police Nicole Connors Raleigh Tracy Howard North Carolina Norman Hall
Pastrnak has a goal and 3 assists, Bruins beat Capitals 5-2

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last month

Pastrnak has a goal and 3 assists, Bruins beat Capitals 5-2

"David pasternak had a goal in three assist while Patrice bergeron had a goal as the bruins beat the capitals 5 to two in the season opener for both teams Pasternak says it wasn't pretty but he'll take the two points That's a good thing we beat today and obviously big stuff for our we have to make sure to fix obviously a couple of mistakes You know that wasn't clean but it's good for us that we are able to win this kind of game David crece added a goal and two assists Anthony mantha and Connor sherry lit the lamp for the capitals Lena Olmert made 33 saves in the win Craig heist Washington

David Pasternak Patrice Bergeron Pasternak Bruins David Crece Anthony Mantha Connor Sherry Lena Olmert Craig Heist Washington
Ward Connerly Discusses His Next Book 'Ward's Words'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:50 min | Last month

Ward Connerly Discusses His Next Book 'Ward's Words'

"Talking award Connor Lee, the author of two books and he is authoring a third book or is it almost out the new book? No, I'm about 60 days away. 60 days, consider it done. Yes. That's close enough, 60 days away, but it's going to be called ward's words. And what is this, what is this since you're 60 days away, you're pretty close. What is this last book about this new book? I want to discuss race where I think we've gone wrong. How do we get back on track? Recently, vice president Harris, for example, said that I think it was the last Saturday, said that with respect to hurricane Ian, the administration would be looking at equity and she mentioned low income people and people of color and she suggested that those were the two groups that would receive priority. The following day, fema went on meet the face the nation and said, no, we'll give assistance to everyone, but she gave us a sneak peek into the thinking of those who proposed equity, you know? We think of equity as what we have in our home, the value less mortgage, and so we've been stumbling around trying to figure out what do they mean by equity. Now we know it's about giving reparations. It's about helping those who see themselves as victims.

Connor Lee Vice President Harris Hurricane Ian Ward Fema
Larry O'Connor: Rumored Show Name Change

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:33 sec | Last month

Larry O'Connor: Rumored Show Name Change

"Are the rumors true. I was asking you earlier, are you already launching a name change effort from O'Connor tonight to nobody else with Larry O'Connor? You know what? If the overlords at Salem let me get away with it, I would go with it. Honestly, I think it's a good attitude. I'm not sure that would fly. I don't think that Camarillo they'd go for that. I'm thinking. I'm not on a limb. You're probably right. You would know better. I'm the new kid on the block. Well, welcome aboard. Always wanted to be on your show. So thank you for having me. Well,

Larry O'connor Connor Salem Camarillo
US survives close matches to double lead in Presidents Cup

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

US survives close matches to double lead in Presidents Cup

"The U.S. team holds a commanding 8 to two lead over the international team heading into the weekend at the president's cup The U.S. team won three of 5 matches in Friday's four balls competition with two matches halved Jordan Spieth and Justin Thomas edged Adam Scott and cam Davis two and one Patrick cantley and Xander schauffele matsuyama and Tom Kim three and two and Billy horschel and max homa beat Cory Connors and Taylor pendrith one up Thanks to homeless 12 foot birdie putt on the 17th hole I was nervous this could be over that putt but it was fun The schedule picks up Saturday at quail hollow club in Charlotte with four matches of foursomes in the morning and four matches of four balls in the afternoon I'm Mike Gracia

Jordan Spieth Justin Thomas Cam Davis Patrick Cantley Xander Schauffele Matsuyama Tom Kim U.S. Billy Horschel Max Homa Cory Connors Taylor Pendrith Adam Scott Quail Hollow Club Charlotte Mike Gracia
Who Would Make a Great Supreme Court Advocate?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

05:22 min | 2 months ago

Who Would Make a Great Supreme Court Advocate?

"Just because you've watched so many Supreme Court arguments, you know, so many of the justices, you know, so many of the legal people. If you had to recommend a Supreme Court advocate today, someone called you up and their company is on the line, they have to argue before the Supreme Court, who would it be? I guess it would probably be Paul Clement. You and I said the same thing. I got asked that question a couple of years ago. And I've never met Paul Clement or spoken to him, but I hit Paul Clement. Tell people why. Well, because he's just if he weren't such a nice and intelligent and good guy, I would say that he was an idiot savant of an advocate. I mean by that, I don't mean that he's an idiot. I mean that even when he was a baby advocate, he came to the Justice Department with John ashcroft for whom he had worked on the Senate Judiciary Committee, I think. And he was in his young 30s and Ted Olson was the solicitor general and had just won Bush versus gore for president Bush by then president Bush and ashcroft, I think, actually wanted Paul to be solicitor general and the compromise was that he would be deputy, which he was for four years, and then he became solicitor general on his own. But as Ted also would say, Paul is just an amazing advocate. And he is not a, you know, when he worked for the government, he represented the government. When he worked for the Catholic Church, he represents the Catholic Church. Do I think that is closer to an approximation of his views? Yes, I do. But he was a just a bang up advocate for the government. And so was Ted Olson. They both represented they both defended the McCain feingold law. And one in the Supreme Court, and it fell apart years later, and they represent different interests now that they're in private practice, but that didn't stop them from being the best advocates possible for their client at the time and their client at the time was the United States government. You just named two of the four of the greatest Supreme Court advocates of my generation, the other two being the now chief justice John Roberts, and the fourth being an it'll come to me. I just forgot his name. And there are four. And they were always, I get calls, and when the chief justice was in private practice at Hogan, I would say go get him. And now when I get calls, I say go get Paul Clement because Ken Starr judge Starr is no longer practicing. They work great Supreme Court advocates because they just are at ease and I bring that up because of your Walter dellinger story on page one 30 and God bless the late Walter dellinger, who is a great man in the law, with whom I disagreed often. But he mixed up the names of justices, O'Connor and Ginsburg in his first argument. That's over practicing. Nina, that's don't you think that's what it was. He was overprepared he had thought about it so much. I'm not going to mix them up. I'm not going to mix them up. I'm not going to mix them up, and he mixed them up, and they were not happy. I don't even know if it was that. First his first argument, it just was maybe the first time he faced the two of them on the court. You're right. You're right. And he said, I mean, I've done this. I've said North Carolina when my script says South Carolina, I don't know what happens. In a less than ladylike expression, it's a brain fart. Yeah. Happens to me like on a daily basis. Nina totenberg. I mean, on a daily basis, three hours of radio you're going to do it, your buddy Steve never makes a mistake inscape. And I really hate that. But I make mistakes every day. Let me go on now to what the essence of dinners with Ruth is. And I remind you of the Frank luntz role, we've got to say the title of dinners with rouge 7 times for people to remember dinners with Ruth and order dinners with Ruth. And I want to tell my Friends on the center right in the right, this book will charm you and inform you and you'll be better for having read it. I said that most recently about Evan Thomas's one, Evan is a friend, one is about justice O'Connor and as dinners with Ruth does for justice Ginsburg one did for justice O'Connor and together they do what is only very infrequently done they give you a glimpse of the real world of the Supreme Court. And you know what? So much better than I do. I know some of the justices, but not as friends. I mean, colleague, John Roberts, an old colleague, chief just a justice Thomas and Stephen Breyer sat for interviews. And justice Gorsuch had been spent time with, but I don't know them like you know them. And you are a great storyteller. And you humanize them, but especially judge justice Ginsburg. Did you intend that when you began?

Paul Clement Supreme Court Ted Olson Walter Dellinger Senate Judiciary Committee President Bush Mccain Feingold Catholic Church John Ashcroft Paul Ashcroft Justice Department John Roberts Gore Ken Starr Connor Ruth United States Government TED Nina Totenberg
What Will Our Diets Look Like in 2030?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:21 min | 2 months ago

What Will Our Diets Look Like in 2030?

"Economic Forum asked the question, is it what will our diet look like in 2030? This is an official document from the World Economic Forum. It says oils like canola oil are more sustainable. Plus reduced levels of toxic testosterone. Now, what's amazing is that if you talk to any nutritionist, if you talk to any weight trainer, they will tell you to stay away from canola oil that seed oils are the worst thing for you. And by the way, you find seed oils in a lot of salad dressings. That's really where you find a lot of seed oils. You find seed oils, sometimes you find them in kind of just like, I don't want to say candy bars, but a lot of the kind of more processed foods canola oil is really, really bad for you. It's in almost everything. I'm not being my memories, not what it should be on working canola oil is it's in every type of food. I just think about salad dressings immediately. It's really bad for you. And the World Economic Forum is pushing forward, oils like canola are more sustainable, plus reduced levels of toxic testosterone. They also say we're going to be intermittently fasting. We'll eat 40% less food in 2030 to meet net zero. Oh, really? This is good for our waistlines and good for the planet. You can eat nothing and be happy. Is this document legit Connor? Can I just, before I can I can we just please double check? This is not some sort of knock off, you'll eat nothing and you'll be happy. Alternative proteins, a third of our protein will come from soy based protein, lab grown meat and up cycled citizens. Do not eat plant based meat anymore, anybody. It's really not good for you. I try to eat Elk and venison at least once a week. It is more expensive, but it's very good for you. In fact, I had Elk burgers last night, really tasty. Bison is very good for you. Just eat, what can be, I'm not against eating plants, obviously. But eat something, if you're a man, try to eat red meat a couple times a week. I'm not gonna tell you what to do. Maybe you have a bad reaction to it. But generally, our diets, I think, are making us weaker, are making us more confused. And in fact, there is some research to show that canola oils, too much soy, not enough meat, not a balanced diet, does play into depression and anxiety.

World Economic Forum Connor Depression Anxiety
Judge stays at 57 HR, Yanks beat Boston 5-3 for 2-game sweep

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Judge stays at 57 HR, Yanks beat Boston 5-3 for 2-game sweep

"The Yankees earned a 5 three win over the Red Sox and maintained their 6 game lead in the AL east Glaber Torres had three hits and scored on his own RBI single taking advantage of catcher Connor Wong's throwing her the play brought in three runs as the Yankees moved ahead three zero in the 5th inning Aaron judge singled and scored but failed to hit his 58th home run The only blemish on the win Nestor Cortez took a shutout into the 5th inning as the Yankees earned their fourth straight win in 8th and ten games Red Sox rookie Brian balo fell to one in 6 though all three runs he allowed were unearned I'm Dave ferry

Glaber Torres Yankees Connor Wong Red Sox Nestor Cortez Aaron Brian Balo Dave Ferry
Psychologist: School shooter suffered fetal alcohol damage

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Psychologist: School shooter suffered fetal alcohol damage

"A psychologist in court says the marjory Stoneman Douglas high school shooter suffered fetal alcohol damage A neuropsychologist says Florida school shooter Nicholas Cruz suffered brain damage when his birth mother drank during pregnancy Paul Connor testified Monday that people with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder often have problems with hyperactivity outbursts motor control and socializing from a young age Teachers and friends have previously testified crews had all those problems while the 23 year old has pleaded guilty to murdering 17 students and staff members back in 2018 this trial is only to determine whether he sentenced to death or life without parole I'm Shelley Adler

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High Florida School Nicholas Cruz Paul Connor Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorde Shelley Adler
"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:21 min | 4 months ago

"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Generation. So let's start there in the book, you talk about John Locke. Give us just an overview and nutshell version of who is this figure and how does John Locke, a philosopher, figure in the development of what we call the United States of America? Yeah, as you point out, he was a philosopher. He was an author. He wrote much of his writings in secret under a pen name or anonymously because what he was writing about would be and was deemed by many to be treasonous in light of being ruled by the king under the British Crown. And so he was writing about these ideas. He has many different essays and books that were very famous. And second to the Bible, his writings were like the most read by the founding fathers. They didn't have the Internet and social media and TikTok and all their ass. They just had stuff to read pamphlets and newspapers and the like, and his ideas spread like wildfire through the colonies. Again, like we were talking about earlier, these unique circumstances where they had been experimenting with self government, trying to figure out how this should work and why the British Crown ruling them was a problem and so forth. And here comes John Locke with the philosophical foundation to give them the support they needed to say, no, what you're doing has moral strength, what you're doing is right. Here's the confidence you can have in taking a few steps further into the darkness and have confidence that what you're doing is the right thing. And so it was a big moral and intellectual support for a lot of the early founding fathers who were taking bold action to have kind of the philosophical intellectual justification for them to stand up to the strongest government in the world. So John Locke basically single handedly shifted the mindset of these colonists to no longer see themselves as subjects of The Crown, but it's free individuals. So he deserves far more credit than any of the social studies books out there are giving him. And more than him, it's the ideas which again, those are the ideas that we can learn from and apply to our world today. That's why we wanted to highlight them in our book to say this stuff matters. We should be reading John Locke still today. Yeah, I mean, it's incredible. When did he live exactly? I know you've got all this stuff in your book here. I'm flipping through. I'm trying to remember, I know he's in the 17th century. Actually, when we come back, we'll have those factors for you. Ladies and gentlemen, we'll be right back. The book we're talking about is a tuttle twins book America's history 1215, 1776. God bless America. We'll be right back. See the curtains hanging in the window in the evening on the Friday night. And lie in The Shining through the window. Let me know everything's all right. You can do what you feel how did America get to be America. Good question. If you want to know the answer, I'm speaking with Connor boyack, who's written a book called America's history, 1215 to 17 76. That's the gestation period of this country. We were just.

John Locke philosophical foundation America Connor boyack
"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:11 min | 4 months ago

"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Folks, welcome to the Eric metaxas show sponsored by legacy precious metals. There's never been a better time to invest in precious metals, visit legacy p.m. investments dot com that's legacy p.m. investments dot com. Welcome to the Eric metaxas show with your host, Eric the Texas. Happy Independence Day. Folks, happy independence week. God bless America. If you know anything about me, you know that rather late in life, I have come to see the astonishing, almost preposterous blessing that is the United States of America. I've begun to understand it. And I want the world to understand it because America is not a gift for Americans. It's God's idea for the whole world. This idea of liberty and freedom and it's beautiful. And of course, it's a checkered story like all stories. You know, the Bible has a couple of checkered stories in case you're wondering. But we need to know our history and we need a specially especially to teach American history to kids. And when I say teach American history, I mean teach actual history, not kind of like lies and negative stories which are misleading and ultimately wrong, but actually true American history. And along those lines, I've just stumbled on a book, not literally, it's called America's history. It's a tuttle twins series of stories, the author Connor boyack is with me, Connor. Welcome to the program. Thank you, Eric, for having me. I appreciate it. Am I pronouncing your surname slightly correctly? I want to be clear. I am a boy that yaks a lot so boyack is how we say. Connor, boyack, you may be known to a lot of people who are listening in or watching because of the tuttle twins. I'm guessing, yes? Yeah. Yeah, yeah, we've sold millions of copies now and you promoted in the past and Glenn Beck and others. So word is kind of gotten out, which is a really good thing. Well, the tuttle twins tell my audience because the book I'm looking at right here, it says it's a total twin series of stories. It's titled America's history, 1215 to 1776. So folks, if you're tracking, that's a Magna Carta, 1776. Obviously, when we declared independence formally, so this is the first book in the series about America's history, 1215 to 1776. But before we get into the book, America's history, talk a tiny bit about yourself and about the tuttle twins so that people understand what that is. So I'm a product of public school. I really disliked it. I did poorly. I hated history. I hated economics. I didn't enjoy any of that. And it was later in life when I discovered a passion for these topics because I've realized that we teach them completely wrong. Young Connor had to memorize names and dates and facts and formulas and all kinds of things that had no relevance to him. So I didn't care. It was pumping dump and I moved on and I didn't appreciate what I was learning. And so what we've done now in recent years has created a series of books for kids of all ages. We've got toddler books and teen books and all the rest called the tuttle twins. And we've sold millions of copies. Our goal is to help parents talk to their kids about the ideas of freedom in a fun, accessible way through storytelling. No kid likes to learn in a textbook and memorize stuff. All of our books are stories and it's through those stories that we can teach some amazing and some complex and important ideas. Well, I love that. So that's the tuttle twins. And the book that's in front of me on this very special week when we celebrate American independence, which everyone needs to celebrate. Don't just have hot dogs, celebrate American independence. Perhaps by eating hot dogs and blowing off some fireworks..

Eric metaxas America boyack Connor boyack Connor Eric Young Connor Texas Glenn Beck Carta Magna
"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:40 min | 5 months ago

"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Have a few minutes left. We're talking to Connor boyack, who is the author of this book. So what is your sense of American history today? As you go through these ideas and you say, you know, what did you discover in a sense, even though you knew a lot of this before? But what did you discover? I think I rediscovered what we've discussed in that is God's hand and the Providence that a lot of the founding fathers recognize this miracle in a lot of ways for the circumstances. I think what had faded for me in years past was the appreciation for how remarkable in the true sense of the word that all of these events where you get used to it. You just, it is what it is. And it's this quote. Let's go set off fireworks and have our barbecue. But when you really start stories, when you see these people going through a can you see someone like Thomas Jefferson, who yes had slaves yet at the same time was bemoaning slavery and trying to figure out ways to move away from it, right? He was a thinker way ahead of his time. We don't appreciate enough the ingenuity and the amazing educated enlightenment of the people who helped form this nation. So what I hope the gift that we're trying to provide families with this book is to say you can appreciate that too. You can understand these ideas and more importantly, they can be empowering to your life today. It's one thing to just read history and say, oh, that was interesting, right? No, we want to empower you to make a better world today, and that's what our goal is with our book. And I do want to say, again, folks, it's hard not to see God's hand in these stories. In the same way when you read the stories in the Bible, you just say, wow, look at God's hand in history. Look at how he moved Moses. I moved Abraham. And there's this story that's working itself out. We don't understand why God did it that way, but he did it that way. And it's beautiful and it's redemptive and it's using broken sinful people like Thomas Jefferson or Ben Franklin or anybody these are people exactly like us and in the end it's beautiful and it's redemptive and it's important that we all know it. So Connor boyack, thank you. The book is titled America's history. It's a total twins book, America's history, and again, let me say, God bless America and Connor, thank you so much for your time. Everybody wants to run takes. Your forget your tickets for a long time. Folks, literally today, over the weekend, this week, we're celebrating the 4th of July. This is the time we celebrate Independence Day. It is one of the most amazing things, 1776. I've written about it in my book if you can keep it. I recommend the book, not because I wrote it. I wrote it to get these ideas out to my fellow Americans. We've got to understand what we have is amazingly beautiful and fragile and important and we need to defend it and fight for it and spread these ideas around the world and certainly spread them in our communities. We need to keep the.

Connor boyack Thomas Jefferson Providence America Ben Franklin Moses Abraham Connor
"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:20 min | 5 months ago

"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Generation. So let's start there in the book, you talk about John Locke. Give us just an overview and nutshell version of who is this figure, and how does John Locke, a philosopher, figure in the development of what we call the United States of America? Yeah, as you point out, he was a philosopher. He was an author. He wrote much of his writings in secret under a pen name or anonymously because what he was writing about would be and was deemed by many to be treasonous in light of being ruled by the king under the British Crown. And so he was writing about these ideas. He has many different essays and books that were very famous. And second to the Bible, his writings were like the most read by the founding fathers. They didn't have the Internet and social media and TikTok and all their ass. They just had stuff to read pamphlets and newspapers and the like, and his ideas spread like wildfire through the colonies. Again, like we were talking about earlier, these unique circumstances where they had been experimenting with self government, trying to figure out how this should work and why the British Crown ruling them was a problem and so forth. And here comes John Locke with the philosophical foundation to give them the support they needed to say, no, what you're doing has moral strength, what you're doing is right. Here's the confidence you can have in taking a few steps further into the darkness and have confidence that what you're doing is the right thing. And so it was a big moral and intellectual support for a lot of the early founding fathers who were taking bold action to have kind of the philosophical intellectual justification for them to stand up to the strongest government in the world. So John Locke basically single handedly shifted the mindset of these colonists to no longer see themselves as subjects of The Crown, but it's free individuals. So he deserves far more credit than any of the social studies books out there are giving him. And more than him, it's the ideas which again, those are the ideas that we can learn from and apply to our world today. That's why we wanted to highlight them in our book to say this stuff matters. We should be reading John Locke still today. Yeah, I mean, it's incredible. When did he live exactly? I know you've got all this stuff in your book here. I'm flipping through. I'm trying to remember, I know he's in the 17th century. Actually, when we come back, we'll have those facts for you. Ladies and gentlemen, we'll be right back. The book we're talking about is a tuttle twins book America's history 1215, 1776. God bless America. We'll be right back. See the curtains hanging in the wind low in the evening on my Friday night. And lie in The Shining through the window. Let me know everything's all right. You can do what you feel how did America get to be America. Good question. If you want to know the answer, I'm speaking with Connor boyack, who's written a book called America's history 1215 to 17 76. That's the gestation period of this country..

John Locke philosophical foundation America Connor boyack
"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:58 min | 5 months ago

"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Back. Have you heard of the tuttle twins? Well, now you have, in case you hadn't, and there's a new book out celebrating American independence brand new book called America's history 1215 to 1776. Did you get that? 1215 to 1776. Connor, boyack, the author is kind of what you just shared about how the centuries leading up to 1776. It's impossible if you're a genuine free thinker, not to see what looks like God's Providence. I mean, the idea that there's this continent that there are these problems in Europe that lead people to get on boats that if you centuries earlier, they weren't able to do this, but now they're able to sail across the Atlantic and to form these free societies and to kind of experiment with the idea of freedom. They're too far away for king George or others to bother them, so they have the freedom to mess up, to figure it out, whatever. All of that really seems providential. It's kind of amazing that this was able to happen so that as the decades pass, they begin to get the idea, hey, hey, we think we know how to govern ourselves. We think maybe it's possible we could govern ourselves. What do you say? I mean, it really is almost funny to me how it happened. I think that's right. The circumstances were extremely unique. I also see God's hand in it. And it's why I'm especially concerned about the state of the school system and history education today to have this birth rate, this blessing that's been given to us. And if we are just kind of discarding that or dismissing it or ignoring it, if we're not teaching kids these powerful ideas to appreciate them to understand them to defend them when they're being attacked, then what are we doing? We're trading away the birthright from Massa pottage and here we are in modern America where people don't even understand these ideas. And so for me, as I survey the landscape and I see how far I think we've fallen, how far things have been dumbed down for kids today. To me, it's a red flag. It's a warning. It's shouting from the rooftops to say penance. You need to understand things have gotten bad. They're talking about all kinds of stupid stuff in the schools. We have to take our own initiative and the problem, Eric, that I've experienced over the years of doing the tuttle twins. Is that a lot of these parents who like me are products of the public school from years past, they feel inadequate in their own understanding. They feel like, well, how do I talk to my kids about something I never really learned that well, or what I can do. And so that's why what we're trying to do is to say, hey, mom, hey, dad, no worries. You're going to learn together with your kids. Just read these books. They're fun stories. You'll talk about them. You all learn together. And I want to say, because sometimes I think there are people out there, maybe they've read my history books. So they have some idea about me like, oh, Eric went to Yale. Let me confess, ladies and gentlemen. In case you have some fake idea about who I am, most of what I know today, I came to as an adult. Many years after I graduated high school and college, and you should never be ashamed to learn something today or tomorrow. Don't pretend like, oh, I'm too old. Nonsense. Most of what I learned about America about history, about ideas about God about the Bible, I learned as an adult and I have to tell you, it's in spite of my Yale college education. It's in spite of that that I was able to learn this stuff. And it's in reading books like this book, which looks like it's for kids, whatever. But, you know, you have some stuff in here, for example, about John Locke. And I think everybody should know who that is. I barely know anything about John. There are all kinds of holes in my background, and I confess this because I think we need to learn this together, things have gotten so bad that we all need to get excited about learning now today for our kids for the future.

boyack Massa pottage America Connor king George Providence Atlantic Europe Eric Yale John Locke John
"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:19 min | 5 months ago

"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Let's go through this. I mean, you talk about what happened in running meat in 1215. You talk about Marco Polo. But as the years go by, how do these ideas slowly lead us to 1776 to the miracle of 1776? Well, certainly you have the exploration of the pilgrims, the seeking refuge for religious freedom from the persecution they were experiencing. You had a lot of chartered colonies of people for corporate reasons or for freedom reasons coming to America looking to better their lives through hard work and industry. You had a lot of experiment and self government, the colonies were in a lot of ways independently managed because of global circumstances, the French and Indian War, parliament taking a hands off approach. And so you had this very unique set of circumstances that allowed for people for perhaps the first time ever in the world to kind of make their society as they wanted it rather than inheriting old forms and being bogged down by dictatorial decrees. And so that led to a lot of innovation in government and self government. It led to a lot of different declarations and constitutions. And certainly the writings of John Locke and others who were fanning the flames for these principles that you talk about, life, liberty, and property, and helping people understand that they are free individuals, not subjects of The Crown, not citizens of a government. They are free individuals with rights of their own to understand. All these things leading up in the centuries before the revolution, it's why John Adams says that the revolution happened before the first shot was fired at Lexington and Concord and not after what happened after it was just the manifestation of the mindset shift that these people had been going through. We're going to go to a break. We're talking to Connor boyack. The book is America's history 1215 to 1776. We'll be right back. Hey there folks, Eric meta taxes here. As you know, our friend and he's a real friend, Mike lindell has a passion to help everyone get the best sleep of their life, but he didn't stop by simply creating the best pillow. Now Mike has done it again by introducing his my slippers, my slippers, they're unbelievable. I know all about them, but I got to tell you for a limited time you will save $90 on each pair of my slippers. They're expensive. You can save $90. This blowout sale of the year won't last order. Now he's taken over two years to develop them. The mice slippers are designed to wear indoors and out all day long made with my pillow foam and impact gel to help prevent fatigue made with quality leather swayed call one 809 7 8 three O 5 7 use the promo code Eric. Or go to my pillow dot com, click on the radio listeners square and use promo code Eric, the offer will not last long, so order now with promo code Eric at my pillow dot com or call 809 7 8 three O 5 7 809 7 8 three O 5 7. Folks, welcome.

Marco Polo Connor boyack John Locke Eric meta America Mike lindell John Adams Concord Lexington Mike Eric
"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

10:07 min | 5 months ago

"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"We can't see tomorrow, but we can hear it. And it sounds like a wind farm powering homes across the country. We're bridging to a sustainable energy future, working today to ensure tomorrow is on. Enbridge, life takes energy. Folks, welcome to the Eric metaxas show, sponsored by legacy precious metals. There's never been a better time to invest in precious metals, visit legacy p.m. investments dot com that's legacy p.m. investments dot com. Welcome to the Eric metaxas show with your host, Eric the Texas. Happy Independence Day. Folks, happy independence week. God bless America. If you know anything about me, you know that rather late in life, I have come to see the astonishing, almost preposterous blessing that is the United States of America. I've begun to understand it. And I want the world to understand it because America is not a gift for Americans. It's God's idea for the whole world. This idea of liberty and freedom and it's beautiful. And of course, it's a checkered story like all stories. The Bible has a couple of checkered stories in case you're wondering. But we need to know our history and we need to especially especially to teach American history to kids. And when I say teach American history, I mean teach actual history, not kind of like lies and negative stories which are misleading and ultimately wrong, but actually true American history. And along those lines, I've just stumbled on a book, not literally, it's called America's history. It's a tuttle twins series of stories, the author Connor boyack is with me, Connor. Welcome to the program. Thank you, Eric, for having me. I appreciate it. Am I pronouncing your surname slightly correctly? I want to be clear. I am a boy that yaks a lot, so boyack is how we say. Connor, boyack, you may be known to a lot of people who are listening in or watching because of the tuttle twins. I'm guessing, yes? Yeah. Yeah, yeah, we've sold millions of copies now and you've promoted us in the past and Glenn Beck and others. So word has kind of gotten out, which is a really good thing. Well, the tuttle twins tell my audience because the book I'm looking at right here, it says it's a total twin series of stories. It's titled America's history 1215 to 1776. So folks, if you're tracking, that's a Magna Carta, 1776. Obviously, when we declared independence formally, so this is the first book in the series about America's history, 1215 to 1776. But before we get into the book, America's history, talk a tiny bit about yourself and about the tuttle twins so that people understand what that is. So I'm a product of public school. I really disliked it. I did poorly. I hated history. I hated economics. I didn't enjoy any of that. And it was later in life when I discovered a passion for these topics because I've realized that we teach them completely wrong. Young Connor had to memorize names and dates and facts and formulas and all kinds of things that had no relevance to him. So I didn't care. It was pumping dump and I moved on and I didn't appreciate what I was learning. And so what we've done now in recent years is created a series of books for kids of all ages. We've got toddler books and teen books and all the rest called the tuttle twins. And we've sold millions of copies. Our goal is to help parents talk to their kids about the ideas of freedom in a fun, accessible way through storytelling. No kid likes to learn in a textbook and memorize stuff. All of our books are stories and it's through those stories that we can teach some amazing and some complex and important ideas. Well, I love that. So that's the tuttle twins. And the book that's in front of me on this very special week when we celebrate American independence, which everyone needs to celebrate. Don't just have hot dogs, celebrate American independence. Perhaps by eating hot dogs and blowing off some fireworks. But talk to us about why you chose to write a book, America's history 1215 to 17 76. I think by the way, that's very clever and wonderful, but tell my audience about that. Yeah, of course. Thank you. It started two and a half years ago. I went on Amazon and eBay, and I bought a whole bunch of social studies books for, let's say, grades three through 8. And I wanted to understand how were they talking to kids today about the constitution about the revolution, the Declaration of Independence and all these ideas. So I buy these books, they start flipping through all of them. And the books do a wonderful job at teaching what I'll call the superficial stuff of history. Who said what and when and when was this battle thought and what muskets did they use? What was the quote we're going to memorize from this letter? What these books did a horrible job at in my estimation is teaching substantive history, the ideas, the philosophy, the judeo Christian influence, the Greco Roman influence. I mean, John Adams has this great quote where he says that the real American Revolution happened in the 15 years preceding the first shot being fired at Lexington and Concord. It was the intellectual revolution. It was the ideas. It was John Locke. These books hardly talk about that at all. So we wanted a boat that could teach kids, not just what happened, but why it happened. The ideas of the past. We talk about all the time. I know your viewers know the quote, those who don't learn from the past are doomed to repeat it. The fundamental problem is we're not talking to kids today in a way where they can learn from the past. We're just teaching them about it. And that's how our history education gets done down. It's how we're pumping out socialists out of our high schools. And so we wanted a book that could focus on true history, the ideas of history and in a way that can be applied to our world today. Well, I always say, I just did an interview about one of my own books is atheism dead. And I thought to myself, in the interview, I was saying that when you learn the truth, it's exciting because I think a lot of us maybe we're a little confused and we think, well, who's to say what the truth is and it's complicated and whatever. In many cases, that's not true. In many cases, it's astonishing and it's empowering and beautiful. The story of these ideas that lead to what we call the United States of America. And the ideas themselves are really exciting and when you get it, you think, wow, this is great. How come everybody in the world doesn't have this? And then you start thinking, how come most people in America aren't even aware of this? Because when the ideas start clicking and you understand the genius of what we call American style self government, you think, how come it took so long for the world to get this. And then you kind of think, on the other hand, why did we ever get this? Like, why do we have the gift of liberty? And whatever. And then you inevitably see God's hand in it and so ultimately it's very exciting. So I'm thrilled that you're focusing on the ideas because once you communicate these ideas, because once you get this, you're done. You're not going to un get it because it's powerful. So now this book did you write it? And again, the book is called America's history, Connor boyack is the author. It's an illustrated book looks like a textbook for what? 5th graders or fourth graders or how do you think of this as what kind of a book is this in your mind? Yeah, so I mean, our book, what we're focusing on, really, is a family resource. What we found with our other total trends books is that they go for kids age like 5 to 11, but we've got like 16 year olds reading it. It's beneath them in terms of format, but the ideas are fresh and exciting and presented in an interesting way. We get parents all the time who are like, holy cow, I never learned this stuff in school. You know, I'm learning all kinds of new stuff now. And so this particular book is for kids were saying about age 7 to 13, but really it's for the whole family. It's to say, let's read this together at the dinner table. Let's have a discussion with recognize God's hand and the influence of the Bible on the early founders of the pilgrims and all the rest that created this amazing society, but more importantly, let's have a discussion and we have props in the book to facilitate this to say, how does this apply to our world? Learning from the past is only interesting if we're not letting it be informative of what we should believe and do in our world today. So we want to empower kids and their parents to say, this stuff should motivate you. It should change you. It should empower you. It's about remaking our world today for the better, not just curiously learning about stuff that randomly happened in the past, is to say, what can we do with those ideas in our present to make a better future? And I just want to say before we go to our first break, I've written 30 children's books, and I have learned many of the things that I know today from reading children's books. I didn't read the Narnia chronicles until I was 30 years old. And I learned theology and things from those books, people said, those are kids books. Not really, folks. Anything that you can read, it's for you. If it excites you. And I think people should never adults should never, ever, ever be ashamed to read books that look like they're for young people. I think of my friend Sally Lloyd Jones wrote the Jesus storybook Bible. I can not tell you how many adults the penny dropped and they're like, wow, I never heard this before. That's amazing. Reading it to their three year olds. And so I know that's true of the book that I have in front of me. It's called America's history, a total twins book, Connor boyack is my guest. We'll be.

America Eric metaxas boyack Connor boyack Connor Young Connor Eric Enbridge Carta Glenn Beck Magna Texas John Locke John Adams Concord Lexington eBay Amazon un Sally Lloyd Jones
"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:30 min | 5 months ago

"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Powerful. So now this book did you write it and again, the book is called America's history, Connor boyack is the author. It's an illustrated book looks like a textbook for what? 5th graders or fourth graders or how do you think of this as what kind of a book is this in your mind? Yeah, so I mean, our book, what we're focusing on really is a family resource. What we found with our other total trends books is that they go for kids age like 5 to 11, but we've got like 16 year olds reading it. It's beneath them in terms of format, but the ideas are fresh and exciting and presented in an interesting way. We get parents all the time who are like, holy cow, I never learned this stuff in school. You know, I'm learning all kinds of new stuff now. And so this particular book is for kids were saying about age 7 to 13, but really it's for the whole family. It's to say, let's read this together at the dinner table. Let's have a discussion with recognize God's hand and the influence of the Bible on the early founders of the pilgrims and all the rest that created this amazing society, but more importantly, let's have a discussion and we're prompts in the book to facilitate this to say, how does this apply to our world, learning from the past is only interesting if we're not letting it be informative of what we should believe and do in our world today. So we want to empower kids and their parents to say, this stuff should motivate you. It should change you. It should empower you. It's about remaking our world today for the better, not just curiously learning about stuff that randomly happened in the past, is to say, what can we do with those ideas in our present to make a better future? And I just want to say before we go to our first break, I've written 30 children's books, and I have learned many of the things that I know today from reading children's books. I didn't read the Narnia chronicles until I was 30 years old. And I learned theology and things from those books. People said, those are kids books. Not really, folks. Anything that you can read it's for you. If it excites you. And I think people should never adults should never, ever, ever be ashamed to read books that look like they're for young people. I think of my friend Sally Lloyd Jones wrote the Jesus storybook Bible. I can not tell you how many adults the penny dropped and they're like, wow, I never heard this before. That's amazing. Reading it to their three year olds. And so I know that's true of the book that I have in front of me. It's called America's history, a total twins book, Connor boyack is my guest. We'll be.

Connor boyack America Sally Lloyd Jones
"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:11 min | 5 months ago

"connor" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Folks, welcome to the Eric metaxas show, sponsored by legacy precious metals. There's never been a better time to invest in precious metals, visit legacy p.m. investments dot com that's legacy p.m. investments dot com. Welcome to the Eric metaxas show with your host, Eric the Texas. Happy Independence Day. Folks, happy independence week. God bless America. If you know anything about me, you know that rather late in life, I have come to see the astonishing, almost preposterous blessing that is the United States of America. I've begun to understand it. And I want the world to understand it because America is not a gift for Americans. It's God's idea for the whole world. This idea of liberty and freedom and it's beautiful. And of course, it's a checkered story like all stories. You know, the Bible has a couple of checkered stories in case you're wondering. But we need to know our history and we need a specially especially to teach American history to kids. And when I say teach American history, I mean teach actual history, not kind of like lies and negative stories which are misleading and ultimately wrong, but actually true American history. And along those lines, I've just stumbled on a book, not literally, it's called America's history. It's a tuttle twins series of stories, the author Connor boyack is with me, Connor. Welcome to the program. Thank you, Eric, for having me. I appreciate it. Am I pronouncing your surname slightly correctly? I want to be clear. I am a boy that yaks a lot so boyack is how we say. Connor, boyack, you may be known to a lot of people who are listening in or watching because of the tuttle twins. I'm guessing, yes? Yeah. Yeah, yeah, we've sold millions of copies now and you promoted in the past and Glenn Beck and others. So word is kind of gotten out, which is a really good thing. Well, the tuttle twins tell my audience because the book I'm looking at right here, it says it's a total twin series of stories. It's titled America's history, 1215 to 1776. So folks, if you're tracking, that's a Magna Carta, 1776. Obviously, when we declared independence formally, so this is the first book in the series about America's history, 1215 to 1776. But before we get into the book, America's history, talk a tiny bit about yourself and about the tuttle twins so that people understand what that is. So I'm a product of public school. I really disliked it. I did poorly. I hated history. I hated economics. I didn't enjoy any of that. And it was later in life when I discovered a passion for these topics because I've realized that we teach them completely wrong. Young Connor had to memorize names and dates and facts and formulas and all kinds of things that had no relevance to him. So I didn't care. It was pumping dump and I moved on and I didn't appreciate what I was learning. And so what we've done now in recent years has created a series of books for kids of all ages. We've got toddler books and teen books and all the rest called the tuttle twins. And we've sold millions of copies. Our goal is to help parents talk to their kids about the ideas of freedom in a fun, accessible way through storytelling. No kid likes to learn in a textbook and memorize stuff. All of our books are stories and it's through those stories that we can teach some amazing and some complex and important ideas. Well, I love that. So that's the tuttle twins. And the book that's in front of me on this very special week when we celebrate American independence, which everyone needs to celebrate. Don't just have hot dogs, celebrate American independence. Perhaps by eating hot dogs and blowing off some fireworks..

Eric metaxas America boyack Connor boyack Connor Eric Young Connor Texas Glenn Beck Carta Magna
"connor" Discussed on I Said No Gifts!

I Said No Gifts!

04:23 min | 8 months ago

"connor" Discussed on I Said No Gifts!

"Gorgeous. I have a feeling that I have a feeling that his lifestyle while unorthodox probably includes a healthy regimen of exercise and proper diet than my own. He's a weirdo, but I can imagine him enjoying sprouts, you know? Oh, of course. And I feel like he's got a lot of running shorts. I feel like he's somebody who's out there early break of dawn running around the city. Also, also, I think we can say fairly confidently that gonzo is most likely a vegan. Oh, a 100%. He loves the chickens. He loves the chickens. There's no way. And once and everything, every other form of meat tastes like chicken, so there's no way that he would do that to Camille. Yeah, a 100%. Look, Connor, I would love to talk about I could probably spend the next hour talking about guns. But I can't do that today. I need to talk to you about something else. What's that? Look, you agreed to be on this podcast a little while ago. I was so happy I thought Connor fantastic as his own podcast, dead eyes, which is wonderful. He obviously knows the scene knows what it means to be a guest, what it means to be a host of a podcast. Absolutely. We'll come on, he'll treat me with the respect I deserve. I will try to do the same and then we'll release the episode and everyone will enjoy it. So I was a little surprised yesterday when I opened my door, thinking I'm going to be recording my podcast, I said, no gifts with Connor tomorrow. And there was a little, a little something there from me. A for me from you, which is now kind of in this bag, kind of a large bag that says celebrate. And so I'm just curious. I don't know what your game is here. I don't know what the plan is for you. Is this a gift for me? I have to say that it is a gift for you..

Connor gonzo Camille
"connor" Discussed on I Said No Gifts!

I Said No Gifts!

04:23 min | 8 months ago

"connor" Discussed on I Said No Gifts!

"Welcome to I said no gifts I'm bridger Weiner. Ah, you're catching me just moments after setting up some sort of new device audio device computer things going on so I'm at my most relaxed I'm just being easygoing and my heart rate is low and I hope you're in a similarly peaceful place. And so you can enjoy this podcast because I think you're going to have a great time with today's guest who is just fantastic. It's Connor ratliff. Connor, welcome to I said no gifts. Oh, thank you for having me. I'm so I'm so glad to be here. How are you? I'm doing well, you know, on balance in these trying times. I'm holding it together. I feel like the last few weeks have been eventful for you. They've certainly been eventful for me. They've also been very eventful in the world at large. It feels like a very fraught time. Yes. Estranged. It's very, very strange years. Not ideal. But not ideal. That's so that's such a perfect way of putting it. Not ideal. Not my perfect things are not going exactly to my plan. And I don't think the same for anyone else. But I do feel like, look, for you, yes. Your mating Tom Hanks, you're going, I believe, on a cruise. You're doing, you're having at least an isolated, enjoyable time. I've been doing rather well personally in the past couple of weeks. But even that is somewhat overwhelming, you know? Right. You know, my natural state is a little more relaxed. And when too many things are happening, even if they're good things, it can be an overloading of the senses. The system can only handle so much. Yeah. Well, let's start. I feel like you were recently on a cruise. Yes, I was a performer on the joko cruise, which is Jonathan coulton's music and comedy nerd crews. Right, and that what you just said is maybe 1% more than what I know about this cruise. I knew that there was some nerd element. I know Jonathan Colton and there was comedy, but I still can't quite zero in on what this happens on this cruise..

bridger Weiner Connor ratliff Connor Tom Hanks Jonathan coulton Jonathan Colton
"connor" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

03:04 min | 8 months ago

"connor" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Connor Hi congressman Here is my request of you We were just talking before you came on the air about microplastics and how it threatens our country and our society our health And in that vein I would like to ask you what's on your radar screen Because we all know that government regulation protects us from such things What is on your radar screen as far as former president Trump's deregulation of our country What do regulations are you looking at to reinstate to protect our health our republic our rights as human beings What are you looking at And Tom my request to you is the same as far as I request that you talk a little bit more about okay Rick I'm going to cut you off there because time is flying by in congressman Connor is not with us for a very long congressman You want to respond to it Well Rick raises a very eloquent point And that is every time I go on an airplane I am thankful that we have regulations I mean the right has made regulations and so there's boogeyman but the reality is regulations is what allows us to get into card safely It's allows us to get into airplane safely We need more regulation on social media So the young people aren't facing depression and two sides We need more regulation to make sure that our environment is safe And Trump had like many Republicans that come in and they cut a lot of these regulations It hurts the environment It hurts workers It hurts children And so we have to be not timid about making the case that regulations are a good thing often for human beings Anthony and Dearborn Michigan you're on the earth congressman condom Here we go I'm Medicare Oh hi Yeah I hear you Here you're fine Go ahead Sorry I heard there was a committee hearing on Medicare for All on Tuesday and I thought I was in the oversight committee It seemed like a strange place for me I would have thought of in the health education committee So I'm wondering why it was there who scheduled it and how and why your leadership doesn't support it because we have videos of Pelosi saying she supported it in the 90s why how that got scheduled if your leadership doesn't support it Well I was on the committee and three I agree ideally should be an energy and commerce but we'll take the hearing where we can get it It was great that we were able to collectively as progressives push to have that hearing and Carolyn baloney held it Not only philosophy president Obama was for single in 2004 before he ran for the presidency And the question I asked during that hearing I made a very simple point that the average American family of four pays a $12,000 tax to private health insurance is average businesses pay a $16,000 tax to private health insurance.

congressman Connor Rick Connor Trump Dearborn depression Anthony Michigan Medicare Carolyn baloney Pelosi Obama
"connor" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

08:43 min | 11 months ago

"connor" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"It's so great to have a network of support, you know, not that it's bad if you only have one go to person, but sometimes it can be a lot to be that person and sometimes I've been that person for somebody and that that person doesn't want to do anything. Doesn't want to seek any kind of help. And it can be it can be tough. It can be draining. Totally. I know. I almost have to remind myself at times when I have people close to me that are going through a similar thing of like, you know what it's like to be that person in the position you know what it's like to not that it takes so much time at times they're going to be a little bit nasty and they don't mean it at times they're not going to take your advice and you just if you care about them, you just gotta stick it out and know that that's not really them half the time. It's a version of themselves they wish they weren't even a version themselves that can change too. It's frustrating when it's somebody who can't embrace that it might be something other than just the circumstances of their life and that it's a death sentence and they're kind of crossing that line and to self pity and chosen helplessness. That that can be really tough because there's such a fine line between giving somebody the dignity to express their experience and how they are experiencing with it without putting labels on it without putting a schedule on it. And just being somebody that is drained and getting the feeling that they don't want to hear anything you have to say that they just want you to be an audience member. People yeah, if people love the myself included, it's like you love to tell people the hard time you're going through, but you don't want the advice or you don't want them to tell them till they're hard thing they're going through. It's such a sick cycle. And it is. Again, it's a sickness. It's a mental illness. You don't want to participate in what you can't help yourself. So it really does have to be handled with care from both ends and it's tough. It is a tough one to go through to be an or to experience on the outside too. So it's like I handle with empathy and grace, but God is not easy a lot of time. Yeah. From either party again from experiencing it or having it happen around. It's so tough. It is tough. Yeah. Condor thanks so much for coming and sharing your life and congrats on your new book. Thank you. And all the work you do and all that advocacy and claiming your truth. It's such a beautiful thing to hear. Thank you so much. Thanks for giving me an outlet to speak my truth too. This was a really, really nice, really nice podcast beyond I appreciate it. And if people want to know more about you, if they're not aware of you yet, where can they find you? Well, first of all, my book publisher would love this, my new book is out everywhere you can get it anywhere books are sold if you like the way I read it, there is an audiobook as well. So you can go check all those out at Connor frantic books dot com. That's an OR, the correct way to spell partner. Let's isolate the Connors. The most controversial thing you've said in our interview. Oh my gosh. And then I make YouTube content along the similar lines, very open mind, very present, so that's kind of on YouTube, Connor for inter cross all socials. That's me. Thank you so much. No worries. Really enjoyed talking to him. I was 11 new people. Especially people that are emotionally intelligent and have a lot of shit to say. So go check his stuff out. Let's dive into some surveys. I'm not sure I'll get through all of these. I don't know why I got alert you to that fact. I'm afraid you're going to judge me. Even though you can't see how many I've got chosen. This is from the shame and secret survey filled out by a woman who calls herself just a leaf on the wind. She identifies his pansexual. She's in her 20s, was raised in a stable and safe environment. Ever been the victim of sexual abuse, some stuff happened, but I don't know if it counts. I would absolutely say that this counts. She writes when I was 8, my best friend at the time made me do some weird stuff. She would make me strip down naked so she could draw me. She would often pretend that she was my boyfriend when we played together. At one point, she backed me into a wall and started to molest me. She wouldn't stop even when I threatened to break her arm. She was only a year older than me but a lot bigger. I dug my nails in and gave her a serious Indian burn until she stopped touching me. She never tried it again. By the way, can we find a different word for that? She never tried it again, but after that, she found a new group of friends and completely shut me out. I never told anyone until two years ago because we were really young. I don't know if someone in her family was abusing her or what, but I still feel like I can't fully blame her. And one of the reasons why I wanted to read that is first of all, I'm so sorry that that happened to you and it's so confusing when it's appear but. It's important to look at this through the lens of what you experienced and what your feelings are around it rather than, you know, as this person legally culpable for what happened because there are two completely separate issues and a lot of times we will ignore processing it and giving weight to what happened to us because we're like, well, you know, they're not fully responsible. Well, that might be the case, but it can still have been fucking awful and scarring for us. Ever been physically or emotionally abused. I've had a lot of people in my life put me on a pedestal, which I guess is fine when it's people you don't know well, but for me, it's been close friends, family, and even teachers. I was always feeling like I had to live up to their expectations of nice, innocent perfection growing up. Even though inside, I felt mean tainted and ugly. It created an identity war for me and huge self esteem issues. I constantly felt like I was behind everyone else and even into my adult life. Darkest thoughts. I used to self harm and would often think that I deserved it. I can be an abuser to myself and have thought that I'm horrible unclean or broken. I've thought before about just getting it over with and having a breakdown so that I could finally have evidence of how I feel inside. I think so many people relate so deeply to what you just wrote. It's like we want to like we were talking about earlier in the podcast we want our outside world to match our inside world so that we can feel seen and validated and wanting to feel seen and validated is such a normal human healthy desire. But it's like when we're raised in an environment where we are not seen or validated and attention is always critical or conditional. We try to find other ways to feel seen and validate and usually they're not too healthy. Darkest thoughts I used to self harm oh, I read that. Darkest secrets, growing up I kept my hair cut the exact same way as I wore it in late elementary up until my first year of high school. I was afraid that if I changed people would notice me and realize that I was actually attractive and want to start dating me. I kept my clothes baggy and always wore a jacket because I'd get so anxious that I would sweat through my shirt. I self harmed until two years ago and it was afraid to wear tank tops and dresses. Sexual fantasy is most powerful to you, being dominated or surrounded. Sharing.

YouTube Connors Connor
"connor" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"connor" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Jordan Davis is not a good matchup against an Alabama team that wants to get the ball out quick and swore the ball around. Against the Michigan team that wants to be more grounded pound. I think that plays into him being on the field more and having a bigger impact on that game. And so having said all that with the front 7 that Georgia has and Michigan not being a prolific passing offense, I think that plays into the Georgia defense getting right. And on top of all that, it's a very proud group of Georgia defenders that know they didn't play their best and are going to be anxious to get out there and prove that, hey, what you saw the first 12 games of the season, that's the difference that we are not the one that showed up against Alabama. So do they have, let's say they beat Michigan, Alabama beat Cincinnati, they're both favored to win. They rematch. What is give me some evidence that says that the game plan Kirby smart can game plan around Bryce young and jamison Williams. Well, I think no mechie is actually a really big factor in that just because obviously Alabama has great younger receivers, but they're not necessarily proven in the same way that John met you was. And so you feel a little bit more comfortable saying, hey, we're going to trust our corners to man up. And obviously we're going to have to do something special with Williams because his speed just makes him so difficult to defend. But I think the no match he makes it a little bit easier to say, I've got to trust Mike or backs to press band coverage and do that and again you came out and you tried to play his own and the numbers with bright young stone defenses all season he has picked them apart. So you've already shown that, okay, we have done this zone sort of attack in terms of trying to limit them. And they just flat out didn't work. So I think from a defensive standpoint, you just have to do it auburn did. And I know it's risky because as our last year in 2020, if you want to play press man coverage against really great receivers in college nowadays, go ahead. More often than not, you're going to lose. And I absolutely do take that play day fact of the 2020 game and now how Georgia went about defensively game planning for 2021. On the offensive side of the ball for Georgia in a rematch, they've got to be better on third down. I think they went 312 of that game and it's got to be better in the red zone. First three quarters, they have four trips in the red zone, ten points. That's just not good enough. Second Ben had an interception in the red zone, get an interception return for a touchdown. I set some beta didn't lose order to that game against Alabama but the problem was he wasn't good enough to bring Georgia back when out when the poll dogs finally started getting some stops there in the second half. Yeah, he didn't cost them the game. He didn't lose to Alabama, but he had an opportunity to win it and couldn't get those to make those plays. So I agree with you there. Connor Riley dog nation. Thank you so much, man. Have a great holiday. We appreciate it. Thanks for giving us some time. Awesome. Thanks, Brad and Merry Christmas to you and all. Yeah, absolutely you too. Connor Riley there for dog nation. Yeah, can't play zone against Bryce young. That is for sure. There's no question about that. The problem is, is then you're playing man to man against jamison Williams. So we'll dive into these matchups a little bit we'll take some calls as well because I do think while Michigan is a very, very worthy adversary to Georgia and to Alabama, I do agree with Connor that the matchups.

Alabama Georgia Jordan Davis Michigan Bryce young jamison Williams Kirby Cincinnati Connor Riley Williams auburn Mike John Ben Brad Connor
"connor" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

Dateable Podcast

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"connor" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

"And even though there had been time and space between it, I think there was still a part that wondered or thought maybe this person would reenter into my world. Yeah, there was a tenderness there, right? It was like this person had reentered another relationship and Connor was actually coming off of a relationship. And so it was interesting because it was a very there was familiarity to for me in my experience of it. There was familiarity and like, oh, this is really tender and raw. I've been in the situation before where a person can change their mind and go back into a dynamic that they had before. And as Connor was exiting this relationship, for me, there was a sensitivity there. I was like, oh, this is either like my wounding or this is going to be such a beautiful healing opportunity for me. You know, that line is so thin. And it's so heart right. It's like wisdom and discernment and yeah, like our awareness and our ability to have these conversations with each other is oftentimes that difference maker between just being in a pattern versus being in the healing of something that gives us that new ending. I'm grateful that, of course, where our relationship developed into was the healing for me, but there were times in the beginning stages where Connor was definitely pulling me back off the edge a bit because I was like, you know, I know this, you know? This is so familiar for me. And I definitely don't want to experience the same thing over and over and over again. And so yeah, there was definitely a Ron is there even though there had been a lot more space between the ending of my previous relationship than for Connor. So there was this fear of history repeating itself that he was would potentially get back with an ex-girlfriend? Is that kind of what was showing up for you? Yeah, I wasn't sure. That I was going to go back. No, I didn't know that, yeah, I don't know that I was concerned about that. But I think just sort of like you're full availability, right? Got it. Got it. It's like a normal question, right? It's like if somebody's coming out of a relationship, how much time do you normally need after that relationship? Because it was, you know, it was a more long-term relationship that I had done that I had exited. And so there was apprehension on her part. I see. And that makes sense, right? I think that's even if you haven't gotten out of relationship recently. We're constantly wondering how ready and other person is. And sometimes we just don't know. So something you said earlier Connor that made me think, well, that's so true with love comes logistics. So what do you think is the chicken or the egg here?.

Connor Ron
"connor" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

Out of Bounds Podcast

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"connor" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

"Max. You're listening to the pursuit podcast on the outer bones, network, the Audubon's collective. I don't know, Audubon's puts it out, so I gotta wrap them because they wrap me. Episode 20 5. I didn't think I'd get 25 episodes out. I don't know if you guys thought I'd get 25 episodes out. But it works. People dig it, keep leaving your reviews that really helps me. It helps jabber. It's my same shtick. I'm super pumped on this episode because I recorded it at K two headquarters. I never thought I'd go to K two headquarters. That might not be that exciting to some people. But to me, that was, I mean, that was the Mecca of me growing up was K two skis, K two skiing. Obviously line skis, east coast. Brand starting, and then, you know, K two bottom. But long story long, Connor Clayton is my guest. He's the marketing guru behind line skis full tilt. He was on track to go pro. He was essentially pro, plagued by injuries. We talk all about it. And then we dive into what makes line skis line skis and how they keep having more fun every year. And continuing to make really great skis that are fun. Again, let's keyword on fun skiing is fun. But no, they make really great skis. Let's keep really well. But they're playful and they're forgiving and, you know, skiing got way too serious for a really long and Lion skis is always been the driving force and Connor's a young gun. He welcomed me into the headquarters, gave me a little tour. There isn't an eruption because of Garth's jabber had to peak his head in. And I can't have anything nice. But whatever. Episode 25, Connor Clayton, I have to apologize because my audio is a little echoey. Good thing Connor talks more than I do. I'm still learning, especially in person interviews. But it came out rad. My good friend Charlie, charlier and fuller helped me on the audio side kind of dumbed it down a little bit for me. So it's really good. I'm excited. I'm excited about all my episodes. Connor, thank you so much. Line, full tilt. Go look out their new line. They just dropped it, it's amazing. Episode 25, the pursuit. Oh, there we go. All right, Connor, who are you? What do you do, man, you're live on the podcast. We're live. Hi, I'm Connor. I'm the marketing manager at Lion skis and folks up boots today. We're here in Seattle, Washington. Beautiful day, not raining. Well, hopefully it actually does rain because the fires are getting pretty bad. But you want me just to start at the beginning and talk about myself? Yeah, how'd you get here? How did you obviously you're here now? We don't have to go way back, but you grew up east coast. Yeah. Yeah, so I grew up on the east coast. Lived a lot of my life in Ohio before moving to Connecticut and around 5th grade or so. So that's kind of going way back. But lived in Connecticut and majority of my life probably about ten years or so. And that's kind of where I found my love for skiing growing up in Ohio and originally before that I was born in Canada. So I've got hockey in my blood, so a lot of hockey growing up. And that was kind of the thing to do when I was younger in Ohio and then moving to get that going up until it kind of nearing high school kind of junior high high school was always playing hockey on the team. And then just met a couple of buddies who would go skiing at a place called ski sundown, which I lived in simsbury. And sundown was probably about 20, 25 minutes away from my house since very. And small hill, maybe four or 500 foot vertical mainly just two chairlifts, fixed quads, that will take you up all the way to the top, fixed triples actually excuse me. It had night skiing, open till ten p.m., and so I'd skied a little bit back in Ohio. My parents taught me how to ski at perfect north slopes in Indiana. So I was good enough to go with some buddies and go see what kind of get skiing was all about. And I just learned that what they like to do is go through the train park a bunch when I was super young. And so as I kind of got a little bit more and more into skiing, I turned into that kid that everybody hates in terms of going off the sides of the rails and thinking it does a really cool jumps and really fun to do, so I totally did that in 5th and 6th grade. But that's an appropriate test. To be doing that. Yeah, I thought so. That's all looking back at that now. But yeah, as I kept on kind of skiing, I just kept on going with this group of friends and every day after school, we pretty much would just beg our parents to go drive us to ski sundown and drop us off so we could ski until like 9 or ten at night and luckily for us we had some amazing parents who were willing to do that at least two times a week. So I started doing that in between hockey practices and then I just kind of kept on enjoying skiing more and more and more. And then as I got later into junior high, I finally said to my mom dad, I was like, hey, I think I want to focus on skiing a lot more, like I'm really having a lot of fun with this. I think I'm going to stop playing hockey. And my dad being a Canadian his, I think I might have broke his heart a little bit, but I think eventually he got over it and like I said, they're super supportive. So they're willing to let me go that route and really focus on skiing a bit more. And when I say focus at that point, there's just something I really love to do. It's not like I was trying to do anything with it. Of course, I'm like 13 year old kid at that point. Everybody has the ambitions to be a pro skier. So it's like, yeah, I'm gonna totally do that, but. Yeah, but good for you for like knowing you were done with hockey. Yeah. Well, yeah, it's like, you know, if you're balancing two things in the winter when you want to focus on one and you're clearly having more fun doing one over the other than why not just keep doing it and put your full attention to it, right? So yeah, that allowed me to really kind of ramp up how much I was skiing and going into high school, started skiing the park a lot more with my friends. We'd go to ski center on the weekends because I didn't have hockey in the weekends anymore now. And we'd really start hiking rails and trying to learn some tricks watching a bunch of YouTube videos. And we're watching super old like TJ schiller video of how to do a rodeo 5 40 and trying to learn all these tricks and watching all of the pros at the time on YouTube and trying to teach myself how to do a 360 on a jump or anything. And eventually you'd learn and you'd landed the first time and it's just the most amazing feeling that would kind of keep you coming back for more and more and more. So that's just kind of what I ended up doing almost any free time I had throughout high school, I think in my freshman and sophomore year there had three good buddies and we would go to the hill, any chance we'd get and we'd always try to push ourselves to do a front two or learn a front four, try to do our first front swap. And so I really just kind of fell in love with the park scene because at ski sundown, you're either skiing park or you're skiing, you know, 500 foot vertical run that takes 30 seconds, then you're going to have to do that again. So in my eyes, that got boring pretty quick, but the park is always something that I think there's something new and shiny. There's something new you can try. There's something that you can learn. And so that would just open my eyes to this whole entire environment, and I just kind of fell in love with it. And then from there, kind of in my sophomore year of high school, I think I experienced what the green mountains of Vermont are in terms of had one good buddy to everybody's Kurt scholar, Chris frula, and they kind of introduced me to.

skiing Connor Connor Clayton hockey Ohio charlier east coast junior high high school Connecticut Audubon Garth Max simsbury fuller Charlie Seattle Washington TJ schiller
"connor" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"connor" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"Would've power project crude. This is josh. Selig aka settled gate here to introduce you to our next guest connor mcgovern connor. Mcgovern is an american professional football player for the new york jets. Formerly played college. Football at the university of missouri was drafted straight out of college to play for the denver broncos in twenty twenty connor suffered a pretty serious hamstring injury which affected the rest of his plane during the season however he is now back to training and lifting and connor is no stranger to the iron. He's a big proponent of the olympic lifts in strongman training four offensive lineman on a side note connor is also very involved in fundraising in charity. Work for the special needs community. In his hometown of fargo north dakota connor was also heavily involved in the fargo able games. Which is one of the first all inclusive tests functional fitness for the special needs community recently in may of twenty twenty one. The fargo able games was able to raise over million dollars for the special needs community but that is a different story. Hopefully we'll be able to learn more about in today's conversation with our guest. Connor mcgovern didn't have anything to mix mine. So i just. I'd just gave it a swirl when it worked pretty good. Let me just do that. So cause a free so in mind is i'm gonna get to the bottom. It's just going to be all chocolate salt. That's the best this a little bit here and there and then also wham element chocolate salt to the face. You know i i was sometimes. I'm following like a pretty religious carnivore diet. But then i recognize like i drink a lotta coffee and then i also recognize. I eat a lot of stuff that has chocolate like this chocolate salt. So i got more plants. I know what to do with causeway is like is coffee. It's a plant. Oh.

connor Selig aka connor mcgovern connor Mcgovern new york jets university of missouri denver broncos josh Connor mcgovern football Football olympic north dakota fargo