5 Burst results for "Connie Power"

"connie power" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

07:06 min | 3 months ago

"connie power" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"See what's happening more studio in qualcomm to thursday show. We have a situation in our house. Now where we have two dogs. I've mentioned eller probably eight or nine months old now then heat. But she's almost alphabet starting to kind of be normal a little bit but we have to keep her in her own space. That has a doggy door. That goes out to the yard. So we got that kind of under control. Stanley bulldog is fine. He's hurt his foot and he's got like a cut in between to pause now kind of managing that he's he also has a situation where he is. I think he saw something outside barking at night. It'd be like a limb elif. The wind i dunno be barking. It would always freak me out. Because i've still some. Ptsd related to being jumped or having a gun to my head. My house broken into just had a lot of situations all at once. That still affect me. When i sleep at night and so i was like okay. Man put you. He now goes to a bedroom at night. Same bed and he stays in that bedroom that we can't see outside it can't like windows and outside of the living room and see anything out there that messes them up so the night. I still still hear him times. It's muffled because the walls go so we put one of those cameras in his room. One of those dog paul cameras or whatever they call them and you can watch. He has nightmares where he wakes up and just starts barking. It's never anything of people outside. We now tracked him and all of a sudden sleeping. He's in a room with all up just before his eyes even open. You starts barking guy. He isn't it could be a nightmare could be fun. He could be playing ball or some then that changes but whatever it is. It's the weirdest thing. We just sleep marking so it isn't as loud as a wake me up. It doesn't freak me out as much now. Because i would always think well he's seen somebody outside. It's gonna come into murder us right. We have like crazy security. We got security all around people hiding in the bushes with guns basically. Yeah and so. I just say anything about it but but that's been kind of the issue of dealing with at home. It happened last night. We looked at stuff this morning and figured out he barks and asleep wakes up. And that's what that's all. It is a minor breakthrough here Margot you are on the bobby bones. Show margot boston is on the phone. Margot let me tell you something. That song you played about grandma being dated was hysterical. I am a grandma in a great grandmother. And i laughed all the way home because i had a similar experience. I have i have seven grand grandsons and one of them walked in on me. One time i mean not now but maybe when i was about fifty five and it was like oh my god and we looked at each other. We didn't know what to do. He turned around and walked out. And then when. I came out of the bathroom. I said Next time somebody's in the bathroom. You need to know. I really sorry agree but yeah I just thought that was showing credible. I can relate to it and i said Whoever is complaining needs to get a life because that was such a amazing songs and people probably my age aaa twit. Then people might give it a grammy. That's what i say. Give that grammy. Well she's talking about is on yesterday. Show i mentioned. We're getting a lot of complaints. No a few complaints about a song from eddie. Neither raging idiots. We recorded live in concert called the grandma song and this is about real life. My grandma adopted me for a long time and was like my mom for years and years and it really happened and so margot. I appreciate that call. That's why i write songs to relate to the people It's time to open up. That mailbag kenya again. Hello bobby bones. My wife and i have enjoyed listening to your show for a couple of months after months and months of kobe. I just started going back to the jim. I'm looking to get back in shape. I need some motivations. I'm looking for suggestions for songs to add to my workout playlist. What is your current goto workout song. Signed heather you know it's weird. I don't really have a go-to is i. Current have a go-to always like this is. If there's one workouts on that i would put on your list. It's kind power when this comes on this part here like whatever i'm doing and elevates about twenty percent and it's like the kate it's this hey hey one in the twenty first century do something mean to me that's the ones a good tempo to that if i'm riding a bike or if i'm running connie power is for me. The song amy. what about you. I have more of a current jam. And i don't know that it has a great workout. Tempo just gets me in a good mood. And it's justin bieber peaches. I'll listen to a playlist comes on and then have a paycheck for the workout eddie. I don't really work out but lately i've been training for this walk so i haven't listen. Bob marley a little jamming. Oh it's just chill. I don't like bob marley controversy. Look yeah popular opinion. I i it all sounds the same to me. This is not going to putney assuming just like it's more of not quick workout fast. It's very slow. And i can do this an hour right like you do. What does you good this kind of music. I i see the baltimore at three songs. I don't know the difference on songs. But that's just because i'm not culture de you're saying they all sound the same exactly i also. I know i'm too dumb to get it get dance. Music sometimes either puts song changes on the same song toward song. The because i'm not cultured in it. Oh man this is like a state of mind. I love it but like unpopular opinion. I only bob marley than good. You hear that america's going that's okay. That's okay neil young. He's good too. I love neil young beyond say i'm not obsessed with fiance. Yeah know but. I'm not supposed to say next taylor. Swift taylor's great Who else is unpopular opinion read. No no awesome. I try to get you on that. Hey richie when you're lifting. What do you do well. This was when i was running. This song came on. Hello by pop. Smoke and i ran about twice as fast as of the mellow pillow. When i'm working out. It's mostly all hip hop stuff. Maybe i'll trickling brothers osborne stuff but i need that aggressive. Be if i'm hitting are almost no country stuff unnecessary slow. Unless.

eight two dogs bob marley Bob marley Margot neil young last night yesterday twenty first century three songs thursday margot boston an hour seven grand richie One Swift this morning taylor eddie
"connie power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:56 min | 1 year ago

"connie power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"M. S. welcome to the program is to stop it let's start with a with a general question about your assessment of what do you think the U. S. health system is to responding to this kind of pandemic thanks for having me on I think clearly where we're not and I think in some in some respects we should be much better prepared I'm not sure that even with the best preparations out we would be completely prepared for something that is so unusual meaning it's so contagious spread so rapidly is so deadly in certain populations but we certainly could have been more prepared with more infrastructure and I believe that there is already a panel working on a set of recommendations for how we would address the next pandemic sadly we are we've got to get through this one but when you go through a difficult period where we're going to pay for some of the lack of planning in the inability to protect our work our healthcare workforce is much it's a show should be and to save as many lives as possible that now it's going to need to be an effort of ingenuity as opposed to them after this okay and and and if it requires ingenuity in your view is sought change in U. S. C. present in the in in the current administration all that people thinking of ways of dealing with what is being confronted in a way that is creative and will result in helping more people I think you'd be ingenuity is in a couple places the ingenuity is in the frontline healthcare workers who are figuring out how as a more time to make a ventilator or mask do more than it was designed to do by clinical guidelines it's creative it's in it's present in medical students who across the country are voluntarily delivering meals to frontline workers and doing free child care it certainly present in the biotechnology sector sector where we have people rushing to create therapies rushing to create other kinds of of prophylactic skin tests that we we should well we should have had them weeks and months ago are are racing to catch up so where are you from the definitely managed to avoid answering the question directly I mean I wonder what you make all the way in which the current administration is attempting to respond you've talked about how brilliantly creative the people on the front line all responding but they clearly struggling if people have to make wartime decisions in terms of triage should this person lives yes because that on the sixty should this person live no actually because they're over seventy that kind of thing has to be avoided at all costs shortly of course and I'm not avoiding your question the but I but I wanted to clarify the ingenuity it was referring to the ingenuity of different it was not the ingenuity of the government I'd say that the the the trump administration has been late on virtually every aspect of planning in responding to this in late in it you know we've all been late before for things in our life and we were able to catch up we're able to us to work an extra shift or work an extra night the problem with being late with the virus or grows exponentially is is like swimming after speedboat by the time you swim to to catch up to where the boat was the boat is further away than when you started and so the the time spent in January and February would have been really well placed to do the the kinds of things we're doing now so unfortunately it's going to have to be the ingenuity that we count on but it's not the ingenuity of a government it's ingenuity of our country and it's also the commitment of people to really staying home and making sure we are leaving people the chance to take care of patients who show up okay okay do you think that this section one one three five waiver which may allow states to skip us the specific steps Burek bureaucratic ones or others that would normally be required to enroll people into programs do you think that can make a really big difference I think there's been quite a disagreement over this issue you may know in the Congress that there was a the last bill there was a poison pill replaced by Mitch McConnell and the Republicans that was the the the final holdout and I believe it came down into the late morning where between Nancy Pelosi and Mitch McConnell and become a blank there was language that actually had hundreds of thousands of people that would lose Medicaid coverage at a time when it is most important now that everyone has it I don't think I think it's helpful I don't think it's sufficient I think unless we're in a position where we can make sure every American who right now is going through financial hardship that they will not have to worry about paying the bills for their medical care everything else we do is just sort of that okay ninety seven thank you very much for joining us acting administrator of the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services under president Obama climate change and coded nineteen now while they may not be evidence that climate change is influencing the spread of this disease what is now incontestable is that climate change alters how we relate to other species on the planet and that's according to experts matters to our health and our risk for new and perhaps infections that are even more dangerous than this one in other words many of the root causes of climate change also increase the risks of pandemics there is a symbiotic relationship I've been speaking to the executive director of the U. N. environment programme Inger Andersen first why is the corona virus outbreak a warning shot as we tackle the pandemic we need to understand where such diseases come from and the health of our planet plays an important role in the spread of zoonotic diseases we human beings have now impacted affect it worked on about seventy five percent of the lands of the earth's land surface and the more we encroach and destroy the more we interfere with what should be remote and wild and we know that about sixty percent of infectious diseases have stenosis as their origin we should just explain to the audience buys you know since you mean a virus that has been transferred from an animal to a human that's right and it could be a domesticated animal members the Middle East respiratory syndrome was originated in camels but more often it is from the wild a bola Z. Connie power as well as bird flu swine flu Momberg its entrance entrance so all of these what we refer to as zonal take IT from this or logical world if you like diseases can migrate when we if you like mismanaged nature or when we get too close to things that are supposed to remain in the wild and remote spaces animal we put nature under stress and the more we sort of interfere with it the more likely it appears although more research is needed that this will be exacerbated sixty percent of all these infectious diseases today that we know off have their origin in stenosis and seventy five percent of new infectious diseases appear to have their origin in synopsis so we should not blame the wild because viruses are everywhere we get the cold and we get into the fluid center but we need to understand the prudent management of habitats and avoids the habitat destruction is critical so in the context of what we're seeing happening around the world today with code of it you appear to be suggesting that although this is enormous and the first response of course is to take care of human life you seem to be suggesting that actually they could be further and possibly more serious outbreaks if we continue to destroy the natural world for farming housing mining except try but I'm not a medical doctor I work on the environment so let me first preface it is but when you look at west Nile virus or Lyme disease I mean each of these are coming into our lives when we get closer and closer into the wild and then we object to it but you know these diseases live there so what we need to understand is that keeping wild wild and keep smart diverse lush biodiversity is part and parcel of our life support system it captures our common it produces the air we breathe the food we eat the water we drink so we can not so close down nature but nature is finely attuned system where each species relapse lies on another as we we need to re claim for a stock of deforestation and invest in managing protected areas and ensure that we buy deforestation free agricultural products these are the kind of elements that become important and of course we need to address illegal wildlife trade and illegal what markets across the world I wonder if you think that that is what's going to happen when all of this is resolved all that we return to the world that we knew before the outbreak of coverage do you think that there will be an international conversation which attempts to look at the connections that you are making well the connections to anyone who works on biodiversity and conservation these are pre eminently obvious and have been called out over the years but it's hard when you get an isolated outbreak of Ebola in a distant country or you get an isolated outbreak of Z. ka in a distant country for the world to pay attention sadly it has taken this dreadful dreadful occurrence of covert nineteen to possibly making the world more and better and and seeing these interconnects and in the context of the biodiversity convention which is the sister convention on the Rio to the climate change convention we are in fact this year twenty twenty looking at getting quite ambitious agreements around safeguarding biological diversity and I would hope that indeed now that it is crystal clear that these diseases need to be managed way before they come into the human setting and that we can definitely get that degree of ambitious agreement get the financing that is needed behind it to ensure that we keep nature because we can't live without it but also that we invest in its protection do you think that it would make a difference if governments around the world decided that the environmental policies that they possess you should be seen hand in hand with health policies that they proceed well absolutely and may it sure is a de stressor nature is also where we have a war in many countries many traditions our spirits and our past and our present in the future nature is that dimension for culture as well as a dimension on house so yes understanding that global health human health and global planetary health are one and the same if I may say so and I into quickly connect it is important much food for thought that from the executive director of the United Nations environment program Inger Andersen you're listening to the BBC world service I'm resit ball this is New South.

M. S.
"connie power" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"connie power" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Hunger is the number one complaint that I see in clinic there, and it often gets directly in the way of being able for them to to take their medications and receive their their their medical care. You know, I think when I returned from Haiti and hearing the questions from from people here, which is frequently, you know, things like what's happening in eighty let you know what what's going on there. And there's always this kind of implicit assumption that not only are things bad in Haiti. But that, you know, this is just the way things are there, the natural state of affairs there. How do you see these ongoing protests? Yeah. Well, I think it's it's first important to consider what I think is really the fundamental issue in Haiti which is that people cannot rely on public infrastructures to supply and support. What are the foundational components of a functioning society, you know, things like education roads job security or healthcare as I as I work in. And it's essential to realize how the state of affairs came to be. And this is you know, how I see it and that first and foremost the country that we call eighty was originally conceptualized, you know, three hundred years ago as a slave Connie powered by kidnap people from Africa, and the original idea of Haiti was not as a functioning society with schools, hospitals and other pieces of public infrastructure. But instead as a sensually giant plantation, you know, specifically designed to enrich France. And that's a direct result of this. You know when Haiti won its independence. None of this infrastructure was there to begin with. And so you might think why why do these events two hundred years ago, even matter now, while the reality is is that since that time there have been multitudes of policies many of them explicitly racist, which have continued to propagate this original historical injustice into the present time. You know, you have France in the eighteen hundreds or fusing recognize any saw. Vereignty until Haiti began a paying the equivalent of twenty one point seven billion dollars over the course of one hundred twenty two years in restitution for lost property. You have the US invading Haiti and the twentieth century occupying them for twenty years as a result of the debt that Haiti incurred to pay France. And then over the last few decades, you have the view, which in my opinion is justified in many cases that the US and other powers continued to tip the scales in Haiti's democratic processes in favor of candidates aligned with the US interest. So this is the lens through which I think my patients see the current protests, which is that all of these storm events and many more have contributed to the propagation of this fundamental problem connect that history then and the whole current state of affairs to medicine in Haiti right now, so I think the most dramatic example of this collision of remote and recent history is the the cholera epidemic, which which in Haiti has resulted in nearly a million cases of cholera and over ten thousand deaths since two thousand and ten both of which are by the way. Probably vast underestimations and the first question we have to ask is why is Haiti vulnerable to color in the first place. And again, this comes back to the fact that cholera waterborne illness that can be basically eliminated with comprehensive, water and sanitation infrastructure. And so the answer returns to this lack of public infrastructure to provide clean drinking water. Think about it this way. The average Haitian household is spending fifteen percent of its income. Purchasing safe drinking water second. You can ask directly. Why is cholera in Haiti will as we know? Now, cholera did not exist in before two thousand ten and was accidentally introduced into the water supply by UN peacekeepers who are asymmetric areas of disease cholera was literally brought to Haiti by the international community. And all that the UN has admitted responsibility. There's a pitiful amount of money that has become available to address this problem. And finally, you know, we have to ask the question why is collar continuing to propagate hit it. What is continuing to drive? You know, these cases these deaths collar and food insecurity are closely related, you know, people who are hungry behave very differently than people who are not..

Haiti cholera France US UN Africa Connie one hundred twenty two years seven billion dollars three hundred years two hundred years fifteen percent twenty years
"connie power" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:25 min | 2 years ago

"connie power" Discussed on KCRW

"Well, right now in Boyle heights on the southbound five after Cesar Chavez avenue. We have a collision blocking the left lane. Has you backed up from the five ten northern split an east LA on southbound five and Olympic. We haven't. Earlier stall moved at a lanes, but you're still stop and go from fourth street. I'm Marco werman, you're with the world for several weeks. There have been protests in Haiti over corruption power blackouts government mismanagement. Generally the demands came to a head this week with the prime minister losing his job after a no confidence vote in parliament this dysfunction. Sadly has become for many the stereotype of Haiti what we want to get out right now is why for an answer to that. It helps to look at Haiti's history. That's something Erin Richter man has been thinking about for a long time. He's a doctor here in Boston who's worked extensively in Haiti for years with partners in health. Aaron you spend your time between Boston and Haiti. I imagine you see you headlines in US media, and you get to Haiti and you see perhaps a different reality on the ground. So where's your head out? When you get down there. Like, you get off the plane you go to the hospital. What are you thinking? Well, you know as I get there. I'm spending my time in rural Haiti working on a clinic there in a town called ash. And so I'm heading to a place. Where you know. There's a clinic staffed entirely by Haitian healthcare providers taking care of patients with HIV, tuberculosis and cholera and. Hunger is the number one complaint that I see in clinic there, and it often gets directly in the way of being able for them to take their medications and received their their their medical care. You know, I think when I returned from Haiti and hearing the questions from from people here, which is frequently, you know, things like what's happening in eighty what you know what what's going on there. And there's always this kind of implicit assumption that not only are things bad in Haiti. But that, you know, this is just the way things are there, the natural state of affairs there. How do you see these ongoing protests? Yeah. Well, I think it's important to consider what I think is really the fundamental issue in Haiti. Which is that people cannot rely on public infrastructures to supply and support. What are the foundational components of a functioning society, you know, things like education roads job security or healthcare as I as I work in. And it's essential to realize how the state of affairs came to be. And this is how I see it and that first and foremost the country that we call eighty was originally conceptualized three hundred years ago as a slave Connie powered by kidnap people from Africa, and the original idea of Haiti was not as a functioning society with schools, and hospitals and other pieces of public structure, but instead is essentially a giant plantation specifically designed to enrich France. And that's as a direct result of this. You know when Haiti won its independence. None of this infrastructure was there to begin with. And so you might think why why do these events hundred years ago even matter now. Well, the reality is is that since that time there have been multitudes policies, many of them explicitly racist, which have continued to propagate this original historical. Injustice into the present time, you know, you have France in the eighteen hundreds or fusing recognize Haiti sovereignty until he began paying the equivalent of twenty one point seven billion dollars over the course of one hundred twenty two years in restitution for lost property. You have the US invading Haiti in the twentieth century occupying them for twenty years has resulted the debt that heating to pay France. And then over the last few decades, you have view, which in my opinion is justified in many cases that the US and other powers have continued to tip the scales in Haiti's democratic processes in favor of candidates aligned with the US interest. So this is the lens through which I think my patients see the current protests, which is that, you know, all of these distorted events and many more have contributed to the propagation of this fundamental problem connect that history then and the the whole current state of affairs to medicine in Haiti right now, so I think the most dramatic example of this collision of remote and recent history is the the cholera epidemic, which which has resulted in nearly. Million cases of cholera and over ten thousand deaths since two thousand ten both of which are by the way, probably vast underestimations. And the first question we have to ask is why is Haiti vulnerable to collar in the first place. And again, this comes back to the fact that cholera is a waterborne illness that can be basically eliminated with comprehensive, water and sanitation infrastructure. And so the answer returns to this lack of public infrastructure to provide clean drinking water. Think about it this way. The average Haitian household is spending fifteen percent of its income. Purchasing safe drinking water second. You can ask directly. Why is cholera in Haiti will as we know? Now, cholera did not exist in Haiti before two thousand ten and was accidentally introduced into the water supply by UN peacekeepers who are asymptomatic carriers of disease cholera was literally brought to Haiti by the international community. And all that the UN has admitted responsibility. There's you know, a pitiful amount of money that has become available to address this problem. And finally, you know, we have to ask the question why is collar continuing to propagate and hit. What is continuing to drive? You know, these cases these deaths. Caller, would insecurity are closely related. You know, people who are hungry behave very differently than people who are not hungry and the people are hungry maybe at higher risk of drinking unsafe water or eating on safe food. And this relationship is important in this specific context because eighty is one of the most food insecure places in the world. So then you know, we have to go back to history. Why is Haiti food insecure now you have US driven changes to the Haitian economy in the mid twentieth. Century to move away from agriculture and towards a manufacturing economy and part by the desire for cheap labor for American firms. And then more recently, you have you know, the forest tariff reductions at the nineteen ninety s which flooded the Haitian market with American grown rice, subsidized by the US government. And in many cases, permanently putting Haitian farmers out of business. When Haitian doctors are working at trying to treat the cholera patients in front of them and treat the day. The annual cases that are coming in with the rainy season, you know, this is the this is the context through which all this must be seen. I mean, you mentioned players like France, and the US some officials from the UN is it up to them to address these. Shoes and come up with solutions at work. We'll start with France. You know, I think that the impact of that direct payment to France over the course of one hundred twenty two years it's measurable in restitution for lost property, which was basically the bodies of the Haitians themselves. And so in my mind, I think there's no question with regard to France at there should be some sort of reparation response to that. And with the US I mean, the US and Haiti their fates have been inextricably linked says the birth of both of the countries. And so I think you know, the role of the US is one to to acknowledge sort of the ways that we have undermined eighty throughout history. But also then to to serve as a good neighbour as a support to let Haiti develop in Asian hands and with patient self-determination, Dr Aaron reprimand, thanks very much for being with us. Really? Appreciate your time. Thank you for having me doctor recommend divides his time between Boston and rural Haiti where he works closely with partners in health our conversation brought to mind someone else's work serves as a bridge. Between the two countries. Singer Malu Beauvoir was born to parents in Chicago her childhood was spent in the US and in France, two countries that as we just heard have deeply influenced Haiti's history. But it's Haiti that Beauvoir most connects to inter music singing to her audience and the voodoo spirits and Creole with a disco back. David. That's Haitian American Malu Beauvoir and a song called Russell all Creole for gathering from the and Bill Harris WG be h here in Boston. I'm Marco werman. We'll see evacuate tomorrow. The world is a co production of the.

Haiti US cholera France Marco werman Boston UN LA prime minister Boyle heights Dr Aaron Malu Beauvoir Erin Richter Africa Beauvoir Bill Harris David Chicago
"connie power" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"connie power" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"You can actually buy one, and you pay eighty bucks ninety bucks, and you go out to a bar or restaurant, and they do the work in the rule is they can't flirt with anyone. So they can't change their mind and actually wanna start date in the person. But they go out people are turning to the service that crazy. I guess there's something I'd never seen this. I haven't either. But I mean, I guess it's extra way to make money. If you're good at it. But you have to be willing to not flirt. You may be married to have. Be single to be a wing person be. Yeah. I've been waiting a lot. Oh, I thought it was like an extra job for college kids, what can be. But I mean, it's extra for anybody. That can do it. So I saw that he may forty bucks hour being a wing person. These are the best workout songs here you go into this. Until I collapsed. You'll never say that I'm now also then lose yourself. Basically all Eminem song. Mad Connie stronger. Connie power. Here's uptown fund. Don't give it to you. What do you think the number will work out songs for people over fifty because they have it on here? People over fifty years old. Oh, their favorite workouts on about. Go ahead. Respect who nuts. Now. I got one staying alive the BG's Amy get held that rocky song. Over there. Give me pumped up that opening Marta down. That..

Connie power Amy Eminem fifty years