35 Burst results for "Connick"

Frozen Envelope Draft of 1985

Conspiracy Theories

02:02 min | Last month

Frozen Envelope Draft of 1985

"The early nineteen eighties. We're filled with connick basketball stars. Magic johnson larry bird and kareem abdul-jabbar are just a few legends. That played during this era celebrity players. Thrilled fans with their incredible skills on the court but some behavior was not worth celebrating on august twentieth. Nineteen eighty the la times reported on multiple accounts of cocaine abuse by nba athletes. The general manager of the utah jazz even speculated that there wasn't a single team in the league that didn't have a drug problem new york knicks star. Micheal ray. Richardson had five. Documented stays at rehabilitation clinics new jersey nets. Forward bernard king had been arrested for cocaine. Possession has had hawks guard eddie johnson. Some estimates claimed seventy five percent of all. Nba players drugs. These habits culminated in the death of shooting guard. Terry furlough furlough died in a fatal car accident. In nineteen eighty an autopsy found ballum and cocaine in his blood. Substance abuse also made players vulnerable to all sorts of criminal activity f. b. i. File suggest that during the nineteen eighty one eighty two season at least three new york knicks players were indebted one of the largest drug dealers on the east coast. These debts lead the knicks to participate in point shaving or intentionally missing shots in order to get a particular score this way. Their drug dealer could place a bet on that score and because of the players cooperation he was guaranteed to win. It was the players way of paying him. Back drugs also wreaked havoc on the players. Mental and physical health stimulants like cocaine can increase in violent behavior. And in this era many players had an extremely physical style of play

Magic Johnson Larry Bird Kareem Abdul Micheal Ray Knicks Bernard King Jabbar NBA Utah Jazz La Times Eddie Johnson Basketball Richardson New York Hawks New Jersey Possession Terry East Coast
"connick" Discussed on That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

03:01 min | 3 months ago

"connick" Discussed on That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

"Lately. Well jill see like will lean bed at night just pouring through cook. She loves loves loves cook. What so she makes. I mean she's always trying new things. I i tend to stick toward. I don't know kinda. I call it a country i like barbecue. I like new orleans like the gumbo and red beans oil like the other day. I made like a like a white bean and kale and in hot sausage. Like a like a tough skin. Kale soup kind of thing. Like i just. I like making food in the crock. Pot that you can eat all week. Just throw it all in there their walkaway. Yeah exactly i. It blows my mind still that we plug those things in leave our houses. I can't i you know what you don't need. You don't ask any questions. Just come back in this done. And it is a weird concept my mind fact that my dad was always like. Don't leave the dryer running when you leave your house but you'll leave a kitchen so what you care about okay. I have one more question for you. Is there anything we didn't talk about. The you wanna make sure we cover. But i gotta tell you i do these a lot in. You're so smart and so present that it was just a joy to talk to you. And i can see why you enjoy the success. You have because it's it's a it's a skill set that people who don't do it may not appreciate but for somebody who's been on both sides. I'm telling you you know you're talented lady. And i just love talking to you and i look forward to the next time we get to do it thank you. I hope we do too. Listen you're a tv host hosting your own show. So i take that as a huge compliment from someone who did it professionally. So thank you have your dad on doing it. I'm going to send you that. I'm going to get that to you as soon as i can. I really mean that. I think you'd into it. Okay the last question. We always ask because our show is called. That sounds fun. Tell me what sounds fun to you. what's on that. I would never do like jumping out of an airplane. I mean that's sounds fun. But i i couldn't tear if i could just just think it's a such an unnecessary risk solid talking about all these gifts that god gave us like. You're going to jump out of a plane. I don't know maybe one day with you. Listen we got a lot of work to do. I cannot have two broken legs at the very least. That's on a good day. Okay so of wes outside. Do you that you really do. You know sounds to me right now. Like like going out to dinner with a bunch of people like just sitting around a table and just just having a good time maybe after show like just seeing people laughing and smiling together. You know 'cause 'cause boy. I tell you i miss it in in a although i'm totally page in in waiting my turn i. It sounds fun to get it back on the road of some music and that funny to think that the things we list now as what we long for we.

new orleans both sides one more question two broken legs one day
"connick" Discussed on That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

05:12 min | 3 months ago

"connick" Discussed on That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

"On the page. Are you working out pain. While you're to visit therapeutic azure. Oh heck yeah definitely you know. There were a lot of times when i would weep on during singing the lyric which i don't do normally because if i'm in the studio this other people around and i might be very emotional but there's a line that you get up to where like it's just i don't know how to say but might get a little weird like sobbing in a studio full of people so so maybe there's a way to like sing it and feel all of that with i just up started crying many times on this album. And that's really wanna hear on the album because it's it sounds beautiful but it's like is that harry weeping on the it'd be cool but like the third time bay. Do we get emotional. So i would read sing it with the same intentions but maybe not with the crying but yeah no. I felt like. I worked out a lot of pain to through this through this. It's like it takes over where we're words. Stop articulate so much with words you know. Music has a romanticism about it in a in a An abstract about it that that is articulated so it it helped me A lot will you tell. Tell us about the mandolin. You showed that you played for a benevolent. I think that right. You told a purse portion that story on instagram. But i was wondering if there was more to and i love to hear about that. Yes so we. We had this mandolin and our house that my mom had bought my dad back in the fifties when they lived in north africa and it was just kind of this. Wasn't i mean it's a nice instrument. Isn't that some you know hundred thousand dollar mandolin. Which is something they probably store in. We've all always had it in a. It was kind of wrapped in bubble. Wrap my house. And i took it out. 'cause i was sharing a mandolin on that song. Benevolent man and i took it to lutheran had a repaired and Decided i was going to play and play the song for my dad. Said you know what that is go. Yes amanda mandolin. I said but you know which mandolin man. That's the one you get. Mom gave you back in the fifties. He's at home. My gosh so. I took pictures of in senate to him when i was reporting in. Just just cool to. Have you know the some family history. You know our instruments like children where it's hard to pick a favorite or. Do you have a favorite instrument in your life and your house. That's like have some really cool ones. Like i have I have some really cool instruments but my favorite is will have to one is the piano. My mother gave me when i was thirteen. She gave me a a seven foot yamaha. Grand piano which i love in it has incredible nostalgia value jimmy and then jill always wanted to stein way nine foot concert grand piano. And for my thirtieth birthday. Jill surprise me one which to this day. I still can't believe she did in. Yeah that that would be like just. That was that's unbelievable. That's like the greatest kids from our give. Someone like me. Yeah earlier when you said do we make kids take piano lessons. I think that answer is just yes. I think everybody should have to do piano lessons for a living so even if they hate it i dunno this this this stuff you can learn from it for sure yes and once you know how to read music. You can play any instrument if you have the internet. The digi where to put. I agree i agree. It's it's not that hard. I mean learning how to learn a few basic things on the piano. And i think it'll take you love farther than you think it can win. Do you think you get to start touring again you know. Whenever it's time you know. I i'm willing to be patient. You know this again. We're not through it. And when when when when i get the sign that is safe and time for me to go. The thing i worry about is what you referred to earlier. The all of these folks who work on his. I mean the the touring the road. The people set up the stages of people bus drivers that that. That's the most heartbreaking thing. I just want to see them get back to work so when it's time for us to go we'll be ready. I think we're we're looking at the end of it now. Hopefully and and you know we will have learned a lot and you know we can get back to some normalcy. What's what's the hope going forward when you're thinking about where the world's going next and just i just want us to We're in a weird time right now even before the pandemic. We're just just a weird time. You know i am all. I can do worry about how you know. I treat people and how how you know what what my little team can do. And i just hope we get to a point where we can. We can all really hear each other and celebrate our a commonality while also celebrating our incredible differences which makes us so unique as a culture. You know it's it's an amazing opportunity. We have as as americans. And i just wanna i just. I just hope we get to a point where we can. We can all love each other even more. I heard you on my friend. Paula fair says five. And you were talking about how much you've been cooking and barbecue and over the last year. Yeah people together you got. That's exactly right. it's amazing. How quickly disappear like over a brisket. That's right tell me a y'all cook.

north africa Paula fair nine foot thirteen seven foot five Jill thirtieth birthday jill instagram hundred thousand dollar fifties third time harry jimmy yamaha one amanda americans lutheran
"connick" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

03:23 min | 4 months ago

"connick" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"Left china with connick connick. Junior could've talked to him for hours. And then if you just heard the ad for rdc is for this concept. Called upstart was away helping emerging artists. Get the attention. They so desperately need wanted to find out more. So i'm bringing on jeffrey lindsey. Who's the person really responsible for rb see x. Music jeffey welcome to china. that matters. nice tony to be here. So tell me what the next dance for rb see x. Music the axes is all to signify. How endemic collaborations are within the space. So you'll often see tariq x. canada goose it's really. You know a fundamental part of being successful within the space as we're learning as bran you need to find the right strategic partners whether that be other brands or musicians to really connect with fans you struck a deal with live nation. That puts the fan. Experience front senator. Tell me a little bit about that. We recognize how intimate attending a live. Show can be. We want to be a brand that elevates and enhances that experience for particularly young canadians this is about providing value beyond traditional bank products and services. And so a couple of the ways that we go about doing that is extending access to tickets and discounts or hooking up to meet their favorite artists onsite before the show kerry junior talked about how important it was to be mentored to discovered. Tell me more about what you're doing with first up. Because i think it embodies a lot of those same values we have a fundamental belief that are bc in the power of music and this naturally transcends into our belief in the power of musicians and artists we have a long standing commitment to supporting emerging creatives through the arb emerging artists project music video production project oviedo summit and now most recently i up with rb. Cx music providing a platform for exposure alongside funding. So that they could pay rent reinvest in themselves giving them the opportunity to meet other emerging creatives and fostering peer to peer networking which is so fundamental to.

jeffrey lindsey jeffey china rdc first canadians Cx music tariq x. oviedo kerry junior canada goose connick connick Junior hours tony .
"connick" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

06:06 min | 4 months ago

"connick" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"With econo- junior in safety. Oh you do madden. Take another careers. A camera finds and says this person can. This guy can own a major part. This guy can own. A movie was part of television. Well in many ways it was familiar because you know the acting was very similar to singing without it. Just didn't have the music but it was. It was a completely different skill set. I had done it in school. I did high school musicals and things like that very quickly. I realized this is just another way of using my brain as an artist with different technique in front of a camera And and being the type of perform. That i am which is i love being on stage. I love with forming. I love pretending fantasizing going all of these different places. It felt like a natural transition. Also i started very slowly. The first movie i did was unstoppable cast. Call the memphis belle. I was surrounded by some the world's best actor. John lithgow david van matthew modine and wait it out that you are somebody they could hold. Your own is can take a scene and make a specialist. We must have felt pretty excited by coming out of that because it is som- lacasse vaccinated talents. Also daunting it can be remember. I was of the belief that if you're an extra not an extra. Because i wasn't an extra but if i didn't have any lines in a scene don't do anything so i remember standing on the outside of this group and become friends with matthew modine throughout the process of filming and he called me over one day and i wish i could do a better impression of him. But he's very soft spoken very elegant guy he says hey Do you wanna be a movie star and assisted. What do you mean he says. Do you wanna be a movie star. I'm like oh yeah. Who doesn't he said the next time we shoot a scene together. Come stand right next to me. I said why he said. Because i'm getting paid the most so if you want to be seen. Don't play this i'm not gonna do anything. Crap comes stand next to me. So i was glued to that. Got him for the rest of the movie in i never thought of. It is daunting. I just thought of it. As died exciting. I never felt adverse to to risks or or there had any ambitious. Really what did you prefer doing. The movies or television shows like will and grace. They're all so so different. It's like jill. I my wife. We have three children. You can't pick favorites. You know so. Music is is home base. So i have the most familiarity with that. Doing willing grace's is a specific kind of challenge. That you can't get anywhere else. Where you learn a script on monday for the tuesday rehearsal and at tuesday they give you a brand new script. 'cause they change all the jokes and then wednesday you come in prepared and they give you a whole new script and then thursday on shoot day. It's all another significance and so when you shoot the show in shoot it take and then in front of a live audience and they take a break for ten minutes and completely rewrite the scene and give you new lines. it's they. Eric you say this w state is harry. Say this sean. You say this mega that. It's just a incredibly fast paced. You better be paying attention. You're gonna get crushed. I love those. Those thrills i've lived. That's what i that's what i live for covid hits and your world turns upside down because there's nowhere to entertain audiences energy to feed off. How did you steal a couple of days when you when you realize that everything you love to do wasn't available anymore. My heart was broken for the people who are out there risking their lives for the rest of his. It really really was. I thought about the health. Care workers I thought about the teachers. I thought about all of the folks who didn't have a luxury of staying at home And whose job. It was to make sure that our lives rant smoothly. I really thought about that honestly. I didn't think about me really. And then as time went on is like if you take that our that's in the window sill so happy to get watered and get some at every day when you take it off the cell and then you bring it into the basement and you put in a closet and close the door. That's what the performer. Me thought like i was wilton in the past for example with katrina in new orleans. You jumped right in there because it was available to you in this case said you're kind of locked away. I mean you're you're isolating like in the world so you go through whole range of emotions with that or is it. Did you just generally one day j. I gotta do something with my life at the time. Not only did. I have a desire to perform. But i i wanted to reach out and connect with people that i thought maybe in similar situations i did ten series ten. Show little thing in my basement. Call hunker down with harry which was like a youtube thing. That was just doing entertained people. Because i thought maybe they might like some distraction. Diversion and i would like some action that version and everybody thought about it like what about my career like that. That actually never cross my mind when you do a youtube video and you're playing like we are right now computer. It must be so different for you because one of the things that always find your career even if this fifteen thousand people or or is this intimacy that you are performing in their living room. You always had this incredible sense of presence as opposed to being held big. Can i be. it's it's how can i can i be with you. This craft to performing in front of camera and so right now. I'm actually looking at your computer. I'm looking into the camera. Couple that with a sincere desire to touch people. I feel like child. I guess i i love the idea of wonder and excitement and spontaneity in the -bility so i never really think about what.

Eric John lithgow new orleans thursday tuesday ten minutes wednesday youtube fifteen thousand people monday david van matthew modine katrina harry sean three children matthew modine Couple one first movie wilton
"connick" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

02:02 min | 4 months ago

"connick" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"Think queens still music coming out at the time and stevie wonder elton john i think hip hop was really starting to take hold at that time so i was definitely not among the popular styles of music but for whatever reason people resonated with it in took a liking to it so that was.

elton john stevie wonder
"connick" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

08:15 min | 4 months ago

"connick" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"In your eyes onto that as you're leaving a base of people that you're already been discovered right rate new. You could build a trailer there for you. That's a big big chains was was. It was something i wanted to do. You know since. I was about thirteen or fourteen. Because my teacher ellis marsalis had two sons that had moved to new york and become very successful. Wynton marsalis branford marsalis and there were like big brothers to me so i wanted to do what they were doing. I figured they can go to new york and make a career plan jazz music. That's what i wanted you to when i was fourteen. I wanna competition of the national association of jazz educators. Now it's the international association but there was a guy named george butler. Who's the anr guy for the jazz department at columbia records. Well i knew about him. Because he signed wouldn't in branford to their record deals. So when i was fourteen i met george and he says when you move to new york. Call me for years later. When i was eighteen. I call mccollum every day for about six months in hounded him. Because i wanted that record contract so bad in the finally got it i was you know. Eighteen nineteen years old in signed signed with columbia. So that's kinda why. I went score years due to prepare for that moment when he's finally going to pick up the phone and talk yet is practice practice practice like you hear gymnasts or athletes in the training. That they have to do. That's all i did. I mean twenty four hours a day. Because i knew that when i had the chance to perform i had i had to be ready in in. When you have guys like wynton marsalis branford marsalis. Talk you up. Oh my gosh. I mean they're the best in the world so you you have to be ready to play so great and a country like america has feeder system. That if you if you're passionate about something that you have an opportunity divan and be mentored discovered. I must be something that is incredibly important nearly stage in your career. Oh it was huge. It was it was all about a sense of ownership. Like the fact that i could actually do this. I never doubted that. Which is why it's so important. People like me wash like me. That i do everything i can to make sure that young people get opportunities like i have because it's all about. I never doubted that. This was what i was going to be doing. I mean never crossed my mind that there was a plan. B or what happens if this doesn't work out him and it was chosen little talent. This has to do with my belief that the opportunity was there. If i were taught enough in was in. That's the that's an incredible luxury to have. I'm well aware that later on. We're going to talk about you know this incredible album long buffet rediscovery who you are. But how important was at this point in your life. You're young you're going to new york. Got this blinding ambition. i fail. Was there a higher purpose league or was it. Just all you know the determination of a young man. It says. When i get that shot i'm most it was. It was probably mostly that. I mean my faith was was pretty strong then but i. I don't think i understood it. I know i didn't understand faith. The way i understand it or think understanding now but no it was a part of it. I mean i remember praying. I remember Counting on my faith to help get me through those times. That didn't look so good. I remember the first opportunity. I had to audition for columbia. Was by a another guy. I leave his name out of it. But with george butler wasn't returning my calls another person said i wanna come here you play and practice so weeks and i told him i was going to meet him at this place. I was gonna play for him in. I had musudan and i showed up at five pm. Ready at the piano in six pm rose by seven eight nine. The guy just never came and that was tough. Because i was so ready. Just give me a chance to play for you. Any just blew you off. How does somebody this spent so much train preparing that one moment you get there five o'clock it every minute. Minute must seem like an hour at six o'clock at seven o'clock. How do you go home and go. I'm gonna make the next day apple versus just going to dark all despair. A lot of people would fall back in their backseat there. But you kept march. I think it must be a personality thing. Maybe it's a genetic thing. I just can't quit. I don't understand the meaning of of quit. And i don't understand no like i'll find another way. It's says it's kind of it's animosity that a developable skill a maybe it's an ego thing. I don't know arrogance at that time. I just maybe we'll today. I don't think it's arrogance. I think it's it's a belief in the idea of manifestation. How can you not make this app. You know just talk to you later. Like you are such extrordinary. Things really focused on this desired outcome. They might not always get they. My name really high comeback. Step if they go so much further than most because they just really lead posssibility. So i mean maybe it is. I'd love to know if the bottle monday. Because i think especially now. Our country needs an absolute dose of this sort of positive energy. And we're gonna get through this. But i wanna you're in new york you've got your album deal. Rob reiner discovers you. Tell me how that came in. Because he's producing this movie which we had no idea is going to be as big as it is. I remain silent. He gives you the game ball. Says i want you to do the soundtrack. That was wild. So i remember. I didn't know this man at the time of this guiding bobby columbia and. He used to be the drummer for blood sweat and tears. Whatever the reason. Bobby columbia's radar was on me. Rob reiner had just on the film and was looking for somebody to play kind of background music through some of the scenes. So bobby said i know the guy. He's kid he's twenty years old ilise from new orleans. Get him to doing. Rob reiner comment my house. I was at my dad's house in new orleans. And i didn't believe it was him. He said you know whatever and he's enosis really mean do. Would you like to play this music on my holy cops so i went to los angeles There was a giant screen in the giants studio in vienna in rob said. There's going to be a green line. That growth goes across the screen when that greenland. It's the end. You play whatever you think is appropriate to the same. And then there's gonna be a red line that goes across and then you stop had my dream again where making lohman olympic judges watching. I've now the compulsory. So this is the finals. Got a nine eight from the canadian. Perfect ten from the americans. My mother disguised as an east german judge. Gave me a five. Six must have been a dismount. I sleep at no problems though the united played. I'm like i said. Is that what you want. And said he goes. There's a song want you to sing on the soundtracks call. It had to be you. We're gonna have a big orchestras great so signed on that was my only contribution. Other than a couple of instrumental tracks to that soundtrack. They had intended to use versions of these classic songs by ray charles ella fitzgerald frank sinatra will as the the legal process to acquire the rights. Li songs went on these particular artist's representations didn't want them to be on it for whatever reason maybe money was right. I'm not sure. So when frank sinatra's camp backed out. I got his song. When ella fitzgerald camp backed out. I got her songs before you knew. I had literally the whole album. So i sang their songs in my way and i had the whole album and that album came out and i went from selling ten or twenty thousand albums millions of albums just a matter of months i mean it completely turned my life upside down if they asked me And when that came out what was happening music that time because you were unique can answer two words. Millie vanilla new artist at the grammys that year. And i was like man. I wanted to win that the usuals were great. I.

new york george butler new orleans Rob reiner five o'clock george five pm ray charles ellis marsalis Millie vanilla six pm nine frank sinatra five today fourteen two words millions of albums los angeles two sons
"connick" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

03:22 min | 4 months ago

"connick" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"How did you were at such a young age. I was doing that. I mean i was playing at three. And then i started playing publicly. Probably around five or six and then played with ios playing a beethoven piano concerto with orchestra round around nine ten. Something like that and i started making albums at nine in the the main thing is that i had two parents. That wanted that to happen just like they wanted my sister to follow her dream. She was interested in languages. We had like a woman from saudi arabia. Living with us teaching her arabic it at thirteen so they were both incredible parents on that way they they provided us with everything we needed to to succeed. How important that is a lesson in life to just have heiress it really say if that's something you're passionate about less invested And they say well you can do that later in life with i you gotta get a degree year. When did you decide that this was at. This is going to be when harry connick junior is going to do after soon music and everything that allows you to do but it was as long as i can remember 'cause i never really had any any skills outside of music. I'm a terrible student out. I didn't do well in school was a horrible athlete at in. I wasn't fast. I couldn't catch a ball throw ball can do any of that stuff Insult skills became dormant very quickly. And all i did was play music all day every day. i mean. I played music competitions in recorded in a after school. That's all i would do and before school. That's all i would do. I mean that's all. I did so i became kind of one sided because didn't have much of a social life so all i did was played music so this is all ever thought about doing in on back to what you said about kudos to my parents. I mean they wanted me to excel at it from a craftsmanship point of view. They wanted to make sure. I was educated in had the tools i needed to.

harry connick two parents three nine thirteen saudi arabia arabic both six around nine ten ios one around five
"connick" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:37 min | 4 months ago

"connick" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Things over on Rob Connick. Here's what's trending this hour. Indiana's vaccinations sign up portal has gotten a tweak to help people get appointments faster. I'm Eric for men. While some vaccine sites of books, days or weeks in advance, a handful have lots of openings right away, mostly in central in southern Indiana. Website has broken out those locations as high volume sights. The West includes to an Indian sick Vincent Hospital and I you Health Neuroscience Center Eric Berman, 93 WNBC Mobile news and with the vaccinations that have happened So far, Indiana has administered more than 85% of those doses we have received, which is above the national average of 80%. This demonstrates how quickly we're working to get vaccines once received into the arms of Hoosiers. State Health Commissioner Dr Chris Box says the state is eager for the vaccine supply to increase that more Hoosiers could get protected from Cove in 19. One of India's biggest conventions is back and you're inviting Donnie Burgess reports. Gen Con is back and set for September 16th through the 19th. This year, the convention will implement a hybrid schedule with both in person and virtual events scheduled. In person. Attendance will have a limit. But that number hasn't been announced. Yet. Jin Cong Online will also return after making a successful debut last year when the usual convention was canceled because of coronavirus, Donnie Burgess, 93. WBC mobile news and gas prices across Indiana are not budging statewide average for gas to 71 per gallon, according to gasbuddy dot com. It's been hovering around that mark for the last few weeks. Murad Khan is on the level on the go on WNBC calm now, the forecast from the American Standard heating Weather Center wet and windy weather expected as we head into your Thursday showers and storms of the overnight hours and into the day on.

Donnie Burgess Rob Connick Eric Berman September 16th Murad Khan American Standard heating Weat Eric Thursday WBC 80% Chris Box last year This year 19th Vincent Hospital Gen Con Cove 71 per gallon Indiana southern Indiana
Billy Conigliaro, First Player Drafted By Boston Red Sox, Dies At 73

WBZ Midday News

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Billy Conigliaro, First Player Drafted By Boston Red Sox, Dies At 73

"This just in to the WBC news room. Billy Comically Arrow, the first ever drafted by the Boston Red Sox and brother of Tony Connick Lee Arrow has died. Ah, Hometown native Billy was born in Revere and graduated from Swampscott High School. It was the Red Sox fifth overall pick and Major League baseball's inaugural first player draft. In his big league debut. He had two home runs against the Baltimore Orioles in 1969 in 1970, he shared the Fenway Park outfield with his brother, Tony. When Tony suffered a heart attack in 1982 Billy devoted his life to caring for his brother until he died in 1990 Billy comically era survived by his wife, Qi Sha. He was 73 years old.

Billy Comically Arrow Tony Connick Lee Arrow Boston Red Sox Swampscott High School WBC Billy Revere Major League Baltimore Orioles Baseball Tony Fenway Park Heart Attack Qi Sha
E.U. Agrees to Cut Emissions by 2030 in New Climate Deal

BBC Newshour

01:14 min | 8 months ago

E.U. Agrees to Cut Emissions by 2030 in New Climate Deal

"For Britain from the European Union apparently being imminent. The Brexit negotiations were not top of the agenda as EU leaders met in Brussels. Difficult discussions on climate change were the number one priority on overnight wrangling did result in all members signing up to an ambitious new target. To cut greenhouse gas emissions. It means you countries plan to reduce those emissions by 55% on 1990 levels by the end of this decade. The eventual aim is to become carbon neutral by the middle of the century. Home Rivet. Connick was a chief political advisor to the U. N Paris Agreement. He's now with the climate think tank called Global Optimism. Well, look, I mean, we've made an enormous amount of progress on climate this year, and we should bear in mind where we thought we might be at this point, and we're a lot further along than we could be. All of this depends on Can we get to net zero before 2050, which is what science tells us very clearly, we need to do To avoid runaway climate change on what's been agreed here. 55% by 2030 is a big step in that direction and is consistent with that trajectory. So, like so much in climate, it is impressive and ambitious, but ultimately needs to go further. But yes, I think this is something that we should broadly celebrate so too ambitious for

European Union Brussels Connick Britain U. Paris
Moderna to seek FDA emergency authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

What A Day

05:02 min | 8 months ago

Moderna to seek FDA emergency authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

"We're hurtling toward. What may well be a horrible and deadly holiday season as cova cases numbers and hospitalizations. Continue to reach alarming highs over ninety thousand. People are currently hospitalized in the us according to the cova tracking project that's compared to the previous high of about sixty thousand in the spring and summer. So more by half just terrifying. We're also moving quickly towards something that looks like hope to vaccines yesterday. Dern submitted its vaccine for fda authorization aaron. What's the latest on that. Well akilah thanks to the incredible work of scientists and researchers. We've now got to vaccines that. Could start to be distributed to americans within days or weeks maderna's mentioned and pfizer which submitted a couple of weeks ago. As soon as the fda reviews and approves either one for emergency use people can start lining up to get poked. Yeah i am also in line to get poked but as you've been talking about on the show with this first round vaccines were not going to have enough for everybody all at once and we don't have one official plan for who gets to be at the front of the line. That's why the cdc's advisory committee on immunization practices or ac ip is having an emergency meeting today hammer out some guidelines for states on who gets there. Kobe shot i. Yeah so what do we know about their thinking. Well much to the chagrin of the kardashians in everybody who would love to feel just a little more normal by having a massless dance party on a private island. The vaccine will not be distributed based on how many instagram followers. You have or even whether your father invented the toaster strudel I'm really bummed. I that's my dad. I know. I know grudging wieners. The has already decided that the first people in line should be healthcare workers and people who live in long term care facilities like nursing homes according to dr kathleen dueling medical officer at the cdc staff and residents at these facilities have accounted for almost forty percent of all deaths from covid nineteen even though there are less than one percent of the total us population if you add healthcare workers and people who live and work at long term care facilities. That's about twenty four million people even with fda approval and firing on all cylinders. There will only be about forty million vaccine doses available by the end of this godforsaken year and both cohen. Vaccines require two shots. Which means that those forty million doses will be barely enough to meet the needs of the very neediest in this group. Yeah and then. It starts to get a little bit trickier when you get into the other. Essential workers and people with high risk medical conditions. Or you know older people right. So according to the cdc there about eighty seven million essential workers one hundred million high risk adults and fifty three million people sixty five years of age or older. And of course there's some overlap between these categories. These are the people that would be prioritized next but as you can see there are a lot of them if all goes well you could see fifty million more doses ready to go in january another sixty million in february or march doing math divided by to carry the one that means about seventy five million people could be vaccinated against covid nineteen by the end of the first quarter of twenty twenty one which means the more people who are at an elevated risk from covid. Then there will be vaccines and there will not be enough vaccines to reach herd immunity at first and it's going to be a while before we get there and so this is just guidance. According to current lame duck secretary of health and human services. Alex as our love connick guy. Lame duck state governments will ultimately determine how the vaccine will be distributed. But who knows if that assertion will hold after biden takes office on january twentieth knows. Well it's a little bit of an elephant in the room. Here you know. America has a long history of ignoring the needs of and in some cases actively hurting the health of marginalized groups like indigenous americans living on reservations. Black people hello Non native english speakers people experiencing homelessness and the mentally ill among other groups. So how can we be sure that the cova vaccine will just pass them over. That's a really important question akilah. I'm sure there are already rich and powerful people trying to figure out how to skip the line. There's nothing more american than that but the acp seems determined to make sure americans have faith in the fairness of this process. All of their meetings are live streamed. So if you're looking for something to do today you can go ahead and livestream. The meeting in all the votes are public. The fda has also having meetings on vaccines on december tenth and seventeenth. This whole process depends on the public trusting the vaccine enough to let somebody shoot two doses of it into their arms and it seems like so far at least the folks in charge are taking that responsibility seriously and all this is happening with derna advisor will still be gathering more data and monitoring for adverse effects as the first groups of people get vaccinated and then the companies will have to go through the normal. Fda approval process as well. This first round of approval is a fast track process. So getting back to normal isn't site kind of if you squint. It's not that far. It's right there it's kind of kind of. Let's put it this way between now and when everybody who needs to be vaccinated is vaccinated. You'll definitely have time to relearn that foreign language tried to learn in high school and if mostly forgotten about by now

Akilah FDA CDC Maderna Dr Kathleen Cova Dern Pfizer America Instagram Aaron Kobe Cohen Connick Health And Human Services Biden Alex
How Chicago's Death Alley Got Its Name

Ghost Light

11:00 min | 11 months ago

How Chicago's Death Alley Got Its Name

"By I decided to restart my day took a shower here. We are feeling good feeling in feel like I'm in the driver's seat. Good. Good. Yeah. That's a lesson forever and restart your day whenever you choose if you're not going the way, you want it. You get to restart it whenever you want and hydrate. And hydrate I'm going to a separate now. Everyone with us. Wasn't that refreshing. So before we get into the history of the Pittsburgh playhouse. Mercedes who again today script wrote us a little introduction. So without further ado, let's get into says. Introduction. She writes I love Pittsburgh. It's my home city, and in my humble opinion, it's one of the top two best cities on the planet. It's a place full of life and culture and history, but it's so small unleash that it tends to fly beneath the radar for most I grew up loving the city and knowing that it has a lot to offer when it comes artistic expression August Wilson, famously loved the city his home city so much that he created that connick Pittsburgh cycle it's an amazing city so to me, it just makes sense that if ghosts were real, they'd want to come back to hang out in the burgh I love for a little longer guests I love that you really heartfelt starts episode Mercedes. I think I need to go to Pittsburgh have you been now? Road trip I how far far could we drive from here? Yeah. I don't think it's far I think yeah I don't know. No I think. We'll take our stark reserves. Okay. So the history of the Pittsburgh playhouse. By Mercedes okay. The historic Pittsburgh playhouse originally on craft and was not so much a theater as it was a collection of buildings that were brought and then turned into theatrical spaces. The first of these was acquired in nineteen, thirty four and was formerly a German Social Club. This building was bought as a wedding present by Richard. Row for his wife Helen Wayne their stories actually very cute. So Richard. Fell in love with Helen when he first saw her perform in New York, his family was super rich and well-known Spanish factors in Pittsburgh. So he bought the location for Helen to give her a nice space to act in Pittsburgh. He basically did this so that they could live there together and she would feel fulfilled even though she wasn't a Big New York City Act trix actress. On that's so cute. Matching someone just give. The building. Just so that you can. Live in the and like feel like you're a big time. Yeah. I get jobs. Yes. Okay. So that their names are Helen and Richard Richard and So. With that, the Pittsburgh Civic playhouse was formed not just by Richard and Helen. It was a group of artists making up the company but like the rows. Oh but like the rows were moneybags. playhouses. Next purchase was an adjacent house to act as a lobby for what was then known as the Roth eater. The first performance in this theater and lobby space was in nineteen, thirty four. The playhouse was fairly popular in the thirties and forties staging productions of Noel Coward's private lives in Thornton wilders. Then new our town during his l.. Then new. Oh. I would like to, I. would like to live in a world where. Still felt new. During this, the playhouses signature leading lady was, of course, none other than Helen Wayne row, which seems like a pretty sweet deal and I'm jealous of her whole situation getting a sugar daddy to basically launch her acting career. Mercedes. SPEAK ON A. So the stage also housed musicals and featured a little known dancer choreographer just months before he would get his big break on Broadway you WanNa. Take a guess Fred Astaire. Close. Close. Oh Who Does skin I don't another dig her come on. It's obvious. Gene, Kelly. of. Yeah. Gosh. Okay. But I've heard he's like Not Nice well, did he like demand rehearsals like over and over again tell people bleeding? Yeah something wacko on in singing in the rain like I've brought up seeing in the rain on this podcast before which is funny. Okay. So that's NEAT I didn't know Gene Kelly was from. Pittsburgh neither that means Jim Kelly Okay Mall from the Burgh. What a gorgeous dancer what? Does little tap into. All right. Moving on. The third building that was additives Hodgepodge of theaters was formerly the tree of life synagogue the congregation moved to Squirrel Hill. I have to stop. I have to stop Squirrel Hill. Sounds like that sounds like a horrifying like like scary movie of chipmunks and squirrels like like. or or Blake dream. Yes my partner like squirrels. Okay. the congregation moved to Scroll Hill in nineteen fifty, one in this space was acquired by the playhouse making up their largest theater space. The Rock wealthier underneath the theater was a restaurant known as the playhouse restaurant. A former ballroom turned ice cream parlor. Cute. Wow. They're out here like setting up a small town. Lot of they got a restaurant. So there's three theaters. All connecting. So like spaces. Yeah. It was the playhouse restaurant, which is a ballroom to ice cream parlor. Got It. So you want got it another local Pittsburgh or to get their star at the playhouse before becoming a household name was one Shirley. Jones. I don't know that is. Listeners You do but I hope you do if you don't Google it we will. Profess, she performed in the playoffs. Many times Okay. Walmer says love that fact but. I feel like we're GONNA waking up in like feel stupid or something. Yeah. Well, another Pittsburgh native who has a history at the playhouse, oh? My Gosh is Jeff. Goldblum. We love chuckles literally Jeff. Goldblum pits. Pittsburgh playhouse butter boop. Out by I love. Jeff. Jacob Blue, that's the best I can I gotta wash him. Once when I go on benders watching Jeff Videos I can get that I can get that down pat? I can do really well that was impression to have like just in your back pocket it is it is when parties come back in twenty thirty I'll be sure to have perfected that party trick. Apparently, his first acting was done with the children's Cedar through playhouse junior an educational opportunities where children received professional training on a professional stage. Mercedes wrote feel free to have Goldblum here I would like to but I don't know why I love You love yes. We've why sorry I just I we did watch this show. But I'm just saying like outside of like that show on Disney plastic everyone by the way if you're busy plus stream Jeff. Goldblum show it's incredible but. I Love Jeff Goldblum I want his his interviews on Graham Norton also highly recommend every interview on. Yeah. True. True. Just pivoting entirely too grim noreen. My favorite episode did US maybe we are together. So don't get mad at me but did you watch that episode of Jeff. Goldblum the world according to Jeff Goldblum by the way is the full title did you watch the episode where he goes to Jeff Goldblum Day and gets like a tattoo like he'll give some tattoo people are getting Jeff. Goldblum. FLASH TATTOOS DID YOU. Know I didn't. But I've seen I've seen him Like. In an interview talking about people getting tattoos of him. And it's so funny. It's like I feel like we should be our next to you remember when we had just left London and somewhat some artists like installed this giant Jeff Goldblum statue on like Phil Lot on the lawn outside the the bridge theater setting somewhere around there and they had this like Gorgeous Gold Statue of Jeff Goldblum laying down like he doesn't Dross Park Oh. Yeah and he's like young his shirtless Yeah Walnut list but tank top or whatever no just a button down but it was like not buttoned half a Oh Anyway so you shouldn't. Superstar. He is he's got to love him. Okay. We're going to move on because this isn't his show but if he's listening it can be your show, Jeff. He's just sweet. Just send us an email. Go slight see the me calm your show. Can take over. So. The theater began to struggle financially and was acquired by point bark. Point Park University in nineteen sixty eight the playhouse continued to operate now mostly for students for many years this way this wasn't a perfect fit though the buildings of the playhouse were old and not originally intended for theater. They were also much farther from Point Park's main downtown campus making the playhouse more trouble for the school than it was worth in late two, thousand, eighteen, the old Pittsburgh playhouse buildings crafts avenue were demolished as the spirit of the playhouse was moved to a new home. Oh, that's a bummer. It's like cool history. The new Pittsburgh playhouse complex is located on Forbes and fourth, and while it may not have as many ghosts lingering as the old buildings had it is at the very least a space that was designed and intended to be used for theatre. Sad. Sad. Okay. Well, moving on things the hunting section of the Pittsburgh playhouse. We gotta get my my spooky vocal but We also Halloween town reference. Have you sir. Familiar. Halloween town. Longtime ago. I know. Collectively, Judge Lino, she was not raised on D. Calms and it shows in times like this. There's a wonderful line that Debbie Reynolds has when she corrects her grandson on how to make a ghost noise like make it like this out of a ghost sign it was one of the daughters anyway she's like she's like she says something about it being like like lower and more melancholic

Jeff Goldblum Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Playhouse Pittsburgh Civic Playhouse Pittsburgh Playhouse Complex Helen Wayne Mercedes Richard Richard Gene Kelly New York August Wilson Point Park University Noel Coward Fred Astaire Debbie Reynolds Google Squirrel Hill
"connick" Discussed on LOVE SOMEONE with Delilah

LOVE SOMEONE with Delilah

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"connick" Discussed on LOVE SOMEONE with Delilah

"Yeah. So. With.

Transcend: The New Science of Self-Actualization, by Scott Barry Kaufman, Ph.D.

The Psychology Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Transcend: The New Science of Self-Actualization, by Scott Barry Kaufman, Ph.D.

"About Maslow's we're we're going to go into your new book coming out called transcendence is that right that's it's called transcend transplants. Verb got it transcend. Is it like an order? You're giving people please transcend. Yes yes that's the idea. It's an action action word for sure. It's a hopefully a inspirational northstar kind of book. They kind of shows what humans could be well any builds on the work of Abraham Maslow's. So tell us a little bit belt who he is we all. We've all heard of him but Philipson is if we didn't know oh good. I'm really glad you said that. Because I've had other people billy well no one's no good no sue Masilela. Why should they care about your book and we thanks so I like your attitude about that? Everyone knows who might as well. Well I think most people who've taken introductory psychology class who have taken an introductory management class have come across maslow's writings. Yeah for sure. I've come across at least if they never even heard him as well have come across that. Connick pyramid now. As Abraham Muscle was a humanistic psychology. The pyramid is the hierarchy of needs. That we're talking about correct maslow's hierarchy of needs and it's usually depicted as a pyramid where you have n- order of needs. That must be met before one can become everything. They're capable of becoming sandwiches labeled soft actualization. Now this is the story this is this is the story that's being told to so many introductory psychology management students and people who see at diagrammed on the Internet however it turns out that massive never drew a pyramid and and there are so many misconceptions about the hierarchy of needs. It's it's incorrect. How it how. It's been taught the past sixty years. Correct a list of needs a hierarchy. But he's never drew them in the form of a pyramid correct. He never conceptualized in that way. His theory was very developmental. He made it very clear that we are constantly this dynamic of moving two steps forward and one step back and then we can also that we can. We can target multiple need simultaneously. We don't have to wait to to start self actualising until everything else has done until we check all the boxes and also as I like to say in. The book of life is not a video game. It's not like we reached one level of the hierarchy like connection. Some voice from above is like congrats. You've unlocked esteem mortal combat or something. It's just not the way the world works and was very clear about that so I really tried to infuse the spirit of what Mazal actually meant as well as the rest of the humanistic psychologists it really is an attempt more globally in this day and age in this world today to to bring back a lot of the ideas of of the humanistic psychologists have been lost but tell us what the hierarchy is. What are the levels the original model in medicine and I revised it revised it but in the original model you had the safety needs or even had below that yet physiological needs okay like food water shelter and safety needs need for certain sense of predictability in your environment and then you have belonging in love and he lumped him together which I teased them apart? And we can talk about that in in my my revised model but he had love and belonging together and then he had a steam needs which is esteemed from others esteem. It's the esteem and others hold us in both. I'd say he. He has two components of that. Both the scene from others as well as our own self esteem. But the problem with that is it's hard disentangle that because we do drawl so much of our own self esteem on this team. It's almost like redundant in like ninety percent of humans and then but then you can get to the self actualized individuals so that's too that's the next level is self actualization is a big. It's a big leap jets. I've always viewed that as quite a jump like okay. I feel really pumped up ego. Wise boom can self actualize? I you know this seems to be a lot of steps along the way there. And in a Lotta ways. That's what I try to. My book is is connect those dots and I took self actualization out as a stage. It's not because it's not we ever reach again. Life is not a game. It's not like you ever reach self actualization and then you win the princess or whatever that was whatever my my video game. I understand just an ordinary language. The words you know physiology safety belonging esteem but self actualization. I'm betting most people hurt either directly or indirectly from maslow's hierarchy of needs. Can you can you tell us a little bit about what he meant by that? I contact Maso talks about in different ways. But there's one one quote he's he used to. If you give me a moment to actually find it I really love this quote. It was the best description of self actualization. I could find okay. Short tie found a unpublished essay that he really wanted to publish it was he was calling critique of self actualization. This was really his attack. He really wanted to publish this before he died. And instead it was left in an unpublished collection. But this is the quote. I think this is this really gets the heart of what he really thought about. Self-isolation we try to make a rose into a good rose rather than seek to change. Roses into Willie's incessant pleasure in the self actualization of a person who may be quite different from yourself even implies an ultimate respect and acknowledgement of the sacred and the uniqueness of each kind of

Abraham Maslow Connick Pyramid Abraham Muscle Philipson Sue Masilela Billy Mazal Maso
Marsalis jazz family patriarch dies of virus complications, son says

Morning Edition

02:55 min | 1 year ago

Marsalis jazz family patriarch dies of virus complications, son says

"Ellis Marsalis the pianist educator patriarch of the most celebrated family in jazz died Wednesday in New Orleans he was eighty five his eldest son the saxophonist Branford Marsalis said his father died of complications from the coronavirus Ellis and his wife Delores raised six sons four of them became jazz musicians including Wynton del fail and Jason he was also a mentor to Harry Connick junior and generations of other musicians when Tompkins is host of the program music inside out which airs on W. W. and in New Orleans when I mean this is just such a huge loss it is a tremendous loss for us in the world and for music lovers everywhere actually Ellis Marsalis was committed to being a teacher and she wants to be a musician so he can help people all over the world and Louis Armstrong we appreciate modern and you know the Ellis park center here in the night or are they called him a master educator you know he came up in the nineteen forties and the nineteen fifties when modern dress had no money in the world nothing there were no schools but by the end of his life you know nearly every jazz musician who's from here or the study had a story to tell about how Ellis Marsalis inspired we're talking about Terence Blanchard thank you your contact book now thank you for that finally Nicholas Payton list goes on and not including of course Marcella they have wonderful careers at I was gonna ask I mean how much did he pressure them to go into into music and jazz in particular well you know what I spoke with him he you know he said that he never rule breaking news out of it you know he said he would wait at if the music and if they wanted to learn to keep with that by wanting them I know pointing out certain artists that they should be listening to and he was also very good at keeping brutal but very useful advice to players you know and that runs an internet connection here but always remark on that in interviews you know come quite famous explain elements helps with with top but but you know but they were the better for it and and obviously carry on again and my fellow spokesman center named Ellis Marsalis center for music named after the great teacher you know Ron you know every great jazz musicians have one thing in common and that is that the person is equally our front continue elsewhere what's that and you know if you ever

Louis Armstrong Nicholas Payton Harry Connick Wynton Del RON Ellis Marsalis Center Marcella Terence Blanchard Ellis Park Center Ellis Marsalis W. W. Tompkins Jason Delores Ellis Branford Marsalis New Orleans
Imposter Syndrome

Mentally Yours

07:10 min | 1 year ago

Imposter Syndrome

"Hi John and Welcomes Mentally Yours metro-dade. Uk's weekly mental health podcast. My Name Is Yvette. And this week my guest is Dr Anne White House. She's a scientist. And also the author of pullback your power we guys be chatting about imposter syndrome confidence and the weird and wonderful workings of the subconscious and White House. Welcome to mentally IOS. Thank you very much for coming on. So which hasn't today about your new book which is called Pullback Your power. Why did you decide that you wanted to write that? Well that's a long answer. Basically I went through a Takkula burnout in my my first career. Which was as the scientists that are not gimmick and instead of giving up I really spend the next two decades vide- digging into why I had had that reaction to walk out in what what is happening to me and other women like me because it's a pattern that many women experience and things it's not about just may about solving the problem for all women and that's really the motivation the book so it's literally twenty five years of my life journey. Twenty eight search making it accessible tool that benefits on and hopefully staff and what I've answered when you say you suffered ban would exactly happen okay. So when I read into my Shit I was there. I was dealing with students. I was dating colleagues dating The engineering companies. And what I found was despite my qualifications a Mike my competence and the fact that I could do the actual job no problem underneath the surface. I felt so undermined is I think probably read. I felt as if I were standing on. Nothing felt that I had no confidence on all of them able to speak up when I wanted to my stress just vamp I'm Sachi wrapped up in Somalia temple on these symptoms just Scott West West and there was no veal. Tangible leased to them I was actually I had was if you don't have the surface out of proportion with the facts the facts whether that should have been a problem underneath the surface. That definitely was a problem. So these Jess Simpson's literally got worse and worse than me so much that your body can cut breath and eventually my buddy says enough. That's enough I haven't you? Maybe some ills that I continue it affected you in quite a physical wears while eventually. Yes I had. All of the the mental and emotional symptoms described. The what I did as many women. Do we put full it? We are so determined to prove ourselves to fulfill architectural and not give up especially with me. Being in a male dominated environment is very rare with the fact that I was the role model what I wasn't going to give up slapped todd and harder and harder but then became counterproductive and eventually taught level of stress is going to go into health clubs in one way or another and it was chronic. Fatigue is that right and anxiety with is that the right description oh eventually chronic fatigue. Yes that's hot manifested for me. Huge level of stress and anxiety which led onto that that connick fatigue hallowed did take field doctor to realize that that was walks going on and also what was caused catch. Well that's an interesting question for a very long time. It was simply that I was told on your. You have a high stress Korea knuckles. I did have a high stress career but I was. I knew that that was going on but conventional medicine doesn't really look at those things so I I wasn't able to have much help funk medicine it because it was mayor what's going on inside me mentally and emotionally which. I believe was the cause of the problem. So how did you go about finding out? What was the cause of the problem because Jenny Don? Yeah so basically. We got the point where I had been forced to give up my academic career and I I thought point see medical profession said look on your Anything for you. Good luck and you have enough. Because it wasn't within their disaster and the expertise I because I is scientific mind. I just wasn't going to let it pass. I was on me. I thought I was Iraq. Thirty one thirty two at the time and I wasn't prepared to believe my life is over just at that's eight Jefferson so by member of every key moment when I literally said I'm not going to settle for this. I'm going to find a solution and I didn't know how long it would take an. I didn't know what it would be but I decided to look at all possibilities to think outside the box to go where I haven't gone before because I was determined to find the solution because I must be a cause that this couldn't have happened for no reason to be something going on which wasn't immediately obvious so I started looking at my reaction to life and that led me on the path of rebel. My subconscious believed. We're why was I reacting? To things may end the consult today often as if I was going to go to my own execution and then again to a meeting it was rare out proportion. Why had I felt that way? And so that led me into digging into the subconscious mind and finding what's really underneath the surface and by this time of course it's not just me. I've been helping other women as well. There was no way is going to go back to my engineering. Could be about who mission on a mission to work this out and to help other women. So that's what led me to identify the patents that I've described in the book about how literally women are being held back by. He owed subconscious Tagami which is still deeply rooted in the past. We've soared so much in the last two or three generations in terms of algae unity's and of our free agents but the operating system underneath in everybody's minds at our institution that solution the pause and that's giving women a subconscious message. You shouldn't be here while consciously pushing forward to Cossack creates enormous internal conflicts which is the visible these problems. That's why I've analyzed in a very helpful very logical way in the

Scientist Dr Anne White House UK White House John Somalia Jess Simpson Takkula Mike Connick Scott West West Jenny Don Todd Korea Iraq Jefferson
New York Icons: Kaufman Astoria Studios

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

10:09 min | 1 year ago

New York Icons: Kaufman Astoria Studios

"New York for its entire. History has brought people together of wildly different backgrounds and that might be different races or cultures or a geographic areas Irish people and Jews and African Americans and you know Italians but also different classes. You had the tenement girl and the rich playboy and everybody in between well. That's just a natural for storytelling. But when these stories were told by Hollywood what was distinctly New York about them could get flattened out for the mainstream. If you look today at a Marx brothers movies the first couple of Marx brothers films. They're throwing all these terms around. Mommy's Nora Nori. There is Jewish for free loader animal crackers in the coconuts where designs you know for a New York audience but when the Marx Brothers then do moved to Hollywood and they begin making films for MGM. There's no Yiddish in those movies anymore. Right they become the sort of universal. You Know Hollywood movie Marx Brothers that that's from forty second street classical nine hundred thirty three musical about the Broadway chorus girl who becomes a star that connick number has the busby Berkeley dance formations but it also has the skyline the elevated train street vendors and attempted rape and murder. It's a film about New York. Made in Hollywood that helped form what sanders calls the mythic city. That dream version of New York. That's a distillation of the real place. Forty Second Street and all those back stage musicals that were made all the homes that were about the putting on of a Broadway show. They were shot in Broadway theaters. They were shot in Hollywood sound stage theaters. You know there was just endless numbers of these amazing films which did not have a single frame except possibly the establishing shot the opening shot would be shot in New York as the credits ran by with music behind him in. May Nineteen thirty. Three paramount turned the Astoria studios over to its main creditor western electric that companies filmmaking arm Eastern Services Studios INC operated it as a rental studio for independent productions. Its output varied widely. The Scoundrel for example was set in Manhattan's literary world. Noel Coward plays a ruthless hated publisher. Julian place the woman he charms. Mary's then abandoned putting something happened. Man I do live. I hope you're playing folk killed when you're dying using it on. The homepage of the year does not think of human when he dies. He's condemned to damnation unless he finds one person on Earth to mourn. Him novelists writes Ben. Hecht and Charles MacArthur rotated but at Astoria. They also got to produce and direct. They won an academy award for best original. We don't be Marquette. Hulu your new. There was a series of Spanish language. Musical starring Tangos Star Carlos Gardell Tambien. A nineteen thirty. Three's Emperor Jones was based on the controversial Eugene O'Neill play main character was a black pullman porter who escapes prison to become dictator of a small island. The film could only have been made with independent funding. Then the studios were called to service for World War Two. The Department acquired the property in Nineteen Forty Two and the pictorial center of the army. Signal Corps moved into make trading and propaganda films. They expanded the facility and built barracks for the soldiers. The army used motion pictures in the war effort and turned to experienced filmmakers for help frank. Capra worked on a series of orientation films called why we fight one episode related to our won the Oscar for best documentary. Just what was it? Made US change our way of living overnight but turned our resources are machines our whole nation into one vast awesome producing more and more weapons of war instead of the old materials by the end of the war the ABC employed over two thousand people making movies over half of them civilians. All this work even brought new film techniques like multiple angles shooting and change film in even more momentous ways for five years American audience. It has been seeing newsreels. And it's someone you know. A movie maker said well you couldn't you couldn't bring in the enemy for for production meeting you know before. The battle and people went out with sixteen millimeter cameras. And these lightweight cameras that could go everywhere. They saw actual action after the war audiences and creators had developed a taste for this more realistic filmmaking. There was an appetite. For a new kind of filmmaking. That would be used more available light less contrived cinematography be shot with faster. Granier film be more shot on location and feel more like a took place in real place and not this kind of fabricated construct and be more adult this desire for realism meant the glossy representations of New York. That Hollywood made before the war wouldn't do director is like Ilya. Kazan felt their stories needed New York locations and New York talent. You don't understand I coulda had class. Gerber contamination could have been somebody by the MID FIFTIES NEW YORK. Filmmakers were more than just contenders. The Oscar wins for on the waterfront in nineteen fifty five and Mardi fifty six affirm. That excellence could come from outside. Hollywood New York is setting is capable of whatever mood or dramatic statement? You WanNa make architecturally in its light for talk about winter light as Mr Bergman did. New York's winter light image. That Sidney Lumet in the documentary film titled by Sidney Lumet. He grew up on the lower east side in nineteen fifty seven. He went from directing theater and TV. Two movies with twelve angry men. You're asking us to believe that somebody else did the stabbing with exactly the same kind of knife. Larger a million or one go onto make more New York classics like Serpico Dog Day afternoon and network. He died in twenty eleven. I'm not comfortable anyplace but New York when I leave New York for any other place in the United States My nose starts to bleed. Filmmakers at this time took full advantage of New York locations for their exterior shooting. When they needed a controlled indoor set they may do with whatever studios were available. Tv Or old movie studios the old Bronx by graph for example operated as a rental studio under different names until the seventy s the Astoria Studios. Meanwhile were still occupied by the army. There was some leftover stages from the twenty s and they reuse them and Sidney Lumet told me amazing stories of going onto these studios which he was in an editing room up in the Bronx. That had been Edison's old editing suite with an e draw you know kind of worked into the curtains E for Edison. These were the oldest movie studios in the world and they were using them in the nineteen fifties to make all those great early in mid fifty s movies like Twelve angry men and on the waterfront the city eventually recognized how vital New York and the screener to each other in nineteen sixty six mayor. John established the first mayor's film office in the world to lower hurdles to filming their Lindsay's film office streamline the permitting process and removed a lot of red tape for shooting in the city he even dedicated a police. Unit to location shoots then in nineteen seventy. The army moved production to different site and turned the Astoria property over to the federal government. This was not simply a movement of some soldiers because most of the people making the films were grips carpenters electricians and actress who were part of. New York's commercial motion picture industry so they were not at all happy when this plug got pulled in Astoria. The complex sat abandoned. For years unprotected and open vandals people would go in there. Rip The copper out of the walls and those people with a purpose then they were also just people in there for mischief terrible condition in the meantime you have this eyesore at the edge of a residential communities have halfway between the area and Long Island city. It's just getting worse and worse and worse. They abandoned cars dropped all around weeds growing through the sidewalk. I remember this very clearly. The film unions local community and the city got together to preserve the studio site. Save film jobs and clean up the neighborhood in nineteen seventy seven. They formed the nonprofit a story of Motion Picture and Television Center Foundation. They managed to prevent the studio from being sold off or turn down by getting the site on the National Register of historic places a process that normally took years.

New York Hollywood Astoria Studios Army Sidney Lumet Astoria Marx Brothers United States Oscar Nora Nori Marx MGM Noel Coward Long Island Eastern Services Studios Inc Manhattan Carlos Gardell Tambien
Restoring the Musical City of New Orleans After Katrina

Aerial America

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Restoring the Musical City of New Orleans After Katrina

"By two thousand five there was no city in America as vulnerable as New Orleans. It was literally surrounded by by water water later later but but without without adequate adequate barriers barriers to to keep keep that that water water out. out. Yumi Yumi event event of of Catastrophe Catastrophe Lake Lake born born lies. lies. East East of of New Orleans within hours after Hurricane Katrina came ashore a wall of water primarily from the lake filled city canals and then broke through floodwalls rushing into the lower ninth ward and nearby communities wiping houses right off their foundations from above off sites that became headline news August. Two thousand five. After Katrina came ashore appear amazingly unchanged by the storm the ICONIC SUPPO now stands on dry ground and once again hosts home games of the New Orleans Saints Commuters have returned to the crescent. Listen city connection. It was across this bridge. That hundreds fled on foot after the storm subsided hoping finally to get out of town but they were quickly turned and backed by a wall of armed policemen. Many claimed it was an act of racism and that the police were only trying to keep New Orleans. African American evacuees out out of the cities primarily white suburbs. Meanwhile one section of the Ninth Ward is bouncing back in typically colorful New Orleans style. Awesome these homes. Were the brainchild of actor. Brad Pitt. After visiting this devastated community he vowed to help his make it. Right Foundation brought together architects from around the world to design and build dozens of eco-friendly flood. Visist and houses so families from the lower ninth ward could return home with dignity powered by solar energy to of these homes or the same. The foundation is also helping rebuild streets and gardens in a city where music is king. It's not surprising that one of the first first and biggest post Katrina projects was to help displaced musicians in the upper ninth ward natives. Harry connick junior and Brentford Marcellus us together. With habitat

New Orleans Catastrophe Catastrophe Lake L Right Foundation Hurricane Katrina Yumi Yumi New Orleans Saints Brad Pitt Katrina Harry Connick Brentford Marcellus America
"connick" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"connick" Discussed on Shedunnit

"It's an iconic connick mystery setting almost to the point of cliche reproduced.

connick
Mountain Dew Turns Mistake into Marketing Win

Business Wars Daily

04:56 min | 2 years ago

Mountain Dew Turns Mistake into Marketing Win

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by sent pro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk is never been simpler than with sent pro online from pitney leabeau's. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit p._b._a. Dot com slash b w daily the uh for i'm wondering i'm david brown and this is business wars daily happy friday everyone well. It's every manager's nightmare chimaera public mistake one so obvious factually inaccurate but there's just no hiding it. That's exactly what happened to the marketing department. At mountain dew the iconic connick soda brand owned by pepsico back in june. The brand launched a campaign called the do nited states intending to celebrate the uniqueness of all fifty states is it designed bottle specific to each state and promised prizes to soda drinkers who collected all fifty but it made one glaring geographical error over on one map. It mistakenly assigned ownership of the upper peninsula to wisconsin for the record. The upper peninsula belongs to michigan. That's the twenty six thousand thousand acres of land that separates lakes michigan and superior as fast company notes yeah. It's hardly a priority for most fortune five hundred companies but not surprisingly residents of the upper peninsula or the u._p. Is the call. The region were quite miffed. The guy who runs the u._p._s. twitter handle a man named bugsy sailor triple triple dog dared the brand to come out with a special upper peninsula branded mountain dew and to give a free case to every u._p. Resident well. We wouldn't be too surprised to find business schools using this case as an example of what to do when you're caught in a blender pepsico took bugsy sailor seriously asli that's right within a day mountain dew vice president of marketing nico- portwood got in touch with sailor assured him the brand would make a special upper peninsula salah bottle now. They needed suggestions for what to put on it. Portwood asked residents of the u._p. They're called uber's to tell pepsi co. What was special about the remote region then the brand designed new label and plastered on nine hundred six bottles of mountain dew gave the sodas away at the upper peninsula state fair where by the way they also gave the ninety thousand attendees chance to dunk mountain dew employees in a dunk tank talk about eating crow more seriously. The brand also redid digital t._v. commercials commercials giving the upper peninsula back to its rightful state on the map. What pepsico couldn't do was to sell the branded soda to come out with quickly one thing to navigate the tricky approval processes and regulations necessary to put it on store shelves well that would have taken too long portwood told fast company in the process mountain dew grew hundreds of thousands of new fans on social media mostly from the u._p. And got a boatload of publicity so what could have been an embarrassing flop turned into a refreshing win for a brand that unlike most sodas is still doing well rival coke as the country's most popular soda but surprisingly mountain dew is the fourth most popular soda in the country. That's according to the motley fool which says its success. Ass is largely regional mountain. Dew is particularly popular in appalachia. The south and the midwest and now in one tiny corner of michigan mountain dew is now number one problem wondering this is business business wars daily this week's episodes were written edited and produced by late apetit ran emma portland edits. The series executive producers marshall rated by for non lopez test one. I'm david brown have a great weekend. We'll see you next wandering. This episode is brought to you by centro. Online from pitney bowes shipping thing in mailing from your desk has never been simpler than with sent pro online from pitney bowes with simple online is just click sand and save for as low as four four dollars ninety nine cents. That's right four dollars and ninety nine cents a month. Send envelopes flats and packages right from your p._c. And you are back back to business in no time. Try it for free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale but only when you visit p._b. Dot com slash v._w. He w daily that's p._b. Dot com slash b w daily.

Pitney Bowes Pepsico Dunk Mountain Dew Nico- Portwood Mountain Dew Michigan Mountain Dew David Brown Pitney Leabeau Connick Soda Michigan Twitter Wisconsin Lakes Michigan Bugsy Pepsi Vice President Of Marketing Appalachia Centro Emma Portland
"connick" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"connick" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"All right pretty famous movie it's by ready Connick junior ray Connick junior it had to be you now the movie super famous song I don't I don't know the song it had it had to be I'd run again nothing on that one nothing all right nothing at all my name comes close to mind so number seven is still out there folks if anyone knows that one if you could choose seventy eight so what's going on with you today you don't come much right right in those great to hear from you not circular first on a lot to do with me for three years I worked third shift and I'm with you like everything by I've never called what do you do for a job I we are establishments places Salem a maintenance company or you're on your own no I pretty much work for one place and then I'll collect some contract for another I used to be a Jenner I I he was a janitor for quite a long time in the hospital and at a university I I actually like being a janitor yeah I I I I but I've been doing it for a while to psychology myself you know I mean you don't know thank you dependence of it I work for myself known bugs read on exactly and one of my favorite things was you know the buff the old school buffer is the didn't have really all yeah we got one downstairs the one that doesn't really have wheels you have to balance it yeah I know you go swing back and forth you know I need all the rhythm and his real skill to that I love that yeah good time in it and if you let go of it where it starts whipping around it is very dangerous you don't really hold on to that because you know you lose it you can hit the corner hit the walls are needed to be real careful and Jeez I got a break or forty five or may go to forty five rap to even things out that's okay seventy vis a and.

Salem ray Connick three years
"connick" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"connick" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Now, if you're my Connick guy, and you like money, and I love money guys. We have the dodgers and the nationals and if you play this game by the forfeiting, you're not gonna wanna watch the game. Because the team that I gave you will be up by five runs, and you're gonna realize that this is an easy winner. We also have a baseball underdog that is one fifty to one or better. And what that means is this if you're not in tune with baseball does the money line you put up a hundred and you make back. Let's say the lines minus one twenty you gotta put up one hundred twenty dollars to make a hundred in this case the line is plus one fifty that means you put up a hundred and you get back one fifty. So if you put a fifty you make back seventy five if you put up five hundred you make back seven fifty or more not being exact. I'm telling you, which one fifty or more. And the reason why not being exact is because I know there's a lot of people going to look at the lines and sale. It's one fifty well, look this range. Okay. This could be one fifty to two hundred this game. But now it's going to pay an awesome amount of money at if you wanna make money. This is the number to call. This is the data called Sunday may twelfth. And I would love nothing. More than two hit a three team. Paulie for you. Have the would that feel we've got the dodgers and the nationals at four ten. We've got this baseball underdog there pays better than one fifty. And we've got an NBA game. It's gonna win by twenty points. Above the spread. You could do a three team round Robin that pay seven and a half to one. You could do a three team parlay that pays six to one. You can play all three games. Now, you're at sixteen and a half to one on your money. Guys, clean up day. I want to win fee you after I hit these three games, you're gonna wake up tomorrow morning, and you're gonna be happy that you called and my motivation is a percentage of the people that are happy that called in that one are going to want to sign up for ninety nine dollars. You're going to want to take a little piece of what they made and reinvest it and do our pay after you win program we clean the slate. Ninety nine bucks thought over again. And then once a week keep track of what you win if you win five hundred bucks. Take care of us that simple. We get paid based on performance. And believe me guys. We are extremely reasonable. We are the big in my opinion sports company in the world. And it's not because we get clients for ninety nine dollars. It's because we have developed bankrolls for some of the biggest sports gamblers in the world, and they pay us based on performance. So when they bet a hundred thousand a game on a game like the dodgers. And the nationals just understand something. I'm putting that game on the recording. I'm not holding back today. Everybody's getting anybody that calls. My recording is getting everything I'm giving every game. I have on this tape recording out to everybody, and you know, my larger players understand because at one point in time they were smaller players, and I'm going to have a guest on the show come on. He's a smaller player. Now. He's a bigger player. Not the biggest player I have. But he's a bigger player. So my bigger players. Understand they called in. They were smaller players at one point in time. And it took a phone call. To get them to where I needed to get them..

dodgers baseball Connick NBA Paulie Robin ninety nine dollars one hundred twenty dollars
ICYMI: Talking Tech with Harry Connick, Jr.

Talking Tech

05:16 min | 2 years ago

ICYMI: Talking Tech with Harry Connick, Jr.

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. Create and publish a stunning website all from one powerful platform, go to wicks dot com to create your very own professional website today. That's w I x dot com in stay tuned after the show to hear you can take advantage of special offer for talking tech listeners musician. Harry Connick junior wants to teach you how to play the piano. He just signed a deal with playground sessions nap, which is co owned by Quincy Jones beach, you how to play the piano is in service that cost ten dollars a month. Let's listen in to my conversation with Harry Connick junior here on talking tech all about learning to play the piano. So I'm wearing a playground sessions, which I know you're familiar with and it uses innovative technology that I haven't really seen before. So explain have a piano works. How reading music works. They also have instructors I'm one of the instructors takes people from. I mean as basic as a possibly gets, you know, talking to people who have never played don't think they can play don't think they have any musical ability, all and walks them through some very basic fundamental concepts of playing all the way through some more intermediate and advanced concepts. So it uses a whole bunch of different ways to engage people. And I gotta tell you. It's it's extremely cool. It's it's kind of a dictating and you kinda learn without realize you're learning. So as it's it's a it's a very exciting new frontier that I'm proud to be a part of in a nutshell is basically giving you numbers for the notes and in knowing that that might see is one in my e may be three or five or whatever. And just associating those numbers with the note. Is that where you begin that's part of it for sure. But I even go back or the map some people, you know, look at the piano keyboard, and they see, you know, all of those black and white notes, and they are intimidated by that I talk about the fact that there's only twelve of those notes in just a block of notes that repeats, you know, over and over again in. I mean, we go back to to those kinds of basics in in like even people that I know that I've seen that particular lesson. You know, you have to assume that most people love music almost everybody loves music in most people know nothing about it. And in you have to you have to remember that like when I was a kid. I knew nothing about music when I was three or four years old, and I was experienced I got I got a chance to had a lot of exposure to, you know, other than listening to the radio most people don't really know how it works. And if you break it down to a really really prime. Mary and fundamental level with the type of enthusiasm invert of that that, you know, somebody like me has I think it's possible to you know, fire some of those synapses in people's brains and get them to think about it in a way, they haven't thought about it before let me quickly ask you the name of my podcast is called talking tech. Are you a tech enthusiasts? You tell me what you bring with you on tour. What are some of the gadgets you like to play with? Well, you know, I I love technology. I got a patent on a system of reading music about probably nineteen or so years ago, and we haven't used sheet music on my bandstand, since then we we have a we developed a software that allows on musicians to read off of the screen, and you know, to change, you know, at the on a dime. Really whatever song. I I need him to play. So, you know, people are starting to catch on to that technology in you know, I'm I write all of my scores on on. My computer so technology plays a really big part in in. What I do. I'm Jefferson Graham with USA day. You have been listening to talking tech. Thanks to Harry Connick. Police have strategy to show on apple podcast, these favorite us on Stitcher, which helps more people find the show in his always. Thanks, everyone. For listening. Sometimes having a great idea is the easy part getting people to hear about your idea. Not always so simple. But now there's wicks at wicks dot com. You can start and publish your website for free wicks artificial design intelligence creates a stunning website for you in just a few minutes. You can choose from over five hundred stunning templates or start from scratch just answer a few questions about your business to get started wicks provides you with an all in one business solution to grow your online presence. Plus all sites include Bilton SEO tools. So you can easily get found online. And in search engines like Google and Bing, build a website of your very own with wicks today. And if you go to wigs dot com and use our code talking. You'll get ten percent off any premium plan with wicks premium plans, you'll get more storage, a free domain for a year and much more. That's wicks w I x dot com promo code talking for ten percent off your premium plan.

Wicks Harry Connick Quincy Jones Jefferson Graham Apple USA Mary Google Bing Ten Percent Ten Dollars Four Years
A review of the new Dumbo

Talk Nerdy to Me

07:13 min | 2 years ago

A review of the new Dumbo

"We just came out from watching Dumbo, and what did you think? Oh boy. Okay. So this is to be to be a kid's movie. And that is what it is a did Disney. Tim Burton's his movie, which is kind of a kind of a weird combination. I tell me I was Tim Burton. I would never ever guess that. That was a timber movie. As of one of the main villains. He looks like the guy the referee from. So if you all. On a lot of movies. I'm telling you, man. He's good at it. He's he's a good scary, bad guy. So of course, you know, this is a this is a very kids movie. It's a it's a remake of a very. It's a cornerstone of Disney's again library and union. So the poster of debris, and I think that was a straight up copy of what they actually will dreamland look a lot like it's like Ringling meets Disney for dream dreamland. And I mean, that's that's about as best as I can do it the overall story. I mean, the original Dumbo so Connick and men, it's it's I think if you if you re watch the original your comet get a better story about Dumbo because I don't think this was actually a good story about dumb. It was more of teaching a lifeless almost almost like, you know, anti business pro animal animals, and you know, and at the end, and this is this is a foreshadowing I mean, this was back in nineteen ninety one hundred years ago at nine thousand nine hundred and so this two thousand nineteen. Don't see you still haven't told me if you liked it. Yeah. I don't I don't know. I I was in different of it. I'm gonna go with you. I. I, you know, they're cartoon invoked so many emotions does when I watch it every time they separate him, and his mom, I tear up and this one bit. I didn't I didn't. I was. Well, maybe because we were already realized that. But I tried to be I wanted to be said, I could not didn't invoke any emotion. Happy sad or otherwise with me. It wasn't bad movie though. It was a good movie. Yeah. I mean, it's a it's a busy timber movie. So I director Iconex movie studio, but kind of actors. Yeah. And adding was a little devito Farrell Keaton. I mean, don't get me wrong. The. Doctors were amazing. The acting was a little like force. But don't take our word for it. What are some of the people watched it? Yeah. Probably a good idea. We have. And Bobby, and we came out of Dumbo. Would you guys think about the movie? Q it kept like some of that innocence with an also brought like real life situations that happens. Casseus? On us. I I was seeing because of my girlfriend. I think shown a greater message about keeping animals in out of captivity. Yeah there. There was a pretty greater message at the end, you know, about the animals and captivity, you know, especially with barley kind of getting rid of all their their animals, and then so so out of let's say ten feathers. What how many feathers do you get this? Million feathers. You're off the scale. I give it a night. Wow. Oh, so you guys really liked guys enjoyed it. Reading for Dumbo to the revenge. Come out. Well, thank you so much. We'll see in the movies. Are it must be couples nights? And we got a couple more people saw Dumbo. What's your names? Josh, what did you guys think? Good memories. But a lot of memories a lot of members you like how the they made an hour and a half movie out of a sixty minute. Yeah. Cartoons. Yes. It was well worth well worth it. So did you get the overall message at the end? I mean, I cry got the message message. Yes. So I mean, that's a big thing since this was place in nineteen nineteen one hundred years later now, we're in two thousand nineteen do you think the movie still holds up? Definitely. And I feel like now even more. So with people, you know, going forward with animal rights xactly so out of ten feathers. What do you guys give it? Tinton while ten ten. There you go you guys from. Josh. Thank you so much. All right. We're here with Robert in rubber just came out of the Dumbo move. What do you think Robert about the movie good? Good. Yeah. Dumble it'll it'll it'll pull on your heartstrings there. And so out of let's see when you were watching the movie, what did you feel about Dumbo? Did you sympathize him? I know this is almost like a learning experience. What did you think about Dumbo? Do you think he him and his mom are happy at the end. Yes. Do you think it was worth the whole place burning down for it? Yes. Did you watch the regional cartoon? And I'm pretty sure we're gonna get a lot of those answers because the ritual cartoon was very old very old and want to date myself. But yes, very old. So so yeah. Out of ten feathers. How many feathers did you give this? Ten out of ten you heard it from Mr Robert himself. Thank you so much. Thank you, sir. Well, you heard it from the crowd themselves of everybody loved it. And some people really loved it. And there's gonna be a common theme that these most of these kids that watch the this this movie. And have not seen the original. So they're probably gonna get a lot more out of it. I don't think this movie's meant for me, and you the minority I guess, we're the minority. Everybody the lowest they gave it was a nine for our audience here. So it's a it's a good. It's a good. I guess I guess not the target audience the audience love it. It's a it's a busy movie. So it's very polish. It's very good. And like I said they would have had any other director wouldn't matter. Probably it was. I'm just wondering how they trained that guy to fly that elephant because I couldn't have been easy. Yeah. It was a he needed that feather. He did he did a really good job of flying. Well, yeah. Heard it from us. You heard it from the peanut gallery, and we also want to a couple of people while we're here at Alamo draft house at this time. Because there's nothing up there is this a bright light. So and we're also thinking somebody else here Ray work productions apparently somebody shirt, there's a floating stick or they're in front of nobody's gonna give you a shirt a disembodied sticker. It's like. I wanna sure give me a sure exactly there now. I gotta sure yeah. We go.

Dumbo Disney Tim Burton Mr Robert Director Josh Alamo Draft House Farrell Keaton Connick Bobby RAY Nineteen Nineteen One Hundred Nineteen Ninety One Hundred Ye Sixty Minute One Bit
2000 episodes of Talking Tech --thanks listeners!

Talking Tech

03:49 min | 2 years ago

2000 episodes of Talking Tech --thanks listeners!

"Talking tech is brought to you in part by northwestern. University offered in partnership with north Western's Feinberg school of medicine. The program prepares students for emerging opportunities across the healthcare spectrum. Details are at SPS dot northwestern dot EDU slash informatics. Hey, boy, this time fly we posted the two thousand episode of the talking tech podcast on president's day. We never would have gotten a two thousand without you talking tech listeners. So I just wanted to thank everyone for listening. We did the thousand episode on November thirtieth twenty sixteen which means that I had about two hundred bonus episodes over the last two and a half years. If you're new to talking tech, it is a daily hit on the latest tech news reviews. Commentary told from a consumer point of view in recent days. We've talked about the joy of free streaming new et supported channels like to be and Pluto TV that have a lot of good content. The only downside. You gotta sit through ads. We've talked about the cost of living in an Amazon smart home Amazon wants to control everything we do in there. We've had guests like more Raka, Harry Connick junior. The epic rap battle guys in the slow. Mo guys they've come on to talk about their latest. You've heard a lot of people talking about the next trend in smartphones. Which is foldable phones will happen to foldable guitar. I saw one at the Namm show in January folded up, and you can take it anywhere. We talked about how to unsubscribe from net. Flicks. I told you about going to see yes. In riding around in virtual reality. Batman, self driving car. That was pretty crazy. We talked about why we all hate Facebook. But you know, what I'm not quitting? How about you? What am I most popular episodes, which was my top ten favorite gadgets of two thousand eighteen? But of course, what people really like is when I talk about the tech Turkey's number one. This year was the Facebook portal video chat device. Talking tech is. Been on the road. We were in Japan not that long ago where I talked about some of the wacky products that are only on sale there like a leg massager while you're at work or a cone of silence that you attach to your headphones to block the view of your co worker out of the way. So you can just focus on work not for me. But I love the battery chargers that you can find on basically every street corner added convenience store dislike the bricks that we buy for instant juice for our smartphones. The only difference there comes with two AA batteries and seltzer twenty bucks. See you don't have to charge your brick before you use it. That's pretty cool. I'd love to see it here. We'll be back in Japan later. This year will also we're also going to Portugal and Spain. So we'll be talking tech from there as well. Thanks again for listening to two thousand episodes. I look forward to the next one thousand will recap them in twenty twenty one or twenty two please subscribe to talking tech wherever you listen to online. Audio please favored us on Stitcher, which helps more people find the show, and again, a two thousand thanks for listening to talking tech. Talking tech is brought to you in part by Northwestern University. The huge amounts of healthcare data available today as well. As advances in technology are making a profound impact on health care students enrolled in northwestern university's online master's program in health informatics, build the expertise needed to use that data and deliver more efficient ineffective patient care offered in partnership with north Western's Feinberg school of medicine. The program prepares students for emerging opportunities across the healthcare spectrum including specializations that are perfect for healthcare. Business and IT professionals. Details are at SPS dot northwestern dot EDU slash informatics.

Feinberg School Of Medicine Northwestern University Facebook Japan Amazon President Trump Turkey Harry Connick Batman Raka Portugal Spain
How to access the Alexa Talking Tech skill

Talking Tech

02:52 min | 2 years ago

How to access the Alexa Talking Tech skill

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. Is Jefferson Graham with USA got great news for anybody who has an Amazon echo speaker? We've got a new way to get the daily talking tech podcast deliver to you first thing every morning. The an Alexa flash briefing. Now, the skill the bring talking tech directly to you is easy to add. However, it will take a few steps. So stick with me in the smartphone. Alexa app, which you used to control the Amazon echo speakers, you enable the talking tech flash briefing skill open the app, go to settings click on flash briefings from there, you can access search just type in talking tech. And then enable the skill now. Each morning, you can either say Alexa, play talking tech flash briefing or Alexa, play my flash briefing. You can also tweet your settings to make sure the talking tech is the first thing you hear as part of your flash briefing. Now, just so you know, USA day is also working on adding the show to Google. Speakers. So stay tuned for more news in twenty nineteen. If you happen to be new to talking tech, the podcast is a quick two to four minute. Hit of the latest tech news reviews and commentaries with an occasional guest in the past week. We offered advice on getting great Princeton smartphones, we weighed in on Netflix price hike. We reviewed the aug home smart. Lock and talk to musician. Harry Connick junior about his new gig teaching piano on the playground sessions app. Beyond the flash briefings. You can listen to talking tech wherever you find great podcasts. And I just wanna thank you everyone for listening. Any concerns any questions you can always find me on Twitter where I'm at Jefferson Graham. Thanks, everyone. For listening to talking tech. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you want to be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com has got you covered. They developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks you. You can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store portfolio or blog wherever you are. How's that for officiant? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You'll look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Alexa Amazon Jefferson Graham Harry Connick USA Princeton Twitter Google Netflix Five Minutes Four Minute One Hand
ICYMI:  Harry Connick will teach you how to play piano

Talking Tech

05:09 min | 2 years ago

ICYMI: Harry Connick will teach you how to play piano

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. Us issue. Harry Connick junior wants to teach you how to play the piano. He just signed a deal with playground sessions in app, which is co owned by Quincy Jones. Q how to play the piano is in service that cost ten dollars a month. Let's listen into my conversation with Harry Connick junior here on talking tech all about learning to play the piano. So I'm working you call playground sessions, which I know you're familiar with and it uses innovative technology that I haven't really seen before to explain have a piano works. How reading music works. They also have instructors I'm one of the instructors takes people from. I mean as basic as they possibly gets, you know, talking to people who have never played don't think they can play. Don't think they have any musical ability, all and walks them through some very basic fundamental concepts of playing all the way through some more intermediate and advanced conserve. Sept? So it uses a whole bunch of different ways to to engage people. And I gotta tell you. It's it's extremely coal. It's it's kinda dictating and you kind of learn without realize you're learning. So as it's it's a it's a very exciting new frontier that I'm proud to be a part of in a nutshell is basically giving you numbers for the notes and in knowing that that by C is a one in my e might be three or five or whatever. And just associating those numbers with the notes is that where you begin. That's part of it for sure. But I even go back further map, some people, you know, look at the Pierre. No keyboard and a see, you know, all of those black and white notes, and they are intimidated by that I talk about the fact that there's only twelve of those notes in just a block of notes that repeats, you know, over and over again. And I mean, we go back to to those kinds of basics in in like even people that I know that have seen that particular lesson. You know, you have to assume that. Most people love music almost everybody loves music in most people know nothing about it. And if you have to you have to remember that like when I was a kid, I knew nothing about music when I was three or four years old, and I was experienced I got I got a chance to a lot of exposure to, you know, other than listening to the radio most people don't really know how it works. And if you break it down to a really really primary and fundamental level with the type of enthusiasm and verve that that, you know, somebody like me has I think it's possible to you know, fire some of those synapses in people's brains and get them to think about it in a way, they haven't thought about it before let me quickly ask you the name of my podcast is called talking tech. Are you a tech enthusiasts? You tell me what you bring with you on tour. What are some of the gadgets, you you like to play with? Well, you know, I I love technology. I Greg out a patent on a system of reading music about probably nineteen or so years ago, and we haven't used sheet music on my bandstand, since then a we we have a we developed a software that allows my musicians to read off of the screen in you know, to change on a dime. Really whatever song. I I need him to play. So, you know, people are starting to catch on to that technology in, you know, I'm I write all of my scores on on my computer, so technology plays a really big part in in in. What I do. I'm Jefferson Graham with USA. You've been listening to talking tech. Thanks to Harry, Connick police. Subscribe to the show on apple podcast. These favorite sons pitcher, which helps more people find the show in his always. Thanks, everyone. For listening. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you wanna be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com has got you covered. They developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks, you can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store portfolio or blog wherever you are. How's that for efficient? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Harry Connick Quincy Jones Jefferson Graham Pierre Apple Five Minutes Ten Dollars Four Years One Hand
Talking Tech with Harry Connick, Jr.

Talking Tech

05:09 min | 2 years ago

Talking Tech with Harry Connick, Jr.

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. Us issue. Harry Connick junior wants to teach you how to play the piano. He just signed a deal with playground sessions in app, which is co owned by Quincy Jones. Q how to play the piano is in service that cost ten dollars a month. Let's listen into my conversation with Harry Connick junior here on talking tech all about learning to play the piano. So I'm working you call playground sessions, which I know you're familiar with and it uses innovative technology that I haven't really seen before to explain have a piano works. How reading music works. They also have instructors I'm one of the instructors takes people from. I mean as basic as they possibly gets, you know, talking to people who have never played don't think they can play. Don't think they have any musical ability, all and walks them through some very basic fundamental concepts of playing all the way through some more intermediate and advanced conserve. Sept? So it uses a whole bunch of different ways to to engage people. And I gotta tell you. It's it's extremely coal. It's it's kinda dictating and you kind of learn without realize you're learning. So as it's it's a it's a very exciting new frontier that I'm proud to be a part of in a nutshell is basically giving you numbers for the notes and in knowing that that by C is a one in my e might be three or five or whatever. And just associating those numbers with the notes is that where you begin. That's part of it for sure. But I even go back further map, some people, you know, look at the Pierre. No keyboard and a see, you know, all of those black and white notes, and they are intimidated by that I talk about the fact that there's only twelve of those notes in just a block of notes that repeats, you know, over and over again. And I mean, we go back to to those kinds of basics in in like even people that I know that have seen that particular lesson. You know, you have to assume that. Most people love music almost everybody loves music in most people know nothing about it. And if you have to you have to remember that like when I was a kid, I knew nothing about music when I was three or four years old, and I was experienced I got I got a chance to a lot of exposure to, you know, other than listening to the radio most people don't really know how it works. And if you break it down to a really really primary and fundamental level with the type of enthusiasm and verve that that, you know, somebody like me has I think it's possible to you know, fire some of those synapses in people's brains and get them to think about it in a way, they haven't thought about it before let me quickly ask you the name of my podcast is called talking tech. Are you a tech enthusiasts? You tell me what you bring with you on tour. What are some of the gadgets, you you like to play with? Well, you know, I I love technology. I Greg out a patent on a system of reading music about probably nineteen or so years ago, and we haven't used sheet music on my bandstand, since then a we we have a we developed a software that allows my musicians to read off of the screen in you know, to change on a dime. Really whatever song. I I need him to play. So, you know, people are starting to catch on to that technology in, you know, I'm I write all of my scores on on my computer, so technology plays a really big part in in in. What I do. I'm Jefferson Graham with USA. You've been listening to talking tech. Thanks to Harry, Connick police. Subscribe to the show on apple podcast. These favorite sons pitcher, which helps more people find the show in his always. Thanks, everyone. For listening. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you wanna be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com has got you covered. They developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks, you can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store portfolio or blog wherever you are. How's that for efficient? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Harry Connick Quincy Jones Jefferson Graham Pierre Apple Five Minutes Ten Dollars Four Years One Hand
An argument against Big Tech being so big

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:29 min | 2 years ago

An argument against Big Tech being so big

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Mozilla makers of the brand new fire FOX monitor a free service to help you stay safe from hackers. You'll get a full report if you have compromised accounts and notifications if you appear in new data breaches take care at monitor fire, FOX dot com, and by Lincoln sales navigator with the sales industry changing so fast. It can be a challenging time to be a sales professional, but Lincoln is here to help blinked in provides you with unrivalled data on buyers through sales navigator as well as a smarter and more powerful way to approach them. Go to Lincoln dot com slash APM. Marketplace for your free thirty day trial and get closer to the right people. The biggest tech companies seemed different when they started out. But one author says that now they're just regular old monopolies from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. Part of the reason there's a backlash against big tech. These days is because some of these companies are so big they're big in terms of users. See Facebook's two billion, plus big valuation, Amazon and apple have both topped a trillion dollars and big in market share more than ninety percent of all web searches happen on Google. The US is taking baby steps toward possible. Regulation Europe is taking more like Paul Bunyan's is steps, but critics argue these companies should have been slowed down long ago. Tim Wu is a Columbia law. Professor and author of the new book the curse of bigness antitrust in new gilded age. He says tech companies in particular were allowed to grow too. Big too fast. They're kind of like an overgrown baby that's still in its waddling close in its crib being protected from the outside world. They have a series of laws that protect tech industry in ways that other industries aren't protected, and they're also unregulated. Unlike let's say telephone industry or banks and that gives vantage as well. Well, you talk about the failure of regular. Leaders to realize that say Instagram was a competitor to Facebook. And so I wonder how much of that was like you said a lack of a regulatory will and ongoing swatting if he will or if it was actually just a misunderstanding of the technology and the potential I think a little bit of both. So I was in government during the campaigns where Facebook bought up much major competitors. Google bought up, frankly, hundreds of companies, and in government, people didn't understand the technology at all the business model giving stuff away for free competing for attention losing money for many years in order to make money later that all just didn't really compute with a bunch of people who were used to looking for kind of monopoly of the old fashioned, even Microsoft righty where you charged money or standard oil controlling an actual product. So that I think was all sort of confusing the other hand, I do think that this crib effect was still there. So new industry exciting. Thing. You know, they seemed full of really good people. So you know, why not just let them buy up all the rivals. Well, and how does this fit into say the FTC's starting to have conversations about trying to overhaul antitrust regulations for the digital age like is the Sherman act going to cut it? Or are they in fact, just normal old monopolies? I do think what a lot of people are realizing is you don't necessarily need a whole new law designed to deal with them. You just have to accept that their businesses. Maybe in some cases, you have to understand that they're interested in attention and not just money, but they turn attention into money. I think what we're learning is some of the older principles really should still apply a standard oil's basic method was to gain a monopoly by buying up all its most dangerous competitors. And that's exactly what Facebook did. So I'm in the school that suggests the old principles which call for the break-up of big monopolies have not gone out of date. Tim Wu is author of the new book the curse of bigness antitrust in the new gilded age that book it's available today. We had a much longer. Sation with Tim on the make me smart podcast. You can find that on apple podcasts or wherever you get your pods. And now for some related links. I rest in peace, STAN Lee who brought us so many things, including of course, that Connick line from Spiderman with great power comes great responsibility. Which of course, is exactly what we're talking about. Now on Monday in Paris, France, and some US tech companies put out a declaration calling for more regulation of the internet for cyber security privacy and to slow down the spread of misinformation. The United States is not currently listed as a supporter of the Paris. Call for trust insecurity in cyberspace, among US, tech companies Facebook, Cisco, Microsoft, Salesforce and Google did sign on. It's actually not dissimilar to something announced last week by Tim burners Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web called the contract for the web Facebook and Google also signed onto that it's a set of principles around affordability access and privacy, and it'll be launched in full next may. Day. And sure at the moment, I know these things are mostly just big announcement. But they're important because this thing the internet the World Wide Web has changed keeps changing our lives, and at the same time it's susceptible to the same problems as anything that humans create and it's so big and profound and powerful that it will take a large and global effort to keep refining it and in case all of that is too high falutin end up in the cloud. The Washington Post has a very black mirror story out this week about a UK study on how driverless cars are going to change tourism, and nightlife and apparently become little mobile paid sex bubbles because also thing about humans is that there's not a single invention that we won't somehow start using for sex. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. Susan in Alta, California wrote to tell us she believes marketplace is an important source of business news, and that she trusts are hosts and reporters to be clear and objective. She's also a marketplace investor to join her and keeping public service journalism strong, donate online at marketplace dot org. Thanks to season and everyone who makes our work possible.

Facebook Google Tim Wu United States Standard Oil Apple Fox Dot Lincoln Lincoln Sales Microsoft FOX Tim Burners Lee Washington Post Paul Bunyan Professor Molly Europe Stan Lee Columbia TIM
"connick" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"connick" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"What was your biggest lesson there did you realize you really creating something that had the potential to be a franchise when you were doing that connick moving well we weren't thinking of it at all like that we just wanted to make that film and i i could we could do a whole night on all the things i love course of course that movie was was my film school but i think the biggest lesson that i learned was that test screening a movie isn't necessarily a bad thing what's a bad thing is who interprets the test results and what happens to the data that's crunched exactly and so on that film we tested the film very early and i'll try to do the short version of the story we tested the film very early and we had a very high slow rating and the studio felt we had too much talkie talkie and not enough action action and they had a shoot another action sequence and cut out a bunch of scenes and are slow rating doubled really by adding more action and i had felt from the beginning that the reason it was slows because they didn't care about our characters they weren't involved so after this disastrous second test screening and everybody left the picture role on i completely re cut the film put back in all the stuff we had cut out and then put some more stuff than we had never put in because we thought it was too much talk any talkie cut out the new action sequence and are slow rating vanished and we got the test scores we were hoping for so that was kind of what puts you on the path towards characterdriven action films.

connick
"connick" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"connick" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Taylor the smartest voice in boston on the great number one wild so you're not familiar with this mad i bet you've never heard it most people out there have never heard a remember i hadn't heard it but i really did like it that guy at a very good boy it's beautiful billy scott billy scott and it's amazing how many people don't haven't heard of it but hey listen that's my little you see i'm i have an anomaly and in it's brilliance for something that doesn't matter but let's get back to what does matter does it this is michelle wolf the socalled connick once in a while i happen to my wife watches the reruns and we have different senses of humor pretty much so i mean she she likes watching saturday night live in the replay she doesn't it's not a tv addict i think how it used to be it used to be great great talent belushi and steve martin i mean i mean it was a tremendous talent now when i see it it's just i mean if larry david comes on you know what i mean that's okay i don't know what it is but it seems like the level of i mean sitcoms have been the lowest thing i've ever seen i can't even watch the previews i get sick watching them so maybe it's just you know they're doing what makes money the networks and i think it's i think and it's my opinion the lowering of of i don't know whether it's to elect a what in this country is just it's remarkable so i want to get back here to the the house correspondent's dinner the white house correspondents dinner day the people should have unanimously walked out on her michelle wolf or at least taking their food i would've taken my plate gartner doggy bag left are i guess i guess i'd be afraid to do this throw the food if you're used to do what he over i feel shows throw the food atta she is unfunny as unfunny could be she's foggier vicious attacks and sarah huckabee sanders was sitting twenty feet away with her husband and she was looking at sarah huckabee is a real lady as i said not the most attractive person in the world but she's camp cheese she does the best she can so she looks fine to me she's overweight.

Taylor boston billy scott michelle wolf connick belushi steve martin larry david sarah huckabee sanders sarah huckabee white house gartner twenty feet
"connick" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"connick" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

"And one of the key elements about this idea being relevant it was timelessly relevant meaning that they were relevant when they started irrelevant as they started to grow up they are relevant as they continue to grow and then last thing is within the universe that they cared to be conic board they were recognized for that distinctive relevance and through long jetty of being recognized for that they became the standard bearers for that and therefore became connick now when you think about a new business are you think about a business say it's been around for a while but doesn't have anything that might be perceived connick i think one of the key questions they need to think about is you know i say this a lot of startups it isn't always the biggest baddest mouse trap that gets the mice it's the one with the stinky cheese and so i always challenged people what how sticky is your cheese you have any stinky cheese and if you don't let's start making some stinky cheese and one of the ways we can do it as start from scratch and whatever we create we really think about this idea of being distinctive and being noticed and being really differentiated versus the competition in a way that's meaningful and then for people who have been around for a long time there's one of two ways to do it one is treated like startup started from scratch the others look at your portfolio figure out are there products that maybe have great appeal recognition doing very well but they're not distinctive how might we make them more distinctive so when i think about this i think about the work you're doing obviously you're bringing your own perspective to it you're adding your own formula.

connick
"connick" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"connick" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Connick american brands though and i think that's nice that if you're going to try to resurrect something that it's that it's such a all of us we karen i've been talking behind the scenes during breaks for what couple days now about our toys r us memories and things like that so share some of them the first time ever went into a toys r us store what happened would you remember that so vividly there was a huge toys r us store that's now a costco so that's gives you the the scale of it that's how big it was and i remember the first time i went into toys r us just i had like the little catalog where i just constantly circled everything i wanted and we went in with my parents and i bought a strawberry shortcake sleeping bag because it was going to be my first sleepover birthday party so i'll never forget that and then just going back and forth for over the years for christmas gifts when i got my first bike it was from there my first roller skates my first rollerblades like all that stuff was all from toys r us and it's you you have those memories as a kid and i understand the nostalgia this and why people would want to donate i don't remember what my first purchase was oh i'm sorry i didn't mean china when you walked into the toys r us and i think we talked about this actually on the air maybe last week but that feeling is a kid when you walked into toys r us for the first time and it looked like it was a mile long right turn from the right to the left and there's like everything you can imagine and just that feeling of when the doors open and you look and my memory because i was such a girly girl is just going to those aisles of pink and just up and down up and down looking at every doll every toy that i could possibly imagine i loved barbies so i'd always be searching the barbie i'll and cabbage patch kids i'm sure we're in there too i was such a tomboy i would i would go right over to the bikes and you know they were set so high the cart tracks and all the.

costco china Connick
"connick" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"connick" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"Prosecutors just say well we've got a convict somebody and why not go with these two i got one better than that and this goes back to my like better better headlines harry connick when he was a prosecutor in louisiana the father harry connick junior yeah he was running i think he's going to run for governor or the senate or something like that and he had this big murder case so what they did was they arrested this guy and they got the guy on the head the guy for a burglary and they just tried to pin the murder on him so they stacked it up they convicted him of the armed burglary so that when they can so when they were able to convict him of the murder they could get a death penalty and that would get him bigger headlines you know armed robbery headlines than dangerous mult repeat repeat armed violent offender taken off the streets kind of thing well it turns out there was blood evidence literal dna that would exonerate the defendant and conic head that evidence from the prosecutors from the defense from the defense and when it came out the day that he was supposed to be executed he beat them in court and our supreme court the united states supreme court decided that he didn't deserve any money from the state of louisiana at all your calls and thoughts welcome eight hundred fifty five four fifty free that's eight five five four five zero three seven three three what are your thoughts on capital punishment compelled speech or whatever i got my blink home security system delivered right to my door download the app and it walked me right through the easy setup even with my complicated router system.

prosecutor senate burglary murder united states louisiana harry connick supreme court