20 Episode results for "Congressman John Conyers"

NPR News: 10-28-2019 1AM ET

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 10-28-2019 1AM ET

"Get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply this message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like Xfinity X. by conyers was a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus and led the fight to create a holiday to honor Martin Luther King I'm Nora Raum N._p._R.. News in Washington Janis to try to prevent new fires from breaking out Eric Westervelt NPR news outside Geyserville California this is NPR news from Washington classes are canceled again Monday in public schools in Chicago teachers went on strike October seventeenth after negotiations with the declared a state of emergency NPR's Eric Westervelt reports here on the northwest edge of the KINCAID fire helicopters are making water runs at ablaze that remains barely school district failed to reach agreement on a new contract Paul Berar Qatar player and vocalist for the classic rock band little feat has died a statement from the to restart talks and how Afghans will be involved the Taliban refused to negotiate with the Afghan government calling it a puppet of the United States Jennifer Glass Reporting Archer mostly burned to the ground wine tasting lawn furniture sits eerily untouched while much of the rest of Soda Rock is now smoldering Ash and debris more than one hundred and eighty thousand people green Afghans and the Taliban that were to be held in China this week we're delayed the US no Taliban were about to sign a deal last month when president trump ended the process the question now is how L. A. -fornia Sonoma's county strong dry winds continue to fan a major wildfire tens of thousands of people have been ordered to leave their homes and the governor had on an extension to Britain on leaving the block the deadline now is this Thursday last week they agreed to a delay but not in how long it should be British Prime Minister Boris Johnson ten percent contained small spot fires burning all along parts of route one twenty eight normally a bucolic stretch of sonoma's Wine Country One winery here Soda Rock has isn't reluctantly asked for more time after the British parliament would not approve the agreement he had reached with the EU on the details of Britain's departure in northern Dan said he was forced to miss the band's current tour to the side effects from treatments for liver disease he was seventy one NPR's Andrew limbaugh reports Argentina's chronic economic problems he failed to do so in his paid the price with a humiliating defeat in the election's first round the new president will be Alberta live from NPR news in Washington I'm Nora Raum the top. US negotiator with the Taliban has been meeting with Afghan officials in Kabul have been ordered to evacuate including parts of Santa Rosa a city devastated by wildfire two years ago PGA shut off power more than two million people across parts of thirty eight either loved or hated them because some people just don't seem to follow the fact that we enjoy all these different forms of music they would rather pigeonhole us in one one brand or another rare joined the band in nineteen seventy two and had been with them since unbound NPR news former Democratic Congressman John Conyers died Sunday city officials say he died at his home in Detroit apparently from natural causes he was and Tina's President Mauricio Macri has failed in the attempt to win a second term Phillips says mccray was heavily defeated in the election that marks AH leftward the season operator a pragmatist with a record of being his own man but it breathes NPR news Saudis twenty-seven members of the European Union meet in Brussels Monday to decide on the first visit since US telethon talks were scrapped last month Jennifer glass reports from the Afghan capital use voice Omay Helios odd arrived in Kabul talks uh-huh as president and now returns vice president despite corruption allegations and political scandals Kushner's foes won't she'll be the true power behind the throne yet Fernandez Andy he was one of the longest serving members of the house beginning in nineteen sixty five until he stepped down in two thousand seventeen after you've been accused of sexual harassment which he denied for the South American country the political landscape of this volatile nation is changing

NPR Taliban NPR Congressman John Conyers president Andrew limbaugh US Washington Nora Raum Eric Westervelt Fernandez Andy Soda Rock Sonoma Congressional Black Caucus Jennifer Glass European Union Martin Luther King Britain Afghan government
2020 Democrat Train Wreck? | 6/20/19

Pat Gray Unleashed

1:38:37 hr | 1 year ago

2020 Democrat Train Wreck? | 6/20/19

"Pat gray is here on the blaze radio network. With this triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three of course. It Pat unleashed on Twitter. Wow. We've got a lot of stuff to get into today as I guess that's pretty much every day year, then we never can't get to all of it, but we're going to do our best. There's just blood will shoot from your eyes today, not because of Bulla it'll be it'll be from the gr- avaition, but that's on its way. And might already be here here. In fact, we don't quite know yet, because it takes twenty one days in some cases for bullet incubates. So we've gotta wait on the Congolese people. The Congolese to see if they have it or not very will may but we took it. We were all the dice at probably not. Who knows? Let's just see. It'll be exciting. That's not the word. I'm going with. But I see your point. Yeah. I mean, it's just it's not dull to think we'll yeah, we might have a massive Abol out. At least we didn't have to go, there conveniently just brought it to us. That's the thing so great. 'cause they're all about sharing. How convenient is that? By the way, breaking news, a US navy drone was shot down by Iranian missile over the straits of Hormuz good earlier today. So there's some heightened even even more heightened tensions in the region after last week's attacks onto oil tankers. And now this commander for Iran's Revolutionary Guards said the shooting sends a clear message to the US. He said, while ran has no intention of war with anyone. It's ready for war. Yeah. I don't think you are really you don't want. None of this. I don't want to give it to you either, but you don't want. None of it. US navy's m q foresee drone which has the same wingspan as a Boeing seven thirty seven. Wow. Wow was over eight or national airspace. Oh. Oh, about seventeen miles from from Iran, while they had no business doing that. So I mean that deserves a response, right? We got to do something about it. Boy. Why would they try to provoke an attack like that? Why? Triple eight nine hundred thirty three Ninety-three also just to get your mind off. Everything. Think about this sailing, the Mediterranean on a ship full of passengers who share your love for this country and your thirst for history. Love great Italian food, nightlife, relaxing, by the pool. You can join Glenn doing that. And Bill O'Reilly and Stu, David. Barton rabbi Lapin all on a fourteen day adventure. Next spring sailing, the eastern Mediterranean, visiting Venice, Italy Croatia, Jerusalem, Athens. I mean, what a what a phenomenal trip this will be. You're going to Venice, the birthplace of commerce. You'll tour Greece where they're a Republic originated. You can walk where Jesus walked in Jerusalem. Bring your kids and share this incredible experience or your grandkids the neighbor kids. But do it soon. Because seriously, the boat is filling up fast. And there's a limited number. I think three thousand is a number. We can take so visit come sail away dot com today and learn all the details, check out the different packages, and find when you could afford and join us everything's included, by the way, when you when you do buy into it. Everything's included, including tips, which is create. I love that part. Go to come sail away dot com and check out all the details come sail away dot com. Gray is on waste. You can save your money for the extra taxes. We're gonna pay on a wealth, tax and on reparations. I can't believe reparations is raring its ugly head again, here we go again. And it's made it all the way to a hearing in congress. Yeah. Yes. You don't serious when they have the Bill and they're, they're having a hearing on it, and they're insisting that reparations are necessary and we need to pay him. Wonderful listening to Sheila jackson-lee yesterday. She's just terrific as always. Here's what she had to say. Is the original sin. Slavery has never received an apology this commission. I'm sorry. A slavery is not the original sin that is Adam's transgression with the fruit. Okay. So Adam, and eve that was original sin, and, like original sin to me. At least I'm not responsible for that. I believe that's any that's any ternal principle that I'm not held accountable for Adam's transgression. Neither my accountable for the people who instituted and carried out slavery. It's that's madness. Plus slavery's never received at nobody's apologize to slavery. That's probably true. But I think that these slave traders and the countries that have. That have participated in that evil have in fact apologized for it is really there's no apology ever been. I think the death of eight hundred thousand Americans was one apology and a pretty big powerful one. And we've apologized ever since what do you mean? There's no apology for it. It'd be comprised of members selected by the president of the United States. Speaker of the house, the leader. And of course, those who've been entrenched in this process, I spoke to John Conyers yesterday on it for you been given the opportunity to leave. This Bill John con-. You said to move on and to lead on, well, that's powerful move on into lead on is did he really say that? Wow. She write that down. Accurate prediction. She must have been weeping through the tears. It would have been hard to write that down because it was so powerful move on and on. Wow. Wow. Is that the right order? I mean did she I'm taking your word for it? And you. I mean, that's something so big you wouldn't want to mess it up. You don't want to get that, right? Right. Vague here. John Conyers also said read the Bill. I get a kick out of these people say read the Bill. If you remember correctly in, and we did write that down if you're. For us. Could take this. Thank you, congressman John Conyers. Thank you, that you have done for all of that. Share with you just a sense of what we face. Okay. Let me first of all, say the number of Africans who died in the new passage. Moreover, two million number of the slave died during slavery, first second and third generation over two point five million. Thanks les. Trae was the largest movement of people in history between ten and fifteen million Africans were forcibly transported across land between fifteen hundred and nine thousand nine hundred at least two seems like those dates have gone by right. Fifteen between fifteen hundred nineteen hundred. I'm trying to think okay. So at the earliest you're talking about. One hundred nineteen years ago. So this past past. It's yeah. Okay. Yeah. Interesting. Okay. Million africans. Ten fifteen percent died in the infamous mental passage as I've said and another fifteen thirty percent died during the March to confinement along the coast altogether for every hundred slaves reached the new world. Another forty died in Africa or doing the middle passage. Okay. We all agree. It was awful terrible. That was an evil that was perpetrated on, on these people, and we don't do it anymore. That's, that's why we haven't done it in one hundred sixty years. So. The idea of this commission should be welcomed by all Americans for. We are not asking one American to give one payment. No. Would you what are you asking you're asking all Americans to continually? Give what unending payments. What is that? What does this mean you're not asking one person you're asking all of us to give who weren't responsible for it? How does that help? We're saying is it's only way that slavery ended was a governmental action of the thirteenth amendment governmental action. Right. So it was instituted by government. So that kind of makes sense, failed after twelve years because it was imploded by governmental people. And after he construction a reign of terror that had never been seen. The hanging fruit. The lynching the oppression of Oti, the tearing away of land the hanging fruit familiar with the hanging fruit problem. What was that? She reference to lynching because she cited them separately, fruit, the lynching wait, what? Okay. The amazing concept so bad, did your defacto impact of slavery today. The African Americans are incarcerated that what, what, what does that have to do with slavery? One million African Americans are incarcerated and. Your point. Is her point don't know? I don't know. Is it because of slavery, the third car serrated today, one hundred sixty years later. Stop it. What are you talking about? None of this is even making sense. All right. A million African Americans are incarcerated today. And. Tie in to slavery. Are you saying it's because their ancestors were slaves at their incarcerated now? Maybe she's accidentally reading an excerpt from her prison reform floor speech, while I don't know, is it continuing impact the black employment rate is six point six percent. And that's because. Currently more than double the national unemployment rate, thirty one percent of way. What is the national unemployment rate? Because I think it's. It's three point eight three point eight. That is not more than double. So six point six is not more than double three point eight. Nice. Poverty compared to eleven percent of white children. The national average is eighteen percent. With suggested the percentage of black children living in poverty is more than one hundred fifty percent even more than one hundred and fifty percent of black children. What she is just but stupid. None of this makes any sense to be my congressional Representative, boy, those. Glorious overcoming on the talent that is part of our community while she's blaming all of these things in the black community on slavery. That's just despicable. It's despicable. If you wanna really talk about problems in the community. How about seventy five percent of black families? Have no father who is present that contributes to all of those detested. I'll tell you that a lot, a lot more than slavery contributes, if you want if you really wanna bring these up and talk about solutions. Let's really talk about what's causing it. Well as long as they continue to blame slavery for every ill. They're going to continue to have those ills, and it's, it's going to continue to get worse. Pathetic. She is. I mean, we know she's terrible, but that was just incoherent. Wow. Triple eight nine hundred thirty three Ninety-three. Let me tell you about another huge data breach. One of the largest real estate title company suffered a breach of nearly nine hundred million homeowners. Flyers. Because of slavery. I think that's, that's one of the causes. Yeah. Yeah. I think so. Your home's title mortgage Bank loans personal info. They all might be in the hands of identity thieves. Now they forge your title. So it looks like you sold it to him. Then they get the alone from an online lender using your equity, and you get stuck with the payments now the first thirty days after a breach are really crucial. So they're giving you thirty days of protection for free. Home, title ach. They put a virtual barrier around your homes online, titled keep thieves away. No obligation, just great service. Register your address right now to verify that you're not already victim and get thirty days of free protection. Go to home title dot com. That's home title dot com. This is bad great. And welcome to it. Speaking of slavery. Here's one of the things that you can do to help solve the problems. If these are problems that are lingering come join us for the special exhibit exhibition twelve scored in three years ago, the unfinished promise of unity. This is a way we can understand our past and then better prepare for our future. Make sure this kind of thing never happens again. What are the many artifacts that will be on display at this exhibit and brought to life by automated reality as an eighteen hundreds prairie? Schooner really cool. Oh, that's awesome. Yeah. That's in the hallway right now. Okay. So that's from the eighteen I was wondering, too. And now we know if you should stop, climbing on it. Yes, frisking existence. This is similar to the wagon used by the underground railroad to free slaves. We have special tours available, David Barton, and Glenn. There will also be a tour by our own Jeffey in Stu. There's a few spots left. So be sure to get your tickets today before they sell out for general admission and guided tours June twenty ninth through July seventh right here. Our mercury studios. Good mercury one dot org. Also come spend the fourth of July fireworks with mercury one and wall builders after you've attended the museum, cool. That's really cool. Go to mercury one dot org, or you can call nine seven two four nine nine forty seven forty seven. For more information come and see this incredible display and become a modern day. Abolitionist triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three. Meanwhile, the Democrats continue to go after each other because that's what they do. And I love it when liberals eat their own. This is fun. It's kind of fun. Yeah, it is sort of fun. Now, Biden has brought up some things that people are all upset about. Do we have is initial comment? It's going to be a part of that CNN report. You've got the audio of right? Okay. Yes. It's amazing CNN was disgusted with him with Joe Biden. Listen to this Democratic Front runner. Joe Biden said something at a fundraiser last night. That is I'm gonna call it insensitive. It's much worse than that. I don't know what to call it except stupid. He said, I was in the caucus with James o Eastland. He never called me. Boy, he always called me son, Mr. Biden, then brought up a deceased. Join Senator guy like Herman Talmadge, one of the meanest guys, I ever knew you go down the list of all these guys. Guess what at least there was some civility, we got things done. Those were to. Nicest members of the United States Senate. Yeah. Why Joe Biden is trying to make the argument that, you know, people can work with, with those disagree, but I'm told by a couple advisors to the former vice president. He's been urged and asked and cautioned in warned to not use the segregation of senators as examples. It adds to the already sort of a high burden he's trying to make to modernize himself, if you will. And then using the word boy, he normally doesn't use that word he's, he's trying to say that. Look, I wasn't given the respect as a Senator, he was a white United States, Senator, he, you know, the fact that James Eastland a noted racist called him a boy, insensitive didn't call him. Boy, what are you talking about the called him son, son? Yeah. So weird. Strange discussion here. Remember that get in real trouble. Older centers. That's what Trent Lott his Senate majority when he tried to praise Thurman at the capital. So that was ridiculous. Really careful about his memories. He wants to bring this stuff up. It can cost him a lot if he wants it up as he's with some blowback. Blow back among the desert. One of the candidates for president twenty nineteen Joe Biden is longing for the good old days of civility typified by James Eastland, Eastland thought my rate, multiracial families should be illegal and that whites titled to let you read the rest of the tweet, because I'm not gonna say it on television, but violent acts against African Americans. Okay. We'll build the Blasi you. Yes, that's an unforced error by Joe Biden, too. I mean. Yes, it is. This isn't something he needed to even talk about the Biden's. He is kinda stupid in that way. He does say ridiculous things like that and gets himself into a little trouble now normally, they'd just blow it off as that Jobe and Joe. But because they want somebody more radical and extreme in office than Joe Biden. They're beating him over the head with this stuff now. Hey, where were you on the first clean good smelling attractive? Well spoken African America ticket store. That's just that's a storybook man. That doesn't happen mainstream African American. Clean. What was it? Yeah. All that fun stuff. I sorta sorta. Who is articulate in bright? Yeah. I mean, that's a storybook man like you normally can't find a clean African American. That's our ticket clear, both clean and articulate. Good looking good just doesn't happen, man. That's horrific. How did he how do you survive that and become the vice president of the guy he was just talking about exactly it's pretty amazing? And he you know, it's not the only thing he's ever done either. He he does this kind of stuff because he's Joe in Delaware. Yeah. Growth population. There's indian-american Hobie from India. You cannot go to a seven eleven or Dunkin donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent. Not joking. I'm really being racist here. I'm not joking. I'm really I'm really stereotyping people from India. I'm really got to hang up about race. He does something there. He does. Certainly more so than just about anybody else pointing the finger of racism that it's usually just nonsense. And that's why you know it dilutes the real racism, the real racists and the things you really wanna denounce society when you're denouncing. Everybody is a racist, when really there's usually no sign of that. Now with Biden, you have some signs of that. It's Larry in Oklahoma. Hey, Larry, you're on the blaze. Hey, than Pat, having a great day. Thank you, to, hey, I don't have a big job ward, like Glenn back dust, but I've been connecting some dots. In fact, your opinion on elect to see if you can at least sort of agree with our conclusion. I've come up with. Dot number one is I believe, Democrats are closer to taking this country to socialism than ever before nation's history. The second dot is they have to win and twenty twenty for a loss will set him back decades. Yeah. In progress, they've made. Dot number three, we're witnessing the train wreck beginning as a yesterday with Joe Biden, and his ridiculous remarks, and the congresswoman from Texas and reparations talk gonna lose democrat. You know, mainstream democrat voters, not the far left, but the mainstream they're not gonna vote for that. I hope you're right. I hope you're right. Appreciate it. Thanks, larry. I I'm not positive anymore because there doesn't seem to be any room in the democrat party for anybody. Moderate anybody who's reasonable anybody who's mainstream. I don't if you're all all of those things if you're mainstream if you're reasonable. And you're not a socialist EU. They've got no place for you in the democrat party anymore. Now, I hope Democrats, you know in the middle of the country. I, I hope they're not there. We'll see I guess we'll see based on who wins this primary. If the democrat party has been completely taken over by radicals or if it's just mostly the elected officials, but it's been interesting to watch. Everybody pile on to Joe Biden. Now they are really pissed off at him yesterday. It was Cory Booker taking him on now. Keep in mind, Cory booker's running for president to. So he's gonna make more of this. Maybe than there, even is the vice president said, I should know better. And this is what I know has been America. I know the deeply harmful hurtful usage of the word boy, and how was used to humanize and degrade. Okay. They're completely misconstruing. What Biden set about boy, he said he didn't he, he wasn't called boy by that racist? But apparently he used that against African Americans, which is bad. And I guess you shouldn't even bring it up. I don't know. Maybe you shouldn't even mention the word in that context at all. I know that segregation is like a two people who were talking about through their laws, and their language, deeply wounded this nation and the present day manifestations of their work can still be seen in black and Brown communities. Like the one I go home to I know that somebody running for president, I states somebody running to be the leader of our party Rouge should know should know that using the word boy in the way he did can cause hurt and pain, and we need presidential nominee and leader of our party to be sensitive to that. And the last thing I know is, is, is I know that I was raised to speak truth to power, and she'll never apologize for doing that. Okay. And vice. Evident by shouldn't need this lesson. And at a time when we have from the highest office in the land, divisiveness racial hatred, and bigotry. He should have the sensitivity to know that stop being time I need to be an ally. I need to be a healer. I need to not engage in the usage of words harm folks. And so this is deeply disappointing. We waited for him to apologize. He didn't did until the next day and whether I'm running for president or not as many people today have been on June. No less calling out for vice president tug knowledge that his words for harmful and hurtful. And so that means no apology from, you know, he said, you know. No. He's got nothing to apologize for. Can can I just ask democrat voters up there? 'cause you guys, please find somebody that doesn't whisper when they're being sincere trying to sound sincere wouldn't they're being pseudo sincere. Oh my goodness. Yeah. Well, that's, that's the only way they know to fake this Insperity because they're not sincere. So they fake it by doing this thing. I just I'm so hurt. And I'm, I'm so reasonable about it right now that my voices, not shrill in any way, it's actually in a whisper mode. And that tells you, it's reasonable human being okay. That's what that tells you that tells you, you should vote for me, because I'm very, very calm. But wait a minute. Even under stress like this. No, I don't think that's accurate because I've seen you like scream at a Senate hearing yourself spot was a Spartacus moment because I was being there's a time to Spartacus and their time as so lack man in America, aren't you upset by what you're perceiving is this racism from Joe Biden, I guess, so why are us yelling showing you the other side of my Spartak is, but now it seems genuine like earlier when we're getting you unfiltered. And you're a freak of nature out there in the Senate hearing commissioning disingenuous ingenuous. Is that what you meant wait a minute, actually, now that I think it through your disingenuous? And both can you find. Happy medium, because I think you're disingenuous when you're screaming, and when you're whispering free Cory Booker. He's absolutely terrible, which, you know, so you don't wanna get too excited about because he's got no chance. He's not going to win. Just gory. Pucker is not going to win yet court. Could you whisper? I am Spartacus. Please combine the two I am Spartacus. Better. Maybe maybe a teeny bit. I don't know. He's terrible. So whether he's yelling or whispering he's terrible. So as giant, Joe Biden for that matter. And again, that's why it's it's fun to watch. These Democrats liberals, eat their own triple eight nine hundred thirty three Ninety-three. Let me tell you about real estate agents. I trust dot com. If you've been frustrated in the past with finding a really good realtor. This is your solution. These are agents who will return your phone calls. They have urgency. They've got real marketing plans. They have track records of success. They do it fulltime. They're committed to their business and they know your market, so so they can help you decide on a price for your home, where you're gonna get the most out of it. Plus it sells quickly. If you're relocating to a new area, you really want that to happen. The last thing you need is to have a mortgage at your old place, while you're trying to build your life in a new city that's not to payments, and then they're done that, and it sucks. So don't let that happen to you. And these realtors are all good. They're all fans of the show. So you're not gonna hear hey, you know who I love is that really sincere? Cory Booker guy is so sincere. I'm having a hard time deciding between him and Bernie Sanders. You won't hear that with these with these realtors. So go to real estate agents I trust dot com. We'll introduce you to the best agent in your area real estate agents. I trust dot com. Pat gray unleashed. I was just thinking. Jeffy has been through so much over the last couple of days hasn't been into work all week because he's working on his house. His house was paddling damaged during a storm on Sunday. And actually, he actually thinks a small tornado touchdown on his house and tore off part of the roof, exposed the rooms underneath, and they got all kinds of damage there were tornadoes right around that area. So I think so, yeah, so he's been through so much when he gets back I we should pool our resources and send him on a nice little trip, so he can get his mind off it. I, I say we get some money together, and we send him to the Dominican Republic so that he can relax for a few days, just enjoy himself. You know, maybe just enjoying Kana. Yeah. And stay at that beautiful resort. They have their I understand. It's very nice. The, the wet the bar in the room. Those are nice come with some really great selections of alcohol. Yeah, it would be terrific for him to just get away for a while. We're going with the word terrific, terrific. Yeah. Would be terrific. Wouldn't it? Even when he's been through this. That's how street it. I've just you know, I want him to relax. That's all okay here helper. A male. How many people have been killed there now? Is it nine or is it ten nine or at night, we did have a group from Oklahoma? Jimmy Buffett fan club went down there and fifty four people get sick. Yeah. Budget parrot heads that may be different because a lot of those were some Annella, but still still bottom line is Dominican Republic, not the place. I want to be. One of the officials from the Dominican just spoke out and said it's hysteria trying to hurt their tourism. Yeah. That's, that's what it is. We just have it out for. We've got it out for the Dominican Republic. For some reason, we the video showed one of our beloved sports heroes getting shot in the back. That was. Yeah. Come on now. They're saying that he wasn't the target. Right. Not mistaken a love triangle. And he had just bought this woman in the Dominican an eighty five thousand dollar Lexus. And so some drug kingpin, whose girlfriends she was had him shot in an assassination attempt. And now they're saying, no, no. He wasn't the target really. Oh, well, okay. It's weird. Triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three and paddle east on Twitter where Anthony John one seventy one tweets win. Pat starts with blood will shoot from your eyes. I can't help but feel will not be having a repeat of yesterday's fantastically. Hilarious episode. That is not the truth because we can we can turn blood shooting from is, the entertainment, Indiana, taint, quality entertainment. That's what we do. Here we had plenty of I you know, blood shooting stories, ashtray you do go back the Neal, you'll hear that. Coffee. Lover 'em tweets, have you ever visited or anywhere near the border within the last eighteen months? This madness, we'll be coming to a doctor's office soon. Yes, we've been to west Africa. Or have you been close to the border feud bit within three hundred miles of the US, Mexico border or any of the sixteen cities? We sent them to all over the country, have you visited, Maine? Are you breathing? Currently fans are you're infected Tyler Margaret tweets. Why would Iran provoke an attack so they can guess the rest of the world by making the US look like the aggressor while claiming innocence, and also to bring back the Mahdi they might wanna do? Right. I want to be doing that the twelve month libertarian ninja tweets. So how many people can go on the three thousand person crews? If Jeffey goes, is it? Yes. Jeffy is going to be the Dominican Republic. We'll be over in Europe. Let's see. In terms of overall tweets. This is about the about the per capita. Poop story we had yesterday Iowa is the US leader in per capita. Poop looking for someone to rap about poop didn't con- you do that for that. That's right. Come on, Pat. I guess I almost forgot about this. Poopie scoop. Scoop DD. Scoop deep described deep brilliant, people brilliant, whoopy-doo scoop. Boop. Boop, right. Scoop poop poop slope DD whoop whoop. Did these scoop DD school? Poop. I this part can do this different. That's powerful, right there. That's an he'll be in the rock and Roll Hall of fame before. Foreigner him and his Casio. Yeah. Jeez. Triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three now we're they're more tweets between we had, we had the direct messages. Right. If you wanna show the OJ between killer OJ Simpson that account, which is a parody and OJ going after him. And so, you know, we had we're OJ but a little knife, emojis said he was gonna cut him next. Yes. And then some people responded to that tweeted back about that, and was Ryan who said, OJ forgot to add God bless after threatening to find someone and cut them on Twitter did see that video. He said, you know, God bless revenge. God bless. Yes. Also for maybe what's her face maybe o j is still in the if I did it mindset all, and that tweet is what he would say if they were a murderous mania. There's just role playing. I can't get over the fact that he's this brazen about it. And I know he's probably not excited about a an account named killer OJ Simpson. But you can't be doing this when everybody believes that you killed your ex wife and her friend, and you've got away with it virtually scot-free free, even though a civil trial found you liable and you owe the family thirty two million dollars, having paid any of it, you shouldn't be conducting yourself like this. Seeing that video just posted about me, you think I'm playing tired of all your b s I'll find your ass and cut you don't. You don't say that after you've almost cut your ex wife's head off. My goodness. Don't believe me just watching. C. B. Watch. Wow. That is you next. That's crazy. And a he literally might be there's something wrong with OJ Simpson. I think we knew that starting at about nineteen Ninety-four, and it's even more true today. Wow. I mean. You would think you would keep a really low profile right after you just got out of jail. And you were kind of giving a makeup sentence, because you went into a room and tried to steal back your paraphernalia and in the process, yet a gun. Okay. But nobody was hurt. Nobody was shot nothing really happened now, usually, you would think six months to a year in jail for something like that. He served nine years. So after you get out, wouldn't you wouldn't you think you'd be pretty low profile and not making threats on Twitter silly, you would think that many wants to get back into jail and just like you started this whole segment was something's wrong with OJ. There you go true. Yeah. Something's definitely wrong with them. Triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three also at that unleashed untwisted. This is an amazing story. There's a new trend where it's a domino etching is called. I love this band a photo of that got the photo of the fat pack. You take the you take your fat, right? And you look at that. So then you paint on. It's not I think they stitch or something, I don't know exactly what they mold your fat. And while look like a six so fat guy and what whatever they did within the molded into a six pack of the fat up toward the torso. That's the same guy without without working out and without a diet, right? Yeah. That's incredible. Same man. Now the game this guy is six pack, who's got that bulge in? Yeah. Uh-huh. If it were Jesse. Oh boy. That would be an Kane pack. To have the edge eighteen pack in there, because this guy, this guy. Jumped in there, too and not, not as good a result. But still that's pretty good. I don't know how much this cost, and I don't know all the ins and outs of it. I just know that it looks a lot better the after the gosh, it's cr-. That's crazy. Sounds too good to be true. Well, it's not Cording to an article says abdominal etching can accomplish quickly what months of sweat cardio and training in a gym once did seems that doctors basically shape, your fat. So you go to a doctor and he shapes your fat into a six pack. My fed to be shaved to a swamp swan. To make your domino region. Look like you're really super buff. Apparently they'll do that for you. That's awesome. I want that. Yes. Great. No price too great. Keep find out how you get that done K fat Google fat edging, and let's make that happen. Well short of that, or if it cost too much. Wow. This really liked better results, and to be healthier because the etching thing is going to make any healthier. You might turn to reduce own because that's a lot of people, including from Sheryl from Texas who told us that along with her Kito diet. She took reduce own, and now she's sixty five pounds lighter, which is fantastic. Where to go Cheryl, we can all do this now. You might not lose sixty five or you might. Either way rid us gives you a really good chance. A better chance than just using your willpower alone. It contains Oei, which is a molecule that they get from from olive oil, and it's naturally present in your body to and it sends a signal to your brain, that your foal read us own strengthens that signal says, hey, put down the fork K. That's what the naturally present. Oh, AAA says reduce own helps it sounds like hey fence. Like that. You can't just edge the fat away. Right. Right. And it's not a stimulant. It's there's no caffeine in it. It's just a and that's about it. Go to radio dot com. That's all righty. You zone dot com. Get a thirty day money back guarantee and save thirty percent on three months. Apply at red zone dot com. Gray. So fat etching. All right. So it's called abdominal etching uses a new liposuction technique to create the six pack appearance. Anyway, plastic surgery. And so does suck fat out of your body. Yes. So essentially plastic surgeons from men's health, they very precisely suctioned fat from the abdomen superficial and deep layers to accentuate a patient's natural, abdominal lines results can be extra defined or more smoothing around depending on preference. It doesn't say the price is very pricey. And then you have to healthy, you have to eat healthy it or else, it'll just go away. Your stomach into a six pack we will post this on Twitter at unleashed. If you would like wonder how pricey it is. What twenty thirty fifty thousand dollars. Let me see here. Tweet. If it's five thousand. That'd be worth worth it. I remember you have to maintain it. I think so cost of a domino, etching. And where can you get it? We'll look into that between three thousand and ten thousand. Come on now. Come on. Well, there's an asterisk next to the ten thousand and it says, prices may vary. If your name is Jeff Fisher is Google up to okay? Well, I mean they're not miracle workers of k they can't perform miracles the Astros, right? Got it right. If you're Jeffey, it'll cost closer to eight hundred million dollars and the results may not be quite so good. Isn't it worth? It. If you can turn that into an eighteen pack the results are priceless at that point. Triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three climate change is an Xs dental issue for humankind, stepping up efforts to keep warm warming to globally. Agreed limits is urgent according to the UN climate chief this week. He called on governments to make progress at talks in Bonn, so they're in Bonn now talking about it the mid year climate negotiations are tasked with resolving outstanding issues in setting rules for the two thousand fifteen Paris climate accord. Patricia Espinosa the head of the UN climate change secretary said existing country, pledges to cut planet warming, emissions would heat the planet by three degrees from pre industrial times. She said, that's just not possible. We are literally in a climate emergency and wear increasing here. Increasingly hearing that this, this is the fight of our lives. Well, yeah, 'cause you keep trying to make it a catastrophe when it isn't so you can say that all you want the Paris agreement, by the way, ratified now, eight hundred eighty five countries set a goal to limit the rise in average global temperatures to well below two degrees celsius and destroy for one and a half degree celsius now temperatures have risen about one degree. In a hundred years. But we're supposed to panic. Espinoza said it's time that all people open their eyes to just how urgent things are we need to get to the one and a half degree goal. But when you talk to them, and you get them to really admit what Paris was all about. It was just about grandstanding and a feel good number. That's not even gonna help. It doesn't even get to the goals. They, they talk about all the time. Al Gore admitted that. Well, that's true. But it sets an example. Literally think that's what he said something about setting an example, or something, right? Yeah. 'cause somebody was thinking China or something not on board. Here's what he said, one hundred ninety five nations on one hundred ninety four targets. It still wouldn't solve the problem. That is correct. However, very powerful signal to business and industry and. And countries around the world. There you go. Hal over. Sanzo power for signal it sends a powerful signal. Hashtag powerful signal ridiculous yesterday. We're talking to Greg, right? Stone about about all of the lies. They tell and the way they spin this issue. And he was talking about the Roman warming period and how they love to say that the warming we're experiencing now is unprecedented. You know, it was three degrees warmer in the Roman warm warming period. Three degrees that is that's way hotter, than we are today. I mean that's unbelievable. So you had the Roman warming period, then there was the medieval warming period. There. They've been trying very hard to erase both of those periods because they wanna make it look like this is the only warming period. We've had in the last five thousand years, and it just isn't. But if they can get rid of the Roman warming period, and the medieval warming will then they can make it look like the hockey stick like like we're just shooting straight up now. So it's pathetic, and it's a lie and we'll get into this a little bit deeper, coming up in a in a couple of minutes here. But, you know, it's not doing, hopefully we get to this, too, because it's very important to accentuate. This is that you need to be drinking water out of a paper box. Okay. All right. Right. Like that's my favorite EKO tip now because what did he spend in a month? Oh, it was three hundred dollars, I think on bottled water. Three hundred dollars more than that, right? I don't think so. I think it was hundred bucks. Well, look it up. Anyway, he wants to help the environment. Here's what just introduce Trudeau is saying now. Due to cut back on. This. We have recently swept recently ranking switch tunnels out of water water out of water water bottles. No. But paper paper. A high water drink box water bottles. Switch to plastic. No water. No not lie story. Pesos abor box, paper boxspring drink. Bucks water bottles bottles of things that are not plastic, he sucks. Bad rate. Well, we lead with our mistakes, as we've always said, in this case lead with Keith's mistake. All right fun. I mentioned the fact that Justin Trudeau spent three hundred dollars on bottled water in a month. I think it was more than that wasn't it challenge. And I told you, you don't challenge me. Don't test me. It never turns out. Well, and so you looked at up. How much did the Trudeau family spend on bottled water? What if you read the headline from the news sites family, spent three hundred dollars on bottled water in a single month? Don't test me. You'll lose again, sir. All right. We learned an important lesson here lesson that I learned what Chevy every day, almost every day from Amy. What's face? Maybe they're whispering. Speaking of the democratic candidates Biden Booker get into whisper mode. Maybe they're whispering because they're on their political deathbeds, maybe from constitutional drunk. You can send Jeffey to Guam await it might capsize unwanted and feeble minded. No. Why does OJ still have an account Twitter account after threatening Bertel harm and threats? OJ cool crowded, speaking truth, hell no. That's right. Pretty amazing double standard. Yep. Also, this thinking the first world problems you have when you're etching your stomach to hide your obesity. That's the beauty of this nation right there. So great. And so true. Yes, let me take a minute to tell you about a great book. It's called the prodigal sons of liberty and it's by Kent long if you we love the country. And you love thrillers that also combined truth in real things, you're gonna love this one. It talks. It uses the, the little known clause article five and that clause stands at the crossroads between America's ruin and its restoration. It's the convention of states, which is threatening to circumvent all of Washington's corrupt elite plans. And of course, the Washington elite are determined to maintain the status quo. And so they use a ruthless civilian force to neutralize the threat of a convention. I love this kind of stuff. I'm not a novels kinda guy, but when it's based to cool history, lions believable. It's awesome. You know, it's very Brad Thor ask. Yep. Really great stuff America's last beds. Best hope is in the hands of a part time blogger. Prodigal sons of liberty and the patriot underground, you'll follow the actions of Lance singleton who goes all over the country to, to try to save the nation. Prodigal sons of liberty written by Kevin lung. He's been writing since he was a kid. Absolutely loves it had east of right with a flashlight under the covers staying up until all hours of the night hiding it from his parents just to get his ideas down on paper and you're gonna love this when prodigal sons of liberty, it's a modern thriller by Kenton long. K. E. N. T O, N, Kenton long available now at Kent, long dot com and Amazon books. Pat gray unleashed. And of course, country also faces ruined from climate change as we were telling you few minutes ago climate. Yeah. Ruined absolute ruin. Yeah. We're being devastated by climate change devastate. I think I heard somewhere. We lost a million species right in five minutes while we're going to yes, we're gonna lose a million speaks a million more. I think is what you mean is that? And when was that when was the deadline on that it's like? Supposed to already done. In fact, gone by the end of March of twenty twenty going to be another animal on the planet. So, so the time is now at hand. It's here, you know, do demand caused catastrophic scientifically proven global warming climate change. The moon is gonna turn to blood and you know, fish are going to swim down the streets on a Sunday. Here we go. Yes, we go. We heard we heard it from Al Gore. I went down to Miami and fish from the ocean swimming in the streets on a sunny day. The same thing was true lose just two days ago. Just wow. Women right down the straight on a day. Credible. Someone told me long ago. That are half you got to go. Climate change is killing us. Greenland melting. Pretty soon. We'll all be dead. It's true. And there is consensus. So. No. Have you ever? Fish? No. Have you ever? The fish. Swim-down straits on a day. Riot here before the phone is cold. Cleo to it's hot. Drives up our temperature. A carbon tax is what will you need? On mobile, Jeff need to bleed. Are you? A climate denier. I wonder. Now. Have you ever? The fish. Have you ever seen the fish? Swim-down your story, Sawday day. No. Have you ever seen? Yes. I want to know have you ever. The fish. Swim down your streets on a funny day. I'm guessing you hail the kid. Problem of. Drivel eight nine hundred. Wow. That took a long time. Not just that was the extended version hard long version. It's the dance version. It's the it's the bonus track. Right. Okay. It's, it's the club mix. You're going. I hear that a clubs tonight and this weekend. Let's go to cannon West Virginia. Hey Ken, you're on the blaze. Hello. Hello, kin and West Virginia line one West Virginia. Hello shallow. Hi. Hi there, we're here. Nope. I left guy, the other day you glimmer talking about capturing California in jars. Can't we use the plastic bottles at the Canadian guys talking about ship them to the farmers them captured California and the plastic bottles, and then ship that to the to the power plants and let them it center right them sorrow solely to problems? Well. Well, get rid of the, getting rid of the plastic bottle, and the MAC thing from Macau and also generating electricity. You've done a lot of really good as a lot of steps can. Yeah. A lot of lot of really good thought there in going into that. Thank you for shade. It tremendous idea as far as I'm concerned, works, as well as any of these other stupid, global warming things, they're talking about and will cost less than ninety three trillion dollars. I think it sounds like it. Yes. I think that'd be everybody wins, including mother earth. And isn't that what we always want? Yes. The end of the day that solution we need right there. Whatever works for her on these BBC BBC shows that are all about global warming. Purporting to be about showing you beautiful locations on the earth. The cinematography is incredible. They talk about the animals they show you how this earth functions, but it's really about global warming. And that's what they're selling. They're selling global warming on all of these programs that are on Netflix right now and it's interesting to watch them and how they complain about. Okay. We've lost half of the forests we've lost twenty four percent or whatever of the ice in the in the Arctic on and on and on and on. It goes. And then every once in a while, they'll tell you the truth, like miraculously, the earth has healed itself. They've talked about that with the oceans. They've talked about it with the ozone layer. What was the other thing that just the said the other day? Oh, the was it the jungles to that end forests, how resilient they are. And how they bounce back even after catastrophic fires and things. I mean, it shows you that this earth. The planet is not fragile like they try to make us think it is. It's actually pretty darned, durable and self healing in many, many, many ways, and remember the oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico. The big that'd be the end of the world. That was the oils of the warming. You remember they showed that a shot of the oil in the water from the sky, and it was we stretched on for miles. How long did that go? How many days was that does spill how long remember spew out of the earth, a longtime longtime and all that oil was pushed out to see? And then what happened to it? It just went away. The earth took care of it. The ocean took care of it. And then you never hear about it anymore. They're like they never come back until you well the ocean. Just. Dissolve that just. Kind of made it go away. Somehow, I don't, I don't even know how exactly five months, five months. Well, five months, it just spewed out of the earth into the Gulf of Mexico. You don't hear anything about it anymore. Nope, why? 'cause you're took care of it. I got this in knows how to do it because it happens all the time. Oil is always seeping into the ocean, every day all day. And the ocean just deals with it. It's crazy. David in Illinois. Hi, you're on the blaze. I was talking to Neil the grass Thais and a couple of days ago. Yeah. You explained to me that the only true factual way that the levels will rise is, if our governor of Illinois JV Chris go swimming in the ocean. The displacement. Well. And if he's joined by Chris Christie, then we got a drought in the ocean. Right. Well, saying or, or Jeffey of what of Jeffey were to do a cannonball interview ocean? Then you're talking about flooding. I don't hate the panicle scale didn't want to say that earth did did. He actually say that David. Gone. We lost the earth, the climate change has gotten him. That's right. Climate catastrophe on the phone. But, you know there's another way it would save the earth is by shaming each other, right. Like shaming each right there. That's store you got right there. This is that it. No. That's not. No the bags right there, right there. Yes. We're going to save the planet by shaming one another into saving the planet if concern over the climate crisis, or revulsion over the contamination of the food chain aren't enough to change consumer behavior. One grocery store is hoping that another emotion might persuade people to shun plastic bags. Customers who don't bring their own bags in to the east west market in Vancouver will instead have to carry their grocery bags home in the groceries home in bags. That read wart only -ment wholesale. Or into the weird adult video. Emporia jeffey. It'd be walking around that bag with pride man come on. So they're actually printing things on the plastic bags to try to embarrass you did not, not taking them out. How about I just don't go to your business and exactly what I would do never shop at your place anymore. That's an f you to these people. I would never shop there again. David Lee Quinn, the shop's owner insisted that the plan wasn't to embarrass customers. We wanted to give him something humorous. But also something that made them think at the same time, it's human nature not to be not to want to be told what to do. Yeah. That's right. And so, I don't care if you're trying to be humorous more. Shane people, I wouldn't I'm with your business would not go there. Absolutely not earlier this week. Of course. Justin Trudeau announced plans to ban the single use plastics. And that's not just grocery bags. That was also plastic cutlery straws all plastics. Yeah, that is just that's asinine solution. Just drink your water out of a box. Do we? What he said more time. We gotta you gotta hear this one more time Justin Trudeau. And when he's asked what his family's doing to cut back on plastic. We go. Switched to drinking drinking bottles out of that. When we have water bottles. Plastic classic towards. Peeper. Water. Water bottles. Might have maybe my favorite clip of all time. Seriously, paper, drink bucks. Water bottles. I don't know. I'm just making this up on my but right now, I'm just I'm just throwing out words tell you, we got so many cardboard boxes in my house, now because you've seen how much money my family spends on water every month that amazing. So fun, so great. All right. There was a reason study in the journal cell metabolism, which I know I don't have to tell you about because you, you read so metabolism in devour. I'm sure to cover every month man is so metabolism here yet, do we have our copy of cell metabolism? You actually race each other to do. She usually beats me there because, you know she's home more than I am. And so she's already read it cover to cover by the time. I get it and I have to. Ruined ruined it for him. Let's not talk about that right now. All right. I can't hear this. You know, the correlation between processed foods and over eating I can't. I can't listen to that. Right. Don't ruin the surprise. Get to the article on my own time. Jackie. So what you should be doing is ordering field of greens from brickhouse nutrition, because just one scoop field of greens has a full serving of real USDA organic fruits and vegetables, boost your immunity using anti-oxidants pre and probiotics. Just great stuff. It's real food. It's not some fakey supplement. It's not some kind of powder thing, just take a look at the nutrition facts on the panel. And you'll see go to breakouts. Pat dot com. Get fifteen percent off your first order, when you use the offer code Pat breakouts. Pat dot com. Offer code pass. It's Pat gray unleashed on the. Nine hundred thirty three Ninety-three attitude. Unleashed on Twitter where Bob blah, blah. Tweets. Justin Trudeau is two boxed water as Caitlin Upton is to maps, for sure. I think of Caitlyn every time we play that Trudeau thing it sounds just like her. And then if you have blaze TV which, by the way, you can get a bazillion percent off roughly speaking, blaze, TV dot com slash pet. You gotta see the hand motions he does. Well, he's like describing the shape of bottle of water just drowning in his arms or just flailing all over the place. Trying to keep them water Sewri from pats Otis facial cream customer, thanks to paddock and no longer. Listen to seventy Sirius radio. Now when the songs come on, I here, have you ever seen the fish American Mormon and paper paper box water? We got we gotta try Goodwin. Oh, yes. Please. I gotta say, I get so excited when I come in here, the show's not on like just during the day in pats in here, and I hear like a karaoke type version of a song. I know something though, the wheels are turning. Parody come in so right? Well, this'll be good rights PS. Can we hear American Mormon again? Yes. Yes, we probably can land of the fleet tweets I can never get enough of pets parody. Well, thank you very later today. I want to walk into the studio unannounced, and I want to hear version back. That's my request. It's possible. It's possible. There's a Syrian man arrested in Pittsburgh on terror charges, twenty one year old pissed Pittsburgh resident in Syrian refugee wait. I thought he was just sir. Good, decent hard working wonderful people come here for a better life, just want a better life. That's all they want the only thing they're here for. He was accused of planning an attack on a Christian church on the city's north side and providing resources to ISIS. And they arrested him for that. Yeah. You know what it is? It's, it's as Lama phobia, not homophobia, but maybe that he may be maybe I don't know. There's nothing wrong. Nothing wrong with that. In fact, it's preferable. It's preferable Mustafa Musab Allah, we Mer like, he must've originally come from Idaho there. I think. Wimmer okay. The Idaho Musab Allah wieners. Anybody? It'd be confused with the no right, right? It's all a Wimmer. Yeah, I do too. But he was arrested yesterday based on a federal complaint, charging him with one count of attempting, attempting to provide materials apart and resources to ISIS and two counts of distributing information. Relating to an explosive destructive vice or weapon of mass destruction in relation to a plan of attack. Plan to attack church. Wow. Allah Wimmer allegedly plan to bomb the legacy, international worship centre using a weapon of mass destruction. The FBI said he thought he was plotting online ended person with fellow ISIS sympathizers, but they were actually undercover FBI, and this is KOMO Weiner is not alma Weiner. It's just all the Weiner. Oh, look at that. I challenge Pat again and I was wrong. You're wrong. I thought it was Weiner. Allah Weiner said, don't notice me, don't sorry. So when legacy international worse, worship center, pastor Michael day, received a call from the F B I is a little overwhelmed. So I'm grateful. Nothing did happen. And I'm careful that we are able to show that God covered us and protected us, and the people are still alive, and the people are able to hug, their children and loved ones when this is all said and done, I wanna know what kind of background check. I wanna know the how extensive the research was done on this guy before he was allowed to enter this country. Well, you can't do why just because he's from a Middle Eastern country. You want to check on his background. I'm sorry. I thought he was from Idaho. Change in our story here, Mr Gray. Okay. Said it sounds like he comes from I'd actually come Syria. I got hung up there. Sorry about that. It doesn't. I mean, does it matter that it came from Syria? No, no, no other country from Idaho, then I would have been. You'd be suspicious. It'd be really good a really good chance. He was a homegrown terrorist. Yeah, a good chain. They one of those lone wolves prowling America. Trying to recruit other loan. Nope. That's right. Well, reminds me of another a parody song, I did back in the day. Do you remember the story of the Syrian band that, yes that did the trial run on, on a flight? Oh, no, no, no, no. I think it was from Houston to Chicago. There were twelve people from Syria and they position themselves all over the plane, and the FBI said got just a Syrian band. That's all that's all. They're flying all over the country, performing because, you know how popular Syrian bands are in America. You can't get enough of them. I've got every album, the Syrian band ever did I can hear the Perez, it was we already serious and. Land coming to your town with. Something to that effect. Kind of getting props. Scrape. Thank you. Triple eight nine hundred thirty three Ninety-three don't understand Glenn is on the line v. Wait. Jesse glitter? Yes. Glenn from Idaho. Or is he back? All right. Well, maybe talking to Glenn next that gray unleashed. Aaa nine hundred thirty three ninety three. Let me tell you about something that could change your life. If you've tried everything maybe take, you know, like Motrin all day, every day or some prescription drug don't do it. Don't do it try this instead or in addition. And then when it works, you can switch over to this thing you need relief factor now. So many of us are in pain, every day every single day, and we spent thousands year to combat that pain, and then sometimes you just give up and say, I'm just going to have to live with it before he reached that conclusion, try relief factor. Keith did tried it on his weird leg pain. My welp. And it worked every day. I swear by it. And when you go off the relieffactor for whatever reason, like surgeries, coming, whatever I'm constantly trying to chop off limbs and digits constantly going in for surgery and they stop taking everything that you're on. And so then for days after the recovery I start to feel some pain in my leg. I'm like, oh, I'm off the relief factor. Get back on it. It's gone safe that works for you. Try it a three week. Quick start. It's just nineteen ninety-five. If it works great order more, that's what seventy percent of their customers do. If it doesn't work for you after three weeks. It's not going to just stop using it. What have you lost twenty bucks? So get your life back right now. If you wanna drugfree natural way to ease your pain and get your life back go to relieffactor dot com. That's relieffactor dot com. That way. Joining us now is Glenn Beck from from your. Yes, secret location tonight. Oh, yeah. Yes. How are you? This would have been good. This would have been good. If you would've let me sneak in on the show just real quick to say, what was that guy that, that Muslim guy's name again? The Muslim guy. That what you're kind of drew a conclusion, I didn't say he was a Muslim guy. That's right. America, her day. Everybody from Idaho. I am here as a song, I am here as a song writer, and you were talking about songs that, you know, you change the words. Right. We've never understood what Michael Jackson was saying what he's like. Say that guy's name Mustafa. Guy's name right? Stop oversaw. Aware something like very close cloudy. It's close. Somebody might have another. Yeah. Maybe maybe it's very close. But don't you I tell you on your way back? Glenn, why don't you write out some lyrics to sing along this inspirational route? And let's get that done next week now so that, that really is what you were checking in for. Of course it. So that, that. Yeah. That worked out nicely. Your show. Yes. I'm just sitting here like an average listener listening to your show. Right. But I have the ability to say put me on. Yeah. And that's what that's what the average listener doesn't have stupid, things just like I was doing. Being I just being your average. We just got to hear things. Right. And not not allowing the professional Glenn Glenn, Glenn. Will you make me a promise, please? Please. Pin a song, but pen to paper on the way back home. And let's handed off depend- it back. I'm driving. Oh, okay. So sure you're behind the wheel. So I am really drove. Drove drove all the way you did not drive. Stop this. You did not drove camman guy did seriously. I did I drove my son and I drove the entire time. What state did you go through the whole time went through, obviously, Texas, then I went, then I went to New Mexico than I went to Colorado. And then to Utah. Okay. And then Idaho. And I know. Yeah. Right. Did you stop at that steakhouse Amaral? I mean you stop there and had there is a great minute. The great driving driving home tomorrow, leaving no Saturday. I'm leaving. Okay. We got like a twelve hour trip. Yeah. It's that place that. I was out steak and you get free Texan. I was actually driving. And there are stretches now. I didn't do this, and I would not recommend anybody doing this. But there are stretches of highway in Texas, that you can go a hundred and fifty one. Wait. Of course. I didn't do that. You didn't do that. That would be Taty. No. You can do it. Then. How how how? Saw maybe somebody do it. Okay. Just figured out that they were going on. I figured I went I think that's about one hundred fifty one. That's. I might be off by one mile or something. But that's still pretty good. That's pretty good. Still pretty good. There's all right. This Texas highways are great. So when he coming back, I mean, for those people, I'm coming home. I'm leaving here. Saturday, saturday. Yeah. And, and in time for the museum of which happened to be back Monday, the twenty ninth and Monday is have you seen have they started building the slave ship yet? I haven't seen the shave it away man. No. They're doing a slave. That's cool. Oh, yeah. We had a we had a company build a replica of, of, you know, the interior of slave ship. And I've seen it, it was it's being built off site, then they're going to break down to build it up in the museum. But it's it's gonna be really powerful. Bad news about your eighteen eighties. Circa eighteen eighties wagon that was out here in the middle Jeffey did request a ride in it, and it will need to be reassembled as well. It disintegrated. Say knocked dust. That's why the house across the street had a little piece of that the, the board from that wagon right through their bedroom wall. Jeffy sat on it. Yeah. It was not pretty pretty at all four. So that thing coming apart was ugly. All right. Zia. Tripoli. Musab. I always wondered mama's is it mama say mama saw. Gosh, Maas Suma lyrics to look this up. Mama say I think people stopped trying to figure out what Michael Jackson did after the the last little documentary. We got to see no one cares anymore. Nobody cares anywhere. What exactly? He's saying their goal in lyric. Find as our source, he says mama say mama Koos help me sing it mama, mama. Say mount Coosa Kusa say, mama. Say mama Koussa. All right. Like rivers in north Georgia. Actually, doesn't same kind of names doesn't make a lot of sense. Neither does Alexander Qazi Cortes. Of course, she is sticking to her claim now that the detention centers at the border are, in fact concentration camps. How long are we gonna have to put up with his dolt long? I'm over it really over it with her. She has doubled down on it. She she'd never backs down off of these claims in. Here's what she said. Instead, DHS ripped thousands of children from their parents and put them in cages with inhumane conditions they call their selves dog pounds and freezers. I will never apologize for calling these camps, what they are, if that makes you uncomfortable fight the camps, not the nomenclature shut up. Oh, somebody learned a new word as she did. Okay. I love how they every single time. That's how they described the writ these children from their parents like the parents handed them over to them. And then they were placed in a separate facility because they didn't want the parents and the children in the same place because you might have some pretty unsafe conditions and so many times it wasn't even the parents, right. Many, many kids, and we don't know who the hell these people are when they come across our border illegally. That's part of the problem. We don't know if they're the coyotes we don't know if they're if they're the drug smugglers, we don't know, if their child molesters sex traffickers running amok, at some of them are actually some of them are sex traffickers. So tired of this twenty nine year old who has somehow almost taken over? Washington now and really kind of sort of runs it from her congressional office. It's just it's really unbelievable. Really amazing. Meanwhile, New York caddy clerks are refusing to follow a new law giving drivers licenses to illegals how about that in New York state. New York state may have approved issuing licenses to illegals, but some county clerks are refusing to comply with that new law. Monday night, Andrew Cuomo Cuomo, the governor, of course, signed the Bill into law, and it scheduled to take effect in about one hundred eighty days. The new law will provide illegals without a social security number that will allow them to use foreign documents such as passports to obtain New York state driver's licenses, twelve other states currently permit driver's licenses for illegals. Jeez. But on Monday one county clerk. Frank Merola said my approach is we're not gonna give these licenses to legal immigrants. People have already violated this law by breaking into this country. And we've you this Bill as kind of waving all that good for you. Nice. Apparently you're breaking the law by driving illegally without a license and without insurance. And we're not going to reward that behavior here in Rensselaer county. He's not the only one Erie county clerk, Michael Kerns insisted that he would not comply with the new lie. Either as I understand it, this act requires that as an agent of the department of motor vehicles. I'll be compelled to give drivers licensed licenses to illegal immigrants. I will not be granting driver's licenses to illegal immigrants. How about that? That's amazing. That is a stand. Would it be made in the state of New York? Wow. He said, I anticipate being sued in either event as a result. I intend to file a d'eclat Ori action in the United States district court challenging the law as applied to the Erie county clerk, and I request your representation in this lawsuit. And in supporting the constitution and the laws of the United States. Current said if a federal judge compels county clerks to follow the law will jump off that bridge when we come to it. Good for you nicely done. Triple eight nine hundred thirty three Ninety-three all right? Let me tell you about wax Rx. Is is a system to clean out your ears that was developed by physicians, and it's basically the same thing they do in, in their office. You just do this in the comfort and privacy of your own home and for a lot less money. And it's reusable so you can do it multiple times. And it's gonna save you a ton it. It's physician developed technology safely effectively removes the build up, and then, so is your ears with conditioned formula. Try the wax Rx system risk-free today. Just go to use wax Rx dot com, use wax Rx dot com. Use the offer code radio, when you check out, and you'll get free shipping. Use wax Rx dot com. Offer code radio. Pat right on weeks. Speaking of New York, New York City is becoming the first city, the first city in the United States of America to directly fund abortions. They want to be a council member in New York said they want to be a beacon for the rest of the country. Death of beacon shining from hell. Earth. And that's what shining out merit applause. Yo and city city council speaker Cory Johnson announced a budget agreement Friday set to be voted on this week that will allocate two hundred and fifty thousand dollars to the New York abortion access fund in okay? Which called it, extremely good news. The mid other states passing antiabortion laws, New York just continues to get worse. It's extremely good rose that here in New York City, we will continue to murder babies unfettered Emily, even help pay for it pay for it. Blasios called the move step up for the city and it state that celebrated expanding abortion access in January. Yeah. All the way to birth all the way to all forty weeks. And this is beyond. Yeah. Meanwhile, in Texas, at the same time that New York City is paying for these abortions for out of staters that are coming to kill the kid Texas passing funding for alternatives to abortion, such as a option programs and stuff like that. So if you ever wanna see a dichotomy between two states, New York, Texas, right there on abortion. My goodness. Madonna has some thoughts on abortion to I've just been waiting with I've been wondering aided breath. I haven't so long win as Madonna gonna sound off on fortune 'cause I I'm a little confused on it, and what I need is Madonna's input. And then I'll know how to proceed from there, you know. And finally, here it is here it is. Don't you think Jesus would agree that a woman has the right to choose what to do with her body? No. I think he would be he would be over to having that conversation with me. Okay. So she's saying, don't you think she would say to the pope, don't you think that Jesus would be open to a woman doing what she wants to with their body, and the answer, of course? No. I don't think Jesus would say, yes, go ahead. And you know get pregnant. Outside the confines of marriage, presumably and, and then go ahead and just kill that baby inside of you that I sent to be inside of you, by the way, don't worry about that. I was a little don't worry about that a little bit curious her patch that she sporting now, just making sure everything's okay with her or something like that. It's a fashion thing. No. It's a it's a new alter-ego on her new album. Madame x that's why she has the patch. Yeah. She's a spy. She's a secret agent. She travels the world just seeing shut up. She is desperate for attention. She's sixty years old now. Nobody wants to hear from her anymore. Nobody cares what she's doing. Nobody wants to see her naked anymore. We didn't want to in the first place and she insisted. We told her back then please don't do that anymore, and she kept doing it and, and nobody pays attention to it. And now she's she's screaming out again for attention. He's listen to me by album. Lease Madonna, I'm Madame x I'm being outrageous. I'm changing my identity. I'm wearing it. I patch I'm talking about Jesus wanting abortion to do here. It's so great. At about eight people bought her latest album. Wow. On a second more than twice, as many people eighteen showed up for the Eric swallow anti-gun rally in front of the NRA. That's right. This a Madonna album. Yes. According to my calculations. Yes. I think that's pretty accurate. Think you're right. So funny, that's so amazing that, that anybody would think that Jesus would be on the side of killing babies. Jesus knows that these human beings. Jesus knows that they're supposed to come to earth. I don't know. There was something in the bible, about multiplying, and replenishing. I don't remember the abortion clause in the bible at all. So you might want to keep Jesus out of the discussion. If you're, if you're pro choice 'cause that doesn't work does that does not work at all. Triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three and we have another one of these colleges that are offended by well, everything I was gonna say, we're gonna go land anywhere day or offended by virtually everything in this case Abell the chimes on campus. No, the university of California, Santa Cruz is removing a deeply painful bell. I can't wait to see how this story in a mission bell on campus and. The, the students on campus are calling it a symbol of racism, and dehumanization. Okay, these bells are deeply painful symbols that celebrate the destruction. Domination, any ratio of our people, according to Valentine Lopez chairman of the on Matzen tribal band, their constant reminders of the disrespect our tribe, faces to this day. Okay. The mission bells were installed across the state to memorialize the California missions k the Christians coming to California. And I guess, converting people. Yeah, but now they're viewed as symbols of racism, and dehumanization. Of course, they are a symbol. Okay. Of that. I don't know. Is there anything, that's not a simple of that? I don't think so. No. I think not now. Right. Everything. Wow. It's amazing. So the vice chancellor of the school said, yeah, they brought forth concerns to us about the symbolism of the bell. They spoke of the historical injustices, and oppression that the bell represents to the Amami moot. Son, indigenous population. It was such a compelling statement of impact that I am pleased. We have been able to work in partnership with them to remove the bell our students also given voice to the need to remove the bell. I love it when people get to sti- do to I stuff out there that, especially to removing things you know, you want to remove the statues of, of Washington Jefferson, you want to remove the bells that commemorate missions in California, often said this too long to humbled to actually say it on the air without prompting. But you've often said to give voice to fill in the blank. In the Blake. And in this case, you're right there with them because those bells agreed just bells chiming and ringing and whatnot business for so long. So you have the floor. Now it's finally you have an opportunity to express yourself on what bells how they trigger you. Exactly. Right. Exactly. Right. You know. And I mean bells have long, pissed me off. I remember when she stood in the doorway, and I heard the mission bell, and I was thinking to myself that this could be heaven or this could be held and then she lit up a candle. And she showed me the way. And then I, I heard these voices in the corridor. I thought I heard him say remove those deeply painful bells would you please? And so I thought, yeah, yeah, that's what we need to we need to remove the deeply painful bell. And that's what they're doing. That's what they're finally doing so good. When you're when you're thinking about lunch, you don't even consider Taco Bell just based on just the fact that has bell in the name. Right. Even though it's not about a bell. That's a name the last name of the people who own the place. It doesn't matter doesn't matter. What are you talking about? That's for sure context. Context, doesn't matter. Does it? And then tomorrow we gotta get into this, because this is amazing. Not just Kirsten gillibrand. But now, Beto aerobic, who has a father-in-law who's wildly wealthy. Is saying now that he doesn't think anyone deserves to have a billion dollars. What do you mean? They don't deserve to have a if they earned it. If the honestly, of course, they deserve to have it. What are you again? That's the socialism that's the class warfare that the, the Marxist creep in our country. It is unclear they'd say, if, if Beto thinks his father in law, who's estimated to be worth five hundred million. We don't know if he deserves his money or not. The times also quoted Kirsten gillibrand is saying, no one deserves to have a billion dollars. So this is another thing pink through the democrat candidates. Everybody's got denounce people who have a billion dollars or more. I, I don't see him going after George Soros, though. And they seem to accept his money whenever he hands it to him. Unbelievable man bear point on believable. Both aerobic though, Angela brand of struggled to gain momentum in this primary field. Rourke averages less than four percent and Jila brand averages less than one and somewhere about half a percent somewhere out. There is a guy named Eric swallow who is jealous of both of them. Could I can't wait for the for the debates though? That's, that's going to be a lot of fun Wednesday night, right? Believe. This coming Wednesday a week Winston Thursday, right? Oh boy. Finally someone will be watching MSNBC. All right. We'll be back tomorrow. Talk about these anti billionaires. And you know there's going to be a lot more Marxism between now talk about to share it all here. I'm Pat gray unleashed.

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Kristen Roupenian, 'Cat Person' & Viral Fiction

1A

24:56 min | 2 years ago

Kristen Roupenian, 'Cat Person' & Viral Fiction

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast. This is one A from Washington. I'm endear Lachman on executive editor of the Pulitzer center on crisis reporting in for Joshua Johnson. In late twenty seventeen the New Yorker published a short story called cat person that went viral, perhaps the only work of short fiction ever to do. So in the story. A young woman develops a crush on an older man who she eventually sleeps with despite her reservations when she distances herself from him afterwards. He becomes so angry at her that he calls her terrible word whore. The final word of the whole story. It's an impactful end to a piece of fiction that resonated in the early stages of the metoo movement, it articulated, what had become a common experience for women, especially millennials that is uncommonly discussed a year later, the author of that story has a new collection of fiction out like cat person her collection explorers stories that we. Tell ourselves about sex dating and consent. Kristen repent is here with us in the studio in her new book is called you know, you want this cat person and other stories. Welcome kristen. Hi, thanks so much for having me. Well, thanks so much for being here. Let's go back to the weekend. When cat person I published online like I said it very quickly went viral from the New Yorkers accounts. And people were talking about it all over Twitter. I remember it very well. I'm a dedicated New Yorker reader, I read it in print and then suddenly my Twitter exploded with people sharing their experiences. And as you know, and our listeners know, it's common for me GMs or videos to go viral. But it's basically unheard of for short fiction. What was that experience like for you as a writer? It was both amazing and overwhelming at the same time as you say, I had absolutely no reason to expect that anything like what happened. And I certainly didn't it actually took me a little while. To even realize what was happening. I wasn't on Twitter much at that time. It was my girlfriend in fact to noticed it who was on her, computer. And you know, it was probably three or four days after the story had been published actually. So I sort of thought that the the moment has ended and Kelly Michael fractured, her computer and said, you know, there's something going on with your story, which was in retrospect, the understatement of the air, and then yeah, it was it was exciting. But it took me a while to wrap my mind around it to really get a sense of the scale, and as people were reading and talking about it and sharing their opinions on it, which were very strong in both directions. I realized pretty quickly that I had to step back because I tried to keep track of this conversation. I would be pretty quickly overwhelmed. So I closed my computer probably Friday evening, and then didn't open it again until Monday or Tuesday morning at which point. Then the think pieces were coming out explaining what had happened with cat person. So I learned about it from them. So I had a slightly different experience actually than many of the people who initially share the story on Twitter. Well, I mean before cat person went live. Let's begin with the point that you had very little published work and nothing in a publication with the prominence of the New Yorker after it went viral. You suddenly landed the six figure book deal. You're short stories got option by HBO. We'll talk more about that. But I mean, I tell us for all the aspiring fiction writers out there. And there are so many listening. How did you even get your story into the New Yorker in the first place? Yeah. It's worth going over that. I think because for a long time I was writing and sending stories out and having a tiny little nibbles of interest. But nothing really landing. I about five years ago. I had written a draft of a novel. And I got an agent for it. And it went out to editors and it didn't sell which was heartbreaking. So if anyone else's in that position. I know what it's like I have been there. But then I had just finished up an MFA. I had written a lot of news stories and my agent Jenny Ferrari Adler, I had never actually met in person. But she she took the story out which was kind of leap of faith on her part. And it went out to a bunch of different literary magazines all of which in fact, rejected it often very kindly. But they said, but they said, no. And then the last one we heard from was the New Yorker and truly hearing that the story had been accepted. There was still ranks as probably the best moment of my life. I remember sitting on the in the yard calling my parents and just trying to explain to them what it meant. And it changed my life incredibly exciting. We will be back soon with more from Christian repenting, the author of the new collection of short stories. You know, you want this? Cat person and other stories, I'm Indira Lakhsman. This is one A stay with us. Support also comes from Rossi's ralphie's is the everyday flat for life on the go. The comes in four fashionable styles for women the flat the point the loafer and the sneaker fund designs and patterns while still looking polished and professional with new colors launched every few weeks. Best of all Rossi's are made from recycled plastic water bottles and completely machine washable. So you can feel good about wearing them. Go to Rossi's dot com and enter code one a to get your flats and free shipping. What unique about the human experience? And what are we all have in common? I'm guy Roz every week on Ted radio hour, we go on a journey to the big ideas, emotions and discoveries that fill all of us with wonder find it on NPR one or wherever you get your podcasts. This is one A. I'm Indira lock on infra. Joshua Johnson retorting with author Kristen Rupeni in about her new collection of short stories. You know, you want this cat person and other stories. His cat person went viral in December twenty seventeen when it was published in the New Yorker, it became the magazine. Second most read story online that year right after Ronin Farrow's piece on Harvey Weinstein. Here's a message that one of you left in our inbox about it. Hi, my name is Robyn I'm calling from Toronto Ontario Canada. I think it highlights an issue that really existed before the metoo generation, and that is the issue of courses sex. I think a lot of women are putting a position of the green to sexual acts or just sex that they don't want. And that is it's unfortunate it makes dirty youth. And really probably not that intersex. Honestly. So it's definitely an issue that should have been highlighted. I'm glad it's being discussed. Well, first, Kristen did you have any reaction to that listener? Yeah. I I I really appreciate her calling in and giving her thoughts. One of I had a lot of conversations. After the story came out about people who felt the exact same way. And how they felt as I think I have which is the story describes something that if you had explained it explicitly like if you or if you ask someone like would you ever have sex just keep someone from feeling uncomfortable? Just because it seems to awkward to stop. You would say no, of course, that's ridiculous. And it's only when you slow down and pay closer attention to your own thoughts in your own decisions moment by moment that you can kind of catch yourself acting in a way that surprises and shocks you. And I think that can be a really uncomfortable feeling to see that that has happened. But that it's hugely satisfying to talk to other people who have been in that place into without judgment be able to share the kinds of experiences that you've had. But maybe haven't quite had the language to talk about another one of our listeners Kelly has commented on our website. I just read Kent person. And to me, it showed how much some women will discount and ignore. For their own intuition, and feelings and accept whatever men do towards them making reasons or excuses for behavior that makes them uncomfortable instead of turning away. It was a very disquieting story one that has played out in real life far too many times. So you know, that was the feeling that we saw echoed on social media again. And again after your story came out, I do think some of this is somewhat generational that it may be as well more of a millennial thing or even younger than millennials. But you know, you created a real sense of empathy for people, you know, they looked at it and related to it. And I guess I'm asking two questions. One is do you think this is at all generational and got to do with the changing and dating and the changing and societal expectations about sex and relationships in the last twenty years, and also what were you trying to do with your fiction to evoke empathy? Yeah. Well. I guess I should say first that I do think there are aspects of Margot story that are rooted pretty firmly in her sort of current political moment, but that I heard from readers after who were of many different ages telling me that even though maybe the the texting aspect of the story was different or the kind of conversations that Margaret was having with Robert were different than the ones that they'd had that the fundamental feeling of having ended up in a place and not quite knowing how you've gotten there, and knowing you didn't exactly want to make the decision. You knew you were about to make that resonated. And that makes sense to me in terms of how I understand what's happening in the story. I I'm thirty seven right. I'm not twenty. And so I started dating before there was internet dating before we were texting. And the way that we are now. And what I my experience suggests is that those. Technologies amplify something that has been there all along which is Margot has a real tendency. And that is something I share with her to spend a lot of time imagining herself into Robert's head trying to guess what he's thinking trying to figure out what he needs in order to give it to him. And he she does that in a way that gives it preference over what she's actually thinking and feeling is like until he is comfortable until he is happy until he is interested in her. She's not going to turn in words and think about how she feels and I think when you met someone, and you're just texting with them that gives you even more space to imagine who they might be. And why what they might be thinking. But it's something that is not necessarily like only because of texting and will not go away. When you meet someone in person, unless you make the effort to remind yourself as Margot does not that you still don't know this person that they are mysterious to you that's incredibly powerful and really painful, the idea of women. Pudding men's needs and wants and desires, and what's going to make them feel comfortable in ways that we've been socialized. If I can use the word by the patriarchy to make men feel comfortable to putting all of that above our own needs as women. I'm really interested though, in the fact that you Adelphi as queer you are in a long term relationship with the woman, and yet this story as well as the other stories in your book are all about heterosexual relationships. And I wonder why is that and, you know, are you going to be writing queer fiction to or, you know, why do you put yourself so much in the head of these hetero relationships? Yeah. I think there are a few different reasons for that one is just kind of circumstantial, I'm queer am by and I was I have been in relationships with men and was in a relationship with a man for a long time. And I always say that I think there's a five to ten year lag between what I'm having experiences. And when I'm writing about them. So I imagine just practically. Yes. My fiction will get queer and queer the longer I'm writing. But also, I think they're actually little flashes of clearness in the book now that aren't necessarily leaping out. But are there on second read? And I also think that regardless of your ent Asian to use your word again, we all live in the patriarchy. Right. And so we're women and straight women alike. I think often come up with this instinctive deference this instinctive understanding that the routes to power our via pleasing the men around us, and that that habit can last much longer than any kind of conscious willingness to do. So. And I think that is partly why Margot's experience is so disconcerting to her and to people who write about it. Because probably like me, they are people who would say, of course, I wouldn't do that. Of course, I don't put men's comfort ahead of my own. And it's in those kind of quiet or shout. More shadowy moments. When you see that you were doing it. You didn't even know that it can be the most it can undermine you the most make you feel the most sort of lost in the world of relationships. And so I think yeah, I guess just an answer to your question. I it's it's funny to me looking at the book as a hall to see that this is the outcome of the it's more than five years that I've been writing these stories have been coming through, and they really do Oriente around these themes of largely interpersonal heterosexual romantic relationships. But I think or at least a hope that are about something larger which is power. Well, some of our listeners, including Joanna silver agree with what you just said in terms of. She says the story was a powerful illustrative of the different ways that women and men are permitted to behave and the dramatically different consequences. They face when their behavior does not comport with gendered expectations. So spoiler for those of you who have not read it, the main character Margo does it. She's a college. Student. There's this older guy. She goes out on a date. She doesn't she's not feeling it, but she has sex with him. Anyway, even though she's not feeling it. And then when she breaks up with him via text, he gets more and more increasingly angry and bitterly attacking her, and in the end, ending with this horrible slur, you know, which really feels like a physical attack at the end of the story into us such a crude and horrible word. It really drives that home the sort of hate against her. I think it's interesting that the publication of cat person at the end of 2017 came out only a couple months into the start of the metoo movement. Only a week before it came out congressman John Conyers resigned, he was the first sitting politician ousted by me to others followed. Of course, the story resonated in a way, you know, both with those political figures and also with ordinary stories of men behaving badly, so. In what way do you try to use your fiction to evoke or explain reality? Well, I would say there are several different layers of answers to that question. I rarely when I sit down to write have an idea in mind of what trying to accomplish beyond the experience, I'm trying to provide for the reader, I wrote cut person in April of two thousand seventeen and so that was prior to the real explosion of the me two conversations. But it was after the access Hollywood tape after the two thousand sixteen election. So in retrospect, what I think was happening, and what the relationship between the story, and the larger movement was is that I was kind of simmering in the same atmosphere that we all were most women were at that time. Which was you know, the news was brutal the language that people were using with each other was harsh it felt to me as though all of our interpersonal relationships were kind of on edge and that talking about. Out gender and power just had this bite that it didn't have before. And so in that moment, I sat down and wrote a story that felt very personal to me that felt to me about my own my younger self about my own sort of increasing satisfactions with my own ability to say what I wanted to ask for it. And to move in the world, I wrote that story put it out there, and it caught this larger wave that was powered I think by the same anxieties the same frustrations the same age or and then works really well with it without having made an active effort to try and make it coincide. Because I think those kinds of conscious efforts to ally in fiction with politics often. It's very hard to get things move so fast people's opinions or so unpredictable. Yeah. And it needs to resonate beyond that political moment for it to be lasting. I think. So. Yeah, I'm Indira Lachman on infra Joshua Johnson. You're listening to one A from W AMU and NPR stay with us. This message comes from NPR sponsor ADT, America's trusted home security company can help protect you against the break ins fires and carbon monoxide twenty four seven emergency response when you needed most more at ADT dot com. In the Trump era. The news moves faster than f NPR politics podcast. Is there to keep you informed? Every time there's a major political story. We get our best correspondence together to sort through the noise. The NPR politics podcast. What you need to know. Right. After it happens. Chris speaking with Kristen repenting, her collection explorers stories that we tell ourselves about sex dating and consent. Will you use the word bite stories having bite and that leads perfectly into my next question. Which was I want you to tell us about one of the stories in this collection called biter which also explores sex desire consent, gender roles. Tell us a bit about it. Sure. So biter in brief is a story about a young woman named L E who works in an office and fantasizes about biting her male co-workers. And it's a story that I hope is because for her writing is a sexual young on. I mean, the story leaves it a little bit ambiguous about exactly what she wants her biting, she. Yeah. She enjoys it physically. She likes the power. She was a biter and childhood as some of us. I'm not saying me once were and liked that feeling of being sort of at the center and having all the power and. And as she gets more and more frustrated with her job and the Ambien low level sexual harassment that life as a woman in an office can involve she the fantasy takes on a life of its own. And she starts to feel more and more compelled by this, you know, intense and violent and also bananas urge to buy a man that she works with so. Yeah, that's the story. Well, it's linked also to other stories which really kind of veer almost into the Jon Rao of horror. I would say and their elements that are grotesque and disgusting. And you know, as a piece it makes readers feel uncomfortable. I would say many readers, which is why find the title of the whole collection, so appropriate. You know, you want this because you know, it's all like, ooh. Kind of gives you the he GB's why does making your readers uncomfortable appeal to you as a writer. I come to it. Honestly, which is that I love to feel uncomfortable as a reader, and I have identified as. A horror reader and fan, and it's easiest my whole life. And I think there are a lot of different reasons and people probably come to horror from a bunch of different directions. But for me what I want. I from book is for it to grab me and to pull me in and to give me the feeling of tension and release tension and release, and I think people have different levels of comfort with that kind of arc of horror story, but at its best I think if you're reading or watching something that works, you're you're you're KAI you're terrified, but you're also kind of laughing it can also be a collective experience. You know, if you watch a horror movie in a theater, you're all in it together, you pull back, and then you realize, and I think one of the things I wanted with biter which is the final story in the collection was to give a final snap of satisfaction after very many stories like person that I think leave you just with this kind of ambient bad. Dennis the discomfort that there's a different kind of discomfort, which is I want I want I want, and then I get and that can be a great horror movie that knocks out of the park or horror novel. I think can accomplish. And to be clear, it's not just the men in your book who are bad characters. A lot of the women are downright bad characters and villains as well. And maybe that's why HBO is so interested in HBO is developing a series based on your collection of short stories. What can you tell us about the project? Sure, it's so the book was optioned by HBO for two women writers Carly Rae and Leila bioch- who met and worked together on the leftovers, and they read the collection and went for immediately, which is incredibly flattering to me. And I have met and spoken with them. And I say bluntly like they're geniuses, and I've read two of their scripts for the two stories in the collection. So they've written scripts for scarred. And. They've written scripts for sardines, and they are so unsettling and so funny at the same time and one thing I really feel like they were able to do is to pull out the humor that is. I hope is underneath the stories. They are so unsettling at so like laugh out loud funny, and should it make it to the screen? It still has to go through you know, all of that development process. But I just think it will be unlike anything else that's on television. Right. I I have seen you quoted saying everything is about sex except sex, which is about power. That's a quote that is not mine that I quoted from someone else, but yes, and that is the sort of backbone underlying all of this. Yeah. I think if I were describing the collection I would say certainly there's a lot of sex in it. But what it's about is power. And what I'm interested in is power. And what is the most satisfying to me to write about is power and that the sex grabs you. Hopefully, you know, like catches your eye pulls you in. But you stay to feel like you're understanding of power has been a little unsettled briefly last question with the short time, we have left Marianne who says she's a creative writer two wants know how you came up with the title cat person. That gives the game away a little, but there's weather Robert has cats or not is a core question in the story. So the fact that people are still talking about that a year later makes me feel like I put my finger on important mystery that I'm excited to have people keep fighting about basically forever. Kristen Rupeni ins new collection of short stories is called you know, you want this cat person and other stories. Thank you so much. Kristen our show is produced by Avery Kleinman. You can learn more about the team at the one eight dot org slash staff. This program comes to you from W AMU at American University distributed by NPR until we meet again, I'm Indira locks on of the Pulitzer center on crisis reporting, Joshua Johnson. We'll be back next week. Thanks for listening. This is one A. Hey, thanks for listening to one A before you go. If you want to help us out a little further, we'd love it. If you spread the word about this program. Text someone Email them or maybe tell them face to face tweet at them if you'd like and feel free to tag us at one A when you do every new listener helps thanks.

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NPR News: 10-27-2019 5PM ET

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 10-27-2019 5PM ET

"Get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply this message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like Xfinity X. by efficient mistress of evil which took an eighteen point six million putting it in second place I'm Janine herbst enjoy listening to N._P._R.. News from Washington himself and the three children the president said the only American casualty was a military dog that was injured Gregory NPR news Washington ends will be involved the Taliban refused to negotiate with the Afghan government calling it a puppet of the United States Jennifer Glass reporting you're listening to NPR news athletics who are accusing the bishops of promoting heresy there were many representatives of indigenous people from the Amazon who attended the three week long assembly known as a sin in northwestern Syria president trump's at the American forces touchdown late on Saturday night emerged from their helicopters and blue holes into the side answer blowing it eighty miles per hour at some parts of the Kincaid fire and wins that fast concert new fires Stephen Volmer as a fire behavior analyst for cal fire news at the Vatican today broke Francis brought to a close in assembly of bishops from the Amazon who are making a landmark proposal there of the building not wanting to go through the main door because that was booby-trapped the US special operators came under fire but killed those shooting at them the president owner has declared a state of emergency and with more strong winds on the way firefighters are working to contain the blaze from member station K. Q. E. D. Michelle Wiley has more the serving African American representative in the House has died he was a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus and introduce the bill creating a federal holiday to honor Dr Fire's moving at very dangerous speeds right now with erratic conditions it's throwing a spot fire up to and even over a mile ahead of itself the fire speed and unpredictability is the Americans entered the compound and track Baghdadi to a dead end tunnel he had taken three children with him and was wearing a suicide vest he ignited his vest killing did some war headdresses and had painted stripes on their faces in his homily Pope Francis had strong words for those who consider indigenous people backward and of little the concurred fire in northern California has burned some thirty thousand acres and force more than one hundred eighty thousand people to evacuate the area the so firefighters can work to keep the blaze from jumping across for NPR news. I'm Michelle Wiley in Santa Rosa former Congressman John Conyers

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Literally in a Korner w/ Teresa Attridge (Reparations, Model Minority, Marie Kondo, Desexualization of Asian Men/Over Sexualization of Asian Women, Avenue Q, Interracial Relationships)

Minority Korner

1:17:13 hr | 2 years ago

Literally in a Korner w/ Teresa Attridge (Reparations, Model Minority, Marie Kondo, Desexualization of Asian Men/Over Sexualization of Asian Women, Avenue Q, Interracial Relationships)

"Welcome to minority coroner with an and James, the wonder twins Apolo casting. Learn laugh play. It's like blues. Clues only. It's more black queer and lady lies. This week on minority corner episode one sixty eight we have actress Teresa at ttrij in the house stepping into the guest co host spot while naked is still out on maternity leave. And as our I as an American guests. Sorry, all it took on. We have so much to talk about she breaks down the myth of the model minority. It's history where it came from along with the decentralisation of Asian men and the over sexualization of Asian women. Plus, we get her thoughts on Marie Cundo. Also, how those empower tend to weaponize our differences against each other and relationships between young Asian Americans and black hip hop culture in her thoughts about that. And so so much more. But I I'm going to dive into the case for reparations is about fucking time YoM, so we're gonna talk about this. And why we could be the generation to do this important work and finish. What was supposed to be done? Over a century ago. I break down the precedence for reparations of happening before inside the US and out what it might look like and why it's so necessary ever going to have true healing in America. So come on and with oven hearts open minds. Let's have a great conversation. And let's get into it. Degrees. Oh onto minority coroner. Oh my gosh. I feel like this is just I'm I'm really coming into my own interests actual corner. You create socially inner corner. Actually it. You just maybe realize we're literally actually recording this podcast recording. This. Yeah. Minorities in a corner. Like people are getting bay exposes exactly it you'll we're doing publicity photos and neck, and I shot up to. Congratulations. Baby is mad Q and sina on my grand-. Just I've seen her, but I would love to see her and her baby both her consent love doorbells Faulk. We actually were trying to take photos of us in a corner reading we're tend to publicity photos of like us and corner. But it's it's hard to offer sharer. I love it because you're here both from the bay area by both from San Francisco Bay area. Both agree shows their center shout out show. We met my gosh. Now, we're both here chasing our dreams here in the Big Apple, it's true. You know, who who are you? Okay. So I use she her pronounce good about like good as in like good. You do I is work a conversation with like, no, it's it's good to bring up because you don't want to assume it's like earlier when I met your cat. I did not assume hats gender. I grew up doing primarily musical theater, but I do. Love a straight play. I just get typecast as like a silly lady a lot. I think it's because I use weird voices. And I do have an animated character in your life. You've done avenue Q how many times three three times anytime retires questions. I think it's time for it to close maybe retool itself 'cause I feel like it's the same thing when I felt when I watched like book of Mormon that they're about avenue Q, I think worked for the guy said that time, but now watching and it's a little cringe-worthy while ends everybody a little bit racist. Like, oh, that's my biggest issue with the show actually realize. Okay. So we don't know their song called everyone's a little bit racist. I remember in college like everyone was singing it because it was still like post racial what we thought we were living. You know, we're like some guys we did it as all around. My god. These puppets are talking about. It. We made it. Well, it's interesting because that the song itself starts because Princeton assumes that Kate monster and Truckee monster related because they're both monsters. Right. So you're like, oh my gosh. You know, that's racist. But the interesting thing is that Kate is she's been talking about her dream of opening like a monster school, right, right? And how she wants to educate monsters because they don't have as many opportunities, and she wants to create a place where they can feel equal and welcome. And she wants to prove the negative stereotypes of what monsters wrong by giving them a platform in a way to educate and elevate themselves and Princeton immediately is like well, could I go, and she's like, no, we don't want people like you. And he's like that's racist. But the thing is like reverse racism is not as thing. It's so the create like historical black college. That's exactly what it the comparison is made ally, you know, which there was a huge thing about that too. It's. Like, well, why do people discriminate against has be called monsters? Are you saying minorities or monsters, you know, but I mean, the idea was that the monster puppet versus the human puppet? It's the idea that you can physically see there's something different. But we're all made of felt the new unlike there is I mean, they're racist. Secondly, a construct or whatnot. But yeah, fortunately, we just created all these rules of people being treated differently because construct and that sort of the idea is that it's like, we've really it's something that we create it. You know, the puppets. Exactly. But I mean when be that's the other thing too. Is people always talk about they're like, well there's one race the human race. I'm like, I mean, even if I like, scientifically, we're all people like, we're all human beings. We have created a system and preach. You know what? I mean, we live in a system that we created. And that doesn't mean it doesn't exist. Right. And part of it is like for us to move through that system. We have to acknowledge that these things created like we snap our fingers and be like, okay, we're sorry. We created the systems we're done with that we have to like look into them. And then dismantle those systems. We have like he'll the atrocities, you know. But I I actually think that's one of the reasons that I still do love avenue Q and a lot of other theaters because you have to take them as period pieces. Ooh. I know what I'm an item. Also, speaks you. How fast we actually really are moving. Oh my God. Because it is a period piece in it is sort of data. Let's think it's interesting for it to go away and come back and like how. Are we now do this with the two dozen nineteen hundred mindset I well. So you also see you identify first of all I think you're going to apologize. I think you're the first Asian-American Harris on the podcast. That's amazing. We've only had two in my defense in our defense and one hundred sixty eight episodes, we've probably only had like sixteen people on the show. Yeah. So it was like we've have like Muslim black. So. So. You know, it's one of those things like I'm happy to be here. Happy to share that perspective. And I'm happy to learn your perspective more intimate. And now you welcome to literally sitting in a fucking core. Fucking coroner. Oh, I'm so glad we can cuss. Fuck. Yeah. Fuck. Yeah. Mother fucker you can say like asshole mother fucking bitch tits. Tits isn't a bad word on yet. People want us to think learn to learn what's that it? It's so now that I have our resident Asian American on the show. I asked you so many questions or anything you want to speak for the community. No. I mean, it's it's funny. The Asian American community is very divisive in itself. Oh my God short and because American community similar to like v black community. It's big he's talking about like, many different cultures subcultures and countries and continents like it's a lot. So we kind of weird for everyone. I think like it's going to be the same way that you wouldn't think like all like white Europeans have the same exact culture and way of thinking about things and do things like Czechoslovakia is very different than Portugal, really mine. Very different. So when I when I talk about, you know, like, the Asian American voice. I obviously like as an actor, especially it's very important to me. But it's also important for me to acknowledge like, I am Filipina. And I am biracial. I am half white. So I don't look Filipino. You are. Are you know by by by is like your team? So it really is by coastal by racial bisexual. I I am insane. You are so many fucking way minus Jefferson. I don't care for him. Oh, fair enough. You know, Janet. Shannon. We can I get my pen out and co sign on now, we're very pro Janet, and I we've kicked Justin into the curb. Page same page. Let's just like leave Britney alone. Hot stop talking about her. Those people who are obsessed with their accent? Can't stop talking about them later. Really? Yeah. No my and like she's just trying to thri trying to live extra her dad's in the hospital right now, she cancelled. Shoes to being a new Vegas residency because she like has revitalized Vegas and dad got sick. And she cancelled it all and he's still in charge of her. She's he's still her conservative now, and he's like help get her and she had the opportunity to cancel or conservative ship. But she's like it's working well, y'all so. Bill as well. And it's on my shapers. This way. But there is you know, she has kids, and that's one reason she wanted to do a residency because she she can stay home in like travel trailers. It's it's fun. When you're in your twenties. I guess I, you know, I think having that added security, you know, in case something should happen. I think that's her being a responsible parent. You know, be with her dad. Yes. So you always make about Brittany. It's kind of always about Britney like that's pretty bitch is obsolete rating bitch. So, but by Bye-bye is you theme song. I am by by issue. There's so many things I want to talk about. So like, this is a broad question. But like, how do you find navigating being in an intersectional relationship? Oh my gosh. Well, it's interesting rules if the put through so many so to to clarify, I am an Asian woman in a relationship with a white Jewish, man. Right. So I mean, the stereotypes about Asian women in white mannered off the I read a study years ago. So I don't even know if it's true so bear with me on it. That seventy for like seventy five percent of interracial marriages for like between like the beginning of the new millennium and two thousand and ten were it was like seventy five percent, white men and Asian women. Really the bulk of the bulk of it and for saying, my, my friend cat. She's so funny. She likes to joke. She's like y'all trying to get white supremacy from the inside just make everybody not. I'm like, I mean, that's not what we're trying to. There's we outnumber everyone. So I guess if that was the plan we'd be doing a good job. But it's also. Yeah. That's that's a weird stereotype to deal with is is you deal with the like being fetishists as an Asian woman a lot by the by everyone you really, right? But it feels like with white men specifically there's a lot of judgement from some people in the Asian community about, you know, we'll why aren't Asia men. Good enough for you. Or, you know. They can't carry on tradition. The same way or like your kids will be confused which is insulting to me because I'm biracial person. And that was a big question that came up when I was growing up was the battle between, you know, figuring out that I'm not half of two things. I'm a whole two things, you know. You know, because I'm very much an Asian woman. I'm also very much a white woman and a lot of ways. But I I don't pass because you feel like you can get away with my name is Teresa average, you know. So when I get resumes, when I, you know, apply for jobs. I always like, I don't have issues getting interviews. You know, when I speak on the phone late that people don't like my mom's name is Eileen. And when people call she works in a customer service job and people will call her and they'll go into see her and they won't look for her. They won't assume someone who sounds like her and looks like her are the same person, which is really interesting to me because you know, it's it's it's not quite code switching, do you know what I mean? Because this is just the way that we speak, but we get like accused of coats which doing. That's what I'm doing. I'm just like. Yeah. Living my life. And then you you always get your English is so good. Thank you. I put on my English like my best like Pacific northwest voice. Just gonna impress you. But they assume they well that's interesting is going back to like your mom because I know generational -ly. I believe that there's a thing with like probably like probably your parents generation are like Asian-American folks in your around your mom's age, I kind of went away from their heritage wasn't very much. Tell me about that. Like, what was that? So it's it's very common, especially for people who are Filipino. And also people who are Japanese actually to have this extra generation where your grandparents or great grandparents immigrated over and they didn't teach their children how to speak their language, and we're like we're going to be American and Americanized, and you're going to be full on like a pro. Crowd all American boy or girl, you know, you are going to represent this new country that you're in. And it's a way to get them to assimilate because they don't want them to deal with the hardship of racism, you know. So the idea is that if you don't have an accent. Because that's my mother never learned how to speak Tagalog. And none of her sisters aren't even though. One of my aunts was born in the Philippines. No. She spoke it for the first two years of relief. They never spoke to her again amounts kinda common because we did a show national leader. The Japanese American in termination brilliant. Yes. Measurers always Japanese American internment camps because actually said Japanese interment camps to George Takei and he yelled at me. So because I was. George you mentioned like bats. Yeah. They're trying to pitch national theatre to get him like donate money to us. And I mean, that's a lesson that all electric, and I lasted I definitely will always job because the Japanese interment camps would have been in Japan as Americans. But yeah. But again that emphasis on American and having to sern- you're American identity now as opposed to you're Japanese American identity versus a Japanese identity versus in American identity. I mean, it's really interesting looking at how the children of those. So we get into the next generation were people like me or like Sam who at the play we feel guilty for not knowing more about where we came from. Because your parents were not encouraged to learn any of that it was down now. You have to seek it from outside sources because a lot like my grandparents I would ask them about. How do I cook this? How do I say this and they're like, no, no, no, no, no Denisa? You don't need to know that and I'm like, I don't need to. But I would really like to. You know, and they were like don't go to the Philippines, like, never go to the Philippines. We don't want you to see the life. We had you know, which is now the sheen behind there is. Yes, it's like I think we're in this movement of really coming out of the dark mist of the way European colonial bullshit. A lot of us are coming out from a like, wait who am I where did I come from and wanting to like tap into those roots because the history is important, and that history is important because it allows us to you know, how many of our white counterparts can be like oh trace their lineage literally centuries and be able to have that I can't on my dad's side, right? 'cause there's a more of like, it was a proud like this is where we came from this and the those records were capped, but for some of us who either were kidnapped from our homes or we're running away from something. So there might be some shame behind that. But we're just like we just want to know. And here's the thing in general families of like, there's family secrets, and it's like, she's like, no I. No that I need to just know the history like it's not shameful. Let's just put it all out there. There's just too much family secrecy, get your aunt really big in the Asian American community as well. Yeah. I feel like it's there's this wanting to keep the struggle internal. So that from the outside people don't see it. And they think that we're assimilating more functional, and they can't use it against us that they can't weaponize pain, you know, and I think that's actually something. And I'll talk about this in my segment leader. Because I mean, one of the big things is in the model minority meth is how Asians were weaponized against black people. Yes. I mean, it doesn't general the consul, and that's part of like this sort of rich paradigm keeping like an era Stocker series as wanting to pet everyone else against themselves and busy get us. So busy with this like day to day bullshit. So we can't really focus on like, wait a minute. What's going on up there? They're keeping us busy that comparison of there's a guy with ten cookies, and there's two other guys and it gives one cookie to the one guy, and he says look out that other guys trying to take your cookie instead of wondering why the other guys still has nine 'cause minute. Why are you got all them cookie? But now you're worried about the other guy who's gonna take your cookie? Meanwhile, that guys like how do I get a cookie and they're calling me cookie monster? Yeah, my fav- last thing before we pivot into there's so many things would have more. You know, St. what are you? I so this is really hot right now. Now, I'm rewind is talking about what brings him joy. And joy, they're giving it away. Now, I'll up my guy. I remember hearing about this book. And actually, I think I know net. But I never read it. Life changing. Magic of tidying-up Marie. Oh, yes. I don't want to because I'm not ready to do the work on that. It is a lot of work. I've a friend of mine just like it's going to take me all month. I'm like, I don't have the have you seen the show? I haven't I'm purposely not watching over a month. I watched the show then I'm because I'm not holder. So. Mason. I then upholding myself to that information. So I'm happily living in ignorance and keeping stuff that does not bring me joy. Or you're preparing yourself for what you think is the next phase in fortifying. What you need a motionless. You can do it in a healthy way. Right. One day. I'll be able to do that and live my life in that way. But then day has not it's not today. And you know what? That's okay. Okay. Thank you. Well, I was just like don't be down on your side. Can't do it. I can't do it. I don't know. What brings holding is a polling where you are now honor yourselves sessions right now. Oh my gosh. I am doing this thing though. Like if something like because I busy myself with like taking somebody projects. Yes. Yes. But I'm gonna space right now. If I'm like if this project does not bring me joy throw it away, and I'm gonna throw it away. So I've taken that philosophy idea. Like simple flying like things that I'm doing or like, you know, we say yes to so many things and there's one thing it's like if it's really really contributing and making the world a better place. But if I'm going to go there and be grumpy Astle, and they don't need to go do that. You're not going to spark joy who. Yes, you're not going to spark to it. It's also if you spark joy, that's true. My middle name is joy. Oh, I was born to do that. I've been this has been a joyful time in the corner the physical corner that we're at. Yes. So use called me off line that there's some like racism that marine condo is facing. Yeah. You know? I mean. I one of my flaws, and there are not many one of my friends are flaws are also your greatest strength, right? Is that right? I will get wrapped up in Facebook arguments girl that is you gotta get out like, but they're only on my I don't go and other people pages unless somebody something for the. Yeah, it's just like when you're on you. And it's like a lot of times. What happens you just post a little lake something like not even thinking twice? Yeah. Any becoming information and some people just not fucking like let it go. And you're like, this is my wall, and I feel like I should have. I mean, the other thing is I don't get in the Facebook arguments to argue with the specific person causing problems, necessarily sure, but I do it because I know people are reading it. And that there will be somebody who's going to learn or there's going to be somebody who's going to feel seen. You know what I mean? Yeah. It's it's just a matter of making sure that you are articulate and knowledgeable and crafting your argument because even if you cannot hitting her one person's mind exactly, which what am I one of my favorite things debate. Is they say be bugs don't be Daffy if you're arguing with someone and you lose your temper, you automatically lose. Yup. That's no. Well, and also like you're probably actually Nakata's or convinced the person you're talking to you. But like you said, it's more. So for the others who are see him who came to watch the bloodbath won't, blah. Are you not in? Which I do. I haven't even watched all the show. I've watched like a couple of episodes because I'm like pacing through it. I really like it. But I also I don't watch much TV. So it'll be it's like a tree I'm like having to watch an episode of Murray. No, she's a nice lady. But a lot of the criticism surrounding her is kind of inherently racist. And a lot of people are coming to their own defense saying, well, I don't I it's not racist. The reason I don't like her isn't racist. And I'm like, okay. I mean, let's dissect that me has obviously, you know, you might not have an issue with Asian people. You might be like, I love Japanese food, and I've Asian friends, and I'm this, and I'm like, that's all wonderful. Yeah. Cute. I haven't SCO wired L, but it's one of those things where first of all those cases are it's like the I have a black friend lights. What it's like I've heard this before you, oh, we have so much in common. I really think black nation people need to come together. We do really do like we just really do. And it's weird. Because like I growing up like in there is especially with like, okay. Growing up like I hung out with like the Filipinos and high school. So much Olympia. Yes, it really was like it was like the Filipino. Mafia high school? My mom was NFL if you know gang going on. Yeah. Well, it's an also like when I went to college I to hip, hop dance. And I don't know if you know this about the hip, hop dance. Community shared all Filipinos. It's like mostly like every dance team would have like competition our school at UC Santa Cruz. Oh, no went to competition. Every team would have their one black person and one white girl and the rest for like all mostly Philippino at least Asian America. I was like how interesting stop. I know while we are got it. Well, I usually it'd be like don't stop. But actually, we're to take a quick little break. We're going to as we say an improvident arrest star game here, we're going to rest our Asian talk a game and. Defendant. We're to change gears. What your flavor little was on the walls? I wanna talk about something really fine reparations. Guilt firestone. Moreno boy, the host of Dr game show, which is a podcast where we play games submitted by listeners, regardless of quality or content with in-studio goose an callers from all over the world to win a coastal magnets now to make sure you get our next episode of a game Manolas or medication. How you play that you have to guess if something's poking on name for a medication first time listener if you want to listen to episode highlights and also know how to participate follow Dr game show on Facebook Instagram Twitter. Is really fun for the whole family will be every other Wednesday starting March thirteenth, and we're coming to max fun. I'll be mine. Vat racin. Yeah. It's reparations has been like a thing that's been coming back into my life kind of like shrugged it off. And why kinda wanted to do is do a dive into like what is reparations even mean? Why should we possibly even think about doing it? And what would it possibly look like before we just sort of say, no to it? You know, totally reparations is defined as the making of amends for a wrong that one has done by paying money to or other ways helping those who have been wrong. So it's been it's four and so way back after like civil war of the US had created reparations plan right after the civil war, and they would be granted that freed families would be granted forty acres of tillable land and a mule by the union army, and this plan was proposed by union general William t Sherman after meetings with black community leaders and Savannah, Georgia. But it was reversed by president Andrew Johnson. So it never happened. So mind, you this is the thing that was supposed to happen. It never happened. It was supposed to happen. Right. So it's sort of like if like someone like rear ended your car and like rear need your car. And they're like, oh, I'm sorry. I'm gonna pay for it. And then you're like, okay. And then they never do. And then they keep rarining your family, and then they like burn your family's cars, still your wife, and they just do it generations and generations. They just never pay for the damage when you bring it up. You're like, hey, you said you were going to pay me back for damaging my kinda like you really need to let the Pasco. Yeah. Always looking for a handout, I'm driving away. And so it was like on the rank car was damaged to see that. You see that? Do you? See this dent. That was you. Yeah. You're the dent in my car. And there are some people who are just like, well, I don't have a great car either. But it's not about that. Okay. It's about the generations that have happened before he had and that debt was owed. And according to the we talk about wealth in the US, according to the Pew Research Center, the median wealth of white households thousand thirteen was thirteen times greater than the median wealth of black household. Gosh. And that's up from eight times greater than ten. So it says oh my God. That's insane. So that they talk about the income got might be closing amongst racial groups. But the wealth gap is not and while is like, you know, having stocks and businesses, and that doesn't you can pass Chris rock does a really great bit from one of his old Santa teens about the difference between being rich and being wealthy. Oh, I've seen a all. It's it's really old. But he talks about how black people have money, but they don't have wealth because white people on on the land. Like, right. So I mean, it's a comedy. But but he made a really really good point. You bring up a great point to. It's like, you know, the opportunity like why that forty acres and a mule at that time would have been such a great first of all black folks know, how to work the land because they were doing it for free. So imagine like they're able to get a leg up and start a business like, and it makes sense that you have these people who literally like talking about who pull themselves up by their own bootstraps even have boots to make their own goddamn, boots boots or strap it have any straps. To make all that shit from scratch instill just to get, you know, set on fire, and then we're talking about white households compared to Latino households on they had about ten times, more wealth, and let's households. And then we talk about the average retirement savings for black and Latino household. It's about nineteen thousand for black families twelve thousand for about a Latino families compared to Louis for White House holds one hundred and thirty thousand so long difference there. There's a lot of difference. So we talk about like the systemic disadvantages that has happened. Well, why would we need reparations while on top of the hundreds of years that slavery happened? Right. So you have that then you have the history of government sanctioned segregation that happened during Jim crow era while our parents were alive. Why like this isn't the case anybody's wondering how long ago it was. Right. Your parents and grandparents remember, yeah. It's it's this isn't a very long time ago. I I mean like my dad was born in the time period where he could not have. He was born in Louisiana. He would not available to vote in Louisiana when he was born didn't sane bananas. My parents wouldn't have been allowed to be married at the time that they were born rate. Yeah. I mean, that's yeah. So things of like just recently started to like get a little like so recent bugai's, the stone to how like recent it was just to emphasize, which is why are we still have massive healing to do. I also think about like, you know, the terrorist groups like the kooks clan. Tear they've wage also post World War Two public policies about from the forties to the seventies. Were does there's so many programs and the government designed to provide upper mobility for Americans, but only really white Americans were able to participate in that thing about like, even the GI Bill of black people, you know in. I even like there's all these programs that were helping to essentially build a middle class wealth, and we did not get to participate in any of that. Buying I win redlining, which may God home ownership a possibility for white people. But shutting out black folks, I an even people of color were even faced to even mortgage lending discrimination around mortgage lending Jay till the same to this day separate and unequal school system, south the United States. So like, this is just it. Oh, even just like subsidized debt free college for white folks after post World War Two, but not for black people. So that's just a small little. Let's talk about affirmative action. Oh that debt. Thank god. And even like, you know by folks were even barred from traditional forms of credit. So it's sort of like again you add on like as if slavery wasn't enough. But he added all this other stuff. And so it's sort of like, again an amend was never made for this hundreds years of atrocities that happened and things only got worse black. We're gonna push through through the bullshit. But it was a lot again. So there's. Sort of like the sort of call to it. And like again thinking about this like you had unpaid labor of millions over the course of slavery, right and all that on com hounded money that is owed to all that free labor that happen. And some people are like I was in one of those Facebook debates that you're talking about when I posed this all started because Marianne Williamson who's running. She's a spiritual guru of you wrote a return to love, and she is talking about reparations that has might years perked up because it's only recently that I've been carrying white folks were now running for office like Cynthia Nixon even talking about reparations, and I even think it was possible. And I think we need to move into a space of like what is possible we need to dream a little bit and get a little Cossio Cortes. Thank you. And like just sort of thinking about like what's outside the box. Instead of just looking at like what has been done in the past someone who was like an again. So I don't wanna have to have an argument with people who are white liberals of y reparations won't work. Like that don't come to the table and just be like no table and be like, I'm not. I mean, they also said that America becoming own nation won't work. Right. Thank you. When you know what? I mean. Like, you think there's a lot of that. We couldn't get to the moon, and they said we couldn't fly a plane fly a plane and sure we fake that first moon landing. But I'm sure some of the other ones were just going to me. No one. No. There is historical precedent for reparations. Crazy Nick nineteen Eighty-eight US president. Ronald Reagan, formally apologized for the US government's interment and Japanese Americans during World War Two, and they have the civil liberties act twenty thousand reparations over eight hundred thousand victims is totally one billion was initially allocated an additional four hundred thousand for later claim. So it's happened here in the US and has in my fucking lifetime in accordance with the nine thousand nine hundred fifty two agreement Germany has paid over eighty nine billion referees reparations to victims of the holocaust will were to they continued. German officials continued to meet with groups make their meeting the needs. They need you to. It's a continuous sort of discussion and thing recently chosen fifteen Greek and Russian parliament voted to demand that Germany pay them for the damage by Nazi occupation. So it's not like, it's a far fetched thing. It's not. It's not already happening. Right. I mean, we also have to talk about the fact that white slave owners were compensated. Yes. For their lost property, which I think I read somewhere again, I'm so sorry. I can't remember sources first of all your property is a human being I'm sorry about your three fifths of a person that you lost. But it was something like it would account for now. 'cause they did the math like what it would have been three hundred dollars a slave plantation full of place. So I mean like, yeah, they lost their free labor, but they walked away with Bank, and they one or Lemus the civil war for their economy. On your did. Okay. Like, he's still got to keep like all of your land. That's taken away from you. Will you sell already put a greater advantage? You still got to pay dirt cheap for your late. So you probably soldiers actually hired some of those slaves or some of them, the great migration out the fuck out of there, which. But you like you said paid dirt cheap for the people who are coming up for it. Yeah. So how could we possibly do it? Because again, like, I think that we need to keep I know. So I'm you're cringing. And I want to say open your mind like come to the table. I just hate it. When like you propose something and people are already say like no that can't be that. That's not possible. We need to think about what is possible how could things possible or even just calming. Listen, I think so quickly people just have like an opinion and shoots something down as opposed to saying. Hi, I don't really know about that. Can you tell me more or also like I had this person who's going into conversation with back and forth? And I was an Iowa's expected to come up with all the ways that this could happen like I'm not in public office. And and that's what are we as a people should come together to figure out. How could we make this work for today? Well, luckily, some journalists have done the work for me. So I'm going to lead to articles of that. I thought were really fascinating about how some of this. I could. Work. What this might look like. And so we'll I like how would you pay for it? And there's one proposal that this one author propose that essentially say, a graduated tax on wealth inherited a on wealth and inherited wealth, so essentially going after like the billionaires I'm essentially would pay like a anyone in excess of five million pay a one percent tax. And then that would could go towards this reparations also penalties for people who have all these offshore accounts. There's so much money that's going to so making penalties for that. I'm Cynthia Nixon proposed using taxes from legalized marijuana when she was running. I remember that and which was so mind blowing in a museum, which I think makes so much sense using the tax dollars from legalized marijuana and giving that towards reparations or these black and Brown communities that have been vastly affected by the war on drugs. Yeah. Because it's new money. It's just new money coming in. So we're not missing out on any. And it's also the fact that it was criminalised in demonized when it was something that was, you know, primarily like, oh, this is like bad. And it's something that, you know, the hippies and black people, and degenerates are all part of and now that, you know, your suburban average mom is just like smoking them out me a better. Mommy, thou. Yeah. I guess it's fun. My gosh. You know? But it's it's just one of those things that it makes sense that you would try to take this thing that was weaponized against a community and turn it into a twelfth. So how do we do it? Like, what are some possible like ways that it could be done first up? We just got to get congress to look at this. And since one thousand nine hundred nine John Senator congressman John Conyers has actually ever year proposed Bill h r forty which is just on a it's it's essentially a Bill that is an exploratory committee to look into reparation. So it's not even saying that we're going to do it. But it just a commission and a committee to look into. How much money would be how much money was gained during slavery. How it would look like so always saying let's just kind of explore this and every year it's been voted down and so- HR forty because it's like, the forty acres and a mule. I see what you did there. And in the book published by Randall Robinson, and he talks about in the debt and the debt what America OSA blacks, he talks about how it could come up in wide range or a phrase reparations abused from cultural institutions community initiatives direct cash grants, targeted wealth-building. So so much so many different ways. And so it could be directly given to people. Once you find out like how they work they'd have to for some people. Maybe it'd be like them proving like their direct, lineage, juice, slavery. I know that mine is like, it's my great great. Great grandmother. Yeah. And like, and my uncle his grandmother, he says, he'll look she just his great. Great grandmother, look shoes, it's like fresh off the boat from Africa, and it was like freed shortly after on she arrived. So some people will be able to trace it. And then those who qualify could be paid properly and a lump sum on. There's also it could. Is a lump sum preferable to an annual some I guess is all up bright up in fronts, you know, possibly 'cause I know there are some people who they get theirs annually. So it's a certain amount every year until a little extra. Yeah. Good. I come in the form of tax breaks as well. Oh, yeah. Be really helpful. There could also be additional funds could be targeted for matching savings programs homeownership business start-ups because again, they lost out on the possible. Ability to start their businesses with the forty acres and a mule. They could be option they could be also for financial literacy training programs that additional educational programs. Like, I said, I I'm home homebuyer programs could be given similar to ones in World War Two that black people miss out on Whitefield were able to participate on your. Also, there could be tuition Twitter free higher education. It'd be a possibility that would help out or extra financial support at universities endowments for historical and cultural institutions could be given as well to different like a museums art programs. I exhibits about the history of slavery and its aftermath national history education programs as well. Like there could be like in Germany. They have like all these places that like we'll have like a stone that will like there's all kinds of memorable plates and stop that looks. So when you're walking around it's just there, and it's a constant reminder which helps because like Germany's knock down that fucking path again because the reminded by it all the time and they've had to pay this debt because they atrocity happened. You know, we've not had to pay that debt. So because of the way world politics right now to there's been a huge resurgence of the Nazi party. Sure. She's terrified. But it's it's so much of what we are allowing government wise and sort of like the platforms. We are giving people, you know. So if we can have those conversations why can't we talk about reparations, or why can't we hold Germany up as an example? And I think one of the big things is that America is still not ashamed. Vermin is a shame eight. We haven't gotten to that. Shame thing, you know to help us be ashamed. Paying the fuck and Bill putting like monuments like that'll be like, okay, don't wanna do that. Again. We've not paid our bell. You know, and like we're having monuments that are a constant reminder of like this lynching happen any plantation house. Magin an any plantation house to be called just like, oh, this needs to be called what it is. Yeah. Like, people should probably stop having these grand weddings at plantation. Maybe right. Yeah. Like. Yup. So like, you said also historical monuments, Marcus is over apparently thirty thousand memory commemorative bricks around in Germany. Routes to Africa giving so tens of thousands of Jews Jewish people. She's me tens of thousands of Jewish young people from the US go to Israel each year birthright, and so they're going to be a birthright trip for folks provocative people to go back. It would build relationships and community and also would also probably help to stimulate live there in that. Great. Yeah. Should be debt cancellation, psychological rehabilitation and also just maybe like a fucking formal apology. There's never been one has there has there has never been one. Nope. And so so that's some of the ways that it could be. So we could at least start brainstorming on this. How much could it cost like it could some of estimated around how much is based on like, you know, I'm not a numbers guy. But they the crunch some numbers and some people have come up with a number of like nine nine point twelve billion in total Assam have said, it's actually even more one point four trillion. Marianne Williamson has thrown up ten billion. For she has her reasons. So I look at it like, you know. And also, the UN has said that they did a finding that the US owes African-Americans reparations. The UN has said they did an investigation. They cited at this needs to happen. And there are examples at Georgetown University announced earlier this month, that'd be offering free tuition to descendants of the two hundred and seventy two slaves that were sold in eighteen thirty eight to help pay the university's debts. That's really interesting. So there is you know, movements that that is happening. And I just say like to anybody like let's be open to how instead of being like oh Republicans ever go for it. Like, you know, I think that we need the white people white folks to be the militias up today because think about the abolitionist we're going up a hell there are many that were just like that's too much for you know, what why are you trying to cross causes a Russell I appreciate these abolitionist as opposed to ally. We. Yeah. I need you to be a fucking like abolitionist and continue the work that you're for mothers and fathers did because the work is half finished. And I think that we can be the generation to see reparations done for me. This is one of my top three political issues that I need a candidate to be openly talking about an honest, actually, probably needs to be and I need to hear white folks have to lead the charge on this. By can't be the ones that do it. We can't be the one saying like, here's the bell. You all have to galvanize organiz and talk about minister communities and not say, oh, it's not possible. But say how can we make it possible to right this wrong? It's the only way that we're going to truly solve racism in America and make an immense because anything else bandaids. Exactly. I mean, people people who make the argument of like, oh, well, you keep bringing it up you keep opening wounds. Like, why can't you let it go? Remember, he'll do because it's never healed because it's still happening. Like the wounds are still occurring, you know. And it's this. I personally can't even imagine do you know what I mean? Because of course, like as a minority I understand what it means to be discriminated against. But never to the degree of the black community. And that's something. I think is really important for all of us to acknowledge that like, yeah, you guys got the shit end of the stick in America. You you really fucking dead. And there is no sort of like when we pit against each other with the whole my family did this, and we did this, and let's talk about Irish alike church. Servitude. It's like that is an important story, and that is its own narrative, and I can respect that while still not letting you derailed the conversation. We need to have good for about what you know, you need the black community needs. And once we start comparing and getting nitpicky. That's I mean, that's what people want because then work doesn't get done instead of coming together to be like, hey, you know, we were out of supreme disadvantage, you know, we had to deal with slavery, and then segregation, and then the war on drugs, and then just, you know, just sit when he list of things it's just been like, a constant tidal wave it seems like from the outside, you know, bridge fire of constant tidal wave of garbage fire. Yeah. Like the garbage in the ocean that we have put their and polluted is all on a fire. It's coming wave is coming. And everyone's like, I don't know why you can't just dance in the rain. You know, like I'm wearing my head dry. You know, we're all going to get in the spoke. But like if you learn how to swim you could get to this boat. You know, like, I don't know why you can't work. It's just people. They have to realize that we all are beginning in different places, and that, you know, black people were forcibly brought here, you know. It was not a choice. Comedian Americans had a choice to come here. You know, a lot of us had the choice to emigrate. Right. But you guys did not. There was other choice and that alone. I think is the reason that it needs to be a priority. When we talk about race. Yeah. That's the way that we do it. Well, that's thank you for coming to reparations corner. And like to see it on the ballot. Let's make it happen. But now, let's get over to you. Ooh. Love it every time. Well, I hope that you're doing this podcast listening to as much as we are pretending to. But anyway, why not listen to another podcast to it's called the flop house and on our podcast. We have recently watched a movie often a bad movie, and we review it on our podcast, but mainly talk about other stuff. And I don't know hang out. It's all about hanging out feeling like you're being with your best friends are your best friends us three Dan McCoy. Dan mclean. Emmy award winning writer for the daily show. Stuart Wellington owner of the best bar in Brooklyn hinterlands and Elliott Ceylan. Former EMMY winning head writer for the daily show with Jon Stewart, former head writer of mystery science theater three thousand the return of so many thing- author of the upcoming children's book. All right. That's the Elliott's predecessors go on and on. Yeah. But if you like the idea of listening to three funny guys talk about bad movies than why not come over and listen to the flop house. It's available at maximum fun dot org or wherever find podcasts are found. So get out of here. As his car on to be. Call when you call it. We to first corner citing my gosh, what you had a very fun fact right off air. And I did let's let's hear. Yeah. So it turns out that the same year that Jackie Robinson became the first black baseball player. It was actually the first year. There was an Asian basketball player as well who broke a barrier in another sport. Apparently, he is name was Lynn what for what ta REU Lynn watt Masako. He's an Asian American who became an unlikely star and played basketball for the next and this is always back in late in the nineteen forties. You're actually I had a friend of mine who did a photo shoot or some sort of film where he played him. No way. Yeah. Yeah. Looking at this picture, and this is the exact same. They did the same shot and shot for shot thing, and they were acting. I guess I love. Yeah. It's a movie. Always gets me. Yeah. I'm like, wait. I've seen the shop before and those short shorts. All right. So I know that one of the things I was really interested in talking about is the model minority mess, but to do that you really have to go back, and it all routes it self in what actually ended up being the over sexualization of Asian women and the D sexualization of Asian men. Which is really fascinating how that plays into the miss. You know, which so basically most people know that China is came over during the gold rush to capitalize on all of that gold. And then they ended up working on the transcontinental railroad. And it turns out that one in four workers who built that railroad over this era's, we're Chinese and other identifying Asian-Americans. Yeah. In fact, in California. So when the Chinese exclusion like the Chinese exclusion act eighteen eighty to eighteen eighty two when that. Like, I just know that like I mean, I I was really jumped you did. I was in all my I know they didn't do that in school. I was wondering. The Chinese exclusion that I hear it is. Talk about the house Chinese exclusion act, actually, oh my God. So the there's so many thanks talk about records to that. Anyway, at the time that the exclusion act was written in only point zero zero two percent of the whole US population was Asian by they made up twenty five percent of the workforce in California. Yeah. Overly representative. So I mean, it was in California was actually the ones who are spearheading for exclusion. But when most people don't know is that there was something that predated the Chinese exclusion act, and that was the page act, which is actually the very first. Piece of basically immigration law because it was the first time that they closed the borders China of people in the United States, and it was specifically Asian women realize just women why because they weren't gonna do those labor jobs. No, no. So the issue was when may light when men came over from Asia Asian American like what would become Asian American men except not because they didn't get naturalized till hundred forty three. It's oh, right. Yeah. Yeah. No. You weren't allowed to become a naturalized citizen until nineteen forty three. If you were Chinese, Dino, I know, but you're welcome for the fucking railroad. But you can't be a citizen, but can you Bill Muir real? Can you do all this dome your railroad? So I can get further out west and take that land from the natives thing. So the idea was when Asian men I came over for the gold rush and then for the transcontinental railroad. They were obviously not encouraged asleep with white women. Don't do it. Don't do. It don't ruin our traditional family units. Don't do it. So they would bring Asian women over primarily Chinese. To be prostitutes for Asian men. So, of course, all the way guys were like capitalizing and all these Asian positive is loved taking things that are from different cultures. Oh, what can I get that? Let me let me hit up in. Then give me up that fight a fucking nickel. I can afford to pay reparations. That's what I can do y'all. You're like, well, here's were that every time someone discriminates against me. I'm gonna help you out. That's a great reparation ship. We help one another. You know, what let's put that over here. I'd much rather the people who should pay though. Agreed you earned your discrimination money. But so Asian women specifically were viewed primarily as prostitutes, and they were seen as sexual objects from the moment, they come into the United States planted sexualization of Asian. So Asian women actually got the brunt of the blame for white men who are like cheating on their wives and disrupting traditional family units and all this stuff so Republican whose last name was page. He was the one who introduced this act saying that Chinese women specifically were causing the destruction of the American family, and they had to go. Wow. So they were barred from coming which meant that the Asian men who were left in the United States either had to choose to stay behind and keep sending money, but never see their families again, or they go home and for a lot of them they'd already established their life here. So most of them state, which then brought the issue up again that they wanted to settle and they wanted to start families. They won. Have all these things, but it was a legal to marry a white woman. It was actually also illegal for Chinese men to own land. Wow. Same story. We were also not allowed to own land. And the idea behind that was that you weren't a real man if you couldn't purchase land, and that's actually where was like the old hats like exactly instead of maga-. Just a big old. Well, all those words on it. Gold rose hands. But yeah, so they they were seen as lesser men because they were not allowed to own property, and they were these labor jobs, and then everyone in labor got pissed because they're like, they're stealing our job. It's I mean, it's details. Seen. Shame Rutto Asia. Jobs that like y'all wanna do? Anyway, didn't want to build the railroad. Well, there were mad that they'll do it for cheaper. Okay. Well, my will then stop not paying Blackley that goes up to like your capitalist overlords. You should be at the end of the day paying people better wage, and then the guy stealing your cookie all over again trying to take that cookie. So Asia couldn't have land. They worked all these labor jobs than people were like, well, we don't want you working these jobs anymore. So they were like, well what the fuck do we do? Now, we can't go back, and we can't do anything. And that's when they started sort of like conglomerate in cities, specifically so that they could create urban communities, and they were the only jobs that they were really able to which were primarily, restaurants and laundries. And those are associated is women's work. So it further de sexualize. Those are the only jobs they could get it was the only ones that could get and they were often mocked for that. And it was used as a tool to make them less desirable to white women's typically, I'm like way to league ridicule and just make someone feel. I mean, it's also great to of just like when someone is the oppressing force to make someone feel less than human. You know? Yeah. And I mean, it's really interesting because the model minority myth started as a complete demonization of Asian people and back then Asian Americans were defined as Chinese Japanese Filipina. And then after the Vietnam war it started to include Koreans Vietnamese Cambodians, basically everybody else by par at first. It was just Chinese Japanese Filipinos Tra which is interesting because a lot of people in like continental Asia, plus Japan. They say that Filipino people shouldn't count as agents. Why what were they be considered as their? Well, they want us to be Pacific. Islanders and Pacific. Islanders are like you're not one of us either. Yeah. Filipinos have a tragic history of just being like the last one picked at he a person without a home. Yeah. You know? And then the home we do have. Everyone's like, well, we're gonna take your resources and your women, and we're gonna burn everything down. We're going to change your language. We're gonna take your mythology from you. And then you're getting a become a U S territory, and we're just gonna like a rod assize America to you. I mean, that's basically what happened. I the history of the Philippines, like if you ever wanna know like about people who have like truly been through the shit in their home country. That's a really great place to start. I mean, it it's so my own grandparents like, it's crazy like my grandmother, watched her seven year old brother get beheaded like five Japanese. Oh, yeah. Oh my gosh. Which is one reason that you know, the whole thing about oh, we can't tell any of you apart is really hurtful because we've heard each other. So when my grandmother and grandfather who had called pop. At non I which is actually Tagalog for mother and father. But they didn't want to be Lolo and Lola because it eat sounds too old. So they just wanted to be pop by not I also reminds me of. Her name was wait. What was there's low gets us into different songs. Her name was leveled sees this show was a show girl, whatever load wants, but again whenever grabbing once grandma gets she does, but my friend who when we're gonna cruise ship and Susan the Philippines and Seebeck. It means grandma would joke about them. We sure do love to tell people. What things me the how how it comes up? And it sounds even remotely like dog where we're like did, you know, sidebar to this is not I don't I just finished watching American crime story Saci mine. Oh, I don't know if you know this. But like, I press daring, I first of all he's hot Filipino. He is also from San Francisco. Yes, he went to Sacred Heart high school. Now, he went to saving nationless. Oh, I was in the private Catholic school. Okay. Like, you went to one of the I went to mercy. Okay. Which for your listeners? I went to an all girls Catholic school across the street from a mall, and it was as terrible as it. Sounds sounds like a CW. We literally had my for speaker at the school. They had a like an abstinence only pro-life speaker comes to us. And you know, I went to a Catholic school. So we're all like, okay. This one's gonna talk to us about obstinate and stuff, but she was actually like a lunatic. And they did not know when they booked her as she went on this whole rant about how like if you have premarital sex, the baby will like fall apart inside you and you're going to give birth to like pieces of a sin, baby. Oh god. He was like, well, I mean, it was just so bad. It was so bad that in my. Was the I was voted salutatorian for my class me into other girls 'cause we got to vote. So I'd like to point five average. And I was my high school salutatorian that went on my resume change. Change. Let's change the narrative it was so bad that we brought it up in our speech like because we did the comedic speech the valedictorian does like the real one where it's like God, we're all gonna learn and like remember gonna. Yeah. We just parody of school. And we did it as a mean girls parody. And they would not allow us to say specifically what happened because they had to issue an apology. He's really serious. So we made it a mean girls themed speech, and all we were like we had that one speaker like like the P E teacher from Maine. That we can't really talk about. But it was a quote everyone knew so we all got it. But none of the principals are all like, oh, they're quoting that mean girls. Now, those slutty slutty women, it's probably fine. But yeah, we dare and Christie the guy who play Andrew Cunanan who killed for Saatchi and spoiler alert five other people. I didn't realize it's a very fascinating story in the American crime story like when they do American crime story. It's like how this was an American crime. And a lot of people who murdered where people who were. You know, I kick out of the mill was one guy got kicked out of the military for dominance. From tile, these rich, a fluent men who are in the closet wants me long. Like, the Andrew Cunanan was also his dad was from the Philippines was chasing. The idea of the American dream. Andrew Cunanan was obsessed with like wealth and all this like, and then his added up like fleeing back to the Philippines, because he was chasing the American dream so hard that like he was misusing the stock market and back. And then it's really it was just a really interesting story about Iran. Murphy just a good job. You're like how is? This an American crime story. And then you see all the different facets. Yeah. That it touches America as an idea and the way that it can have a toxic effect on others. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Because I feel like it's the toxicity of these these these under these things that we've not healed from cleared up, and it has created you see all the chaos that creates and this person's live, and then how it sort of a domino effect and like scions of like murdering these people in like killed versatility. And then for Saatchi, and I'll be cruised by the way, revelation some good like playing Donatella like she was fucking phenomenal. Anyways, Ida grass back to you. Yes. In the corner in the corner back to you in the corner, I'm here to. Yeah. So obviously, I Asia women were eventually allowed back into you say, okay. Thank. And here. I am here. I am world. But the myth about us was still perpetuated. There is it's really interesting. So a lot of that was due to World War Two specifically because of Japanese women who serviced American men overseas. Say like all the other wars, then thereafter, I mean on more Rian comfort women, and it's there's a huge history of American men specifically coming to Asia. And it's what was it? There was a statistic it was seventy five percent of veterans who have been to an Asian country admitted to seeking an Asian prostitute. Right. So I mean, there's there was a demand and Asia provided a supply to man for their own sick thing. And this is where we get into. Why is important to include intersection -ality in feminism as well. Because you know, we talked about how you know, sex trafficking is awful. And it's one of those things that it's been so prevalent in Asian culture. And it's something that never gets talked about, you know, Honey way world tour to happen. And that was when those stereotypes are being enforced, and then of course, there were there was. Japanese American internment. Now, a lot of Japanese people at that time in California. We're farmers who all lost their land. Again. This is about taking land from people or you know, there was I mean people lost everything they lost everything. And this is where the model minority myth really began because after you know, generations of being beaten down and not allowed into the country, and then not allowed to work and being treated as subhuman to the point that they were put in a camp. Sure, you know, suddenly you have to start all over and so- Japanese-Americans and all Asian Americans. Because you also have to remember how the time people didn't give a fuck about the difference. Right. There's no anybody who looked remotely Asian was Japanese. And my Nana says I was actually the hardest part of coming to America. Was that people accused her of being Japanese? And through slurs at her for being Japanese after she had witnessed her younger brother and her grandfather and her job and being murdered. You know? I mean, I mean, it was crazy. My grandfather literally like walked like through gunfire like a couple times get school, and he came to the United States to the coast guard he joined the military, so I also come from a military family and immigrant military family. So it's very interesting. How patriotism weaves its way into our narrative. Yeah. And a lot of a lot of Filipino people. I know I have a really good friend who's also play right? Caitlyn Kenny and she wrote a play void. I did with her last summer, and it's about how military families from other countries. What being an American means to them, and how to relate as both, you know, an American, but also as a Filipino person. But being Filipino American. Never feels quite correct. Because you feel like a traitor either way, you know, what sort of like, I Don I sort of just reminded me of I, you know, I think a lot of us when we go back to like, we have this a lot of black people were like thinking when they went back to Africa, they'd feel this like, you know, welcome home. But like Michelle Obama talks about in her book becoming when she went to, you know, Kenya. As she very much felt just like an American woman this outsider person and just how different like if you're as blank American. How different your experience in life is the same way of like crazy rich Asians in. It do mom over in China. They didn't care for it all that much. Well, it it was a story about an Asian American woman yacht from that and the and from that perspective. I mean, they also talk a lot about how when I love dogs by Wes Anderson came out, it got a really good reception overseas, but not here because here people were like he has no right to use the. Japanese voice, and this is a parody of our culture, and this all this stuff, and they loved it over there. Interesting because I think the thing people have to understand is that in America, we're still fighting for our identities to be acceptable in a melting pot country whereas over there, it's just like who they are. And it's very homogeneous. They know they are they're born into it. The yet seen their history their around their nationally has weighed in a way that you know, because there's still so relatively young and our hand. Experiment. Like what's happened? Here is not ever happened anywhere else. Not at all. You didn't have like slavery. Didn't it wasn't the same way that it was over in Europe and over an eighteen build a country the way that it did here. Very true. Yeah. Totes? Yeah. So it's interesting because for Asian Americans when everything was taken from them, right? They worked from the ground up. They had to apply, you know? And I mean, there's all the the tropes and the stereotypes about Asian people are so hard working, and they're so polite, and they're so docile, and that's why they were successful. But the real reason is that we were given opportunities that other races were not. And in doing that we were able to succeed because we had the same hunger and the same dry of and the same, you know, need to prove that we could be Americans. So what started happening was as we started coming up and like gaining things. Because again, even though we had everything taken away from us. We still started ahead. You know, what I mean because we had a lot more agency from the beginning they figured out. They could weaponize our success against the black community specifically, and it became finger-pointing. It became you know of Asian Americans can do it. Why can't you they're polite? They don't talk back like you keep complaining if you just put your head down like they do and you work harder, and you educate yourselves. There's no reason you can't because they can you know, what that actually did was it was Asian Americans like scrambling for crumbs, basically, really. Yes. Like, we will take these. We will take these benefits like we will make the best of ourselves. And a lot of it was buying into the illusion that we would fully assimilate in the way that in a lot of ways like say Irish people fully assimilated, you know, even like some. Yeah, I wish people even like some like some Italian people here. Like who you your the once they lost their accent just make him a white person? Yeah. I mean, there's a whole argument to be made to like I personally like don't take. Well, that we actually do use a lot of racist tropes against Italian still to this day. But because they're white. We don't take it as seriously. And I think that that's something we need to address in St. L. What we do like, it's like that. I really rate live band, Matt. Okay. Yeah. Similar to someone doing like an urban black voice. I actually quit a show that asked me to do an urban black voice. You're like not literally left like last episode on that show. Thank you for not being scarlet Johan's double puppet show. And I played a frog puppet. I I'm not even giving the name of it. It was a whole thing. And what can you do our urban? Yeah. Here's a you. You more urban. And I literally was like what do you mean? He's like, you know, like a little bit more like St. no, sir. I don't know what that was like so like a Hooker. No, I'm sorry. I don't get it. And I just play dumb. And he was like, well, you know, just make. I yeah. He did. He was an old white guy. And the thing the thing that always gets me as how hard they try and how progressive they think they are being like look at my obviously, black frog puppet. Look inclusion see. But meanwhile, as being was a white woman puppet and everybody else was an animal guy for the records. So it's big and I had to do. A rap voice is done by like a guy, you know, their mom, I left. I never went back. I was like I'm sorry. This is no longer going to work out. But yeah, I mean, that's I mean, as we have to stand we have to stand up for each other in these small ways, and the thing that sucks is that I feel like in the Asian community. Specifically, the the next layer of the issue is in trying to Americanize so much. We're appropriating black culture because American culture, inherently appropriates, black culture. And that's why you have like all these Filipino kids who love. Hip hop dance or. Oh, yeah. Because they're seeking American identity, and there's nothing more identity than the block American identity. You know? And it's I it's also like gross to say, but it's a rebellion against having really racist parent because her parents are like those probably like there's because they want them, I'm assuming they want them to assimilate, but like the show demonize and like the media new stop. So it's like stay away from them. And then there's a rebellious. Like, yeah. I mean, my aunt grandmother really did not like black people for a long time. And she said, they're like, well, they were more racist towards us than white people were which I really think she believes is true short because all the benefits and stuff. They got were from white people because they were in charge of the military and Oliver stuff, and you know, when they were in poor rundown neighborhoods, and these people were in these communities, which Lagaan have throw hod a garbage fire of tidal-wave throw. Now just trying to survive as well. And again, we are we were pitted against each other. You know, I was in a barbershop and this woman was plaque barber and she was talking about how. Yes, or needs to be a wall because they're taking our jobs, and it's like I wanted to hug her because I'm like you've been fed this lie. Yeah. And that's not true. And we need to band together. And you're feeding into what again the Aristocats aristocrats. But the original Docker Sierra soccer. See? Yeah. So I mean, it's it's I personally I feel like a lot of guilt about ways that I know that I've appropriated black culture, especially growing up in the bay area because bay area Asians are loved to be like. Yeah. Well, like, all my black friends. Let me say the N word so ratchet, and I'm so, and I'm just like, I don't know how to explain to you how problematic that is in a way that you will accept because you really hardcore believe you are in titled to that experience. You know? And I think that that's one of the major issues when we talk about again intersection -ality in race relations and everything is that. We can't demand rights for us or for us to get more roles in movies and for more representation, if we are also misrepresenting another community, and if we are not being supportive. I mean, you know, it's it's tough for me as an actor who doesn't pass for my own race because I'm biracial. I looked Japanese. I very very pale skin. And I have some eurocentric features like I have like a really small button nose, and you know, I have high cheekbones, and so people think I'm Japanese so I called in for a lot of Japanese parts and part like avenue, q I've played Christmas Eve twice, and I'm not Japanese. I mean, like if you ask my non I am decidedly Japanese. History. The history sodas always occur to me. That's like. Is this an appropriate? Am I taking apart from Japanese actor or is this what we're doing? Because of the scarcity of parts, there's there's a lot of parts out there for, you know, actor specifically now, especially because even if there were I would not get cast in them because you don't look the part at all even though that's who I am. So when you know, we talk about the model minority myth, and how we're supposed to be doctors, and lawyers and this and that I'm like, well, I would love to be an actor to represent Asian people in my community. I don't even get cast in my own community. And then I have to worry about the responsibility of representing another community. Well, if I'm going to take that job. And if I am going to take that job, I do look into it. And I'm like did they consider anyone else for this part that is more appropriate? Like am. I the kind of person who would back down like if I were asked to play Mulan on Broadway in the opening cast Moulana Broadway. Oh, I don't think it's morally take that part because it says it should go to a Chinese. American right. Yeah. I. So begging big on the thing is so many people would be like it shouldn't matter like you look the part enough. And you know, you, you know, you're still Asian. It's still the Asian experience. But it's the Chinese American experience versus Filipino American or Japanese American Cambodian Laotian. It's your no scholar Johannesson, a, no. Amanda was who I if you know Mandal Sandberg, she played little rue the hunger games. I'll I love her. You give she's really brilliant. She turned down apart and Black Panther. Yeah. Because she's like, I don't I can't play an African Princess, right? She felt she was too light skin. Is that what I? Yeah. I believe that's what I read. But I was like, you would know them marvel actually Lamar reading that. I really respected it. I would love Sakib Hugh here talking all day. But I think we're out of time. Oh my God. I was off the show. Thank you for your corner as someone who's Filipino and half. I know that there's a lot that I can never cover. So I'm always open to people who want to either bring me more, knowledge or corrections or ways that I can do better. So you can find me on Instagram. I'll spell it for you. Because my name is long. It's a T E R I J O Y E U X, Terry Joyal. Woo Theresa joy. But like, my nickname in the middle name and France, just the throat keep them on their toes sake. You know, because then I can pretend to spell it wrong. If I give it to somebody. I'm like, oh my God. There was a letter. Sorry, you'll never find me. But my pages it's public. I like letting people see how I thrive. No one's putting you in about all you're on the ground. Yeah. Exactly. And you know, my cat has an Instagram. You can find through my Instagram if you're into those kitty cat pictures, I've had her for two weeks, and it's already a huge part of my identity. I'm crazy play love love while also do the all of our listeners. You can also remember to tweet at us at minority corner. And let us know how you what you liked about the show that we forgot all y'all. Love fact, checking us, so can you please? Because I know there are things that I definitely reference that I remember reading doing things, and I don't have the exact links or references. And I would love to be fact checked about a lot of what I said. Well, I just want to say thank you all for all of our listeners. Thank you Teresa for joining us having you here on the corner. Right. I've enjoyed it. Well, thank you all for listening to minority corner. Because together, we're the majority all we need is a little back this, you know, we can all do better. Maximum fund dot org, comedy and culture, artists owned listener supported.

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Black Agenda Radio - 07.08.19

Black Agenda Radio

55:33 min | 1 year ago

Black Agenda Radio - 07.08.19

"She's black agenda radio weekly hour of african american political thought an action well go to the review magazine that brings you news commentary and analysis from a black left perspective i'm going forward along with my coast nellie bailey this is one of the most difficult shows we have ever done coming in the wake of the death toll booths dixon a co founder of black agenda report will have common sense commentary by his colleagues a committee in congress has been collecting powerful testimony on the need for reparations for the descendants of enslaved persons in the united states and move me a boom jamal confronts ones who sued julie fact that he may be going blind but first bruce sticks and the managing editor of black agenda report was scheduled to speak at eight number of panels at the left forum the yearly conference of left wing activism in new york city however dixon succumb to blood cancer only days before the event the entire conference what's send morning for dixon the former black panther and lifelong active is who cofounded bar in two thousand six and why say key force in the green party bar executive to edit church land for remembered his tom rat the guy who puts all but i don't know how you been wanting to do we have to beat on service and and i've been alexa goofy fax who's dixon for students that he has been a struggle for a tease for human dignity for black liberation nation and hopefully for socialism in this country and world who's what's a review soldier soldier in the sense that he was willing and eager to save don any aspect of deliberations road and to explore all the questions that tasers and beginning of creating the most vicious mechanisms will move in politics who's as a soldier in the black panther party on the first happened in chicago and in the decades after the crushing of the party was an organizer when we go into housing projects and find out what focus in the project will talking about and what kind of slogans actually organically slow from these people's analysis of the conditions of they were facing in the projects or after work files eventuality examining all aspects of improper use admitted became addicted to be released while you're right to political game but it will be only one a vet bills were placed in chicago is and so for a long time see the game was going nowhere but when i met through still lose a two thousand two and he moved to alaska and i remember we had just done eight deitz in the black commentator which is the best fighters on city kitties loss to the court will act as it is in her a congressional seat in a in his lack of an eye headlines said something like you're beginning as sunday cloudy fifty five this week so i get up better on email from some guy instead as well she certainly was defeated but i don't know how to divide that was announced new students and then the new analysis of why cindy kitties one of the reasons because he had been quite popular in that in that district in any was in analysis was down the street it was never ran it was analysis and the black commentator likes packaging the report and novices are stocking say a so a media leaks of struggles conversation with this dixon that only ended yesterday where he is in his dixon as didn't part and parcel learn to bar has been sometimes nine steeper of blankets has a bit of a when we say as you get older he may toppled the thing that means you have less skilled people like myself not to as one of those doing everything that i do just is levels i would so we lost not just the right off and on a lake and it's going to be quite difficult continue without further ado let's try because he didn't let multiple myeloma slow getting back to hold off until a man's password and david wednesday day mornings german let's just be clear as day until the doctor told him to go to the hospital next face and he left emergence of news will never leave like i said the truth he is eight permanent fixture you must consider what news would have stayed at how who's got move this project forward everytime i mean from a nine year for that was bar executive editor glenn ford margaret kimberly it's an editor in senior columnist a black agenda report she in glen cofounded publication along with bruce fiction thirteen years ago kimberly pay her respects to dixon she also found some comic relief envy antics of new york city mayor bill de blasio who is one of eight twenty something democratic candidates for president at these debates in miami get baccio seen qb channeling let's say go off turn up by saying also la toria here at michael mayor unknown source new story about or worries mayor build the blasio who was for reasons only itself is among the cast of thousands running short in traffic already nomination president's avenues in florida or for their base and he's at the end of the air force dry by the airport workers and he says i enjoy it is fine but he didn't know apparently that's a phrase is associated with jay here are media florida with lower humidity community this okay but problems treater he's like oh i'm sorry so sorry sorry if but sounds i know he's like so is so connected the champions say more often because i know so i think we should all know that yeah you know i tell the story is so easy to poke fun at democrats these days is that story some problems in black people have is dealing with this system since gauging the empire it's a chick yuli difficult moments that especially now elections in storage and we're told that this is only way for us to organize the only way to keep her skills way making changes pain is is the electoral process and i'm not gonna say don't you feel like your process but americans are told this is it this is all is all you've got an especially about in the wake of the trump presidency we are browbeaten into supporting the democrats and then you would have to go to the democrats and playing how convenient to them for a truck convenient white house so of the campaign starting they're not one but to debate this week and that's in washington this is too hard on me but then at the same time i kind of red stars on the line user for the life of friends who said on a social media so then we got the the dog and pony show as we see how people are propped up by the broken media joe biden joe biden joe biden will guarantee you will be an apparently kamla harris came back i mean look stupid you could hardly use this as i wrote a column this past week but a funny thing happened one of my fundraisers and then they might be mcnamara he's checked butler in california and he said yesterday i got a raise money provide this one and that means by start if the rich people say they're not gonna raise money versus now recently they didn't share bag they were they had hiding their tightened roof rack but he died of a self gross to write a check and he told him that he's doing very badly and he said he sure the nominee will fundamentally james five and two new residence it doesn't matter now you know they all we need people to a single good they have been good for the brand apparently by is not anymore so partly funny to me he's already been shopping bus because he's he's moving forward but that also we don't have the biography that a if the people who write checks the bottom of the checks can decide who does or does not become resident then that is positive you're not have democracy and i think that's something that has to be said seven people don't fit in the next year a seven month meaning their democracy were there to jack or store wandering back will save from you from any is evil but we do have a month before january when i get my hands or every year when the dog and pony show when they ended up meeting about him in a listen to what people said it seems to me that once again they did not raise any of these issues that are of important to just lack people in particular to their home countries we are living under the threat of war trump is so hard to be what he will do but apparently he decided not to start a war with iran at least as of last week who knows today or tomorrow at this very moment win a major powers are taking sides what are democratic kansas things these people this party is lacking come to that we're told her only seniors were they saying about the drivers say nothing at all four they give me an email double talk a person that comes in congress for historical more or less what you're gonna say kosta come see the say yeah thirty minutes they know that if they say yes he did goes and make a good case so we have a couple of people taking an antiwar instead it's older people dismissed by horford media and not only are we dealing with so for the conventional warfare we all know a full lives and bomb but we also have sanctions which are not using different states of sanctions could be use them against cuba and they're all sixty years in recent years the trump administration has released wrapped up section a as a study recently you indicated that to kill brings out people in venezuela alone and let's just remember something about to west government sanctioned they not only means that americans or a physicist government cannot do business with the targeting nation but any other nation that does so there's also targeted and that means usa actions are international sanctions that means that no one can do business in venezuela for vinci ron or visit zimbabwe way without also suffering a comparison is a wreck of a fourth an impoverished in iran went through this process of his so called the iran nuclear deal in exchange for sanctions being a this dude or lack of trust you batteries out the bronze michigan state years of full years waiting with europeans and make good on promise and do something to help one of course they don't and now they say they will be news radio news richmond but the media tells village if you wanna do ron and it's very interesting watching news story of this huge out of this room which was not in international airspace ronnie airspace but this is the moment for the people who were told there representing are getting to stay on of course when they do say something it's all about being tough race iran is being tough on russia being tossed his try and talk to somebody but no one very few glasses day expressing an antiwar voice and these issues to consider entire country's biggest stars black people in particular and this is a moment where we need to buy the many of us are providing that position that black people always at raleigh people go skeptical of war we were both ways people question what our country fair down there and treats that we suffered after obama became president and still hanging around because i guess as long as you live and still have to fight against that but we separate ourselves from people's you're tools are are only saviors you're heavy talked about mass incarceration now i understand campbell harris called herself a progressive prosecutor she wrote checking on on you know you can call it could read any further investigate her putting black mothers in jail if their kids schools and fighting against the overcrowding measure but a could be the next one day properly diversified alone to test but we can't can be home by her he's been seen this movie you know being so they don't talk about mass incarceration except to lie ones who helps and mass incarceration system like harris unemployment raising the minimum wage all of these things people needed more of not being discussed a normal person most identifiable raising some of these issues bernie sanders and the reason there are of how many people running for president among democrats is to be sweating forty some odd to make sure that he doesn't get the company so this is where we are as the finnity buddies is you know as a week or so ago both black politicians can you go back and buy new excusing a his racist remarks is go back decades you have the protection of obama and he was chosen by obama i think for that reason she's chosen to the bottom to make clear and then you had already but the timing to renovate then he wasn't going to do anything black people but now he doesn't have that protection anymore and it all came down and we saw the black leaders we call him we saw into safer so it'll be interesting it'll be funny to watch a how they tried to fill out of supporting this man now the rich people around forty four so i started off by talking about bill blasio and his comedian attest to be to be a leftist but i i think those are all the problems we have democrats all the problems a we have a call from the liberal and how ridiculous they are to us and we have to also talk about what happens if a democrat means in twenty twenty what will happen for black people a it's pretty clear that are choice comes down to the overt racist versus the covert made a we have a party where it's not the bottom of bragged about the crime bill that would bill clinton crime bill also an abandoned so we were told me had support silverback area even when we win we lose and we're going to keep losing unless we jettison the whole project a let me begin process in the democratic land i think that says so for all people make up the rest of the world that must be this party they are the problem they give a in a new they lose one past history of a decade in a very long time and they did anything with the people we need a real people's party of steel workers party real pizza party and it's not bad though at this moment empire is such a crisis is to forty four of those of us who are coming to the band called left for it's important for us the state gotten around to pray save not the kind of rats and we have to be raised you can't let people tell him out of office trump in missouri he's a republican men isos boss at first of all i even billions he'll be couldn't be one billion dollars billion dollars and you're not gonna laugh at you radio mikey fifty thousand more votes roughly the humidity will stay for a while you can't spending all their time talking you're jerseys ryan dangerous drugs in we can't be civil and get out and vote as they really haven't talked about the fact of black people both are stolen a voter suppression effort all across the country that are recently in not just rent is too precious about red bull stat is moving in states like michigan which hillary clinton lost by just ten thousand vote they were harry's were black people to just were not counted and doesn't come up it doesn't come on even when he had the democratic party so i think there's some of it's pretty clear that we have to be i'm afraid it is essential in fact it's moving in history that we escape from a bond of of this corruption that is hurting people all over for a while i heard this morning recently the g claim somebody that's happening in japan and they're already trying to be a lot of climate change the course of this attitude in in tarot of european experiences horrible heat wave is happening all over the world so we're talking about life and death for everyone so the green new deal which is so funny to be green supposedly the villain is called the trump wins the democrats deal program game of the program anyway at any rate detroit we look like they're the ones who were actually doing something and then people all over the world who are doing things i don't know if you've seen the story from germany where people literally plots of coal mining coal mines preventative from opening and that sort of thing we have sixty have to accelerate the prize we only get changed when the people bring a crisis to the system and watching these debates i guess you could washington going to get some stronger storms and ninety but we can't give who was again and they did a little bit more and better this one this one better in that one day all of that up for us and this is the moment turn are back on this a charade it's our moment to stay out clean plantar lack elsewhere and stop supporting this just so so let's black agenda report editor in senior columnist migrate kimberly that'd be high fall a regular contributor to bar and co author of a new book titled american exceptionalism and american innocence of people's history of fake news from the revolutionary war the war run tamra high falling as part of the bar panel that the left forum he began with some words on the doobie departed bruce dixon ohio are are worried about the reasons it's been quite around twenty four hours forty eight hours in a word about reece's kind of ridiculous 'cause i don't think we have enough where's that we could say about him and all the services people i will say that you with very important i mean when i first first came around blockage ever for and i had done labor organizing they've been you know are occupy wall street i was really confused about o'clock by matter movement invest heavily involved a little bit in that game a lot of backlash because ffiliated with blackjack those sort of general for with maintaining his criticism of the black lives matter network organization in a very strange that movement in order moving forward and because i don't you like again there were there were a lot of feeling i am boston time or just call up ruth and he was really i mean and really showed me what this is len ideas or being emitted withdrew his name that's one thing that really they believe in his legacy everything alternative older you'd be well began remark an i think the real question that i'm trying i mean we all are is what is the role those who are oriented for the start of the working class under my belt is a struggle repeated this is who they are cues from the black liberation movement which as we all know the left general larger the british moving at number three is on their menu writing answered the question many wrong one of one of the most important task that you right now is the development of the end by purely politically hostels in an imperial they hired away when theoretical analysis is simply opposing war as important as that is new polls have shown that you are voters in the republican party can are actually more in high intervention in the democratic again an apple calls around the question is feared dead and thirteen obama obama drives redline long that country those donations an ad here though is revolutionary was orientation that race through the limitations of who you are is wildly insert doesn't idiological framework which organization like the black diamonds repeated by the time they got to me time period and only that joke for you i like global affairs bernie sanders in in tie up their platform granted a democratic socialism has been the most popular politician he was in the politician that has been most attacks by downright starting his demand however are not entitled cereal has been so in the fall short of a legitimate chapman strawberry in many ways they don't get in the category of antiwar item indeed standards opposes not the word such as these potential you us invasion of iran the war but you at that indeed again in this is a story about position to you i support or contra nfl america during the nineteen eighty did you hear my opinion recalled standard quote unquote foreign minister of earnings vermont and he was a politician there mayor in response to the antiwar history they used the antifa communists were really shows how antiwar more politics in all forms of carson entirely by start totally unacceptable regardless of the elected they may be but sanders is running in the belly of the war party so we really can get an understanding materialism from him and we also can't develop their understanding of material from alexander okaz yo cortez or her affiliates who's features continue to vote american exceptionalism nationalist prior on usa his role in world war two for example let this i'm in the democratic party in the little problem with the fact that you were military department these the back on the uss fears of any democrats and their child is in the factory marseille we see this right now even though she far from mannheim fearless token gathered in the blackout or major goals in corporate media networks produce honoring the notion of antenna interventionism when she hasn't been discussed it is is near her as a moving hostage or the name of russia despite the long history in you as a military antiamericanism tore in japan by intervention is material announces a new rule and finding capitol immigrant advocates global capitalism by capital is be nominated for the world capitalism is not there are good reasons why the international monetary fund has warning in effect for the corporate debt why they utilize the best one point six trillion dollars in student loan debt or whether you want the government kerry trillions of dollars worth of its own national debt is they call it monopoly rule in the banks are came by capitalizing on bags on energy increase whole markets where itself as misery of capitalism and you are capitalism had become dominated by by capitol despite losing his inherit contradictions of the system has turned into activism capitalism drive is from neighborhoods which is a really word contest in you though i think the rate of exploitation paying workers left an beating them gauchan by spending money on technology investing in competition between capitalism worthy than have led to and unprecedented president's visit inhabitable level of capitol concentrations monopolization is driven decisions of athletic humanity into barberry simultaneously increase the cost of technological investment in production in in the military things which are totally unrelated to maintain the super crop into the super rich the paradise by capitol have swoop has prompted the major corporation in the handling living standards of the gore was no shortage of debt since two thousand eight households corporation the government worldwide as he could have forty three point eight trillion dollars in debt defender of i am capitalism items of over forty percent of all you escort her profits affirm just ten percent thirty years ago what makes democratic socialism nicer handling imperialist nor socialism is that is not answered voluntary where they were trapped in the making of history's black america has created the value music critic devaluing well but the empire and workers all over the world there man at the center of production of these large but largely be updated pocket find capitalism without the convenience other miseration one of the worst in a in a binding handled on wall street would literally privatization predatory lending endless war are all precondition finance capital's the jimmy which help it to our landscape in pay you're in the necessary information because is not just a narrow program that reforming individual aspect of imperial albatross it is a fear in the hearts of that ehlers ross the struggle where the transition of power and they're going to boycott and so the question is what is during the festival example of campaign of realism in the world today i think that there's a beard example in kind of realism in the world today that might be the judge in all left his circle and organizing apple without bourbon as china let this many political persuasions however especially in the united states claim that china is no longer the country i'm playing medicine imperials country seeking to devour africa old yet any kind of the most powerful industry pleasure the way corporation which could have made the news to you as a challenge of their ceo although it's gone up by ninety percent by trade union and china is eight hundred million people out of poverty since nineteen seventy eight and over that same period real wages but the bottom half the country they're written by former under one percent real gdp growth in china averaged ten percent well above be sluggish wandered three percent growth experience in the united states since the two thousand eighteen china is it's not merely an emerging world power is intended alternative you're again unless it's pretty satisfy effort long capitalism free market forces to investment in the country dirty molly globally comic crisis of the late devante in early nineteen eighties china has become the first fallen soldiers oregon socialism or just in protect godly the revolution but also in terms of raising the standard of living with the people the people's republican publican's says i am hurting predatory about how an warmonger the next day by offering economic development mile to the planet's most impoverished people this is one of the news the road be one belt one one road initiative team to accomplish over one million dollars in public spending on infrastructure projects across the valley chinese best friends national law in development goals offer real timing envelope containing beardless progress not perfection progress in historical moment whether you are waging war on the entire planet do her the rise of the people's republicans you only have board from up there he is entitled here and just doesn't mean that banner handled a large majority of people in the united states who favor morris says the green new deal medicare for all or others us policy issue even gated ignores where condense which means that out entirely struggled against the materialism we lose by who was the tender austerity we end up falling in the living suicidal reactionary fat of national chauvinism white supremacy in american exceptionalism the struggle to develop a black liberation strategy independent only on the condition of the barrier but also adjusted effort of ebola feed the worst of the reaction that exists within its ranks emerging in the great john talking about the democratic party bigger problems the future of humanity depends on e n i here's rose in the belly of the beast eight ambling individuals more votes in the bottom half of the world's population julius julia signs of being tortured behind bars liatti kingdom well dozens of key leaders in the black liberation movement affiliated movement here experience was in decades long torture within you and all the while oligarch joe biden nancy pelosi kamala harris and the like the big gestures of resistance to the big orange men donald trump austerity away at the root of these dire conditions reversing course of politically economic and social shorts alive for firing massive he will not be in history of united states while there's no threw the ball at the f four win such as people will occur we must understand the black liberation movement is are best poker survival in that that was barking tribute you're danny hike bob barr executive editor blandford follows hike falling on the panel he talked about why it's necessary to have publications like black agenda report or no are most likely to do to us and we shouldn't be trying to do just bail to britain this cat who is irrelevant again as bloodlessly as possible so then we'd been getting closer to black liberation and socialism in a world peace the defining characteristic of this late stage capitalism is that lawrence of capitalism financial overseers having holes who wishes to the bottom in which all of the world's burgers must couldn't eat each other just so damn labor at ever lower and lower prices the chinese he's not in courtrooms this beijing's american and european capitals this is in post if you west worker is living standards have been involving for two generations under global it's capitalism the decline in usa living standards anti especially east comics security is not a side effect of globalization as it is sometimes described in portland cbs gave his intended effect of this global maybe she best teams in quotes and capitalism interior consensus they are we are this used to destroy all impediments to the most popular full exploitation of labor as technology everywhere in the world that means they're not only labor runs it's all democratic rights must be curtailed you can do one without these other the cameras are determined to make money you old fashioned way by ruthlessly driving down wages and wagering the voters and other federal guiding light schools we used to call these wild right here relevance to be actionable government is also science otherwise it doesn't matter how you vote you're not going to get your way dispose of these method is of capitalism dictatorship at the same time the lower to capitol hill are visiting loosely privatizing what's left it's new year's and modifying and the nationalizing every aspect of human relations and maybe you do with the lights on for the lights off in other words the catalog miss step by step creating eighty two championship like we have never seen and i mean that literally this is the plan world just we're creating i think we could see this plan world then betting has arrived in that even the definition of job on his long or what it used to be a i find it could accusing when people talk i have a job or a movie together job but i know devante deployment we've been talking about abusive relationship which viewpoint bird has no obligation whatsoever to the worker and just let them work and vote avenue we'll and one in which there are too often to classes burgers on the same time to a one the contract worker who had no right it's an one be more water will be employed were a move students find themselves in every person's categories and yet there is no nationwide social the news about this development that is be nature of of employment now somebody that is quite different and even though no interceptions ninety percent of the new jobs that we needed under obama a after the greater depth that work these contracts jobs not recedes jobs you know obligations that is being world whatever the future a future of absolute in security and i don't mean just eating securely in terms of getting it wrong but insecurity in terms of what is the nature of my relationships and this these people won't this please go to everyday an eight times total security of our once you understand that is the kinds of society that will require different kinds of policing obviously they smoke out of policing of population must change as the relationship of the losers to that often these changes and so there is no obligation on the part of the rule is to a word these social contract and you're seeing the people who own basically the society and those of us who just limited happy we vote will be looking at these ship jobs that is the location of the larger contract get lonely all these bastards who have to use of doctors it's they won't be when they knew who did this up to something that will missiles as the job is quite nightmarish cops say the ramifications of this new society but we need to do that we need to have that kind of dialogue about a nightmare that has already arrived in an if we understood these revealed plans of these ruling class which i just outlined never ending austerity stephen security inexorable euros in northwest winning while liberties remaining any relatives of you were while back to system will see really understood that i think best move is supposed to be formulating different kinds of plans of the most important thing to do is to take this news to the people as a whole if folks understood what does this store for them what these austerity dictatorship or revie years i believe that even defend the spread that would've told mistake with each of humanity ten people can see if it were pointing out to see the beginnings of this new society the shit jobs they are all life aware of i think that even in less circles these pushed by the democratic narratives and skill in which both corporate media and social media have been focusing our eyeballs on what they want us to look like short circuits are better just in terms of setting technical biology's so we wanna talk about i have looked so bad we wanna leave even if your packages were secretly for bernie sanders even a not not is our hero but as somebody who's been contributing to breaking up a that dangerous institution called the democratic party probably wasn't even supposed to western the republicans were all talking about that in this new dictatorship almost germany string been every day so that's why if you miss a day just about what is taking shape right in front of us which most of us in are they not enough attention to the end that's where you were when they're not paying attention to reality and skinny to lost in there as an existing feed you that was by executive editor glenn ford at the less forum in new york city back in nineteen eighty nine congressman john conyers first introduced his bill coli for study of the question of reparations for black descendants so people in sleeved in the united states be hr forty legislation languished with few co sponsors for decades but this year reparations is an issue in the democratic presidential race and co sponsors are popping up all over the place plus hr forty now has a companion bill mb usa senate which means it stanley a serious piece of legislation last week the house committee holding hearings on reparations heard from katrina brown who produced and directed the emmy nominated film traces of freed well story from the deep do i grew up in philadelphia six blocks from independence hall and the liberty bell i think seated patriot so it was devastating to learn my grandmother at age twenty eight that are ancestors had been slave traders answer to discover the vigil will swear in fact the largest slave trading family in united states history bringing over twelve thousand africans perkins to be america's in chains that these were my rhode island ancestors and the rhode island turns out to be the state the more shift africa than any other required me to reorganize my brain eighteen pm asia in my family matched the larger amnesia north self serving ness of being all he's on the right side of history i could no longer carry a sense of moral superiority relative to white southerners north sense of innocence visa visa black claims he said he blocked claims on the white conscience i decided to initiate a family journey to retrace the tribal trade nine relatives joined me two of which are here today and the documentary traces of the trade the result the subtitle being a story from the deep north what we learn how we stumbled how we grew drawing that journey led me to become kind of passionate believer in the importance of reckoning with the history and legacy of flavor slavery a believer in personal and family reckonings institutional one the animal archer national reckoning with that in the need tougher repair or repaired of action which can and should take many many forms express wholehearted support for hr forty and i've met countless people of all backgrounds who believe in this form of national effort as well i know there are many strenuously object to the premise but we need this reckoning the pushback i hear most often is that's your problem giving your ancestors but it has nothing to do with me it's understandable that people distance themselves are focused on two reasons one most of us learned a distorted history of slavery in school so is white americans most of us don't realise lies are connection to it second there's a natural instinct to avoid that which can't bring feelings of shame about are people about the country that we love to address the first issue here's a quick rundown of historical facts i had not been taught that the north winds deeply implicated slavery was legal in northern states over twenty over two hundred years but northerners up and down economic spectrum made their living in business is tied the slave trade in slavery northern mills process cotton harvested by enslaved people the mid west and the west were implicated they grew food to feed the south where land was devoted just a cash crop like cotton harvested by being enslaved consumers throughout the country were implicated in their everyday purchases of clothing coffee sugar rice tobacco people who immigrated from europe after slavery were implicated i have irish french and german immigrant ancestors came to the united states and the nineteenth century worked in factories struggled but they were given access access to the american dream why were wave of immigrants walk in here because it was so land of opportunity why would be economy booming why were their jobs because it had been built largely on unpaid labor one here european immigrants got to systematically leap frog over black families with devastating consequences up to the present day slavery built the nation turning up into an economic powerhouse do mostly to i must say good folks who participated in mundane ways and looked the other way now for the second big reason push back against this bill these emotions said stirs up and i speak directly to my fellow white americans on that first year not so it's counter intuitive over and over again a liberating tower facing this painful past second white people tend to imagine that about black people are angry at us but in my experience black americans don't blame us for the dates at a bygone gone ancestors but are rightfully angry but we don't just dropped the defensiveness or the self absorbed guilt and sign up to work with them shoulder to shoulder to tackle the legacy it's still with a third when we let go of defensiveness or guilt we can get to a healthy share grief which opens the door to sober sacred respectful creative collected conversation about how to make things right their scores of organizations that are already able to attest to this the power of this work they know i know the process the commission would help the country embark upon could transform it is positive and lifegiving thing for the country as a whole a beautiful thing is good for the soul percent of people kind of a nation that things right thank you that was katrina brown justifying the congressional hearings on each of forty the booth to study reparations for the sentence of viewers sleeves romania although kim all the nations that's now political prisoner there has been incarcerated by the state of pennsylvania for the past thirty nine years since the death of philadelphia policemen a boot jamal has suffered any number of health crisis this is due to atrocious medical treatment in prison including eight battle with hepatitis c contracted in prison and left untreated for years now v prolific author and journalist he's losing his site he'd files this report for prison radio its title walking in the dark for years if it's been difficult for me to write or speak about myself other people's stories seemed more interesting until now several weeks ago as i was walking along the main path feeding from the chow hall i noticed that i could no longer see a single face despite the river of men passing by it was then that i recognize how bad my eyesight have become i said nothing to no one not my lawyers not my wife what i didn't tell my supporters north even my personal physician new york internist doctor joseph hours one thing what could they do for another prisoners are extremely wary of telling other prisoners about their disabilities one doesn't want to seem week among such man every time i used in i drop would steroids my vision turned milky as if someone pulled a white shade down over both eyes i realized to my car that i was function of life where i couldn't reader paper or book or even faces when i went to an eye doctor protests a guard will company said damn jewel you're blind as a bat you said this because the tests showed i couldn't see anything letters or fingers that in milpitas has since dissipate as i've stopped using the drops yet my vision has become so for huge voices to recognize people that's a blind man does vision romaine more than four from prison dacian this this is a you've been listening to the black agenda report on the progressive progressive radio network information for liberation

review magazine nellie bailey co founder congress united states managing editor dixon executive jamal julie bruce new york ninety percent ten percent one day eight trillion dollars six trillion dollars one billion dollars one million dollars forty eight hours
Morning Brief for Monday, October 28th

WSJ Minute Briefing

01:38 min | 1 year ago

Morning Brief for Monday, October 28th

"The Wall Street Journal listeners come from all walks of life and business and no matter what type of business you're in eighty P is here to help you achieve what you're were looking for with HR talent time benefits and payroll informed by data and designed for people learn more at design done eighty p the congressional black caucus in nineteen sixty nine for more details had to our website wsj.com or the W._S._J.. APP trump made the announcement in a nationally televised address from the White House. Baghdadi was considered Islamic state's founder and inspirational leader. California's is utilities cut power to try to prevent additional wildfires former Democratic Michigan Congressman. John Conyers died Sunday at the age of ninety governor has declared a state of emergency due to wildfires says strong winds and dry conditions remain a threat at least eight wildfires were burning across the state on Sunday his family says he died in his sleep conyers was one of the longest serving members of the House of Representatives he was first elected in nineteen sixty four and co found largest that kincaid fire north of San Francisco has forced the evacuation of about one hundred eighty thousand people millions of people are without power dot com. I'm angry for totally for the Wall Street Journal President Trump announced on Sunday that Islamic state leader Boubacar al-Baghdadi died in a US strayed

The Wall Street Journal John Conyers White House wsj.com Trump Boubacar al-Baghdadi House of Representatives Baghdadi San Francisco California Congressman US founder President Michigan
The hidden life of Rosa Parks | Rich D. Richardson

TED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing

04:39 min | 11 months ago

The hidden life of Rosa Parks | Rich D. Richardson

"In one thousand nine hundred forty four eleven years before her fateful decision on a Montgomery Bus Rosa Parks was investigating a vicious cried as an emissary for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. She traveled to Rural Alabama to meet with retail. A young woman who had been sexually assaulted by six white. It would be difficult enough to convince an Alabama record that even one of these men guilty but Rosa was undeterred. She formed a committee to defend racy and court flooding the media with testimony and sparking protests throughout the foul when a jury failed to indict the attackers parks demanded. The Governor. Assemble a new grand jury. She wrote I know that you will not fail to let the people of Alabama know that there is equal justice for all of our citizens. Harks repeatedly challenged racial violence and prejudice systems protecting its perpetrators but this work came at an enormous risk and a personal price. Born in Nineteen. Thirteen Rosa was raised by her mother and grandparents in Rural Alabama. But outside this loving home. The fear of racial violence cast a long shadow. The Ku Klux Klan frequently drove past their home and Jim Crow laws segregated public spaces at nineteen. She settled in Montgomery and married. Raymond parks a Barbara. Who shared her growing fury at racial injustice he was involved but the local chapter of the Nwea C. P. A. Roll many avoided for fear of persecution at first Raymond with eager to keep rose safe from the potential dangers of activism. But as she grew more incensed the limitations imposed on African Americans. She could no longer stand by when she officially joined the NWF EP in nineteen forty three parks and Johnny Rebecca car with the only women in the Montgomery chapped. She began keeping minutes for their meetings and soon found herself. Elected Secretary of the chapter formerly beginning her secret double life by day. Rosa worked as a seamstress to support her mother and husband by night. She researched and documented numerous civil rights cases from local policy disputes to high profile murder cases and he crimes as secretary. She prepared public responses on behalf of the Montgomery Chapter. Battling the harsh sentencing. Both acusations and smear campaigns frequently used against African Americans in addition to her legal work parks was brilliant. Local strategist as adviser to the end. Up Lacey. Pe- Youth Group Council. She helped young people navigate segregated systems including voter registration and whites only libraries through the cover of the N. w. c. p. park strive to bring clandestine civil rights activities into the open. She advocated for civil disobedience training and spoke out against racial violence particularly the murder of Emmett till in Nineteen fifty-five her refusal to move to the back of a segregated bus helped ignite the grassroots movement. She had hoped for parks was arrested and jailed for her one woman protest where she was visited by local activists together. They plan to twenty four hour. Bus Boycott it lasted for three hundred and eighty one days. Parks Simple Act had transformed nascent civil rights activism into a national movement in Nineteen fifty-six the boycott ended when the Supreme Court ruled in favor of desegregating public transport but this victory for the movement had come at a great cost. Rosa had been receiving vicious death threats throughout the campaign and was unable to find work in Montgomery because of her political reputation in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven. She moved to Detroit. Continue working as a seamstress until being hired by congressman. John Conyers to help support his burgeoning. Civil rights campaigns ever vigilant and the fight against racial inequality parks remained active for the next forty years. She wrote several books traveled across the country giving talks to support other activists and established an institute for the Education of young people in her late husband's memory today. Rosa parks is remembered as radical spirit railed against the most powerful people and policies. Her Call to action continues to resound. Know what must be done does away with Vera.

Rosa parks Montgomery Bus Rosa Parks Montgomery Alabama murder Ku Klux Klan John Conyers Advancement of Colored People Secretary Emmett emissary Johnny Rebecca Pe- Youth Group Council National Association Nwea C. P. Vera Raymond Jim Crow
NPR News: 11-05-2019 1AM ET

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 11-05-2019 1AM ET

"This message comes from. NPR sponsor. Xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like Xfinity X.. By get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. US House impeachment. Investigators have released transcripts of two of their depositions positions as NPR's Michele Keleman reports they include statements by the ambassador who was recalled from Ukraine in the transcripts career diplomat. Marie Ivanovich describes what what amounted to a smear campaign that led to her ouster. The former ambassador to Ukraine's she was shocked to see what president trump had said about her in July phone. Call with Ukraine's Raines new president. He warned quote that she's going to go through some things you'll von of it says she felt threatened and she was surprised that the president would speak about her or any the ambassador in that way to a foreign counterpart describing her ouster as a dangerous precedent. Another longtime diplomat Mike. McKinley says he quit after failing to convince his former boss. The Secretary of state to publicly back IANOVICH Michelle Kellerman. NPR news the State Department. The Treasury Department has imposed new sanctions on nine aides to Iran Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. The move came forty years to the day that Iranian revolutionaries took over the US embassy in Tehran and held fifty. Two Americans hostage separately Monday. The State Department announced a reward up to twenty million dollars for information leading to the whereabouts outs of missing former. FBI Agent Robert Levinson. Who was last seen in Iran nearly thirteen years ago the United States is formally notified the United Nations of its withdrawal? Oh from the Paris. Climate Agreement signed almost by almost two hundred nations in two thousand fifteen. The withdrawal process does not become official for a year in a statement and Mondays Secretary of State. Mike pompeo touted the US carbon pollution cuts in called the Paris deal a quote unfair economic burden to the US. Economy the deal which prevented any signatory from leaving. In the first three years after it was ratified in November. Two thousand sixteen a combination of wood smoke from homes and stagnant air. It prompted fire bans an era advisories in some parts of the Pacific northwest as Brian. Buhl reports from member station K.. Elsie see the restrictions are expected to last I into Wednesday officials are urging people with respiratory conditions as well as senior citizens children and pregnant women to stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise. A original air quality agencies also issued a wood smoke ban for several cities including Eugene and Springfield because the smoke makes the air dance with particulate matter. That can't can't really go anywhere right now. Some homes Meggett exemptions if they rely heavily on wood as their main heating source. Brian Bouillon Eugene Oregon and online position post host in petition posted Monday Google employees are demanding. The company issue climate plan that commits it to zero emissions by twenty thirty it also calls on Google to decline signed contracts that would support the extraction of fossil fuels and to avoid collaborating with groups involved with the oppression of refugees this is NPR news the publisher of forthcoming book about the trump White House says it will not disclose any information about the anonymous author has shut book. Group says the writer knows the president. President is trying to reveal the identities of whistle blowers. It's responding to a Justice Department letter warning that the author may be in violation of nondisclosure agreements. The world series champion Washington nationals visited the White House Monday as part of a roving series of celebrations. NPR's Timbre Keith reports. The President Trump honored the team them in familiar fashion the US marine band played baby shark as the team walked out. The children's tune became a rally song for the nationals Who battled back from a downright terrible early season record to win the world series and I tell you what that turn out to be very very powerful? Little tune trump recounted the team's post-season triumphs and somehow connected it all back to his own current predicament. America fell in love with the nets. Baseball they just fell in love with that space. Well that's all. They wanted to talk about that. An impeachment I liked baseball all much more a handful of players declined to attend at least one in protest Timur Keith. NPR News General Services were held in Detroit. Monday for former Michigan Congressman. John Conyers former president Bill Clinton was among the speakers. Conyers died October. Twenty seven at the age of ninety two years after resigning from Congress Congress before he served where he served for fifty years on Asian

president NPR United States NPR trump Ukraine Mike pompeo Iran John Conyers White House Brian Bouillon State Department Shay Stevens Baseball Ayatollah Ali Khamenei Washington Paris Google
What Do People Get Wrong About Rosa Parks?

BrainStuff

08:36 min | 1 year ago

What Do People Get Wrong About Rosa Parks?

"Announcing the year of Twenty Twenty Twenty Twenty Vision that is twenty twenty vision at the center to be exact. That's why we are giving you twenty percent off your twenty twenty with thick with design plus a free consultation and no interest financing. Call the is center today at eight. Eight eight eight four four twenty twenty to get your twenty percents off isla thick or visit the eye center dot com to schedule your consoles online financing on approved credit see website for details restrictions apply. Today's episode is brought to you by Lexus. You at Lexus. Their greatest curiosity is you because the most amazing machines aren't inspired by machines. They're inspired by people. That's why Lexus asks different questions. Better questions more human questions like can you see with your ears and answers are as inspiring as you are which may leave you with one question. What amazing ideas will you inspire next? Discover the answers. Lexus DOT com slash curiosity? Welcome to brain stuff. Production of iheartradio. Hey rain stuff lauren. Vogel bomb here. Most of us know Rosa Parks as the African American woman who quietly but firmly refused to give up her seat to a white person on December. I nine hundred fifty five in Montgomery Alabama. That small active resistance sparked the year long Montgomery bus boycott which in turn kick-started national efforts to end racial segregation in the United States. In honor of that we wanted to fill in some of the often misunderstood circumstances surrounding parks resistance to start with. This wasn't some totally random act. Parks was a lifelong activist and she came from a family of activists. Parks was born in nineteen thirteen to James and Leona MacAulay. The couple separated two years later and parks. Mother moved the family to her parents. Farm in Pine Level Alabama parks grandparents rose and Silvester Edwards where former slaves who strongly believed in racial equality. One of parks early memories of her grandfather standing guard with his shotgun. As the Ku Klux Klan marched down their street end of him telling her stories about black history and courageous figures like Christmas addicts. Harriet Tubman and Marcus Garvey in nineteen thirty two when she was nineteen Rosa MacAulay married. Raymond parks an active member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People or N. Double ACP parks began her civil rights activism shortly after graduating from high school and continued until shortly before her death in two thousand and five at age ninety two. She served for years as secretary to the president of nwpp's Montgomery Chapter Parks also worked on issues such as voter registration desegregation of schools and public spaces and justice for black victims of white tally. In addition she participated in numerous major civil rights events such as the nineteen sixty three march on Washington entity nineteen sixty five. Selma to Montgomery March parks was also an activist for women's rights and ending the Vietnam War at one time. She served on the Board of Planned Parenthood when she made her famous stand. It wasn't her first interaction with the bus driver. The driver James e Blake often made derogatory marks to African Americans especially women he also made black people get off his bus after paying then reboarded in. The rear sometimes hid driveway before they got back on twelve years before. The boycott in Nineteen forty-three Blake tried to make parks board after paying. She refused and he tried to push her off. The bus after that parks avoided lakes. Best no matter. What but on that fateful day. She didn't notice. Blake was the driver when she stepped on board her family reports. The parks was distracted. Thinking about Emmett till as news had just come out that his lynch's we're going to go free but about that famous stand in telling. The story sometimes mistakenly said that. She sat in the whites only section. What really happened. Was this in fifty-five Montgomery's buses had thirty six seats the first ten were reserved for white people. The Middle Sixteen were first. Come first serve with priority given to why people and the last ten were for black people park sat down in the first row of the Middle Section next to a black man. A two black women sat across the aisle. The other black people got up when Blake told them to parks as we know did not and she didn't refuse to give up her best seat because her feet hurt. She wrote in her autobiography. I was not tired physically or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day. I was not old. Although some people have an image of me as being old then I was forty two. No the only tired I was tired of giving in several months before parks refused to give up her seat. Fifteen year old. Claudette Coleman did the same thing. But unlike parks colden made a scene and was physically removed by police officers. Some say parks. Refusal ignited the boycott and Colin's because parks was calm polite and slightly older which made her more sympathetic figure and parks was well known and liked in the community through her work with the ACP however it was cold and not parks who is part of the lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of bus segregation in Montgomery. You may have seen photos of parks. Mugshot or being fingerprinted. But those are not from that first famous arrest there from two months later with the Montgomery bus boycott going strong when parks was helping. Arrange Carpool rides to people who refused to ride the buses on February twenty first nineteen fifty-six a grand jury indicted parks and others for violating an Alabama law prohibiting organized boycotts once again parks was arrested and jailed. The Montgomery bus boycott lasted three hundred. Eighty one days ended when the Supreme Court Segregation on. Public transportation was unconstitutional. Although the boy was a success it through Rosa and Raymond parks life into turmoil. Montgomery Fair Department Store where parks worked as a seamstress fired. Her Raymond was also fired from his job after his boss said he couldn't talk about Rosa or the boycott at work. The couple who had received threatening phone calls death threats and hate mail during the boycott continued to receive them for years after in nineteen fifty seven after neither could find steady employment in Montgomery. They joined rose's brother and cousins in Detroit taking along her mother. Leona but even in Detroit parks had trouble finding work finally in nineteen sixty five. She was hired as an administrative assistant for congressman. John Conyers junior a position. She held until her. Nineteen eighty-five Retirement. Parks died in two thousand five and her body lay in honor the US Capitol Rotunda the first woman to receive that distinction but she remained an activist all her life in one thousand nine hundred four. At the age of eighty-one she was mugged a young black man. A crime that many pundits is a sign of decaying values and young people but park sought differently. She said at the time I hope to someday see an end to the conditions in our country that would make people want to hurt others. Today's episode was written by Melanie. Mcmanus and produced by Tyler claim. Brenston is production. Iheartradio's how stuff works for more on this amount of other topics visit our home. Planet has stuff works dot com and for more podcast for my radio. Isn't the iheartradio APP APPLE PODCASTS? Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by Mazda. The joy of being alive comes discover on our journey and with the first ever Mazda C X thirty. There's inspiration with every mile traveled. It spirited performance and available predictive. All wheel drive heightened your senses like no vehicle you've ever experienced with ample cargo space and available off road. Traction assist the thirty s perfect for weekend getaway destination wherever engineered like nothing else to feel like nothing before experienced premium Mazda C X thirty at your local dealership Mazda. Feel alive twenty. Seven club is a new podcast about famous musicians who died prematurely. In sometimes mysteriously at the age of twenty seven. This podcast is hosted by me. Jake Brennan Creator and host of the hit music and true crime. Podcast disgrace season one features twelve episodes in the life and death of Jimmy Hendrix. The Twenty Seven Club contains adult content and explicit language. You can listen to the twenty seven club on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. For Your podcast. Watch out for us.

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Owning Up: Reparations, Jamal Khashoggi, and Joy Harjo

Skimm This

12:23 min | 1 year ago

Owning Up: Reparations, Jamal Khashoggi, and Joy Harjo

"It's Wednesday June nineteenth, welcome to skim this, where breaking down the most complex stories of the day and giving you the context on why they matter today on Capitol Hill. People are talking about, whether the US should pay reparations to the descendants of slaves. We'll dive into why this gaining traction as we head towards twenty twenty Ben United Nations report is calling for the Saudi Crown prince to be investigated in the death of journalists DeMarcus Shoghi, we'll give you the details. And finally, there's a new US, poet laureate in town. And she's making history we're here to make your Wednesday smarter. Let's skim this. The most complicated story today is about reparations for slavery today, the House Judiciary committee on the constitution civil rights and civil liberties held a hearing about a Bill HR forty if it passes, it would create a federal commission to study, slavery and reparations to review the history of slavery in this country and basically, to decide whether to pay back descendants of slaves, and in what way it's the first time congress has held a hearing about this in over a decade. Here's the Bill sponsor Representative Sheila jackson-lee at the hearing today, talking about why this Bill is important for African Americans. It is only this group that can singularly singly. Claim to have been slaves under the auspices, the institution, and leadership of the United States government. And so. HR forty is in fact. Is in fact, the response of the United States of America long overdue. We're going to get into the history of talking about reparations for slavery, why. It's back in the news now. And why it's still controversial. Burst. Like we said, the concept of reparations isn't a new thing in eighteen sixty five union, generals proposed giving quote forty acres and a mule to former slaves to help them start their lives. But after president Lincoln was assassinated, the new president, Andrew Johnson, nixed the idea reparations came up again every so often, but it wasn't until the late nineteen eighty s that congressman John Conyers of Michigan proposed a Bill to commission, an official study on reparations. He proposed it again. And again, every year until he left office, two years ago in two thousand and eight congress passed a Bill apologizing for slavery reparations weren't included in that Bill, then in two thousand fourteen a writer named Tallahassee coats laid out the case for reparations in a sixteen thousand word essay for the Atlantic magazine coach word about slavery, and all the ways in which black people continued to be oppressed after slavery ended their things. The lack of access to education and housing discrimination. And he said, the US needed to pay its debts including maybe by cutting checks. That sparked a huge debate. And now a lot more people are talking about it, including a bunch of twenty twenty democratic candidates. But there's not a lot of agreement over how to solve this issue yesterday. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell was asked about it reparations for something that happened hundred fifty years ago. None of us currently living or responsible is a good idea. We've tried to deal with our original San of slavery by fighting a civil war by passing a landmark civil rights legislation. We've elected an African American president that comment created a lot of tension for today's hearing, especially because McConnell grew up in the segregated south testifying. The congress today, Tana hoc- coats, the author of that article the case for reparations said, it's not just about what happened way back when Giardi leader McConnell cited civil rights legislation yesterday as well. He should because he was alive to witness the harassment, jailing and betrayal of those responsible for that legislation by governments want to protect them. He was alive for the red lining of Chicago and the looting of black homeowners of some four billion dollars victims of that plunder, very much alive today. He's done research on this, connecting the disparities for African Americans today to slavery and the Jim crow era and so of other people, according to a study from the center for American progress, the average black household in two thousand sixteen had a tenth of the wealth of the average white household, today's hearing was packed other people who testified included Senator twenty twenty presidential candidate, Cory Booker, and actor Danny Glover to be clear, not everyone is in favour of reparations including some African Americans writer Coleman Hughes, testified that reparations for all descendants of slaves. Could insult black people. House speaker Nancy Pelosi has thrown her support behind. The Bill to study reparations something she usually doesn't do before legislation passes committee, but since Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell has nixed the idea the Bill just to look into reparations probably doesn't have much of a chance of passing while he's in charge. So what's the skin? There were a lot of ideas pitch today on how to deal with reparations, but no detailed proposals. Remember today's hearing was just about whether there should be a commission to study the idea, we'll hear more about this because it's become a huge topic on the twenty twenty campaign drill candidates are using this as part of their platforms, and they've got some ideas for some, it's a check others are looking at broader proposals to close the wealth gap for African Americans. The timing furthest hearing wasn't random today's June team, a day on which people commemorate the end of slavery in the US, it's when the union army finally reached Texas in eighteen sixty five and let slaves know that they'd been freed by the emancipation proclamation, and people have been talking about reparations for slavery, almost ever since. Meanwhile, the UN is looking into a different controversial topic. The death of Saudi journalists Jamal kashogi that's next. There's a new report out that has people talking about the Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin soman, aka m b s the report is calling for him to be investigated for the murder of former Washington Post columnist Jamal kashogi. We already knew a lot of what's in the report. But there's some new info and it's pretty condemning before we get into it too much. Let's take a step back. Jamal kashogi was a Saudi journalist who had been critical of the Saudi government. He was last seen walking into the Saudi consulate in Turkey in October. At first people thought he might have been kidnapped, but then evidence started coming out that he had died after some pressure, the Saudi consulate confirmed saying there had been an altercation. They called it a botched interrogation, then the Turkish government revealed there were recordings from inside the consulate after listening to them and doing some research of their own the CIA confirmed that kashogi had been murdered and that it was planned. And they said the murder plot went all the way up to the top to the crown prince other countries came out condemning MB s but not the Trump administration NBS has friendly ties to the Trump family, Republicans has split with the White House on this one, though, congress has condemned the Saudis and voted to pull military support for the government, but they never tried to sanction MB s. Enter this report by this U N investigator. Agnes Calamar Calamar listened to the tapes. She says you can hear Saudi officials planning kashogi murder. They talked about how to get his body out of the consulate even before he arrived. It's all pretty gruesome. The main takeaway is that the killing was premeditated. The report has been described as damning and it cast major doubt on the official Saudi story. Remember, they said it was just an interrogation gone wrong since then, the Saudis, have given each of kashogi children, a house, and at least ten thousand bucks a month, which some people think is an admission of guilt. Calamar now wants a further investigation into individual Saudi officials. She's specifically named check crown prince MB s and she suggested that targeted sanctions may be an order, the Saudis have already put eleven people on trial for the murder Calamar does calling for the Saudis to scrap the trials and start over saying, they don't live up to international standards, and that at least one person who should be on trial didn't get charged all of these findings and suggestions are going to be presented to the United Nations Human Rights Council next week and they might put more pressure on countries to take action against the Saudis. And the crown prince including the Trump administration. June is all about the rainbow connection. It's pride month here at the skin. We know you like to celebrate smarter we've got what you need to know like the ABC's on LGBTQ plus and the icons that paved the way to pride, even our skin, h cures learned a few new things about pride how to be an ally. I thought was incredibly helpful. Like I know a lot of people identify as pens actual or like as actual, and I never really understood that that means for about digging into the fact that pride is happening, and different parts of the globe sort of at the same time I thought was really exciting. Check out all the guys at the skin dot com slash pride pride. The name you need to know today is joy Harjo the library of congress just named her the twenty third poet laureate. Basically, the country's official poet but she's the first native American ever to be chosen. So some info on Harjo she's a member of the Muskogee creek nation and grew up on native land in Tulsa, she's written, eight books, poetry, mostly about the history and experiences of native American people nature, spirituality and womanhood are some of her main themes, but she's not just a poet, she's written a memoir, and two books for younger readers, and she's released five music albums, the poet, laureate, usually works on a project that raises awareness of and appreciation for poetry Harjo says she hasn't decided what she's going to focus on during her tenure, but that she wants to bring people together to heal political, divisiveness here, she is in an interview with the academy of American poets though, I think of how poetry in Abel's us to maybe to shift our images of each other and to listen you cannot write poetry. You don't listen. Before we go today, we've got a fun fact coming to you from Adidas. You know, the sporting goods company by signature three stripes, on everything from sneakers to offer jerseys two bags and more, sometimes Adidas, which is it up with the logo. They make the stripes vertical horizontal or even backwards turns out a beat us only has a trademark for the slanted version. It was trying to expand that protection for. And this is a quote, three parallel equidistant stripes of equal with applied to the product in whichever direction today, the general court of the European Union denied them, the trademark and ruled that all those other directions are fair game. They said Adidas couldn't show that they're stripes had enough of a distinctive character throughout Europe, the court called a design just an ordinary figurative Mark trademark burn. And that's all for skim this, thanks for listening and make sure you subscribe and leave a review today is June teen, and we've got a deep dive on the importance of that day for African American history in our skim app. We've got a bunch of other premium content there, too. You can find it in your app store.

congress United States Saudi Crown murder Mitch McConnell Jamal kashogi Agnes Calamar Calamar official Saudi consulate president Senate Bill Saudi government Adidas joy Harjo writer Sheila jackson-lee
Warning Signs: Media Access, Privacy Please, Chinas Birth Rate

Skimm This

10:56 min | 1 year ago

Warning Signs: Media Access, Privacy Please, Chinas Birth Rate

"It it's Friday January seventeenth. Welcome to skim this. We're breaking down the most complex stories of the day and giving you the context on why they matter all eyes are on the Senate in the run-up to next week's impeachment trial but new rules could make it difficult or even impossible to keep up with what's going on. We'll tell you why then we'll dive into your inbox to help. Explain all those privacy policy emails. You've probably been receiving and finally why China's falling birth great could have global repercussions. We're here to make your evening smarter. Let's skim this there. You hear you hear a previously. On Capitol Hill. All persons are commanded to keep silent on pain of imprisonment while the House of Representatives is exhibiting to the Senate of the United States articles of impeachment against Donald John Trump president of the United States. The pain of imprisonment. It's unlikely they'd actually go to jail but it means while House Democrats make their argument for why President Trump should be convicted in this impeachment. Trial Senators have to shut up. They're supposed to be silent. Members of the jury inside the Senate Chamber but new rules might make it harder for them to speak outside the Chamber to the Capitol Police and the Senate Sergeant Sergeant at arms kind of like the study hall monitor are preventing reporters from interviewing lawmakers in the hallways of the Capitol even when lawmakers want to talk to them. We spend a lot of time talking about how this impeachment trial has gotta work but now it turns out we might not have much of a chance to actually see it play out because these restrictions could could limit overall press access and in turn how much the American people outside of DC. We'll get to see I. There are already some pretty strict rules in the Senate on a normal day like journalists can't take any photos but there is an artist. Toby drawing courtroom sketches journalists also can't bring any electronics inside the chamber so there is no way to report in real time. What's happening but it's about to get even stricter capital police are also saying journalists are only allowed to sit in a small roped off section of the chamber second floor while the trial is going on? They can't move around in approach. Lawmakers freely like they usually do and journalists will have to go through extra security ready to get into the room at all so we might be hearing a whole lot of this as reporters run in and out of security scans to tell us what's going on lawmakers on both sides of the aisle feel iffy about how the process is being treated Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar who's also running for president told. CBS after Tuesday's democratic the credit primary debate that she actually tried to expand press access during the trial. There's always gotta be rules about where people can go where they can't but I don't know why at this very important the moment where you would want to allow the people to see. They're deciding to pull back accident. It's not just Democrats who are upset. Republican Senator John Kennedy from Louisiana called the restrictions on press access a quote. Huge mistake saying they send the wrong message the Capitol police have already started it. Enforcing these rules and on Tuesday. Senate Majority Leader Mitch. McConnell will introduce rules for the trial that may leave viewers even more in the dark. That's because the Senate rules would allow closed sessions during some parts of the trial for private debate that means reporters leave the room and the C. Span camera turned off these kinds of blackouts also also happen during president. Clinton's impeachment trial in nineteen ninety nine. Some people argue that these sessions behind closed doors might actually help the debate since senators can speak more freely without out worrying about how they'll be covered in the press others worry that shutting out the press could make viewers at home question the legitimacy of the trial. So if they close the doors all we can do is hope the lawmakers will come out afterward and tell us what we missed. So what's the scam. Most of the impeachment process so far in the House of Representatives has has included wall to wall coverage from the room where it happens but as we get ready for the third impeachment trial in US history. There are a lot of concerns about how transparent the Senate is going to be Senators have been sworn in and trial officially resumes on Tuesday. After that both sides we'll get to start presenting their case on whether trump should be convicted and removed moved from office whether the new rules fuel criticisms of shady goings on behind closed doors or lead to a more fair effective trial is TVD. We'll be watching on Tuesday I to find out God mile over the past few weeks. You might have been getting a lot of emails emails with subject lines like privacy update or check out our new terms and conditions they might have come from music streaming services the site. You buy concert tickets from or where you found someone to print an image of your dog onto a pair of socks open up those emails and chances are they all contain the same four letters. CCPA DPMA that's for the California Consumer Privacy Act. It's a law. California passed in two thousand eighteen but that finally went into effect on January story. I and it's a big deal. It's the first ever modern consumer privacy law in the US it's a new sheriff in town to help rein in the data collection industry mystery. which until now has kind of been a wild west? If you've seen HEADLINES ABOUT GENETIC TESTING COMPANIES SELLING YOUR DAD drug companies without your knowledge or your your location data being sold to help companies target you with ads. That's what we're talking about. Well this new law gives California residents the right to check out all the info companies have on them and they can even ask for that Info to be deleted or tell companies to stop selling their data with just a few clicks online. Pretty cool right. One company known for collecting a lot of data about its users is facebook. It might take some digging to find but facebook now has a page for California residents to make these privacy requests asking for that mountain of data to be deleted could seriously limit what the company knows about you which could be exactly what you want her. For Privacy activists the California law is a big step toward changing the rules of the digital economy. You might know the saying if you're not paying for the product you are the product the CCPA could start to change the script by giving consumers who's personal info companies. Use to make money a chance to opt out. Open up the windows and yell how are you Moore's l.. I'm not gonNA take this anymore. We likely won't find out. Just how effective the is is until at least the summer. That's when California can start cracking down on companies violating the law until then California resins might not be the only winners the laws created a new gold rush for companies that help other businesses with compliance by one estimate companies could spend a total of fifty five billion dollars to make sure they're playing by the new rules and even though CCPA only applies to California residents changes could soon becoming to other states. A handful are now considering similar laws including some that give consumers even more rights over their data than CCPA. Meaning twenty twenty could be shaping up to be a good year for consumer privacy. No matter where you live and that is one sound that China is hearing less of new. Chinese government figures. Show that last year. The country's birthrate fell to its lowest level in almost sixty years. They families are complicated in China. It's family planning that especially complicated for decades the ruling Communist. His party enforced a one child policy. It was literally against the law for most families to have more than one child. The idea was that keeping the country's population and check would lead to economic growth and better living standards. China is now the second largest economy in the world mission accomplished as its population got older. The government needed a plan to keep that economic momentum going China is reversing its decades-old policy of allowing only one child per couple. It'd be considering ending the one child policy today. They revealed that they have done exactly that. China will fully implemented policy of one. Couple two children in a proactive response to the issue of an agent population since two thousand sixteen the government has let families have two kids except people aren't doing it. The cost of living means that raising even one kid is extremely expensive. Plus women now make up a larger part of the workforce and are putting off marriage and children so China has a problem apple montanes it aging population could drive up the cost of healthcare and it's smaller working age. Population means fewer people are contributing to the economy and to China's taxpayer-funded pension fund. It also puts pressure on the Chinese cultural norm of younger family members. Taking care of their elders basically in China there soon may not be enough enough people to share the burden which means into future China could find its status as an economic powerhouse on the line. Monday is Martin Luther King Junior Day there are events happening all across the country this weekend. One place that's going. All out. In terms of commemorating his legacy is the state of Michigan. Michigan has long standing ties to the civil rights leader. Michigan's former congressman. John Conyers was the first to introduce a bill on the House floor calling going for a Federal Holiday Inn. King's honor four days after his assassination Detroit Michigan was also the site of a civil rights. March that happened the same summer as the nineteen sixty the three march on Washington. The one where King gave his famous. I have a dream speech just two months. Prior one hundred and twenty five thousand people marched in the walk to freedom in Detroit King was there too and during that March is when he gave a big preview of his I have a dream speech at the time it was reportedly the largest civil rights demonstration to happen in the US and a gathering that king described as one of the most wonderful things that has happened in America. One of the things king advocated for particularly in the weeks leading up to his death was economic justice. We have a guide out now on the history of wealth and income inequality in the US and where things stand. Today you can find minded the Skim Dot com slash guides or in the skin APP. And that's all for Skim this thanks again for listening and be sure to hit subscribe and written reviews on Apple podcast. We're taking off for the holiday weekend but we'll be back on Tuesday and so we'll are free newsletter the daily skin you can sign up right on our website site at the Skim Dot Com. Everything you need to know to start your day right in your inbox.

China Senate California United States CCPA president Donald John Trump Michigan House of Representatives Capitol Police Senate Chamber apple facebook Senator John Kennedy CBS Senator Amy Klobuchar King Washington
Monday, Oct. 28: A day of Hot Topics

The View

37:57 min | 1 year ago

Monday, Oct. 28: A day of Hot Topics

"Subscribe to our podcast to get hot topics delivered every afternoon and while you're at it rate us and labor review we make Mondays better. The view is live kick off the week with an entire show of hot topics victory against most ruthless and violent terror organization anywhere in the world he died after running into a dead end tunnel whimpering and crying and screaming all the way Abu Bakar Albuque- dotty is dead he was the founder and leader of Isis the serves weaponized sacks rising democratic star Katie Hill resigns over leaked nude photos and allegations of an I did this thing also so maybe he should back off a little bit in stop bragging about it so much here's the press conference from yesterday take a lot last night the United States brought the world's number one terrorist leader to justice military operation in Syria took down the number one most wanted terrorists in the world Isis leader Abu Bakar L. Bye Daddy even was there during the impeachment hearings the Nixon impeachment hearings and the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty five mu talking about a long term who passed away at ninety years old he passed away from natural causes and he he's he was around a long time if he didn't need to go the other thing we WanNa do is acknowledge I've been sad news because we lost the longest serving black congressman John Conyers can McCain now let's get things started house of hot topics is in session with what B O B Huntsman Joy Behar Sunny Halston and affair was she a victim of revenge porn plot plus you your deal for life hats us every day I five mentioning that there is a state of emergency happening in northern California California really right now over wildfires out of force nearly two hundred ices and so this is a good thing my problem is that at least by New York Times reporting folks in the I think we can all agree that it is important to to battle Isis and certainly he was the self proclaimed leader the Lilac great people and so we want to send out our condolences to his family when you think about his public service I mean he yeah he said you know Elliott Bay Obama should not be taken credit for this because the navy seals well in this case the special ops oh whoever they were thousands of people from their homes we just want everybody to do what they need to do to stay safe if they say you gotta go don't take a lot of time thinking about it because they wouldn't tell you to go inside of the intelligence community you're saying that this operation was done despite or inspite of president trump not because of him and they're also so can we at least agree that the world is a better place without this guy in it trump with mcdonagh turn civil servant yeah the amazing so here's some wonderful Republicans and Democrats are united in their applause for the news saying he had this sort of selective notification about the operation so rather than inform Pelosi rather than inform Adam Schiff rather than inform Schumer this kind of operation which is so important to the national security of our country you don't remove yourself from the chain of command it it's a huge deal it's a big deal I mean this is the biggest death of a terror leader since Osama bin was a woman from Prescott Arizona who was a doctors without Borders volunteer who was taken by al-Baghdadi tortured captain solitary confinement raped over and over remove yourself from the natural the norms of reporting and just concerns me that even in something like this he just doesn't follow the rules just does it the gang of people that are supposed to be informed of this kind of operation he informed just two people instead of all eight and I think when you are conducting the military on this earth I thought yesterday like when we complain all the time we still rock we still rob because we're leading we are leading this world in this fight against terror but daddy's a bad guy they should they deserve to be praised for what they did in that praising them but but I just think we need to take a breath and focus on how this came to be this has been in the works for years Osama bin Laden and I don't care that's to say this morning I don't care it's our way of life or the others when you're bringing up the Kurds is a valid point the Kurds helped us get information welcome to the welcome to the view so we wanted coming in the situation room I think that's why you're not hearing the the sort of patriotism that you heard when Osama bin Laden was taken down and that's why I think when he you had none of our men and women that died in the process and while trump would love for us we talk about him I'm sure I'm not GonNa do it today I'm not going to spend my time I'm so proud of this country we are the very the lead to bringing this bastard down but I will say I remember when I was on with Bin Laden was killed I was on a plane and the plane applauded and her the men and women in our armed forces that executed this and our allies like the Kurds who yeah and I'm the believer that President CEO when bad things happen you get the blaming when good things happen you deserve some credit I'm not we spend every day on the show with a tit for tat and finding oh ex-staffers to speak freely about it or is it more complicated than that you think politics these days her we honor her family this Guy Baghdadi was the worst of the worst of the worst kind of scum on planet earth and I for one hope he's burning in hell is not this feeling of celebrate celebration the way that we should take these wins because it's a win for America and it's a win for democracy and it's a win for freedom and it's a win for people who don't believe in torture and the views Halloween horror fest is back in Hell Right now not yet you're not ready and actually ended up had the opportunity to leave didn't enslaved other women and she's a very big name I think nationally but in Arizona in particular and I think today we honor is dead trump is now taking credit for all of this and I realize when when Osama bin Laden we got we got up that he put out was captured the heart pounding performance. It's crazy it's holloway all my Gosh Halloween on the view don't you dare miss it we're I I agree that this is a win for the country and that certainly we need to on raping young women who are just volunteering with Doctors Without Borders overseas and I I really think at this moment my all of our hearts should be with the family the president does not feel the support of the country the way you would expect is because many people do not feel that he puts this the leader of you deal with the solutions your looking for country first night a lot of people feel that he puts his financial his finances I people questioning his methodology into to hit on trump to see what a president is. I'm not going to do that today I'm not gonNA waste any of my time doing that because you know what the men and women that were involved in this they don't deserve it they do not deserve that Congress the women will be this year on talk Dr Ghoulish Guess Jordin sparks and Broadway's beetlejuice light things up with AH welcome back we're continuing the conversation you were saying I was saying I think that one of the reasons that people do not feel was so I was crying elated and I remember wanting to go out on the streets there's a bunch of people I was going from DC dealing with people celebrating and I wanted to celebrate yesterday and at our military men women can do the matching you're flying in the middle of the night in Syria over Russian controlled airspace not only weights thank thank them because about the Kurds well the Kurds fought along with us which says a lot about them given what we just did can I talk sorry so i WanNa talk about Kayla Mueller who with Ukraine people are are feeling that he uses this country as his own personal cash register and that and that is why it's important today like I agree with that I wear the American flag bandannas and like toast to freedom and I am that person I will say it is weird to thank Russia before it in in the swamp is a bunch of lobbyists and people in DC that can afford to go to the V world nobody the second hold up a second we'll come back and finish this conversation he also thanked by the way the currency should have thanked them a lot more but he thinks Syria and Turkey for their help because we couldn't have done it without their help so if you're sitting you're talking to the generals before he told his own Jhangvi I got in the South I'm not I'm not in one let's not forget that so it's tape and what we don't trust him we don't trust the real American I would try that he's in in calling wave that he crossed the let's not forget that he also dismantled Pelosi and the Democrats in the house by saying that he didn't tell them because he was afraid they would be they all crack later times up at NBC does the networks lay statement about workplace sexual misconduct it up at the world series people were yelling what they were yelling things heard lock in parts of all people don't feel like the world series and sort of you know because I was in the night of the game so I saw that I wasn't that was signing books search shining and terrifying example of horror and misery just wait because is clear true troops to save a why would hand his man did it we're talking about trump right now here's a chaotic foreign policy everything is tainted because of what he did to the Kurds to I was shocked that he thanked Russia I feel about regiment on but that still doesn't negate the fact that this is a big win and we shouldn't be politicizing it but the problem is he politicises it was a whole bunch of folks black White Latino Age was just at a whole bunch of people I think people just they didn't want are you ended what happened in real time it's kind of attack line and so I think anyway I wonder if that's why you're hearing noble more you in this situation the trump necessarily didn't think I in fact he thanked Russia I saw a cheap attack line sonny oh I think it's the where you and I think the saddest part of it is this really celebrate Tori Day because we have brought a bastard to hell where he belongs period but the sad part is the politics and the things that he has done it again to cut but you didn't put Russia in context sunny you said well thanks for thanked Russia before he thinks leaders but the reality is this is the most dangerous mission talk to me you think our troops and the flag and America first period so that is the one thing I will agree with on and let's not forget that he can the nationals and the I I don't know why they did it but folks well let's just sell it the thing with ever imagine it's kind of creeping wait until you see ought to give him very much because in a way you're all correct about what's going on people are annoyed with them because you wanted audience beautiful moments when we're using his words against him let's face it and let's face it that the lock him up didn't come from the suites those are expensive seats those the Aww I think price listen just one thing I mean listen I am the type person like I am a we're going to put in their assets the American way woman on the set WanNa get up and be really on top of what you've done it so often and he's disappointed you so often that people go I don't know the the reason the reason I say this because I so lots of people in their jerseys going out so it was ah the audience is important but I do think if he can say locker up than we can say lock him protesting is an American time again trying to bring context and there you go leave us a compliment if you were to look kids that were tweeting they say to Meg's point we're in the swamp we want people to hate us I always go to what Michelle Obama said why are we gonNA stooped his bat those chance came from the upper scene where I sat in as a kid okay those aren't the expensive seats those are the people seeds so I think you have this fervor coming I even saw banners veterans for impeachment people are upset absurd team owners did not want to sit with him well why don't you just do this of engaging in a quote smear campaign built around cyber exploitation the question is is this starting to feel like revenge porn the welcome back Democratic Star Congresswoman Katie Hill has resigned amid allegations of an affair with a staffer which she denies the moment it's easy to sit at this table and attack for calling Russia I but that's not the weakening of Douglas actually we hate Russia we couldn't have done without comfortable that he told Russia about this the crowd is important no that's in the middle of the Washington DC swap if he had been in I don't know to diamondbacks game able to the people that were out screaming that that's what he does why do we have to do that because we already know this is not that I I think the context of there were also leaked nude photographs of her with with the person she did acknowledge having an affair with before entering congress she accuses her estranged husband I'll talk I says the president oversaw the military operation that killed the world's number one terrorist leader are Americans not giving him the credit he I will say the person that she was having an affair with worked for her on her campaign which I think is probably the reason why she stepped down to satisfy all the way around I had a friend that ran for Congress that went through a she had photos that were leaked of a party years ago and what the media often realize or maybe care the Republicans don't resign when they have had Franken I mean look at their we'll a California Representative Duncan Hunter has been indicted on multiple felony counts charged with misspending the big rising star Nancy Pelosi gets taken are under her wing a bit and I don't believe that I think if people are just open about their personal life people are much more receptive you want revenge porn definitely played a factor because photos of her new you can I mean I wouldn't suggest looking up because I don't believe in that but they were published online general here and ask him that question because you don't know that I don't know that all I know is as dangerous as it was only needed Russia's help we'd be up just we're all happy that the when we talk about that time but he would have gone well before now talking about the photos you just go to the Daily Mail two days ago and you even if you didn't see them they were flashed across the whole front screen do we have so many outlets that we can just throw out there go ahead I was going to say that she she needed to resign because the Democrats are stricter than the Republicans can ruin people's lives by doing this and she made her own choices and I think she probably ended they needed to resign there was too much complicated stuff going on but for our own benefit of reading a tabloid Meghan that's that may be why yesterday when you was at the ballgame the nationals Zina's worth it to ruin that person's life to give them years of hell that they have to kind of pick up the pieces and build their family back I worry about that are cited because today we have the I think it's the hiding of it the palace fence sorry of that's the press powered I also think if it were a man what no no I don't think just look I think people are Piston have I think people were are legitimately angry at him we have a toast to Jack Daniels later tonight for killing terrorists oh well we ask for that to that leak the leaks coming from ministration that's where the leaks eventually for those but I like the that's the saddest part and I think this is what odd in in the line of when he thanked versus our troops our special forces the men and women into military the bat is the only thing that I the roles so I'm not I don't water here on this two hundred thousand and campaign funds he resigned to no no okay stat guys are not done a low level Arizona Republican for Peterson with ties to human trafficking and adoption for game has he resigned so I mean the very president this man listen apple podcasts or your favorite podcast APP and using the code the view at checkout you see headlines across your screen all day but you're busy what do you need to know what's actually shaping your world I'm Brad Milkey from ABC News Times the antioxidants of regular teas and our triple toxins screen to ensure you get the most health benefits from each cup get ten percent off select tease by going to peak T. dot life slash the view else to be put in a position where people can come for you this is why we say you WANNA be careful don't take it seems like a good idea photos but it's commonplace alleged this is what this is what we're in a very awkward position I think often times in this country with US newsmakers smart reporting taking straight to the heart of the story starting here listen for free on apple podcasts or your favorite podcast app I'm just resigned as soon as you do that if her husband released those shame on him not naturally boost energy levels contributes to mental performance supports immunity gut health and provoked song jeopardy it also gives you sustained energy without the jitters peaked he crystals deliver twelve the shame on everybody in this that that allowed them judge Moore which is what Pelosi said about her resignation Pelosi said she has acknowledged Ariza judgment that made her continued service as a member untenable and I think the right thing abby I wouldn't want to see this if it were a man either yeah and I think it just shows such judgment show such a lack of just you think apple in need for providing our entire studio audience with a bottle of their delicious Jews PT is a better way to make a healthy and delicious cup of tea awesome and every morning we start here it was extraordinary for US watching here in Singapore this is ABC News daily podcast a handful of stories just twenty minutes director Comey thanks for it is the Pixar Marvel Star Wars National Geographic and more are coming to Disney plus so preorder now and starts dreaming as soon she wants running for office yeah Stafford still why they take a picture just as you waiting to get you a resign I'm nobody nobody wants to see it in years when you trying to become congressman okay it but they don't and it's unfortunate because she was a rising star was compromised so talk about like pay nude photos she's thirty asleep so just in case don't take personally also they know I liked to Chitchat at at the salon I like that really because we encourage people yeah just do you. Nobody's going to nobody cares what you did when you were younger and Ronald and you say people don't do that don't put your pictures having people take pictures of you with a bomb naked might not be the best thing in the world is put them in the past for her to do was to resign if we were talking about a man we would all say he had to resign Republican or Democrat say it but we why don't we order it just don't don't just take the call S. November twelfth I love I love apparently sister acts on their own but I'm not in the commercial but all your favorite movies and shows y'all would like that sometimes you just don't want to talk to anybody maybe that's my life and I just I go home and it's just like kids running around but like my moments of silence on I get a lot of information when I get the Manny Pettis Oh yeah you know but then my husband told me recently that I could talk to a wall so curious curious let's see well but but there you are we're pinches wasn't you run in two weeks from now or fifteen years from now that which you and a bomb because eventually you may want to have a different kind of game she and knows how I don't I don't know anything what I'm saying is worth the trip to London Hey maybe we can find you want to talk to you during a massage I only teir I always say I might act I love that and you have to just order you have to order Disney plus extra like you have to sign up for whatever I just tell you in a chimp pass along can be very social but not of unite in the move for Tech John in London is offering a silent haircut yeah I people are boy but I assume that it's sunny Halston a woman who was raped shot and left for dead shares the shocking twists of her hunt to find the man who attacked her and murdered girlfriend. you-know-who is lawyer Rudy Giuliani needs to keep his on sale. When do you relax right there I probably don't rely don't I'd probably don't really I like engaging with people because you find all day and all night yeah we have a channel so they don't talk to you at all oh no I I like it you know because I I talked to everybody I like to Chit Chat I get a lot of scoop at the Salon Yeah one driver said to me you know how are you feeling well my doctor told me I have very black stool sharing I sweat yeah that's very interesting story why is that why would why it just seems to me because my son used to play football right off their chest sometimes people wanna yell at me about trump sometimes people wanna like stay nice it's a talk show talk to me I just days on ABC tomorrow straight from the riveting new series truth about murder cell phone out of his pocket costs a paralegal he's but dial in the same reporters voicemail did it twice last month okay so you know these ladies aren't afraid to voice their views route of it but a heart to do you know what the daily show tweeted they suggested that maybe it's Giuliani's but that's been the whistle blower this whole tow truck him out of his but I will say I so rare and I take every second that I get of them because then I come on this show how much is that haircut is it worth it I know I don't know who I believe it's again I thought she should resign weeks ago it was like I broke with but long and like Alec Dumber you running congressman I used to get but we've had like a story of a about dial like a an executive of another network used to not knowing would but dial me the president was a twenty twenty s in Robert Around problem we need twenty thousand I need some money the report twice every week for months on an got the point where I couldn't say anything because I had received so many like when they were in meetings people never luckily I'm not the type of person that that for you to voice yours so wrap your phone and join the conversation put her wild we want to hear your take on hot topics have been read he's doing it while running a shadow government for the president being data yeah it's definitely a national security issue is that

president Rudy Giuliani Congress Disney Doctors Without Borders ABC Jordin sparks Ronald football holloway Manny Pettis Halston murder congressman London Alec executive twenty minutes fifteen years
Ep. 142: An Appeal From Michael Moore To MAGA Nation -- "I Don't Want You To Die"

RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

51:26 min | 3 months ago

Ep. 142: An Appeal From Michael Moore To MAGA Nation -- "I Don't Want You To Die"

"My podcast her was created by me using the anchor app. Anchor is the free podcasts platform that allows me and you and anyone to set up in start their own podcast free of charge so that your voice is heard inker will distribute your podcast for you again free of charge so you can be on spotify on apple podcast many more now. Why are they doing this. Why have they done this for me. Since my very first podcast in in december simply it's because they believe in the democratization of audio pure and simple and because of that. That's why i use this platform. Don't forget it's free and it's easy to use encourage you to download the free anchor app or go to anchor dot fm and get started. I can't tell you how many people i've heard from from you. People listening to this podcast. We've gone on to create their own. Podcast i'm so happy. Hear this now more than ever. Our voices need to be heard lack of mid cigarette. She broke his on. He spent his whole life and to forgive. We watched him as pain. Away little Buddy never could be drunk and get her off his mind and to the nah he put that bomb to hand in full the trigger and finally dragway her man show this time. It was bigger strang. The this found him with his face down and pillow. With no. I love her. And when beary and the the willow angel sang scheme loan love. This is michael moore in. This is my podcast rumble honest. I know a lot of you. I hope one of you who are listening to this today and brought here to this podcast because a friend of yours relative co worker neighbor said. Hey man you hear this. Michael moore left wing radical dude. He's got this podcast and It's check it out. Check out this one episode at least saana hoping that Some you for listening to this are listening because you are not me. You don't you. And i don't see eye to eye on things. We voted differently this past month where he angry at part we have in common about different things about how things are taking. You know what's taking place in this country and what's happened to it. But i wanna talk to you today. You those of you. Who are the people that were there. Advance the mega people trump voters people who see themselves as conservatives on the right and i wanna talk to you about something that i hope i pray doesn't have anything to do with politics in that way although i am keenly aware that does but but i wanna talk to you today. not about. you're on the right on the left. And i'd like you to just give me a second here just to just let me have. Let me have a shot to say something and you know what if you want to say something to me. There's a A voicemail click on here on the pike s like you could just click on it in and give me give me your thoughts. Give me a piece your mind. Whatever it is. I wanna hear i wanna hear i will listen to you but i want you to listen to this because i know a lot of people say this who are liberals democrats on the left or whatever going to wonder if i lost my mind because i'm because i want to say this to you and i wanna say it with all sincerity in love that i don't want you to die. I want you to live. And i'm i need to tell you i need to warn you. That many of you are going to die. Or you're going to get really really sick. And then after live with infirmities from this sickness for months or years to come. We don't know because you know this virus is a new thing that the s that's what i'm talking about. I know it right away. You're thinking i don't wanna listen to this anymore. The viruses hoax. It's not real. But i know you know it's real. I know you're smart. You're not yes. Of course there's you know people on your side of the fence and aren't very bright. I know. I know that. I'm sure you'd say the same thing about my side of the fence but it's not about that. I think you now that we're in deep deep shit in that if we don't pull together as americans we're not gonna get out of this. More people are going to die. And i don't want that and i don't think you want that either. What would it take for us as fellow americans to pull together in the way that we would pull together. If let's say we were literally attacked. Let's say people invaded this country. We stop to argue about our political differences. No we band together to protect ourselves one for all and all for one. I mean that's right. Chris we would what we have a common enemy here right now. The coronavirus you've got to just listen to what i'm saying here. I don't just don't turn this off and say on. How much is a hoax. Though such thing you know that there is by now the state that you have in has lost thousands of people. You know somebody who died. You definitely know people who've gotten sick people in your own family have suffered are suffering. You know you have to kind of let it go here. It's it's not about being loyal to trump now or any of that stuff. We're losing americans. We never want to lose americans and look again. I realize i'm trying to reach a certain group of you. Those of you. Who are the white supremacists. If you've happened upon this. You can turn it off now. I never going to ever be able to reach you. I'm sorry about but you're gone. You're lost i. I hope that you come around someday. I'm talking to all the rest of you all the rest of know better and who don't wanna die. We have lost. I'm recording this and it's just it's it's like two thousand people it's on. Its way to three thousand people a day this week that we're now and they're predicting that next week it could be up to four thousand americans a day. We're already at one nine eleven a day. Can you imagine that one nine. That's how many people are dying. We're not reacting. We're not reacting the way we reacted when that many people died with nine eleven. Two hundred and seventy thousand has. I'm recording this a day. That's that's the equivalent of the entire city of buffalo. Being wiped out every person man woman and child dead in buffalo. The number of americans have died to date. It's the same almost the same amount of people of the entire city of orlando florida. A major came on the news. Just now orlando just got wiped out everyone dead. How would you respond. Oh i'm not gonna do anything about that. How can i'm just that's a hoax. You're not going to do you know better. Maybe i'm talking to the to the eight million obama voters that voted for trump and sixteen. I don't know. I don't know who's listening to this right now but i i. I'm recording this episode as a personal appeal to those of you who disagree with me or not like me. It's okay it's we thirteen and a half going on two fourteen million people infected. That's just in this country and it's all the red states now. It's growing faster than anyplace else. It's growing back again. New york and that. But the the positivity rate in new york is still. i think it's less than three percents somewhere around there in wyoming last week it was ninety percent ninety percent positive one of our red states. Why do you wanna die. Why why to take a stand against us liberals show us a thing or two you showing us. You're showing how to die. Why do you want to do yet. I don't want you to die and yet in all these places that voted for trump people are just dropping like flies. The hospitals are full. People are trying to get through the sickness at home. She didn't want to be told what to do. You didn't want to be told that that you can't gather with a whole bunch of other people on thanksgiving or before that you don't want to be told the wear a mask you don't be told to stay six to ten feet away from other people. I mean on some level. I get this because as americans we are sort of like fuck you leave me alone. I'll in my life. I don't want you telling me what to do i. There's a piece of that. I think in all of us. I understand that but when doctors are trying to tell you something to help you so that you don't die. Why would you not listen to them. Why would you refuse to wear a mask like like the proofs. How brave you are. Do you think you're invincible. That is there some kind of superman complex going on here because how many times. How many people. Now we known big bad rough and tough people. I'll show the virus. I'll show you and then you're knocked down your corentin your bedroom in the house and everybody has stay away from you or worse. You're in the hospital or worse we just got back from your funeral. Here's here's the thing folks. I believe that we're going to have a good plan here to try and get rid of this fire. We're going to have some leadership we're going to have a president who's gonna fight this lead is gonna listen to the scientists. He's going to have a plan but we're going to have to follow the plan. So here's the thing as one of the doctors from the h. Said on this very podcasts. And number of months ago this very well could be three to four year pandemic three to four year. Who wants to keep living like this for the next three to four years. I don't don't either. And that includes you my mega friends here. That includes you. you don't wanna live like this it. We're going to be stuck with this unless we all agree to certain things must. We all agree to live a certain way. Where the mask. Keep your distance. Sure hands if you think you've got to get tested. They're going to have some drugs pretty soon. That are going to going to be able to treat it if you catch it. Within the first ten days of when you've noticed that you've got symptoms and you'll be able to take these drugs in the drugs should be able to keep you out of the hospital. You'll be sick for a while and then you won't be sick if we all play by the rules. If you will do the simple thing of wearing that mask wearing the correct ask them wearing it correctly. We be done with this virus this year. This coming year twenty twenty one could pretty much be the end of it. Who doesn't want that don't you. Aren't you tired of football being interrupted. Aren't you tired of not being able to go to the bar. Don't you want this over now. i do can. We agree on one thing that we both want this gone now and that we don't want anyone in our family to get sick and we don't want to see our parents or grandparents die before their time. Can we all just simply agree that. That's it not talking. Guns were abortion and god or gays or whatever these things are at keep us apart just talking about each of us get through this coming year coming out on the other end of it alive but it will not happen. There are seventy three million of you. Photo for donald trump. The hard part for you. I think to get over is the fact that that biden when all the votes are finally counted is going to win this by seventy eight million votes. He's he's going to win it by thirty six votes in the electoral college. It's gonna win it by five states. That's just a fact and you know those numbers. Just keep getting worse. I for republicans and people on the right. It's not going to get better for your some now. Go have larger numbers of young people will have larger numbers of people of color. they're not going to vote for republicans that you'll never be able to catch up. That's just a fact. So if that's is a fact would you wanna make your peace with it now and figure out a way like how you can continue. Make sure to live life. You want to have the way you want to have it. 'cause you're gonna have to get along with the majority you're going to have to obey the laws we enact. Basically we're not gonna say obey the laws. It's more like your coin to have to have your income raised from seven two thousand five hundred fifteen dollars an hour. That's what you're going to have to do. You're going to have to not pull out your wallet when you go to the doctor maury where the money in that wallet to pay your portion of it your wife. Your girlfriend yes. I'm talking to guys hear ya. They're going to get paid the same as the guy next to them. So look at all the good that will come from this. You will per- personally benefit from this. And i can promise you. Nobody's going to take your guns away if you have them legally and you store them safely so your kids can't get out all the stuff you don't need to worry about this stuff. Need to worry about staying alive. Need to keep your parents alive and your kids. What is wrong with you that this wouldn't be priority one. It's all of our priority number. One protect our family. Protect ourselves tron with. You can wear a mask really doing that because you don't believe it helps if you bought. You've bought the conspiracy theories that's it you're gonna cling to that and watched loved ones. Get sick and watch their loved. One die you know. I've heard some people on the left. And i like hearing this but i've heard people say. Hey dude just let them go do their thing let them have their you know the supreme court this week said they wanna open up the churches. That the mall pack into the church's. Let them do let them kill each other. They wanna die. It's the right. It's a human right. If you don't want to live any longer you have the right to take your life if they wanna do that just let them infect each other and we're not going to be around them we're not gonna go into their bars. Were not going to go to their sporting events. When are going to go to the things whether you know. We're not going to be invited over for sunday dinner. So let them have their sunday. Dinners without social distancing without wearing a mask and let them get sick. Let them be miserably. Sick let them never get back their sense of taste or smell let their bones and joints being such pain for the next. How many years who knows and let them die. They wanna die. You can't force somebody to live if they don't wanna live. That's kind of true. Isn't it so you listening to me right. Now you trump voters you mega-guys you wanna die. Why do you want to check out. I mean really you die. Who's going to kick my ass issue seriously. This i don't if you die. Who am i going to have to beat to defeat at the polls in the grand debate that we're supposed to be having a citizens of democracy you're going to deny that like now wear them not social distance and then be too sick to participate as a citizen or die wanna die you wanna live you wanna live so you can kick my ass you wanna live so you can win. Remember when dining isn't winning dying is called forfeiting the game to me to me in my own and we will run the country that your loved ones will be left behind having to live in the country that we are going to run and we're going to win every election because thousands hundreds of thousands god forbid millions of you aren't going to be with us in a year or two or three. Do you want us just to sit back and revel in that who've who would feel good about winning because the other side died playing football in high school he played a football game and in the posing team was taken the school bus over to your town and it ran off off off the edge of the road over a cliff and the whole football team. Dis what is the high school football association. Do with that. I guess you get the forfeit. You're gonna feel good. They're standing on the field. When you hear that the other side just died in the bus. A bus crash. Hey you're the winners though. So i don't wanna be a winner. I don't wanna hear that. I don't wanna win that way. I'm gonna win because you're gonna die. I'm going to win but simply because you wouldn't wear a mask no matter how much i and others like me. Try to get you to wear one tried to get you. The social distance. Try to get you to just maiming. Not go to the bar for. Let's keep the bars close for. Let's do something here so we can get rid of this virus so we can all live in all participate in this great democracy. Let's have the big fight. Let's have the big debate. Let's run against each other and let the people decide not the virus. And that's what you're doing you're chickening out leading the virus decide who's going to win. Why would you do that. Why would you take the coward's way out because you're afraid of me beating you you're afraid of me defeating you at the polls ily. Well see when we don't have that much power is that it is that just because you're so such a scaredy cat and you're so chicken shit that that you'd rather just not live and have to go through another defeat like the one you just went through last month so you just going check out the hell you are. What makes you think you don't get to you. Don't have to show up. You had to show up. You have to fight me. You have to go up against me in the next election or whether it's whatever at the city commission meeting school board he just want me to have my i'm gonna have my way i'm gonna have i way and all the people like me we're gonna have our way you know. Yeah i know. I know this would have been a lot different billy. Bob had shown up if jimmy had shown up. But you know they're gone now. They wouldn't wear a mask. No no no really. I tried to. I honestly tried to tell. The police wear a mask. I didn't want them to die. I didn't want it to end like this. Okay i'm sorry. I'm yelling at you. I don't mean to yell at you. Started this episode. Playing the the first half of that song by brad paisley ian alison krauss whiskey lullaby. I wanted to start that way. Because i want you to know that i i grew up with you. I know heart it's been. I know all of us who came from the working class. This is not an easy life and a lot of this shit is rigged against us. You're absolutely right about that. I know how hard it is to get through this back in the day. When i wasn't making anything i didn't i didn't make my my first film is like thirty five thirty six years old. So i'm you know so. Those i years of my adult life three different times. I lost my job stood in the welfare line. The unemployment line Tried to hold on to by the skin of my teeth. Make it work. I know this. I know what to says. I know what we all do to try to eat the pain of this life whether it's alcohol or cigarettes or drugs or ambling sugar the all or friends. They're all there for us in our times of need. Know you're angry you're upset you know the rich man. His set the system up to make an unbearable for us to just fucking it through the week with a month of the year. Half of not having four or five hundred dollars to our name study. That came out a couple of years ago. That said that that the country if we had an emergency car breaks down or death in the family and need the fly across the country. Half of americans don't have that four hundred dollars to make that flight to go to the funeral their loved one to get that car. That's broken down fixing to work. And what do you do them. It's going to help us then is going to help you then. How many times have you had to suffer through this and then you you look at the people on the other side of the political fence and they all seem so slap happy about themselves so smart so smart. So smug about it and you fucking hate them understand. Where does he get us really. I wanted to record this episode here. Because i don't want you to die. I want anybody that i want you to help me join with me to get rid of this virus. We can do this. We understand it now. It's quite simple mask. Six to ten feet soap and hot water a love for others no matter who they are and the love of yourself matter how hard life has been for you i mean. Let me put it this way. I would do anything for you so that you wouldn't have to continue to live the shit existence that you have to get just to get by. You should never have to work a second job in this in this society. You should never have to work a third job. This is all wrong. You gotta quit. Seeing this as left a writer democratic or republican got to stop this piece of it right now and decide to just call a truce or whatever you want whatever you wanna call it. But we've got to work together right now to get rid of this virus this coming year and when we get rid of it we can go back to the big fight physical fight. I mean just the big fight over the issues of the day or whatever are we can try maybe not to fight but maybe convince each other that maybe you've got a point. Maybe i should listen to you. Maybe you should listen to me again. We're not gonna attire this right now. Myself and people on my side of of this divide. We're not gonna listen to the racism misogyny acre of women. We're not we're not gonna do that so you gotta come to the game. You gotta get in the ring with us without without the sucker punches without weapons of hatred and cruelty. I'm not gonna tell you what to do about it. You're going to have to think about it. I know it's scary. I know i know you see the future. It's very near now way. People will not be the majority of this country in the twenty forties. Took you know what's okay. You know enough african americans you know of mexican americans you know. Come on you work with them. You already know. You're good people and like all groups of people they have people you like in the like and they feel the same way about you but come. Aren't we going to have a much better time if we worked together on the stuff. I need you to join with me on this. I'll never ask another thing of you again. I swear to god. I want you to hear me is one of you. I came from where you came from. And i still. I still live that way in many ways. Not the red neck way. But you know proponent the gas station. I'll go get a lottery ticket. I know you're they what you need the lottery tickets. I know i know. I know but there are just things that the way i grew up where you grew up. We just don't do things the same way. There's certain beers certain alcohol. We'd never touch because it's like. Oh who would drink that. A lot of people drink but we don't drink it. That's okay that's we are. Okay come in to this for each other. Let's do this for families. Let's do this for the united states of america. let's even do it for the world. Remember the world the world that we helped save many times over that world. They miss us. They like our help us. Maybe to listen to one or two of their ideas. They've got some. They've got some good ideas that work. We could teach us use those ideas and have a better life. Come on this ridiculous. don't don't drown yourself in your sorrows. Don't reach for the next bottle of opioids to make this pain go away. Don't see me as the enemy. Don't see don't see liberals and democrats as the cause of your. You know who the cost of your paint. You know what they look like you know what they do for a living you how much money they have. They've gotten rich off your labor off your suffering and they can't wait to bilk you. You're being wheeled into the hospital. Private health insurance private hospitals money money money money money. One of us being willed in a chain ching alway out them and you know it. Don't forget that they're not worth dying for. They're not worth giving up your life for the mask the mask and you know what i'll give you this. What would you like me to do if you will wear a mask from me. Because i'm asking you to do that if you'll keep your distance from other so you're not too close so you don't give or give or get the virus. What does it you'd like me to do. Maybe there's something. I can do that. I don't want to do but i would do it just to prove to you that i consider you my brother and that we are americans and we are going to. We are going to survive. And we're going to kick this you like do you want me to do. I mean i'm sitting here trying to think of something i could offer. You will allow you to shut the fuck up. It's i know. I know i know but i and my dna is wired not to do that. But but but while i'm not shutting the fuck up. Can you hear me when i say how much i care about you or your loved. Ones die now. I believe you. And i can work together on this one project this one project and when we pull through this ran on the other. We're on the other end of this. You know i'll i'll protect. I will stand up for your rights to worship the way you want to worship to to have your kids in the schools. You want them to be in i. I don't know what is it that i can do here. Send me an email. The address is here on the site. I'll read. I'll read what you say. If you got a couple of good ideas. And i can do it. I'll do it for you. Listen listen you hear what i'm saying here. I'm at the point now. Where i would literally do anything if i could to convince you to help me get rid of this virus to make twenty twenty one the last year of covid nineteen and to stop with this foolish political thing that you and i have going right now because there's nothing political about it got president. There's gonna be a new way of doing things in the meantime. You wanna live long enough so that you can vote against him in for years. Get some guts get some resolve. Hold my hand out to you. Can you meet me halfway. can you hold yours out. Would you please put a mask on. I bump elbows here. Stay and keep our distance. It's a pretty long elbows areas. But that's all i wanted to say today. I'm hoping that that somebody who'd already heard this. Podcast was somehow got the word you'd at least give this one a shot. You would hear that. I care about you and i want to live. I want your family to live. And i want you to get in the ring with me when this is over and we'll have that we'll have the great political debate in the idea that has the support of the majority of the people win and while the majority rains. Make sure that we protect the rights of the new minority. I think you have all of our commitment to that. Nobody's gloating over this. But i can't have seventy-three million of you not wearing a mask. There's no way out of this and you can't have eighty million plus us setting things up in a way that you're not gonna like it but you had no say because you're in hospital bed that's it. Please accept my offering peace my belief that you are good and decent soul that you are my fellow american and maybe i just want if i just wanna feel good that three years from now five years from now you'll run into me on the street and you'll damn heard that podcast of yours me. You want him to wear a mask in return. You do something to help me. So i thought i'd try it for a week. That was the week that that my brother who wouldn't wear a mask came down with covid. Nineteen that was the week at the guy on the line. here. I work with came down with covid nineteen. That was the week that my niece died. And i started to wear masks because i heard you're crazy ass appeal that you wanted me to live so that i could kick your ass someday. Now here i am standing on the sidewalk. And i'm just about ready to kick your ass bike and i'll be like okay dude. I'm like three years older now. You know i used to be very all jujitsu and everything but not I'm not there right now. So please no kicking of my ass just to get involved politically from the things you believe in defeat me that way. okay. I'm glad you're alive brother. That's it three years before the next election you're alive. You're organizing people to vote the way you want them to. Who doesn't that sound better than standing up for principle that isn't even a principal on the wearing a mask. Oh my god please. I love you bless you together we can survive this but only together don't i. I wanna play the second half of that song. I started with today. I'm brad paisley at the beginning of the episode here in second verse by elson krause. It's called whiskey lullaby and Moy said i wanna hear this psalm. Because i think a rough so many people have it and they did not need to check out and come back on the other side of the the second person that song make on the other side because i just have a couple of things i want to say to the general audience here of rumble. So please stay with me and And think about the story of this woman in the song none of us. None of us need to end the. It's a life worth living and you us. She tried her skin. Budging the trigger ankle He's big owned his picture skiing. Telsim krause and brad paisley with whiskey lullaby. None of us need end up like that. All of us have a right to live. Should wanna live and I thank you for letting me talk to you today before I move on into the file. Things they just want to say to to use my regular audience probably picking themselves up off the floor right now but You know that's why. Am i will fight for the things that we all believe in. I'll fight tooth and nail for them. I'm also going to do whatever i can to make sure we get out of this pandemic alive all of us so thank you for. Let me talk to people that we don't necessarily agree with today. I also want to thank our other underwriter for today's episode effect. Just take a second to do that. It's ray khan They have been with us now for a few months Rakhine of course makes those great wireless earbuds high-quality but unlike the other earbuds half the price so these were invented by the great songwriter and rapper. A ray j. of course he's got snoop dogg and melissa ethridge in a bunch of others using them. I love them You know i mean. The holiday season has started. People are looking for things to give to others and to give the gift of music and away where that music it sounds so good and it can be done and affordable price considering what some of these other things are what they're charging. You could six hours of playtime with them. It's got more bass very compact design your easy to carry around and it's amazing to just cut out all the other noise that surround the rome or whatever so give them a try or you gotta do is go on their on their website. Just go onto by ray khan dot com by raytheon dot com slash rumble. Go there today. The twenty percent off your recons. You'd be listening to this podcast. That's it thank you. Thank you ray j for supporting this podcast in. Thank you ray by rake on. That's b. u. I r. a. y. Con okay by ray dot com slash rumble. I'm sure you've all heard about how president elect button Fractured his foot playing with his dog. Got some broken bones in the foot and the foot has has like i went psycho. Your foot has a twenty percent of all the bones in your body. i don't know that's the sickest and probably right but it's pretty close and a lot of bones in your in your feet and And so he's busted up a couple of them here And now he's going to be one of those walking boots for the next several weeks. Maybe like in january This is not good. This is not i i. I thought they had cats. I thought the biden's had cats when we're not no. The dog got a dog dog and cats. Okay look i know what the republicans are thinking. This is an impeachable offense and They're gonna soon as they're back in session on january third. We're gonna find some way to stop him from taking office Because he's got a walking buddha. Th you know where this is heading so anyways well no Hope he hope he gets well. I know now. He's an avid lists. Aren't this podcast so get well. Take care of yourself. Stay off at like the doctor. Says it'll heal faster if you do that and And i also want to say here depending on what day. You're listening to this Tuesday of this week. Tuesday december first is rosa parks day. It is on this day. Sixty five years ago sixty five years ago this right here. This tuesday december first. That rosa parks refused to give up her seat on the bus. Montgomery alabama that that sort of began and kicked off the modern day civil rights movement And I was very lucky to get to meet her Many many years ago A year or two after the montgomery bus boycott which They won she. Dr king and the others montgomery the death rates in the harassment and everything that she had suffered through. She and her husband decided that they wanted to move and live some place where they could feel safe and so they moved to detroit. They went to detroit and they live the rest of their lives in michigan and because she was the receptionist for congressman. John conyers need walk into his office. There in detroit and there was rosa. Parks like mind explosion I've always felt that should be a national holiday to remind. Just the average american. How one person can make a difference. One action can make a difference in while it it you know. She and the the local group of So rights activists there hit for some time trying to figure out how they were going to put together this boycott and they were very smart about it and they they got so many people around the country supporting them and then finally when it went all the way to the courts and the supreme court. Yes and boom. There you go. That was the end of that. It was also the first step of many things that had happened in so many things. That still haven't happened to this day. But what if we taught our kids in school. We taught them while they were growing up. Yes there's an actual holiday to honor an average citizen for taking action and the action. She broke the law. She broke the law. So that we could make the law better and takes a lot of courage and I always grateful to her for that learning about her as a child and about her what she did finally meeting her and being able to talk to her such an unassuming gentle soul but but such a reminder to that there are tens of millions of people just like her. Any one of us can on any day decide. It's time i'm going to take a stand here and it may cost me. I may have to spend the night in jail to spend a week in jail. Lose my job but you know. Great changes only occur when those individuals decide that they've had enough so perhaps to you rosa parks. Thank you for being part of this world. you did Thank you for the joy you gave the people it came into that congressional office in in downtown detroit. It's much appreciate it and Into those of you. Who are listening. We've got a lot of work to do in in the upcoming podcasts. We're gonna talk about what we need to do to get prepared for the biden years He can't do it without us. he needs us. So let's be there and do these things that we need to do to make sure that the progressive agenda which is the agenda of the majority of americans things that they want to have happen to make their lives. Better more equitable. We've got work to do so we'll be talking about that and other things here as we roll now into the month of december we're in our twelve month of the podcast still not a full year yet and So grateful to be able to do this and to do this with all of you. I hope all of you had a good thanksgiving weekend. This past weekend And were safe and got to spend some time even if it was online or on skype or facetime or whatever with your loved ones It's so important that we be in touch with each other during this time. Thanks for letting me be in touch with you. Thanks for listening to rumble. We'll talk very soon. I'm michael moore and S wishes to everyone. Thank you john. the

four year football ninety percent seven two thousand five hundre ten feet buffalo orlando beary strang brad paisley michael moore Michael moore thirty five thirty six years four hundred dollars biden donald trump ten days wyoming ray khan alison krauss
Democracy Now! 2019-06-20 Thursday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:28 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-06-20 Thursday

"Hi, I'm Amy Goodman. Did you know you can get democracy? Now's daily news hour including our headlines stories even special web exclusives delivered directly to your Email inbox every day, just text democracy now all one word to six six eight six six to subscribe today. Make sure you never miss a single story once again just text democracy now. One word to six six eight six six and thank you so much. From New York. This is democracy now. I don't think reparations for something that happened years ago for none of us. Currently living responsible is a good idea. We've tried to deal with our original San of slavery, by fighting civil war by passing landmarks will rights legislation. We've elected an African American president as Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell dismisses growing calls for the US to pay reparations for slavery. The households historic hearing reparations to Mark the anniversary of June, teen speakers included the acclaimed writer, kind of hussy coats slate mitt rain for two hundred and fifty years on these shores, when it ended this country could have extended its hollow, principles life, liberty the suit of happiness to all, regardless of color, but America had other principles in mind and so forth, century. After the civil war black people were subjected to a relentless campaign of terror campaign that extended well into the lifetime of majority leader mccown kinda Hassi coats won't join us for the hour all that and more coming up. Welcome to democracy now. Democracy now dot org. Warren peace report. I'm Amy Goodman. Iran's announce that shot down a US navy drone claiming it entered Iranian airspace. Unnamed US officials have confirmed drone was shot down, but claimed it was in international territory. The head of Iran's Islamic revolutionary guard Major General sense salami said the incident should send a clear message to America not to cross Iran's border. The incident comes as tension continues to escalate between the two nations on Tuesday, the United States announced it was sending thousand more troops to the region last week. The United States blamed, Iran for attacking two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman, despite lack of any confirmed evidence, Iran has denied the attacks repeatedly said, it's not seeking war with the US the US. Navy said Wednesday fragments from mind that allegedly struck a Japanese owned tanker last week bear a strong resemblance to an Iranian mine. However, the president of the Japanese company that owns the tanker had said the vessel was not attacked by minds, but to flying objects, the UN and other international actors of coal for and de escalation of tensions. Meanwhile, Secretary of state, Mike Pompeo and other top Trump officials have reportedly been linking Ron to Qaeda Taliban during closed door briefings with lawmakers in with Democrats fear could be part of a plan to invoke the two thousand one authorization for the use of military force to attack Iran, during a tense hearing before House Democrats Wednesday. The State Department's special Representative for Ron Brian hook was grilled about the president so thority to declare war. This is California. Congressman Ted lieu questioning Brian hook under a concert. Futian does the president of the power to declare war. I think this is a discussion about a trick question under a constitution does the president of the power to declare war just ESO? No, we. Okay. Let me make it really easy for you under the constitution congress has powered the clear war, correct. Not a trick. Question, sir. Have you read the constitution? We will do everything. We are required to hook, heavy read the constitution. I have read the constant okay. Under the constitution. The framers gave congress the power to declare war, correct. Just. Yes or no? This is my understanding is that we're here to talk about Iran foreign policy, which I can do State Department special Representative to Iran Bryant hook did not respond to the question on Wednesday. The House Judiciary panel held historic hearing on reparations for slavery. The first of its kind over a decade lawmakers are considering a Bill that would create a commission to study the effects of slavery and make recommendations to congress, including a formal apology for slavery. This is actor and activist Danny Glover. This show, reparations policy is immoral democratic and economic imperative. I sit here, the great, great grandson. Of former slave, Mary Brown was free by the emancipation proclamation on January first eighteen sixty three despite much progress over the centuries. This hearing is yet another important step in the long in hit ruin struggle of African Americans secure reparations for the damages inflicted by enslavement and coast immense patient, and racial exclusionary policies acclaimed author ton of Hassi coats was the lead off speaker at yesterday's hearing. He will join us for the hour after headlines. Former vice president and twenty twenty presidential candidate Joe Biden is under fire for funding. Reminiscing about a civil relationship with segregationist senators in the seventies and eighties. Speaking at a fundraiser in New York City, Tuesday night, Biden, expressed nostalgia for his relationship with the late democratic pro secretary senators James e slenda of Mississippi and Herman town that Georgia Biden, reportedly said, quote, I was in a caucus with James o Eastland. He never called me. Boy, he called me son Biden, went onto say, quote, a guy. Like Herman Talmadge one of the meanest guys, they ever knew you go down the list of these guys will guess what at least there was some civility, we got things done Biden said jersey, Senator and twenty twenty democratic candidate, Cory Booker responded to the remarks in a statement saying, quote vice president Biden's relationships with proud segregationists, or not the model for how we make America safer, and more inclusive place, for black people and for everyone. He's wrong for using his relationships with these Linden Talmadge is examples of how to bring our country together Booker has cold for Biden to apologize. This is Biden's response, or you guys like the resilience would quivers called for it. He knows better not a racist bone. In my body. I've been involved in civil rights, my whole career period, period, period, Senator Booker was not the only presidential candidate to call out vice president Biden, California, Senator, comma, Harris accused Biden of coddling the reputations of segregationists, senators Warren Sanders and New York City. Mayor Bill de blouse. You also condemned Biden's remarks. Former White House communications director hope Hicks appeared before congress Wednesday in a closed-door session where she refused to answer most questions about our time in the White House. White House counsel said Hicks was immune from answering questions about her time, working as an advisor to President Trump, acclaimed dismissed by judiciary chair Jerry Nadler, who said it was ridiculous. And Democrats would destroy it in court lawmakers, subpoenaed, Hicks as part of their investigation into Trump's potential, obstruction of Justice corruption and abuse of power. Hicks did not respond to some questions about her involvement in Trump's two thousand sixteen campaign was reportedly asked what she knew about contacts between Trump associates and Russia. She also reportedly shared. She was unaware of any hush money payments made in the run-up to two thousand sixteen elections, ho picks now, serves an executive and chief communications officer at FOX corporation, parent company of Fox News in environmental news. The Trump administration's replaced, an Obama era energy rule, which was designed to close older coal plants and titan emissions restrictions. The new rules announced by the Environmental Protection Agency Wednesday allow states to set regulations for emissions and decide whether coal fired plants should make improvements. Obama's clean power plan sought to lower carbon emissions through federal regulations, but the plan never took effect to multiple legal challenges, from energy companies, and some states. Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club said, quote, Trump and Aiden. Straighter Wheeler are pushing a plan that will lead to thousands of deaths while ignoring the public's demands for climate action, just so a handful of wealthy coal executives can make a little more money. This is an immoral and an illegal attack on clean air, clean energy, and the health of the public Broun said, legal challenges, from at least six states, and multiple environmental groups are expected on Tuesday, Trump touted his energy policies during his first twenty twenty campaign rally in Florida. We all creating a future of American energy independence, and yet our air and water, or the cleanest, they've ever been by far research, by the American lung association refutes Trump's lies the group found that over four in ten Americans live with unhealthy air due to high levels of pollution and dangerous climate change and deuce ozone levels. The poor air quality can cause. Quote, premature death and serious health effects such as lung cancer asthma attacks cardiovascular damage and developmental and reproductive harm again this according to the American lung association. Chinese president Xi Jinping is in North Korea to meet with Kim Jong-Un marking his first presidential trip to North Korea, and the first Chinese state visit to North Korea since two thousand five the two leaders are expected to discuss the contentious denuclearization negotiationms with the US, which stalled after President Trump walked away from talks at a summit in Vietnam, and February came in sheet will also discuss the current state of trade relations between the two countries which have been severely impacted undercurrent sanctions against North Korea. President Xi is expected to meet with Trump at the twenty summit in Japan at the end of the month. Amidst a mounting trade war between China and the United States. A new U N report finds nearly seventy one million people were. Displaced last year by war persecution and other forms of violence that numbers more than two million people higher than the preceding year and represents a jump of sixty five percent from a decade ago, nearly twenty six million refugees were recorded in two thousand eighteen over half of them under the age of eighteen of those less than one hundred thousand were recycled over forty one million people worldwide were internally displaced and three and a half million were registered as a Silom seekers Syria represents the highest number of refugees at six point seven million while he THEO paeans represented, the largest newly displaced population last year, the vast majority internally displaced to intercommunal conflict, the annual report by the UN refugee agency was released to coincide with World Refugee to Refugee Day, which is today. International investigators said, Wednesday, three Russians and one Ukrainian will be charged with murder for launching a missile that down to Malaysia Airlines flight in two thousand fourteen over eastern Ukraine. The investigators say the plane was shot down by a Russian missile, the Russia has denied involvement in the attack, and they seventeen was on route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur carrying people from seventeen different countries. All two hundred ninety eight people on board were killed in the attack. Prosecutors say at trial in a Dutch court will be held next March. The suspects will likely be tried and upset you as you crane in Russia. Both have laws protecting citizens from extradition back in the US house budget committee held a hearing on poverty in America, Reverend Dr William barber co chair of the poor people's campaign, cold for moral budget, framing the pedantic of poverty as moral crisis. In society with our first constitutional duty is to stab Justice and promote the general Wim the general Wellman. That we were mouthing in Justice a positive the three point five percent of people are poverty, and people here who could teach this society, and we would walk away from our constitutional values, and walkaway from our spiritual value that tell us that it is dangerous for nation not to lift up the poor wherever Dr barber called the systemic inequalities in the United States direct results of policy decisions that work to keep one hundred forty million people and conditions of poverty in California. Democratic governor Gavin Newsom apologized Tuesday for his states, quote, systemic slaughter of California Indians, unquote governor nuisance you the apology, which accompanies and executive order at the site of the future Indian heritage centre in Sacramento, where he spoke before a group of tribal leaders governor Newsom told them it's called, genocide. No other way to describe it. And that's the way it needs to be described. History books. He said, Newsom, also announced the creation of a truth and healing council. In eighteen fifty California passed a law allowing for the separation of native American families their removal from tribal territories, and the creation of a system of indentured servitude. The Los Angeles Times reports, California's native American population declined from about one hundred fifty thousand to thirty thousand between eighteen forty six eighteen seventy nine Daniel so Gobbo of the Kuria band of Indians told the times, he appreciated gover newsome's actions and that quote, in any kind of relationship, there's recognition of wrongdoing and apology and healing starts to take place and poet musician and writer joy Harjo has become the first native American poet laureate. Harjo a member of the Muskogee creek nation is the author of eight poetry books, including the celebrated in mad love and war, which. Won the American book award in nineteen ninety as well as a memoir and stories for children and young adults. Harjo toll the New York Times Justice when I started writing poetry where two crucial time in American history. An planetary history poetry, as way to bridge to make bridges from one country to another one person to another one time to another. She said, and those are some of the headlines assist democracy now, democracy, now dot or the warrant piece report, I mean me Goodman, and I'm not mean safe. Welcome to listen view around the country and around the world. On Wednesday, a subcommittee of the House Judiciary held a historic hearing on reparations for slavery. The first of its kind in over a decade, Wednesdays here in coincided with June. Teens a day that commemorates June nineteenth eighteen sixty five when slaves and Galveston, Texas finally learned that the emancipation proclamation had abolished slavery this year, marks the four hundred anniversary of the trans Atlantic slave trade. Lawmakers are considering the Bill titled the commission to study and develop reparation proposals for African Americans act. The Bill was introduced by democratic Representative Sheila jackson-lee of Houston this year after former congressman John Conyers had championed the Bill for decades without success. The Bill carries the designation h r forty of reference to forty acres and a mule, one of the nation's first broken promises to. The newly freed slaves ahead of the hearing Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell was asked by reporter even Kende of spectrum news, whether the government should issue, a public apology for slavery. Reparations for something that happened a hundred and fifty years ago for whom none of us currently living responsible is a good idea. We've tried to deal with our original San of slavery by fighting a civil war passing landmark civil rights legislation. We've elected an African American president. I think we're always a working progress in this country, but no one currently alive was responsible for that. And I don't think we should be trying to figure out. How to compensate for it. First of all, we'd be pretty hard to figure out who to compensate. We've had waves of immigrants as well who've come to the country and experienced your Matic. Discrimination of one kind or another, so. No, I don't think preparations are good idea. Natwest Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell well on Wednesday. The award winning author hoc- coats, testified at the historic congressional hearing on reparations and took direct aim at McConnell. Yesterday. When asked about reparations Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell offered familiar reply. America's should not be held liable for something that happened one hundred fifty years ago since none of us currently alive are responsible. This rebuttal profits strange theory of governance, that American accounts, somehow bound by the lifetime of generations, but well into this century, the United States was still paying pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers. We ought treat treaties that date back. Some two hundred years despite no-one being alive, who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we have sold individually responsible for, but we American citizens and thus bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond individual impersonal reach. It would seem ridiculous dispute invocations of the founders of the greatest generation on the basis of a lack of membership in either group we recognize lineage as a generational trust as inheritance. And the real dilemma posed by reparations is just that a dilemma of inheritance. It is impossible to imagine America without the inheritance of slavery, as historian at Baptist has written slave -ment, quote shaped every crucial aspect of the economy and politics of America. So that by eighteen thirty six more than six hundred million almost half of the economic activity in the United States. Derive directly or indirectly from the cotton produce by the millionaire slaves by the time, the insulated, where emancipated they comprise, the largest single asset in America three billion in eighteen sixty dollars more than all the other assets in the country, combined the method of cultivating. This asset was neither gentle cajoling nor persuasion. But torture rape and child trafficking. Enslavement rain for two hundred and fifty years on these shores when it ended this country could have extended its hollow, principles life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, all regardless of color. But America had other principles in mind and so forth century after the civil war black people were subjected to a relentless campaign of terror campaign that extended well into the lifetime of majority leader McConnell. It is tempting to divorce this modern campaign of Tara of plunder from enslavement, but the logic of enslavement of white supremacy respects, no such borders. And the God of bondage was lustful and begat, many, heirs who data's and convict leasing vagrancy laws in debt, pinheads, redlining racist, GI bills, poll, taxes and state state-sponsored terrorism. We grant that Mr. McConnell was not alive for apple Matic's, but he was alive for the electrocute of George Steny, he was alive for the blinding of Isaac Woodward, he was alive to witness tok receipt in his native Alabama and a regime, premised on electoral feft majority leader McConnell cited civil rights legislation yesterday as well. He should because he was alive to witness the harassment, jailing and betrayal of those responsible for that legislation by governments one. To protect them. He was alive for the red lining of Chicago and the looting of black homeowners of some four billion dollars victims of that plunder, very much alive today. I am sure they'd love a word with the majority leader with they know but this committee must know is that, while emancipation dead bolted the door against the bandits of America, Jim crow, which the windows wide open. And that is the thing about Senator McConnell's something, it was one hundred fifty years ago, and it was right now, the typical black family in this country has one tenth the wealth of the typical family black women die in childbirth, four times, the rate of white women. And there is, of course, the shame of this land of the free boasting, the largest prison population on the planet of which the descendants of the enslaved make up the largest share. The matter reparations is one of making amends and directly dress. But it is also a question of citizenship in h off forty this body has a chance to both make good on its two thousand nine apology. Slave -ment and reject Fairweather. Patriotism to say that a nation is both. It's credits and debits that if Thomas Jefferson Mattis soda, Sally Hemmings that if d day Mattis sodas, black Wall Street, that Valley, Forge Mattis sodas fought pillow, because the question really is not whether we will be tied to the something's of our pass. But whether we courageous enough to be tied to the whole of them. Thank you. That was award-winning author kind of Hassi coats lead off witness before the House Judiciary committee on Wednesday. His seminal two thousand fourteen essay that case for reparations help spur new calls to. Amends, for slavery one. We come back, he joins us for the rest of the hour. Feeling. Shimmer prayer for cleaning, the water by poet, musician joy Harjo, who's become the first native American poet, laureate. This is democracy now. Democracy now dot org. The Warren peace report. I'm Amy Goodman, with Nermeen shake as we continue to talk about the call for slavery reparations. We spend the rest of the hour with tunnel. Hussy coats, who testified at Wednesday's hearing. He's the author of several books, including we were eight years in power, an American tragedy. He's also the author of between the world and me for which he received the two thousand fifteen national book award for non fiction. He's now a writer in residence at New York University, China Ho Si coaches seminal two thousand fourteen essay that case for reparations help spur new Kohl's to make amends for slavery today. He joins us for the hour, turn hoc-. Thanks so much for being with us. Can you talk about the origins? Of this hearing, the first and a dozen years. And the Bill that is being considered in what you hope to come of this. Did you ever dream that this is what would come of? Well, it's been going on for decades, but five years ago, you intensified the discussion with your piece on reparations. Yeah, it's been I have to be honest. It's been absolutely fascinating to watch. I think the thing that people need to understand. About the fight for reparations is precisely how old it is. I mean, this, this goes back to Belinda, Royal who sued these state of Isaac, Royal back in post, colonial times after the American revolution up to Kelly house in the nineteenth century into James form in senior who was a leader. It's Nick, making his demand for reparations up through in Cobra people like professor. Charles Ogle trees, that this is a long, long fight and published the case for reparations in the Atlantic. You know my hope was to just make my entry into that fight. I didn't expect it to quite get here. I think this is definitely progress. I don't think this is anywhere near the end goal. But I think yesterday was progress, let you made, of course, number of extremely powerful remarks during your testimony. Among which you said, quote, it's impossible to imagine America without the inheritance of slavery. So for our international audience, and others who aren't quite as familiar with this history. Could you explain what you mean by that? It's impossible to understand America. Without this inheritance. Well, sure the two Greek crimes in American history is obviously, the destruction of this country's native American, the near destruction say not that the destruction the near destruction of this country's native American population theft of their land and onto work. That land was brought in a native Africans into this country, beginning in sixteen nineteen those twin processes, profoundly altered, the shape of the world and made this country possible. Obviously, first of all, you know, the land on which America and Americans currently reside was that was the land of native Americans but the people brought into to break that lane. Just transformed, the profits derived from slavery are more extreme than I think a commonly acknowledged said yesterday in eighteen sixty the combined worth of the four million Inslee black people in this country with some three billion dollars. Nearly seventy five billion in today's share of dollars. Cotton in eighteen sixty was this country's largest expert, not just its largest expert. It was the majority of exports out of this country. So many financial perspective, just the economics of it. It's absolutely impossible to imagine America, without enslavement the onset of the civil war, the greatest preponderance, the greatest population per capita of millionaires and multimillionaires in this country was in the Mississippi River valley. It wasn't in. Boston wasn't in Chicago wasn't in New York. The richest people in this country was slaveholders. Most of our earliest presidents was slaveholders. And the fact that they were. Presidents is not incidental to the fact that they they're slate to, to their slaveholding. That was how they built their wealth. That was how Thomas Jefferson built his wealth. That was how George Washington built his wealth, individual sleighs with the equivalent of say, owning a home today. They were people, but turned into objects of extreme wealth just from the economic perspective, there's that and just forgive me for extending a little bit. But there's also the fact of what America actually is culturally, our greatest export today is entertainment and, and in his culture, it is impossible to imagine American culture without jazz about the blues without hip hop. It's impossible to imagine American cinema without regrettably birth of a nation. It's impossible to imagine American Linda at this point without James Baldwin without Tony Moore's. All of these the primary secondary territory fruits of slavery. And so if you strip slavery out of America, you strip black people out of America, you really. Don't have in America, turn hoc- coats, I wanted to go to a cliff of use speaking at this historic hearing yesterday before the House Judiciary committee chair answering chairman Jerry Nadler. It's been said, I think alluded to repeatedly throughout this conversation that somehow wealthy African Americans are immune to these effects. But in addition to the wealth gap that cited one thing that, that folks should keep in mind, is that, quote unquote, wealthy African Americans and not the equivalent of quote unquote wealthy. White Americans in this country. The average. African American and country, making one hundred thousand dollars, you know, decent money actually lives in the same kind of neighborhood that the average white family, making thirty five thousand dollars a year lives in that is totally tied to the legacy of enslavement and Jim crow and the, the, the input any idea in the mind, the white people and black people somehow deserving of different things. If I injured, the injury persists, even after actually commit the AC if I stab you, you may suffer complications along after that initial actual stabbing if I shoot you, you may suffer complications long after that initial shooting. That's the case with African Americans that people well within the living memory of this country that still suffering from the aftereffects. Thank you very much. So that is kind of hoc- coats, speaking at the hearing, and win that I want to go back to just a clip of what the Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell said. I heard it said, just earlier, for instance that. I don't think reparations for something that happened hundred fifty years ago for him. None of us currently living or responsible is a good idea. We've tried to deal with our original sin of slavery, by fighting a civil war by passing landmark civil rights legislation. We've elected an African American president. So I wanna point out that the question that he was asked about reparations about apologies for slavery was asked by a young African American reporter named even Ken end of spectrum. His comment is being heard everywhere. But the reporter herself is only being talked about unto microscope now and the significance of this tunnel hoc-, and then if you can talk about the Bill, that's being considered. I mean you yourself said when you started your historic peace, five years ago, in the case for rations you yourself, weren't convinced. First of all, I wanna thank you. You know. You know, a shouting out that before that actually, has meaning because you need a black reported there in the first place, actually asked the question to set all of this in motion. So that's true. No, no, no. I you know, and to be honest with you, for instance, the previous answer. I just gave you on the economics of slave -ment and its relationship to to this country. I would not have been able to give you that answer. I think when I started in two thousand fourteen actually was at that point four reparations, but you're referring back to something I wrote in two thousand twelve when I was again, I wouldn't been able to give you that answer. I didn't have that level of knowledge and beyond that, I didn't have the level of knowledge on how it persisted. I mean, I had a vague sense of segregation Jim crow excetera in the hundred years after but I didn't know about red, not, not, not in that degree of detail. And I didn't know how this extraction as call it of wealth from the African American community. Lawn through the state into the white community through three redlining through the FHA loan program through TI. I just didn't have knowledge of that. And once I saw that it's like, wow, this is persistent, you know, a pattern of, of extraction that meets a really, really radical. And at that point, reparations may total total sense to me. But I that it made sense to plenty of people long before it made sense to me, antenna hussy, could you talk about? I mean, how do you think conversations about reparations in the American public sphere have changed since the publication of your piece? I'm not that piece got a lot of attention. I'm not totally convinced that that's why this is happening right now. Hey, did you know just really want to say again that people have been fighting this battle for a long time? So it's like you put drops of water in a glass, and eventually, you know, the glass tips over, and you see some sort of larger effect I was building on the work. You know, when I published in two thousand fourteen only what ten fifteen is that have been Randall Robinson's, that debt, as I mentioned earlier to efforts of Charles, they've been all of these little, you know, sort of efforts that didn't get the same degree of coverage. That's the first thing. And I also think having your first black president followed up by someone who I've referred to as your first white president has had a tremendously radicalising effect on a lot of people. Can you talk about? I mean this discussion about reparations immediately last night on the talk shows. What are they talking about giving checks who exactly would be involved who would get the money? How would this be determined? Going back to when ABRAHAM LINCOLN signed a Bill Mansa, painting and slave people. The slave owners around Washington DC being given reparations for each and slave person that they free. What was it three hundred dollars a person? Right. I can't I can't remember the number. But yeah, you're exactly correct. In fact Lincoln offered that to several this idea of what it was called compensated emancipation at the time, and he offered it to several of the border, slave states, Delaware. I believe Marilyn Kentucky also that that was a plan to, to compensate the actual slaveholders, and I should say, that's a global pattern throughout history, the country of Haiti for having the temerity to actually liberate itself from his slave was was forced to pay reparations to France, the country that actually enslave, the people that so this is a global pattern with people, when slave, it is only questions of power that we find ourselves able to continents, the idea that people who've done the enslaving should have been conference. And that was fine. And not just people who weren't slave with people who are suffering affects at afterwards should not be compensated. Talk about can I just cannot cannot add one just one quick thing, also this whole thing about who should get a check and should we cut checks? I understand those questions. That's great. Those people should support HR forty though. Because that's what he does it tries to get that figured out and get that mass figured out the best way to it. But if we don't actually have a study, we can't actually answer those questions. You can't ask a doctor to make a diagnosis before. There's an actual examination. Those people who have all of those questions support h off would it should be as big as supporters? I want to go back to some of the enduring legacy of slavery in the US, the house budget committee held a hearing on poverty in America, and Reverend Dr William barber co chair of the poor people's campaign called for immoral budget, framing the epidemic of poverty as a quote moral crisis. In infrasonic to with our first constitutional duty is to stab list. Justice and promote the general Wim the general Wellman. That we will allow the in Justice a positive for the three point five percent of people are poverty, and people here who could teach this society, and we would walk away from our constitutional values, and walkaway from our spiritual values. Tell us that it is dangerous for nation not to lift up the poor. Reverend Dr barber is wearing a sash that says, Jesus was a poor man. And I just want to point out. So you're having this hearing on June teeth and the budget committee is having this historic hearing on June teeth, and you're actually speaking it exactly the same time that hearing culminated three days of the poor people's campaign, of course, picked up from the last year of Dr Martin Luther King's life as he led the poor people's campaign democracy. Now is there a Monday at the trinity university when Dr barber and doctor? Liz THEO, Harris question. Nine presidential candidates about this issue of the connections of poverty, and racism, saying this issue of extreme poverty was not raised once in one of the presidential debates of two thousand sixteen. Can you talk about this trajectory from sleigh? What we're describing today. Yeah. Again, I think, in this moment, you know, one of the reasons why, you know, this sort of. All of these questions that may have been, you know, off to table in two thousand sixteen off the table and in two thousand eight it's not that. People weren't raising them. You know, it's not that people weren't weren't making the point but I just think you know in reaction to what's going on to this country in this country right now. People are just much much more open, you know, and in terms of poverty and race in this country. Again, you know, one of the things that I really, really wanted to stress the level of poverty specifically that you see the African American is not AXA dental. It's not actually this was, this is part of the process, the process of insulate -ment involves stealing something from someone. It involves taking someone something from someone Jim crow was theft. First and foremost, it was staff if I if I tax you or if I tell you, you have to be a loyal to this country and pledge fealty to it's laws, but then I don't give you the same degree of protection. I don't give you the same access to resources that I give to another group of people, I've effectively stolen something from you. I've stolen your tax money. I've stolen your field t-. I've stolen your loyalty. So. So when the state of Mississippi for instance, you know, taxes, black people, and then builds one facility of education, and another fus in one facility for education for whites then inferior facility for blacks that Steph Steph, if I build a, you know, a public pool system and until you can't use that public pool system that's theft. And so that, that, that is the long history of this country doesn't in again, conservatively until nineteen sixty eight and so there are people who very much alive who've experienced that who are suffering the aftereffects effects of that. And that's as far as you know, the whole movement around reparations is about, and I suspect, I didn't hear, you know, Dr Reverend Barbara's comments. But, but I suspect, there's this quite a bit of overlap there, too. I wanna ask about, what may be a changing perception of. The position that the African American community in the US is in and possible change in what to be done about it. A recent survey by the Associated Press found that fifty two percent of Americans believe the government doesn't put enough resources into improving the conditions of African Americans but only thirty percent think the government is obliged to compensate for past racial discrimination, your response to that. And the distinction between the two. I think people again, I think people have said this yesterday. I think people are very, very uncomfortable. When we start talking about the things in America's past that do not credit us again. We have no problem at all taking credit for things that people who are no longer here, you know who, who. In our past. We have no problem taking credit for those efforts you take somebody like Mitch McConnell who does not want to be responsible for enslavement that happened a hundred and fifty years ago, but yet and still wants the right to operate his operators business will operate his his career any building that was built by slave people. And so we have no problem taking the credits the benefits for what was done in our past. But when you start talking to people about actually paying that, you know, back actually, you know, some sort of evenness around that, you know, a lot of discomfort comes up, I understand that I would like to also take only my paycheck and not have to pay my bills. I would like that to that would be great. You know, but I think if this idea of patriotism, citizenship, is to mean, anything, you know, you can't be a fan weather friend of your country. You can't decide that you're past only matters you know, that you want in vote, you know, your country as land of the free, when you wanna go invade Iraq, for instance. And then, you know, when you're being called to be responsible for what made it possible for that country to be called land of the free in the first place to act like you know, you don't own anybody anything, you're not you're not part. It's especially as I said, yes. When a lot of this happened in your own lifetime. It isn't a pass. It happened while you were Mitch McConnell was twenty six years old, by the time to Voting Rights Act was passed, you know. So this is very well within the lifetime of living people today, I wanna go to Coleman Hughes columnist for Quillet undergraduate at Columbia, University, who spoke out against reparations. I understand that reparations or about what people are owed, regardless of how well they're doing. I understand that. But the people who are owed for slavery, are no longer here and we're not entitled. To collect on their debts. Reparations by definition are only given to victims. So the moment you give me reparations. You've made me into a victim without my consent. Stana say coats, can you respond to combing Hughes, who testified at the same hearing that you let off? Yeah. I mean, I think that the testimony was that one should not receive payment. That would probably properly, be due to the enslaved. But this country is this very day, receiving payment that was due to its enslavers. That's, that's the way inheritance works. You know, in this country are however one might feel about that. If I assemble a massive money, I have the right to pass that onto my kid. My kid has the right to do whatever an impasse it on today a kit. And so there's something fundamentally injust, if I have secured that money by taking it from one group, and then pass that money onto my kid my kid, by the way continues continues to do injustice, to the descendants of that other group, and we're allowed to continually collect. I don't want to fall into this trap, and I really, really tried to make this clear yesterday, this didn't end with his slave reparations isn't just about enslavement. There was a two hundred and fifty years of enslavement that period of theft after one hundred years of terror that period. Theft, and I would argue a fact I present system of mass incarceration emerges, right out of that. And so this notion that, that a nation somehow only. Especially when we're talking about, it's debits that it only lasts through the lifetime of its present generation. It's clearly ridiculous. The state itself would fall apart if that were true. All of our treaties were broken when this generation dot of all about taxes and responsibilities. If we said to pension as we will no longer pay you because the people that made the decisions about those was no longer live. We would have huge problem as I said yesterday to this very day or at least I should say, as recently as two thousand seventeen we were paying pensions to the civil war widows. I mean, this is tremendous that we would recognize ties to the past when it comes to certain things, but not other things in Tennessee cuts. We have to break, and I also wanna point out, ten Hassi speaking to us from Washington D C, where he testified yesterday. And he's speaking in front of an image of the capital which was built by enslaved people, China hoc- coats writer in residence at New York University, author of a number of books. Including we were eight years in power, an American tragedy. That includes his case against reparations this case for reparations will be back with tenneessee in a minute. Spanish. Way. Who the serval unbroken, by the staple singers, this is democracy now? I mean Goodman with Nermeen shave democratic presidential contender. Joe Biden is undefined for funding. Reminiscing about his civil relationship with segregation of senators in the nineteen seventies and nineteen eighty s speaking define razor at the Carlyle hotel in New York City, Tuesday night, Biden expressive, nostalgia, for his relationship with the late democratic pro segregation, senators James Eastland of Mississippi and Herman toll merge of Georgia Biden, reportedly said, quote, I was in a caucus with James Eastland. He never called me. Boy, he called me son, Biden, said Biden, went on to say a guy like Herman Talmadge one of the meanest guys ever. No, you go down the list of all these guys. Will guess what? At least there were some civility, we got things done Biden, which widely criticized by other democratic presidential contenders. He was asked on Wednesday if he would occur. Holidays. Are you guys? For what Quakers called for it. He knows better not a racist bone in my body. I've been involved in civil rights, my whole career period, period, period, Biden spoke off to Senator Cory Booker had issued a statement. Read in quote, vice president Biden's relationships with proud segregationists are not the model for how we make America, a safer and more inclusive place for black people. And for everyone, frankly, I'm disappointed that he hasn't issued an immediate apology for the pain. His words are dredging up for many Americans. He should Booker said, other candidates also weighed in Senator Bernie Sanders tweeted, I agree with Cory Booker. This is specially true at a time when the Trump administration's trying to divide us up with its racist appeals, New York. Mayor Bill de Blasios poster photo of his family on Twitter and wrote quote, it's two thousand nineteen and Joe Biden is longing for the good old days. Civility typified by James Eastland Easson thought my, what multi-race? Family should be a legal and that whites were entitled to the pursuit of dead. And words, Senator Kamala Harris said quote. Yes, it concerns me deeply if those men had their way, I would not be in the United States. Senate Senator Elizabeth Warren said, quote, I'm not here to criticize other Democrats, but it's never ok to celebrate. Segregationists, never Tana hussy coats, your thoughts. This is what same same. I mean you know. I, I mean job on shouldn't be president. You know, obviously, I don't think I'm breaking news, if you end up being the nominee better him in him, then Trump. But, you know, I think that's a really really low standard. I think when you have is somebody who. Celebrating their relationship. The ability of, you know, a person who saw no problem depriving an entire population of African Americans in this state of the right to vote the right to participate as American citizens. The fact that that person was polite to them. I mean, it's nice that Eastland never called hotel, whoever was never call Joe Biden. Boy is nice that Joe Biden had had that privilege. But the fact that Matt is still buying owes his very presence in the race right now to first black President Barack Obama. And if it were up to Eastland. And if it were up to Talmadge Barack Obama would not only not be in the White House. He actually would not exist. So I, I don't know what is going on in your brain. We, you know, you decide to celebrate the fact that these people, what polite they could afford to be polite because the, the, the major opposition in this state that being African Americans. Was effectively at that time and time to, you know, most of Korea wiped out at a political process, and he raced as an electorate, Joe Biden says that. These been involved with civil rights is entire careers. Remembering Joe Biden opposed busing, and bragged about it in the nineteen seventies, Joe Biden is on record as being to the right of actually, the New Democrats in the nineteen ninety s on the issue of mass incarceration. When it more people sent sent sentenced to the death penalty when it more jails. So, you know, I just I I'm not surprised. I mean, this is Joe Biden news. Is that sending somebody shows you who they all believe them? This is Joe Biden is, but tenneessee what about your assessment of the other candidates in the democratic presidential field, right doing again? Reliving the Atlantic. With Elizabeth Warren. I did. Yes, I did can you talk about that? I know. Not to stop Tibet, China hoc-. What are you paying particular attention to with these candidates? I mean, it was interesting yesterday after Biden made his comments to donors on Tuesday night, and said, you know, Eastland didn't call me Voy. He called me son now again Senator Eastland who talked about African Americans as the inferior race was called, the voice of the white south. Yes. As you pointed out, obviously, he didn't call him, boy, Joe Biden is white, but you're the first two people to speak out as far as I could tell were first, Cory Booker, and he referred to Corey immediately as Corey said Corey should apologize to him, Joe Biden, and then. As well. You had Kamla Harris speaking out the African American Senator from California. And then, of course, Warren, and Biden, rather, Warren, and Bernie Sanders and do Blasi you. But what are you looking for in these candidates? The stands you want to see them taking. I think I would like to see somebody listen, it's understandable, where a large portion of this country is. They want somebody who can beat Trump. I get that. And there is a feeling among certain people that Joe Biden can out, white man. Donald trump. I'm not convinced that I don't think anybody can white men, Donald Donald Trump. I hope that what will see eventually is something more than I can beat Donald Trump. Donald, I can be Donald Trump should be the floor. I get that beating Donald Trump is extremely extremely important. I get that. But I just hope that, that's the floor and not the ceiling, well, one of the leading contenders is a Senator Bernie Sanders in the twenty twenty upcoming elections. So I'd like to go to him being questioned about the issue of represent of reparations by the views sunny halston earlier this year. Boy, to believe that at a time of tremendous disparity, the wealth gap, for example, between the white community in the black community is, like, ten to one health, disparities are terrible. Environmental disparities terrible. Flint, Michigan comes to mind. So I think what we have got to do is pay attention to distressed communities, black communities, Latino communities and white. Unity's all over this country at as president, I pledge to do that. Deport reparations. What do you mean by reparations for slave? Depend on what does that mean? Exactly money. Well, I think that right now our job is to address the crises facing the American people in our communities. And I think there are better ways to do that than just writing out a check. So that's Senator Bernie Sunday's viewer response hussy to, to his position on reparations why I think I should I should say before I say, as my understanding is that Senator sale is now supports h off forty. I think I think that's where we are. So I'm obviously pretty pleased about that. I listen when we had this dust up a few years ago when I was repeatedly told was, you know, it's not class or race. It's both. And I agree. So I think all of the things that, you know, Bernie Sanders just listed about paying attention to distress communities should be done. And we should also have reparations. So I don't see those things as in conflict. It's not clear to me why, you know, both can't be on the defect. It was never clear to me. Why both can't can't be on the agenda. Why can't why can't associate themselves with the massive gaps in wealth that don't just exist in the African American community, but exist in communities across the country? And at the same time recognize that there's something specific about the gap in the African American community is tied to the specificity of American history. But as I said, I'm happy Senate San now supports h off what he I think that's progress. And finally, where does this Bill go from here and talk about even its name HR forty where it? Comes from. Yeah. I mean obviously you know he comes from the field. The letter, given by general Sherman, the whole forty acres in a meal, this reference back to that. I don't know where this goes. I don't know where this goes. I'm shocked. We're here. I've said that repeated. I'm surprised. We'll even here I am a writer and journalist, you know, soon to be novel. It's those preoccupations that, that's my. Disposition. I'm not a very good for NAS Decatur. I would not have told you that you would have had a black president in two thousand eight I would not have told you that, you know, they would have been hearings, you know, in a house floor on reparations on H off forty I would not have predicted any of that. I don't know where we go. I think you know, in my mind, I try not to get too high and try not to get too low as, as it said, in my mind, this is this is still a generational struggle. And that's how I expected, you know, that, that generations after I'm gone will be we'll continue to fight this battle, and it's always been a generational. Generational struggle has he cuts? Thank you for being with us writer in residence at New York University, author of a number of books, including we were eight years in power in American tragedy, between the world and may end his upcoming book, a novel, the water dancer, I, mainly Goodman, with Nermeen shape. Thanks so much for joining us.

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Rosa Parks

Historical Figures

57:37 min | 1 year ago

Rosa Parks

"Rosa parks rocked back and forth in her seat as the boss made its way through downtown. It felt like another normal day. The air was hot and the sun cast long shadows down the sleepy Alabama street as it did every day. The bus stopped outside the Empire Theater Rosa watched as a group of white passengers stepped on board and move to their seats but one of the new white passengers was left standing the whites. Only section at the front of the bus was full. The bus driver ordered a row of black passengers to stand stand up and make room for the man three passengers complied but Rosa didn't. She didn't feel like moving the driver driver. I'd Rosa through the rear view mirror once more. He ordered her to move. She met his gaze and continued to sit defiant. She wasn't going anywhere at least not of her own free will she couldn't know it at the time but Rosa Rosa Parks had just made herself a symbol that would spurn one of the most successful protests in American history. Hi I'm Vanessa Richardson. Send and I'm Carter Roy Welcome to historical figures apar- cast original every other Wednesday. We discuss different persons lasting historical compact unique personality and impression on the world around them. You can find episodes of historical figures and all other par- cast originals four free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream historical figures for free on spotify just open the APP tap browse and type historical figures in the search bar that podcast. We are grateful for you our listeners when you allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach shout on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network and if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. See you wherever you're listening. It really does help we also now have merchandise head to park cast dot com slash merch for more information our our audio biographies cover big lives but we like to focus on little known facts. Today we're discussing. Rosa parks dubbed the mother of the Civil Civil Rights movement. She's most famous today for refusing to give up a seat on a bus in Montgomery Alabama. Her Act of Resistance Against Racist Segregation Segregation launched a boycott that proved pivotal to the fight for racial equality but Rosas activism extended beyond bus protests. It's an active member of the N. double. ACP Rosa championed black victims of sexual assault organized acts of civil disobedience and founded educational initiatives for disadvantaged students of Color Rosa Parks was born Rosa Louise as MacAulay on February fourth nineteen thirteen INTAS Gigi Alabama her early life was unstable as her parents separated when Rosa it was only two roses birthplace in Gigi insured. She grew up in the center of the nascent civil rights movement prominent Black Intellectual Booker. T. Washington was active there as soon as Rosa was old enough to understand issues of race. She was hyper aware of the inequality as well every Sunday she worshiped at the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Historically Black denomination initially founded to promote an abolitionist geology and then later devoted to racial equality. When Rosa was eleven years old she moved with her mother and brother to Montgomery Alabama Alabama where her grandparents lived there. She continued her harsh education about racial politics by the early nineteen twenties the white supremacist hate group that Ku Klux Klan was increasingly active for a decade after the civil war the K. K. K. had terrorized people of color color in the southern United States the hate group had declined to the point of nearly disbanding in the late eighteen hundreds but white supremacy experienced a resurgence surgeons in response to the growing number of immigrants in the US by the time Rosa was a young child the KKK boasted more than four million Leeann active members fearful of racially motivated attacks each evening roses grandfather laid a loaded shotgun across his lap APP and slept in a rocking chair near the front door eager to help defend her home and family. Rosa took to sleeping on the floor beside him. You're so when Rosa Parks was eleven. Her mother enrolled her in the private segregated Montgomery Industrial School for girls. It was the best education available to a black girl in the city despite her young age Rosa had to work to pay for her tuition. She took a janitorial job at the school pool cleaning up rooms after classes and every day she saw little reminders of the inequality she faced the white students had a bus Rosa and other black students didn't she walked to school every day. Even in the winter in her autobiography biography Rosa Parks My story Rosa wrote. I'd see the bus pass every day but to me. That was a way of life we we had no choice but to accept. What was the custom. The bus was among the first ways I realized there was a black world and a white world hold on during her walks. Rosa often passed by white children and adults who would shout racial slurs at her unprovoked. Some children even tossed pasta rocks at her as she walked by to cope with the stress. Rosa found comfort in her religious beliefs. She reminded herself that her bullies were simply lost sinners and prayed for them while they harassed her. She knew she couldn't do anything more concrete to defend herself because the police wouldn't look kindly on a black girl fighting white people even if they'd started it. Rosa attended high school at the laboratory school at the historically Black Alabama state teachers college but unfortunately she had to drop out a year later to help care for her ailing grandmother shortly after Rose's Rose's grandmother died her mother to grew. Ill now the family's primary caretaker. Rosa needed to work to support them and provide medical medical care education was out of the question at least until someone new entered Rosa's life and encouraged her to go back to school in Nineteen thirty one when Rosa was eighteen a mutual friend introduced her to a twenty eight year old barber named Raymond Parks. It was clear during their very first meeting that Raymond was romantically interested in her but Rosa didn't return his affection one of her biggest reservations nations lay in the fact that Raymond was a light skinned black man Rosa didn't find him physically attractive and she also doubted that a man and who could pass for white could really understand her day to day struggles as a dark skinned black woman however as their friendship blossomed Rosa learned that Raymond was passionate civil rights advocate and a member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People War N. double. ACP She was surprised to find that although Raymond dressed well and was an intelligent and thoughtful speaker he barely attended school at all aw thanks to segregation in time a romance blossomed between Raymond and Rosa and they were married on December eighteenth nineteen thirty thirty two when she was nineteen and he was twenty nine Raymond Encourage Rosa to pursue the education he'd never ever had and with his support. She returned to high school and finally completed her degree. Soon after Rosa got a job as a seamstress at a department store you're while Raymond continued on his work with the N. double. ACP although Rosa and Raymond shared beliefs about equal rights initially she kept her her distance from the organization N. Double ACP members feared reprisal from white supremacists and they regularly came to meetings heavily armed should did they need to defend themselves on one occasion. Raymond volunteered to host a meeting at his in Rosa's house shaken by the number of men who arrived lived armed Rosa walked out of the House and sat on the porch hunched over with her head between her knees while the men inside discussed politics Sushi's sat alone in the dark waiting and fear for the first bullets to fly in the moment Rosa was paralyzed by fear violence silence but long-term she grew increasingly frustrated with these sexist assumption that her husband could take risks and join the N. double. ACP while she she needed to be shielded from it so in nineteen forty three thirty year old Rosa finally joined for herself once again sexism reared its head at the N. double ACP as the only woman to attend on her first night. Rosa was tasked with taking taking meeting notes. She was elected secretary at that same meeting but she soon had the opportunity to advocate for women and Black people alike has the chapter began to examine the racial inequality in how police investigated sexual assaults. It was all too common at the time for black men to be falsely accused of raping white women if those men were lucky they'd go to court but still have to plead their case before racist judges judges and juries if they were unlucky. The accused were often lynched by white mobs before their trials began black. Women men also suffered from unjust investigations when they filed reports. The police rarely took their cases seriously rape survivors of have color had few opportunities to pursue justice especially if their attacker was white a particularly egregious case involved a woman named re resc- Taylor on the evening of September third nineteen forty four was walking home from church with two friends when a group of white men abducted abducted her and gang raped her after the assault REC- reported to the police what had happened her friend corroborated the account a few hours later a police officer found the rapists and asked if they had an alibi imen- confess that they'd raped reecey and the police halted the investigation there without pressing charges news of this crime and the polices inaction made it back to the N. Double Lacey Pe- later that month Rosa volunteered to investigate receives case firsthand not only to uncover the truth of the matter but also so to draw national attention to the injustice but before Rosa could capture the attention of the press. She drew scrutiny from the police piece. She stepped off the bus near receives home in Abbeville Alabama to find the sheriff armed and waiting for her already. Roseau walked right right past him to enter Recipes House for the duration of their meeting. Rosen noticed the patrol car that drove back and forth in front of the house she he was resolved to just ignore the police until receives front door burst open and the sheriff stepped inside. He warned Rosa that he didn't approve. You've of troublemakers and urged her to leave. Rosa packed up her belongings and departed. She was content to let the sheriff think he'd. He'd won this battle. She bring him the war up next. I we'll discuss how Rosa parks and the N. double. ACP advocated for rec- Taylor fame money obsession. These things can make athletes seem superhuman but what happens when those in professional sports reveal the darker side of their humanity every week minute show sports criminals investigate some of the most significant sports crimes throughout the world and we explore explore the dramatic collision course are most revered athletes and the underbelly of society you'll learn about these athletes rise through competitive sports and and how the discipline and motivation that brought them to the top served a push them into their downfall. Whether you're a rabid fan or a passive observer these stories carry significance significance for us all listen and subscribed to sports criminals for free on spotify and anywhere you listen to podcasts and if you hang around after the end of the show you can hear a clip of the first episode of sports criminals now back to the story in September nineteen forty four thirty one year old N. w. c. p. activist Rosa Parks met met with rape survivor rec- Taylor in Abbeville Alabama local police tried to stem roses advocacy attempting to intimidate and even threaten in her into letting receives case disappear the moment she was back in Montgomery Rosa returned to the end of Lacey Pe- office and explained the encounter counter to their President Edgar Nixon in response to the police's tactics. Rosa and Nixon founded the committee for equal justice for the rights of Mrs Mrs Resea- Taylor as subgroup of the N. double. ACP This committee was comprised of a dozen leading black activists that were dedicated to making taking Taylor story public knowledge. They sent dozens of letters to the office of Alabama Governor Chauncey sparks urging him take the case to trial in one letter Rosa wrote. I know that you will not fail to let the people of Alabama know that there is aqel justice for all citizens roses efforts paid off and the incident was picked up by local newspapers then by press around the nation by February of nineteen forty five Alabama. Governor sparks was forced to take action. He reluctantly agreed to launch a second can special grand jury investigation into the crime but the special jury ultimately brought no charges against the accused rapists. Rosa was furious all her efforts had stirred up public support an outrage but Taylor still couldn't secure justice one by one. The frustrations of dealing with inequality on a daily basis started to build up a year earlier. Rosa Rosa had had a memorable encounter of her own. The Montgomery bus system was becoming a lightning rod for political controversy in part because of the extreme lengths they went to in the name of segregation for example bus tickets could only be purchased at the front of the vehicle meaning meaning all riders had to use the front doors to buy their ticket but Montgomery buses also had segregated entrances one for white people at the front and and another for black passengers at the back when a black person wanted to take the bus she'd have to board at the front purchaser ticket then and leave and re board through the back doors. The ridiculous policy served no practical purpose. It was only there to embarrass an inconvenience black black riders on a rainy day in nineteen forty-three. Rosa boarded a public bus in downtown. Montgomery reluctant to go back out into the rain mm-hmm. She instead walked directly back to a seat without exiting and re entering through the back door. The driver James F Blake was is infuriated. He ordered Rosa to exit and re enter through her designated entrance twice. Rosa refused so oh blake grab. Rosa dragged her outside and threw out into the rain before she had a chance to process what had happened. The bus pulled away a stranding her. The whole ordeal was incredibly traumatizing for Rosa in her autobiography she wrote. I never wanted wanted to be on that man's bus again after that. I made a point of looking at who was driving the bus before I got on. I didn't want any more run. INS is with that mean. One Rosa wasn't the only person who is sick and tired of discrimination on the buses in nineteen fifty five fifteen year old girl named Claudette Colvin was riding the bus home from Booker T. Washington high school in Montgomery. The bus was was crowded that day and cove and was asked to stand so a white woman could take her seat. Kovin refused the bus driver ordered cove and and to get up but Kovin held her ground this escalated to the point that the police were called and Coleman was arrested at at that time Montgomery had several contradictory laws regarding segregation a symptom of the push and pull between civil rights activists and the racist cyst establishment so one law not only permitted but required the bus driver to have cloven arrested while another protected cove ines right it to any seat. She wanted the N. double. ACP had long been looking for an opportunity to challenge the pro segregation laws and have them formally formerly overturned in Co.. WTN's arrests seemed like a perfect opportunity to bring Jim Crow all the way before the Supreme Court however the Organization soon learned that the teenage Kovin was pregnant out of wedlock. This should have had nothing to do with her case but at the end of the Lacey Pe- feared that juries would be less sympathetic to an unmarried mother with stakes so high they didn't WanNa take any chances chances the organization raised funds for coal WTN's defense but chose not to try to make her the new face of racial inequality. They'd have to wait for the next arrest nine months later on December first nineteen fifty five forty two year old Rosa parks boarded Ed bus number two eight five seven. It was about six. PM and she was on her way home from work at the Montgomery Fair Department Store. She paid her affair and sat down in an empty seat in the back section. She wasn't paying much attention as she boarded and didn't notice that the driver was was James F Blake the same driver who'd kicked her off the bus the previous year for not using the back door for the next three stops the bus traveled along its normal route more passengers got on and the bus slowly filled up by the time the the bus reached its third stop outside the Empire Theater. The whites only section at the front of the bus was over capacity. There was no seat for one. The white passengers in the front so blake stopped the bus and told the first row of black passengers to stand up so he could make a new row for the white writers. He said Y'all better make it light on yourself and let me have those seats. Rosa hadn't planned to make a stand that day but for whatever reason something snapped she later explained. I was not tired physically no more tired than I usually was. At the end of a working day how old I was forty two. No the only tired I was tired of giving in the rear of the black passengers stood up up Rosa didn't she later wrote when that white driver stepped back toward us when he waved his hand and ordered us up and out of our seats. I I felt a determination cover. My Body like a quilt on a winter night. Rosa remained in her seat staring at the driver. Offer Blake squinted back at her. He asked her again. Why don't you stand up. She replied. I don't think I should have to stand up then. She moved to the window seat. Further away from the Isle Lake asked her again if she was going to stand up Rosa again refused blake threatened to call the police. Rosa responded you do that so blake aac place the call while they waited. Roseau remained firmly planted in her seat. She tried to ignore the judgmental glares from the other. The riders assured that she was in the right eventually. Two policemen arrived at the scene. Blake explained the situation and Rosa was was charged with violating chapter six section eleven the Montgomery City code which enforce the segregation of public buses. They took her off the bus and drove her downtown to police headquarters along the way. She asked one of the policemen. Why do you push us around around. The officers. Response was simply. I don't know but the law's the law and your under arrest. Rosa was allowed one call at the station which he made to her husband Raymond. She told him that she had been given even a court date on December. Fifth Raymond was worried but he was also proud of his wife from making stand he promised her he would find the bail money to get her out of jail soon N. double. ACP Chapter President Edgar Nixon arrived the same night Rosa was sent to jail AOL Edgar paid her bail and had her released by then word of Rosa Parks arrest had spread to most of Alabama's black population. Rosa was an upstanding member of the community in many were astounded that she of all people would be arrested for such a minor offence offense. Edgar saw this anger in his community as an opportunity to get people mobilized later that night he visited the parks home and explained a plan to Rosa she could be the face of a new activist movement and as Rosa listened to Edgar's pitch. She felt hope spring in her chest. She was about to spark the historic. Montgomery bus boycott up next. We'll hear how roses work transformed the civil rights movement now back to the story. The black community in Montgomery Alabama was outraged following Rosa parks arrest on December first nineteen fifty five the N. double A. C. P. wanted to capitalize on roses case raising awareness as they tried to overturn Montgomery's segregation laws when they decided the best way to fight fight-back would be to boycott the Montgomery City buses on December fifth the day of Roses Trial N. double. ACP volunteers mimeographed yeah graft over thirty five thousand fliers to get the word out about the boycott they read stay off the buses Monday in protest protests of the arrest and trial. You can afford to stay out of school for one day. If you work. Take a cab or walk but please children children and grown ups. Don't ride the boss at all on Monday. These flyers were sent home with black schoolchildren and they were posted in black neighborhoods and on December fourth Nixon was even able to get an ad in the local paper on December number fifty nine thousand nine hundred fifty five around twenty people gathered at Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Zion church in Montgomery to discuss the best strategies auditees for the bus boycott. They decided that if Rosa lost the case the boycott would extend beyond her trial date indefinitely to organize organiz a longer bus boycott the group elected one of their most trusted team members to spearhead the movement a twenty six year old Baptist Reverend by the name of Dr Martin Luther King Junior together with the help of the N. double. ACP He formed the Montgomery Improvement Association. Their goal was to keep the boycott going until the status. Quo Changed that day forty two year old Rosa parks stepped into the stuffy halls of the Montgomery County courthouse. She was greeted by a bustling crowd of around around five hundred local supporters cheering her on her attorney was a man named Fred Gray and accomplished lawyer preacher and and activist who graduated from Case Western Reserve University School of law he was a go getter with a strong passion for civil rights in fact upon moving to Alabama. He said he was ready to destroy everything segregated but given the racist laws in place. Rosa never stood a chance the entire trial lasted all of thirty minutes during which Rosa was convicted of disorderly conduct and and violating the local bus ordinance she was fine ten dollars plus four dollars in courtroom fees approximately one hundred and fifty dollars in today's currency all the crime of refusing to vacate a bus seat the N. double. ACP and the black community at large deemed at this verdict unacceptable Rosette should not be charged with breaking the law if that law was unethical in the first place and so the Montgomery bus boycott began it rained on the evening of December Fifth Nineteen fifty five but but even so the city buses were mostly empty forty thousand people walk through the rain to get home from work some as far as twenty twenty miles as Montgomery's black population made up about seventy percent of all bus customers. The boycott struck in early in devastating blow. The buses soon became something of a laughing stock public buses sat at the side of the road completely empty except for the drivers ars but the boycott also had an adverse effect on Rosa and her husband a week into the protest. Rosa was fired from her seamstress job he'd held for years. No reason was given about Rosa suspected. It was because of her involvement in the boycott the next week Raymond also lost his job after talking about the boycott at work but the setbacks only made the parks family all the more more resolute as weeks passed the city of Montgomery began to feel the financial impact of the boycott bus fares bears were a reliable source of income for any city and now with the boycott in full swing that revenue stream was drying up on January anuary thirtieth nineteen fifty six the fifty seventh day of the boycott. The home of Dr Martin Luther King was bombed to buy white radicals two days later Edgar. Nixon's house was also bombed but once more the black community refused is to be intimidated in the face of property damage and violence the boycott continued meanwhile roses legal troubles proliferators liberated the city of Montgomery had criminalized boycotts and on February twenty first nineteen fifty six. She was arrested once again again for her role in the movement. Her supporters once again bailed her out but she knew that the fight wasn't over yet six months after the boycott began roses attorney. Fred Gray finally managed to gain an audience with the US District Court for the Middle District Straight Valla Bama in June nineteen fifty six fred argued that state bus segregation laws were unconstitutional and violated the rights of his community on June fifth nineteen fifty-six the three judges announced their ruling two to one in favor of Fred Gray. The fight still wasn't over the city of Montgomery filed an appeal that took the case to the United States Supreme Court on November Thirteenth Nineteen nineteen fifty-six over the next month. Fred continued to fight for his community and on December seventeenth nineteen fifty six he emerged victorious the Supreme Court rejected the appeal and ruled that bus segregation was illegal at the time roses case and the accompanying boycott was the largest successful black civil rights action in US history on December nineteenth nineteen fifty six the supreme court's written order arrived at the Montgomery Court House. Segregation of buses was officially officially illegal in the city. The boycott ended the next day and Montgomery's black citizens resumed using the buses after three hundred and eighty one days of walking and taking cabs for her bravery and her vision Rosa came to be known as the mother of the civil rights movement unfortunately even after the boycott ended she continued to face further harassment and threats Rosa and her husband Raymond grew to feel so oh unsafe they eventually relocated to Detroit Michigan in nineteen fifty seven and settled near Rosa's brother Sylvester MacAulay while in Detroit Rosa became an administrative aide in the Detroit Office of Congressman John Conyers Junior. She stayed there from nineteen sixty four to to her retirement in nineteen eighty eight regarding her work at this time she said I would have to take long of a minute to and give my whole synopsis of my life but I want to let you know that are all of us. Uh should be free and equal and have equal opportunity and that is what I'm trying to instill and and curry and inspire young people to reach the high for ten zero throughout the nineteen seventies Rosa Parks donated most of her money to civil rights organizations like the N. double. ACP and witnessed the establishment of a number of equitable laws including the Fair Housing Act and the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty eight the nineteen seventies also proved to be some of the most personally heartbreaking years of her life on August nineteenth nineteen seventy seven her husband died of throat cancer a few months later in November nineteen seventy seven her brother also died of cancer mindful of her husband's in the ability to receive a formal education during his lifetime Rosa co-founded the Rosa Rosa l Parks Scholarship Foundation for college bound high school seniors and the Roseanne Raymond Parks Institute for self development to serve Detroit's youth on October twenty fourth two thousand five at the age of ninety two Rosa Parks passed away in her apartment in Detroit Michigan she was laid to rest in the US capital and honor typically reserved for statesmen and military leaders in fact she was the first woman to ever receive such a distinction at her funeral over thirty thousand people passed by her coffin to pay respects and on December first two thousand five most major cities in the United States left seats empty on public public buses to commemorate roses incredible act of civil disobedience roses dedication to community and equality extended far beyond a refusal to give up her seat on a bus she was an advocate for black people and women everywhere and helped catapult the civil rights movement to the mainstream thanks to her courage. Rosa parks became a role model and icon and for women of Color as she explained I have learned over the years that when one's mind is made up knowing what must be done does away with fear for more information on Rosa Parks amongst the many sources we used we found her autobiography. Rosa parks my story extremely helpful to our research. Well thanks for tuning into historical figures. We will be back in two two weeks with a new episode. You can find more episodes of historical figures as well as all of our casts other shows on spotify and anywhere else you listen to podcasts lasts several of you have asked how to help us if you enjoy the show. The best way to help is to leave a five star review and don't forget to follow us on facebook and instagram. AM At podcast and twitter at car cast network. We'll see you next time. Historical figures was created by Max Cutler. It is a production action of Cutler media and is part of the park cast network. It is produced by Maxon Ron Cutler with sound design by Anthony Vowel sick production assistance by Ron Shapiro and I'm Paul Muller additional production assistance by Maggie admire and Freddie Beckley. This episode of historical figures was written by Michael Allen Herman and stars Ars Vanessa Richardson and Carter Roy as promised. Here's a clip of the first episode of sports criminals. It's about Olympic runner Oscar pistorius and the shooting death of his girlfriend Riva steenkamp to hear the full will I episode follows sports criminals for free on spotify and anywhere you listen to podcasts or visit podcast dot com slash sports criminals listen so now London two thousand twelve the thirtieth summer Olympic Games. The Sixty six thousand capacity stadium was full to the Brim for the men's four hundred meter semifinal eight of the thirty two fastest men in the world stood in front of the starting blocks. There was a smattering of applause for the Venezuelan in lane to the Brit and lane three received a predictably warm roar of appreciation from his home country. The Belgian lane four fed off the energy of the excited crowd hollered for him as well but it was the South African in lane in five who ignited the stadium into a frenzied uproar indeed millions of is around the world were fixated on the man in the fifth lane the starting gun fired and the runners took off South African maintained pace coming out of the first turn but was soon overtaken shaken by the Belgian when this was of little consequence all the South African needed to do to qualify for the finals was finished in the top three but within the runners came to the home stretch and the South African found himself in sixth place looking ahead at the determined runners including the man who would go on to win gold in the last fifty meters the South African fell back into seventh in the final twenty meters he was overtaken by the Venezuelan Venezuelan and crossed the finish line in dead last several strides behind the man in front of him but then the winner of the heat the future gold medallist turn to embrace the South African. He signaled that he wanted to trade the BIBS that had their names printed on them. A sign of the greatest respect between athletes the South African man then raised his hand and bowed to the crowd as though he had one the stadium cheered wildly for him at homes around the world family sat in their living rooms and shook their heads in disbelief amazing some mm said absolutely incredible they reacted as such because the South African was a man named Oscar pistorius the first double amputee to run in the Olympic Games to get here he not only had to qualify competing against the world's greatest but also navigate the trials of hellacious litigation to prove that his carbon fiber prosthetics did not give him an unfair advantage edge historians had become an international hero a poster boy for overcoming obstacles but what he would be remembered for was not his phenomenal unrivalled resume of athletic achievement. It was the result of a single night six months after the London Olympics when when Oscar pistorius fired four shots into his closed bathroom door killing his twenty nine year old girlfriend Riva Steam Steam Camp Welcome to sports criminals criminals podcast original every week we dive into the dark side of sports history and look at athletes who not only broke the law but broke the rules is an covenants of their sport will also uncover how their actions impacted the history of the sport they played and had a ripple of cultural and social implications nations. I'm Tim Johnson and I'm Carter. Roy Sports is built on a foundation of fairness with rules that aim to set up equal obstacles for two opposing housing sides so why is it that so many people within this strict moral code stray outside the law whether that means they simply break the rules of the game or commit a brutal act like murder. There are an untold number of athletes and others involved with the sports world that wind wind up in a life of debauchery sports criminals aims to unpack this connection we seek to uproot how fame and cutthroat nature of professional factional and amateur sports can exacerbate and feed some of our darkest desires you can find episodes of sports criminals and all other other park cast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream sports criminals for free on spotify just open the APP APP and type sports criminals in the search bar. The story of Oscar Pistorius is one of the most emotionally complex six in sports history in many ways he represented everything that draws us to athletics overcoming obstacles the triumph of spirit and determination an unparalleled work ethic and a commitment to persevere no matter the odds historian was not just an inspiration gracious to Paralympic athletes but to all athletes proving that even the greatest trials can be overcome the runner also carried with him a confident student in light charisma charming his way through interviews to become a media darling not just a hero of South Africa but hero of the world the attention he brought to Paralympic athletics flooded the community with sponsorships and spectators they had never had before his humble but confident outward persona and what appeared to be genuine and authentic Joie de vive made it absolutely shocking when the events INSA Valentine's Day two thousand thirteen came to pass in just a few short hours everything the world thought they knew about Oscar occur pistorious started on raveling at three. Am that morning historian shot and killed his girlfriend. Reva steenkamp through his closed bathroom door at his home in Pretoria South Africa historian claimed it was an accident prosecutors called it premeditated murder and cited an unknown unpredictable incredibly aggressive side to historians that he had hidden from the media for years ears in the story your about to hear we will try and present the tragic rise and fall of Oscar Pistorius from the most objective viewpoint point possible but what will come to light is the simple truth that it's impossible to know what happened on that fateful night whether pistorious aureus knowingly shot his girlfriend of three months or did so believing he was protecting her his actions that night were incredibly reckless less. Perhaps he was a cold killer and incredibly calculated liar or maybe he was so intensely traumatized by the idea of a break in that he was willing to act on violent impulse. One thing is for certain at the end of this tragic tale. It will be impossible not to form an opinion opinion one way or the other. Oscar Pistorius was born on November twenty second nineteen eighty six in Johannesburg South Africa without a fibula in either of his legs Oscar's mother. Sheila knew her son would need surgery to have the lower portion Russian of both his legs removed so when the baby was six months old she wrote her son a letter encouraging him in the trials he was sure to face in his life the piece that stock with Oscar when he read the letter as an adult stated the real loser is never the person who crosses the finish finish line last the real loser is the person who sits on the side the person who does not even try to compete Sheila's strove to ingrain this attitude within her young son. Even after the eleven month old pistorious had both his legs amputated six months later he was given his first prosthetics and from that moment forward Sheila stories made sure that above all else her son would not feel different different and for the most part he did not he pursued the world with an energetic thirst for adrenaline climbing and falling from trees launching shing himself onto motorbikes racing his brother's go-carts so fast down a hill that the pair had to use one of Oscar's prosthetics as a break. It was moments. Ullmann's like these when Oscar considered his differences the most as a child he did not feel pain as manufactured leg ground for Roche ously against against the Gravelly road. It's something else became apparent about Oscar's attitude the carried with him a sort of reckless of Banten contain an attitude of jump. I ask questions later. This type of daredevil persona is accepted in the sports world in fact act. It's encouraged but for Oskar would string together a series of unchecked behaviors that culminated in a tragic death however in childhood there was little to suggest his audacious physicality was anything out of the ordinary he took naturally to athletics and this seemed like a good environment to exert his energy but pistorius is childhood was not entirely defined by adrenaline and athletically fueled outings when he was six years old in nineteen ninety three his parents divorced. Sheila began excessively drinking as a way to subside the turmoil of singlehandedly ingle handedly raising three children when she moved her family to a smaller home in a poor neighborhood she also developed an acute fear of break ins and going so far as to sleep with a nine millimeter pistol underneath her pillow this planted planted and immense anxiety within Oskar that stuck with him into his adult years but it was not necessarily unjustified in the nineteen ninety s South Africa was on the tail end of the decades long horrors of apartheid the institution of racial segregation that had dominated cominated South African Society for nearly fifty years despite the political moves toward a more democratic country violence and civil unrest still title rampage through the nation it seemed at turns filled with random acts of violence and rife with the brutality of organized crime. Townships townships lobbied for anarchy. AK47 sold on the black market for fifteen. US dollars citizens were left as refugees when the fires wires in violence of territory wars push them from their homes the pistorius family even after the divorce was relatively affluent affluent compare to the incredibly impoverished and segregated black community of South Africa but the unrest of the country bled into all homes is rich and poor alike as the tides of reform force the nation to scramble for any sort of identity above all else. SUSHILA Pistorius was concerned for the safety and wellbeing of her children which is why she enrolled Oscar in the prestigious Pretoria boys high when she brought Oscar in to see Bill Schroeder the school's headmaster he is the boys prosthetics suspiciously. Schroeder politely addressed Sheila Sheila. She understood that this was an institution of the highest athletic standard did she not all enrolled were expected to Excel L. Sheila hardly blinked and ignored the man's concerned Gaze. Oh yes she assured him. Oscar was quite accomplished. In many many different sports this unfaltering determination and belief that Oscar was just another boy instilled in him and unwavering confidence ends that is missing legs would not get in the way of anything he did. Oscar's mother made sure that he never thought twice about fitting in and pursuing doing whatever it was he was passionate about which is why it hit especially hard when in March of two thousand two Oscar's father came to Pretoria boys high to break the news to a fifteen year old Oscar that his mother was fatally ill her excessive drinking had led to an incurable liver problem and during her treatment she suffered from an adverse drug interaction one that tragically took her life fat March at the age of forty three the news shattered Oscar but he was fortunately able to channel his energy into sports he especially he took to rugby and water polo with an incredible fervor aided by lighter more aerodynamic prosthetics. Oscar was able to compete within the ultra competitive landscape of the Pretoria Boys School that is until June twenty first two thousand three Oscar was playing rugby the on the outside wing when a pass came in high and fast Oscar leapt to catch the ball but as he did so two boys slammed into him in one high and one low he spiraled into the air and crashed to the ground sending a shock wave of pain through his leg. The drunken can fathers on the sidelines drank their beers and goaded. Get up you sissy. I didn't come out here to watch my kid play against a Panzi Oscar as he always did gritted his teeth and stood up. He finished the match and pedaled six kilometers back to his house house the next morning. When he woke up his knee was discolored an incredibly swollen Oscar new immediately that his athletic career was in in serious jeopardy. There are two things of note about this injury. I it is another example of of Oscar reckless willingness to throw himself head first into a situation even knowing his relative vulnerability second the injury put him on a crash course with the sport that would see him making history as fate would have it the physical therapists that Oskar consulted with for his injury suggested a very specific routine to regain functionality in his knee sprinting so so in two thousand and three Oskar began training with a track and field coach needless to say he took to the sport immediately a teacher teachers signed him up for a race which he won easily then he anchored the last one hundred meters for his schools for by one hundred relay and posted an almost mind boggling time of eleven point seven two seconds to take home the victory reveling in the immediacy of his son success. Hank pistorious started researching being the paralympics all the while Oskar continued to win race after race posting ludicrous times for a seventeen year old double amputee. QT Then may two thousand four came around and so two did some relatively shocking news Oscar Pistorius was chosen listen to represent South Africa in Athens for the Paralympic Games but his tenure in the two hundred meter race seemed destined to get off to a rocky start. Oscar had performed well enough that he was set to compete in the men's single leg amputee division Asian. He was the only double amputee in the entire. Field Oscar also had considerable difficulty starting racists mostly mostly because he lacked feet to feel the starting blocks and never quite perfected the proper push off. This issue came to light as he crouched down for the first round round of the men's two hundred meter. Oscar was in the Seventh Lane Elaine he would come to hate because he preferred to play catch up in the seventh seventh lane. Almost the entire field lined up behind you. Oscar and his coach had been working tirelessly on his starts focusing on making sure his weight hovered covered forward and over his body to launch himself out of the gates. This is what Oscar was thinking as he crouched on the track weight it forward launch out of the blocks strides gained forty centimeters on the lean. Oscar was so focused on his technique that he completely missed the sound of the starting gun for one point eight seconds he stayed crouched while the other runners runners took off when Oscar finally came to he scrambled upright and ran after the group by the end of the first turn he had moved into third place place in the home stretch overtook second and then I as though they were standing still he crossed the finish line at twenty three point four three seconds seconds finishing first in his heat and setting a new world record for the Paralympics then came the finals finals seventeen year old Oscar pistorius with a mouthful of braces. Only eight months removed from his first therapeutic sprints lined up up in lane five this time pistorious did not get off to a slow start from the outset. It was easy to see that the race was never in doubt many might believe sprinting to be an aggressive and uncoordinated sport a sort of British and unrestrained launched a run on as fast as you can. The reality is that sprinting takes a great deal of grace a unique balance of stability and rigid strides with bodily relaxation in fluid limbs sprinting has a unique aesthetic from athlete to athlete the long tall runner will allow allow the leverage of their limbs to carry the momentum of their strides while a shorter stockier person might look for quick thunderous steps in this way sprinting displays the functions of the body in an incredibly intimate in beautiful way to watch Oscar pistorius. Even in those early today's it was easy to see that he had a connection to his form that radiated a type of elegance powerful but effortless overturning inning of limbs at once more electric and more calm than every other runner in the field historian sundered passed the competition bursting across the finish line at Twenty one point nine seven seconds shattering the world record and securing the gold there was something radiant in the young athlete that day he hugged his competition and looked up at the crowd mouth opened in a joyful smile while those select few who watched the two thousand four Athens Paralympic Games new they had just witnessed the birth of a legend legend a once in a lifetime competitor.

Rosa Rosa Rosa Rosa Parks N. Raymond Parks ACP Alabama Montgomery Alabama Rosa Rosa l Parks Scholarship Empire Theater Rosa spotify Montgomery Color Rosa Parks Rosa Panzi Oscar Rosa Louise SUSHILA Pistorius Rosas Montgomery Rosa James F Blake
AWTR Show #784:  USO Military Spouse Programs

Army Wife Talk Radio

1:01:33 hr | 3 months ago

AWTR Show #784: USO Military Spouse Programs

"Attention know spouses families and service members. It's now time for another empowering episode of armond white. Talk radio the leading and longest running podcasts of its kind. awt are is here doing gauge. Educate and encourage you by sharing dynamic interviews social media connections news and empowering military life information here are your awt our hosts your army wife network command team who i an army wife talk radio listeners. Welcome to another empowering and exciting episode. This is episode number seven hundred eighty four and i'm your host. Amanda macneice army wife networks empowerment agent. Joining me today is our teams. Content curator assistant jennifer brown. Amanda and thank you for that warm. Welcome i'm looking forward to hosting with you today listeners. In typical fashion. We have another great show lined up for you today. Grab a beverage of your choice and settle in or lace up your shoes if you're listening while getting workout in and get ready for your weekly dose of military life empowerment on. Today's so we will listen in to an interview conducted by army wife network. Commanders read dog and she chats with guests. Elizabeth lee program manager of uso military spouse programs jennifer. I'm glad to be hosting with you today. Let's take a few minutes to catch up on mail slave. Give me a quick situational report or sip rep of your age six status. Well amanda as you can imagine. There's a lot going on in my household as the holidays are quickly approaching. I'm beginning to realize how. I really for this holiday season. On top of our woodworking. Business is booming. So we're steadily filling orders especially for that holiday rush while i continually try to squeeze my own project needs onto my husband's to deal as so we are still busy but i'm very excited for the holidays. We've got some trouble plans made and we're ready to see some family members. We haven't seen in a while. So i'll also that here at fort. Benning georgia the took Finally below eighty degrees. So we've been doing so much outside on. It's finally a good time of year. Where i can actually do hair. It's not all messed up by nine. Am and that always makes me extra happy. Would've gone on your way. Things are going pretty. Well i will say here in colorado though. Our weather is so crazy that we don't get we really can't predict how it will be one minute. It's snowing and then the next aids seventy eighty degrees so it's hard to plan but yeah things are things are going well for me. I just started working out again. So i'm hoping to get in shape as i've just moved to Remote working from home as a teacher. So that'll be a nice battle but other than that everything is going great. And i'm glad to hear about your woodworking business. That's awesome thank you. It definitely keeps says super-busy Sometimes too busy but we really enjoy. My husband. And i are great team. And it's something that really connects us. Good ambassador But it keeps us all the time. So yeah it's very enjoyable that's awesome. I have to say that. As much as i love. Living the mill spouse life. Sometimes they really do need. An extra dose of encouragement encouragement. Is one of our army wife network pillars so. Let's just take a moment and listen in so. This week's encouraging moment from veteran teacher author john wanda bryant. Then we will check in with one our one and only correspondent joe mcknight with all things meets no news welcome spouses to sixty seconds of serenity. Which ones brian. Your encouragement of today res self. Love is so important because when you're all alone in his three am and you're crying. Who's going to be there for you. You you have to pick yourself up and find the strength to carry on at the end of the day. You're all you've got listen. Spouses crying is an emotion. That is necessary. I say let it all out. Sometimes it may take a sent in action or even a remembers to exciting emotion. But that's okay you must get in the habit of care for yourself. This is not selfish by no means if you cannot function how will you be able to support the ones that depend on you self. Love may look like cna therapist or counselor to get help are taking pilates or eating right or even sleep in for just a little bit longer. You must love yourself by taking care of yourself. This has been sixty seconds of serenity. Which wanna brian military veteran and author of the mini adventures of danny ended employer mini series. No news is typically good news in this military life country. So here is our. Aws news six correspondent with this week. sob stories. hello. Amanda and jennifer. Here's this week's top stories. Veterans affairs compensation and pension exams will be completely outsourced. According to military times. The exams are a key part of the process for veterans to receive disability benefits the under secretary for benefits. Paul lawrence told military times right now. Contractors already doing the bulk of them we think the value of having contractors available to do them is flexibility and the ability to surge some lawmakers have voiced concerns over this move despite the va's belief that it will be a service improvement for veterans read more at military times dot com. The department of veterans affairs announced that military veterans and gold star families will be granted a lifetime access to national parks wildlife refuges and other federal lands managed by the department of the interior according to npr dot org an annual pass typically costs eighty dollars. And will you access to more than two thousand. Federal recreation sites. In order to qualify. You must provide documentation showing that you served in the military to include the national guard and reserves learn more by visiting the national park service online at nps dot gov the us navy announced that us navy expeditionary seabass six also referred to as esp. Six will be renamed after medal of honor recipient marine corps. Sergeant major retired john l. Canley canley served during vietnam. Where when his commanding officer was wounded. He led his company to hugh city which included multiple attacks against enemy fortified positions being wounded himself and carrying wounded marines to safety. He was awarded the medal of honor for his bravery and courage in two thousand eighteen and now the naval ship will be named in his honor. Esp vessels will deploy marines of the future carrying the name of marines of the past secretary of the navy kenneth j braithwaite. They are leaders. Who truly embody our core values of honor courage and commitment and the future crew of us. John l. canley both sailors and marines will carry on his legacy character and professionalism throughout the lifespan of this vessel. Read more about. Candy's heroic acts at navy dot mil and this week in history on the evening of december first nineteen fifty-five seamstress rosa parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger a three hundred and eighty one day boycott of the montgomery bus system followed and led to a supreme court ruling banning segregation on public transportation. Rosa parks is considered the mother of the civil rights movement and following the boycott rosa and her husband. Raymond moved to retreat. Where she worked for congressman john conyers for more than twenty years. Rosa parks was awarded the us medal of freedom in one thousand nine hundred ninety six and the rosa parks peace prize in nineteen eighty-four read more about rosa parks legacy at the library of congress online at l. o. C. dot gov find the link to all of our new reports at army wife network dot com this is your army wife network new six correspondent joe lean mcnutt signing out. Thanks to joleon for making sure. We always have up to date news this military life. Now let's take a sixty second commercial break. We will be back with more in just a few moments armie talk. Radio is celebrating our fifteen year on the air. Awt are is the leading and longest running podcast and has over. seven hundred episodes in the archives. Subscribe to this podcast on our website. Www dot army wife network dot com or on the pod catcher of your choice such as i tunes ugo play spotify. Or pandora engage educate encourage. Awt are is your source for military life empowerment jennifer. What is on the docket for this week's resource recon. This week's resource recon is all about. The resources offered on our website. And this week we want to share the most popular resources we offer post with the most as mills spouses. One of our greatest challenges is preparing for an upcoming pcs. Or if you get the chance to potentially pick a new duty station. There is a lot of information out there and it can be overwhelming. We here at army waste network wants to take some of the guesswork out of the needs to knows about duty stations around the globe hence our post with the most series. That's right our post with most series is truly an on some resource. I wish i had known about eight years ago. And i'm so fortunate to know about it. Now i will definitely be using it when we come to our next. Pcs which is just shy of two years. Now and for those of you who don't know our army way network command team and band of bloggers and their most. Those tribes have helped to compile installation specific information to help you no matter what army station becomes your new home. We have the insider details regarding local realtors off post healthcare options unit information spouse testimonials social media connections hidden gems of the area restaurants. And things you have to do before you leave. You can plan how to make the most of your new location before you even arrive. And make connections with other spouses. Who are already. They're using the listed social media groups for me. I have truly learned the power of making connections and joining those groups before arriving at a new location because it really helps you to feel in the know. Right from the start amanda. I'm much like you. And that i really want to explore our next duty station before arriving from the local and surrounding areas down to the social media connections if nothing else it really makes my mental transition go much more smoothly. This really helps maintain the sanity for entire family. Really so i know. Is you happy. Wife happy life while my motto motto. When it comes to saying is well informed wife happy life. The post with the most feature is something. I wished i had seen sooner and now that i know it's there. I find myself looking through periodically. Stayed about our next duty station looking into things that i see on the list of you know shopping and restaurants and of course all the fun stuff But post with the most feature really does highlight information own one place. I'd like to think of it as like a cornucopia of information just their fingertips. Yes definitely. i couldn't agree more in total feature forty five army specific locations around the globe if you have additional tips information connections or personal testimonials about any of our military locations. Feel free to leave a comment on our website or you can email us at info at army wife network dot com to help out your fellow military spouses host with the most is empowering on its own but we couldn't have an empowering resource segment without something from you. Amanda army wise network in agents. Hello army wave talk radio listeners. I'm amanbek niece bringing you. This week's empowerment patrol report. Today we are showcasing. Two of our volunteers who are emory winners. Which by the way that stands for motivated at ready to empower first step. We have amanda krieger. A member of our band of bloggers amanda is an army wife and mom. She met her husband while he was enlisting online boot. Even though at the time they only lived five miles apart. She has a bachelor's and master's in theology masters in english and creative writing. Her hope is to publish a memoir chronicling her life as a woman with a disability. Who happens to be married to a military man a stay at home mom and still relatively new to military life. Amanda spends her days taking care of her family and learning as much as she can about military life. She's passionate about body. Positivity disability representation self care her faith and good food. She loves to see new places and try local cuisine. Amanda loves the seasons at fort drum. But it's looking forward to the change of scenery when our family heads to texas next year you can also find her on youtube under her name. Amanda j krieger next step. We want to give a huge shoutout to our army wife network command team member chrissy gifts chrissy joined the military spouse life in two thousand ten when she married her favorite tanker she knew that life would be more adventurous and sometimes more difficult but it would always be worth it. She had previously received her bachelors and masters in special education and spent a few years teaching but once she began having children. She chose to put those talents to work in her own home. Chrissy is a mother to four energetic boys. One husky pup and the whole family is currently choosing to live small or to live big rather in an rv with plenty of travelling adventures. Outside of the normal army moves chrissy and her family have visited forty one states canada and mexico during their road travels and hope to add some different countries to that list. In our free time you can find her at the beach working out at a plate with close friends on the hunt for the next gio cash or hiding away binge watching her favorite guilty pleasure. Tv shows much. Thanks goes out to amanda and chrissy for doing their part to empower military families all across the globe until next time. I'm amanda macneice reminding you that we are never completely alone on this military life journey. Another big congratulations to our m. r. e. motivated and ready to empower recipients. Amanda krieger and chrissy gibbs. Both of these empowering individuals will receive an on some prize from army wife network as well as a permanent spot on our website in our empowerment gallery. I know of someone else. That is motivated and ready to empower this week's guest elizabeth le- let's see what empowering info she's got for us hello listeners and thank you to our host this week. This army wife talkradio's interview segment. And i'm reading knob. Lock your army wife network owner in commander today. We have the privilege to chat with. Elizabeth lee the program manager for us military spouse programming. The uso known as united service organization has been supporting service members and their families for almost eighty years uso. Coffee connections are monthly gathering event allowing spouses to relax in a comfortable setting shared vice learn about local events and make new friends all over a cup of coffee and pastries. Which i don't know about you. That sounds like a perfect recipe for me. Spouses are encouraged to come as they are or bring other military spouses to join with them in the conversation in twenty. Nineteen the uso hosted. Two hundred events that connected more than seventy five hundred. That's seven thousand five hundred military spouses this year. In spite of the shift one hundred percent virtual coffee connections there still on track to host roughly five hundred events and connect more than eight thousand spouses with other others in their local military communities. The coffee connection live was created in february twenty nineteen in response to requests from military spouses. Who didn't necessarily have that ready. Access to a uso location but yet still wanted to participate in the us spouse programming. Thank you so much for everything. You're doing for the uso mill spouse programs elizabeth and welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. It's great to be here. I'm really looking forward to our conversation. And i know that the coffee connections are really great. I was able to go to one. Live gosh a couple years ago. Now i'm not sure. I love that you guys have been able to kind of pivot this year and go virtual. So let's go ahead and get started as i shared in our bio. You've we've known now that the us has been supporting servicemembers for many switches almost eighty amazing by the way so go ahead and tell us about some of the middle spouse support programming that you all offered through the uso absolutely. Well yes like you said shritah on for almost eighty years. The uso has been supporting service members and those of us who work for the organization. We always say we're supporting service members and their families but we we learned a few years ago but a lot of military spouses didn't realize that they could also use the uso So we purposely set out to create programs specifically aimed at supporting military spouses and letting them know that the uso is here for them too so you mentioned our coffee connections program which is really one of our core programs. It's one that we're so proud of. Its its sole purpose truly is to connect military spouses to one another so that they feel connected within their communities. They feel that they have personal network of support. And just you know resources that they can go to whether they are the new kid on the block at their installation or they've been there for a while they wanna support somebody who's just getting there so certainly. Coffee connections is one that we're very proud of and as you also mentioned coffee connection live which is our virtual version of that where once a month we speak with somebody who is what we like to say an influence or within the within the military spouse community We have spoken with everyone from celebrities to mill spouses to subject matter experts. And and we can go into that a little bit later but it's been such a fun endeavor for us to be able to reach those who aren't near uso. We also have a program that's called special delivery baby showers where we've partnered with target and with heidi markov. Who is the author of the what to expect when you're expecting series and we host baby showers for expecting military mama's around the world and that's been going on for actually longer than any other military spouse programs that we have we've got one that's called military spouse networking which is sort of the original mill spouse program which is where we bring military spouses together and we teach them networking skills How to create their own personal brand and network themselves whether they're looking for a career or simply to make friends in a new community and then some of our newer programs include discovering your spark which is with the two thousand seventeen military spouse to the brittany bacher which it helps military spouses to sort of dive into themselves and discover what makes them happy and talks through throughout the course of the several hour workshop how to sort of bring that to the surface and find their joy again and turn their camps into cans. It's great Our brand new one is with corey weather. who is also a military spouse. And it's called your leaving again and it is focused on opening up the communication between Spouses when they are preparing to be a part whether it's for deployment may be Tdy or even the dreaded gio bachelor time so again. It's focused on opening up those lines of communication to talk through what it's going to be like when you're apart and then actually doing it while you're apart so those are some of our military spouse programs goodness. I had no idea that it was that deep. In far reaching i guess i was familiar with the coffee connection and coffee connection live. And i've heard of discovering your spark. But i love the special delivery showers and i fan girl over quarry whether she is just powerhouse mill spouse and i love that you guys have partnered with her as well. She is so much to offer Especially when it comes to the being apart again Because it sometimes seems like groundhog day from saying those leaders to our service members. Wow so many. Good programs You guys are offering in person and online. So i'm curious. How would a new military spouse who's just moved to their first location. Utilize the uso such a good question again. We want military spouses to know that the uso is for them so the first thing i would encourage him or her to do is find out if there is a uso center on their installation Wherever they are whether they have just joined a military family or if they're just moving to a new base they can go. Uso dot org and look our location finder and find if there is a uso installation. Go to the center meet. The staff made the volunteers and meet the other people who are in there are centers are a beacon of information on on wherever they are And if they're not year near uso center Certainly look for one as you're traveling through the airports but also you can go online and find the us facebook page which is just at the uso or even search for our brand new us military spouse facebook group which is a private group. You must be a military spouse to join it. We do ask questions to make sure that the people joining our military spouses but within that group we are sharing so much information that is helpful to military spouses again. We are here to make sure that military spouses are able to connect with one another and make friends because the most important thing is feeling like you're not alone when you're on this military life journey sounds very similar to kind of what guides us. Here at army wife network is reminding folks that they're not alone because really sometimes it feels like a very lonely island kind of experience So really appreciate you. Guys are creating that innate network for people to get connected and just a slight side note. Shameless plug you mentioned the uso centers in the airports Shout out to the uso in dallas. Last year for christmas our flight with super delayed i was flying alone with both my time to humans and guess last year malik. My son was too. He was too so trying to contain a two year old and a six year old in the airport for like seven hours late at night. They saved our skin. They took such good care of us and made sure we were fed and entertained. And i've never used the uso in an airport before really had to but You guys are taking care of your spouses. And i cannot say thank you enough for that. That is awesome. It's like having your very own. Vip lounge at absolutely yes and they. Oh they were so good us. We're like here's another. Dvd has your hope. Your flights delayed another two hours. And i was like i don't know ever get out of here They stayed open late for us. 'cause we are flight didn't leave till almost midnight so they've really took care of us So anyway back to what. You're actually here for i. I'm gushing about the. us oaks. You guys do such a great job. Tell us elizabeth. How did you come up with coffee. Connections in also the coffee connection live program while the the credit for this goes completely to my partner in crime nicole vogel. She is our senior programs. Manager at the uso four military spouse programs and this was all her brain child she herself is an air force spouse and had worked overseas at the us usos in kaiserslautern germany and when her husband's job took them to the dc area. She started working at uso headquarters and she said to the programs team. Hey why don't we do something for military spouses and the response was what should we do. Come up with something. So she actually created the military spouse networking program. I which is the one that brings people together to teach them. You know how to make their own elevator. Pitch work on their networking skills And just learn how to make friends in a professional setting from that. She said to herself one day. What if people just want to come together and have coffee. What if we just got these people together in the room for spouse networking and then said. Come by the uso next wednesday and we'll just have coffee and chat so from that we literally had a few locations that decided to market coffee connections again just as an opportunity for military spouses to come together. We are not selling anything. We're not asking them to do anything. Just come in. Have a cup of coffee. there's pastries out if you're hungry and just just talk That was back in twenty sixteen. We started with just a handful of locations and a few spouses who would come in once a month or once. A quarter however often that That location wanted to host coffee connection. And if you fast forward now to twenty twenty like you mentioned at the beginning we are on track to host five hundred coffee connections this year. Globally and we're going to reach more than ten thousand spouses and it is just something. We're so proud of because it started as just this idea of bringing spouses together and the coffee connection live program was born in february of twenty nineteen again before the world really turned to virtual programs and has more our sole means of keeping one. Another connected It was after a coffee connections that nicole said to ourselves. I want to bring this to people who don't have access to a uso but still wanna connect with other military spouses and feel like they're part of this community so the very first coffee connection live was in february of twenty nineteen and it was two of our program managers sitting in the office at uso headquarters in arlington virginia. Talking about the research that we adjust done which told us that military spouses feel. The uso was for them and did not feel connected to one another. So they had a discussion about that using zoom. They had a chat box off to the side where they invited military spouses watching live to chime in and chat and ask questions and it was this amazing virtual interaction that was just born a year and a half ago A month later they spoke with brittany bacher. Who told the world about her amazing series discovering your spark and the following month the Chairman of the joint chiefs of staff general dunford. His wife invited nicole to her home in arlington and they had a chat about military spouse life. So again it's just become this this thing that we do every month it's grown Every month we have more and more military spouses joining us. Live and and again. It was just born out of the idea that we wanted to connect people whether it's in person or virtually. I've got goosebumps all over myself. Just thinking how this started with you know the focus and the intention but how. It's grown because clearly that indicates there was a gap an a need that needed to be fulfilled and you guys stepped forward encourage In you know risking boldly to make that happen and now it's gosh ten thousand spouses in a year and you were ahead of the curve for you like nobody predicted the pandemic in february twenty nineteen. But you guys had the groundwork established before this was even a thing so That's so cool so good elizabeth. You mentioned some of the folks you know how you have. Subject matter experts or other bill spouses of the year or you know networking experts but who has been on your coffee connection live program and you mentioned it was monthly. How can listeners. Tune into that. Good question why i wanna i wanna do a little bit of name dropping because we have been so fortunate to have some amazing guests with us on coffee connection live. We have had celebrities. We've had everyone from a monte durham who is on say yes to the dress atlanta. He's actually joined us two different times the first time we just talked about fashion and all things beauty and then the second time he came on six months later he actually talked to us about hair and makeup. Because i'm not sure if anybody knows this monte just opened up a salon in old town alexandria in virginia. Just outside of washington. Dc and by trade. He is actually a hair stylist so he taught my colleague nicole how to cut her own hair at home because this was of quarantine and she said. I haven't had a haircut in so long. How can i have my own hair right. So on zoom in front of hundreds of military spouses on and it looked great. So we had monte jerem. We've had amy browns from the bobby bones show who actually was a military spouse before her husband left the airforce. We've had celebrity chef carla hall and we had country music singer. Craig morgan join us. We have had military spouses. Who are just sort of argo twos on everything from homeschooling to We had a military spouse who at hr recruiter for google. Talk with us about resume writing and how to get your dream job. We've had a military spouse who spoke with us about establishing your virtual brand. You know how to brand yourself like for linked in if you're trying to expand your professional networks We had leah whose husband used to be the secretary of defense again. We had general dunford's wife new just tons of military spouses who are really influencers in this space and then subject matter experts we had hiding markov. Join us back in august again. She wrote what to expect. When you're expecting there. Were so many moms out there who had questions about not only pregnancy but giving birth during a pandemic home moving with babies and they just just so many questions and again they couldn't get to those baby showers that we have right now so heidi joins us live and just answer. Everyone's questions in everyone's minds at ease and actually just last week. We had a celebrity makeup artist. Join us. She is a land. Comb a Client executive and also a celebrity makeup artists and she literally walked me through how to do my makeup. So that i look good on zoom. Because we're doing now on zoom has fresh-faced and she walked me through everything and it was amazing and we record all of these so if people want to go back and watch any of them they can simply go to. Uso dot org slash military spouse and find the link to coffee connection or they can go to youtube and search for uso. Coffee connection live and see all of those recordings That's so neat. And i i just have to laugh because like doing your makeup or like learning how to do your makeup presume and also like giving yourself a haircut in front of all the people. I was like no pressure. You guys way. More courageous that i would ever be 'cause i don't even with experts. I'm not sure. I could pull that off but love. That you guys are branching into that So if listeners. Want to listen live. How do they connect with that if they want to tune in absolutely so again we we have the military spouse facebook group. The uso meltzer's facebook group on facebook. If you join that. We are constantly posting flyers invitations to join us. Live with little registration link. It's really simple. You don't need to download anything you just register. And using zoom the military spouses. Who join us live are not on camera. It's only us in our guest who are onscreen. But you have the chance to ask questions. And then the most important thing that i think about coffee connection live is the chat box you can chat and interact with other military spouses tuning in live and share your reactions to what's being said on screen. We always invite everyone who's tuning in live to show their linked in profile because we realize not. Everyone has a facebook or instagram or twitter. But a really safe way to connect through linked and so we always invite people to connect on linked in and share their linked in profiles if they want to connect with the other military spouses who are joining. And what's been so fun about. This is that we've started to see a lot of the same spouses come month after month after month. And we love it because we've gotten to know their personalities through their questions and through their chats just as much as they've gotten to know ours so again. Look on the uso military spouse facebook group and also we have a weekly email that we send out to military spouses who have attended our events whose emails we already have an in that weekly email. We share all of these upcoming events. So if you're not on that. Try to find that facebook group. We've got a little link that you can click to sign up to be on that email list so i'm not gonna lie. I'm multitasking right now and just requested to join that group on house as you guys are doing such good stuff i'm to be. Hey who else. Are you collaborating within the space to support military spouses. Oh my goodness well. As i keep stressing connecting and networks are everything and the uso cannot do this alone so we are really really proud that we have worked with so many individuals and organizations Most importantly we worked with several military spouses of the year again. I've i've mentioned britney with her discovering your spark workshop series and corey. Weather's i am also a huge fan. Read her book when my husband floyd to be too had her on coffee connection live two different times once with her husband and once just her own. Gosh all the goosebumps in tangles when that woman is talking We have a really fun series that we do with a man named michael quinn. Who is an army veteran. he's also known as a linked in guru. If you have ever wondered how to market yourself on lincoln. Michael quinn is the expert and he has hosted Some virtual linked in series just for military spouses and also for everyone in the military community So again we've we've partnered with mill spouses of the year. We've partnered with veterans was also partnered with a lot of corporations who support what we're doing and are are very eager to let military spouses know that they are included in the support that these corporations offer to military families. I specifically want to call out. Lowe's home improvement stores they They have hosted two years in a row. Do it yourself workshops to teach military spouses skills. That can be used around the house. And i have to tell you. Cherie deville early Born out of desperation on my part when our boss came to us just before my husband was about to leave for a year to go to iraq We getting ready to pcs. We moved from alabama to florida and three weeks later. My husband left iraq for a year. And i have two little kids and i didn't know anyone in the neighborhood and i thought how am i gonna do all the things around the house. I need to learn how to hang up curtains in picture. You know all the things. But i also wanna like learn how to use power tools. So coincidentally lows had approached the uso about some partnership opportunities and. They reached out to the mall spouse team at said. Could you use anything from lowe's and we created these workshops in two thousand nineteen representatives from lowe's stores actually went to twenty apps are ten different. Uso locations and we gathered military spouses around. They taught us how to do. Things like spackle holes in walls because their kids walls in the have to fix right and this year we were supposed to do twenty four workshops but because of the pandemic we took it virtual and it was amazing pivot. Where lows had someone at their networks studio at their headquarters partnered with a maria read has another army house. Military specity are who we love and who is very well known in the diy space. Yup we got those two individuals on zoom. We did it coffee connection lifestyle. We did this. Virtual diy workshop and we did a series of three weeks hot military spouses how to make a fire pits We told them everything that they needed to get where to find it at lowe's You know they could go get the stones and the sand and everything that they needed and then for an hour we show them how to literally make a firepit in their backyard. The second one we did was painting one on one. So whether you wanted to paint like an accent wall in your house or you just wanted to refinish some furniture. We did a one hour. Diy workshops on painting and then the last one was on customizing furniture again. Whether you wanted to repaint it or refinish it or stain it or strip it. We did that so Just a shout out to the corporate partners who have an interest in supporting military spouses that we are so so happy to work with and we're really really eager to see how much more we can do for the military spouses. Thanks to everyone that we've been working with. It is so neat that these programs you're partnering with sharing with mill spouses. Not only other fun. But they are like a legitimately useful I i mean. I just partnering with lows is so great because i remember being like i don't know twenty five or thirty weeks pregnant laying under my sink undoing pipes and unclogging the sink because maintenance wasn't going to be able to come for like a week or something and drill sergeant. He just did not have time to deal with it and how much easier that have been to be like. Hey how do i fix this sink without making a disaster like exactly exactly this is not even a damsel in distress sits. You know we are not implying that Terry spouses cannot do these things. We are here to empower them to know that. Do them on their own and they will. Because it's it's not that difficult and were here to share those skills with them. It's superfund rate. It helps it you. You just hit the nail on the head. Hi putting tendon. Because we're talking. Improvement couldn't resist You hit the nail on the head there elizabeth because i feel like sometimes when as military spouses the opposite the opposite of empowerment feeling deprivation deprived in kind of at the mercy of the military or if our service members we're going to be home or when maintenance can come but instead of approaching it like that we get the opportunity to really focus on things that we can learn and maybe do ourself and so that we're not so stuck with. I have to wait for someone else. But hey i can handle this. It's really not the damsel in distress situation. I so appreciate what you guys are doing. And how intentional. You are in crafting these programs to fill those needs in that gap elizabeth. I really enjoy learning about everything you guys are doing. I thought i was relatively well-versed. But clearly i had no idea and i just love it. I've enjoyed our conversation so far. So we're gonna take a super quick commercial break and then we'll chat a little bit more about other wonderful things you all are doing with your military spouse programming experience listeners. If you'd like to connect with the uso you can go ahead and find them online on twitter at the underscore uso on instagram and facebook. Simple at the uso. So t h e u s and their website uso dot org forward slash campaign for slash. Coffee dash connection dash live. Or you can also just go on there and look up the military spouse programs stay tuned for the rest of this interview after our quick commercial break we will be right back with more. From elizabeth engage. Educate encourage empower advertise awa has many opportunities for promotion of your bryant service or including web creatives flog posts social media promotion giveaways and podcasts audio commercials. Email empower at army wife network dot com to get started. We sincerely thank you for your support to empower military spouses families and their service members around the globe listeners. We are back talking with. Elizabeth lee program manager for us military spouse programming. The first segment of our interview has already been so enlightening and empowering with all of the programs the you all share for military spouses from the coffee connection. Live to partner with lows and Experiences with careers networking discovering. Your spark how to deal with your service member leaving again so elizabeth. Let's make this a little more personal. Because i can. How did you get employed at the uso and does the uso hire. A lot of most houses This is one of my favorite stories to tell. I have actually been with the uso on and off since two thousand five. So it's been fifteen years. And i was a young not too recent college graduate living and working in the dc area. And while i loved my job. And i loved the hustle and bustle of dc. It was two thousand and five. We were in the height of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. And i just felt like there was more that i could be doing. I had always wanted to work in international business. And what i was doing was marketing and pr for a company in dc. But i saw this job opening for a uso marketing person in okinawa japan. And i don't speak japanese. I had never the japan. But i thought why not. That sounds fun. I was married. I had no kids. I had about two suitcases worth of possessions in life. And so i just on a whim decided to apply for this job and i got it so i packed everything that i had and i moved to okinawa japan in the summer of two thousand and five to start working as a marketing director for uso. Pacific it was. It was the most incredible thing i was in my mid twenties. I didn't know anything about the military. I didn't know anything about international nonprofits but it was the best time of my life So really it was just going out on a whim. Taking a chance in applying for a job that i i ended up getting and since then i've worked in marketing worked in operations I've worked in the pacific region which covers japan korea guam and hawaii and then i worked at uso headquarters and when our family pcs to germany many years later actually had the opportunity to work over there as well. So it's been an amazing journey. And i'm so so fortunate to have been with the uso throughout so many of these moves and to answer your question yes. The us does hire a lot of military spouses It hasn't always been the case. But i'm so so proud. That in the recent years as technology has picked up the uso has been so supportive of military families military spouses and we are enabled to move when our families. Our jobs can stay with us. So like i said i've worked on three different continents and i think i've lost count of how many states i've i've worked the uso while living in but they are very supportive. They know that that uso spouses are capable of military. Spouses are capable of balancing many things of tackling challenges head on in just multitasking. So yes the uso is incredibly military spouse friendly i i i guess. I'm almost speechless. Because i love your story how you almost accidentally got connected with this. But it worked out so beautifully and fifteen years later. You continue to be a mover and shaker and now military spouse and you know making such a difference on so many fronts. i. I love hearing people's stories because it just so encourages and empowers me personally and i know it does the same for our listeners Most jump back a little bit talking more about the uso and so thinking beyond the creating the connections for mill spouses tell us a little bit more about other types of programs that uso offers for military and their families absolutely well. I'm sure a lot of people know or think of the uso associated with entertainment. May who hasn't heard the stories of bob hope going overseas for christmas shows and and to entertain the troops everywhere from vietnam to korea. Everything in between We still have a very strong entertainment department and our entertainment shows a really well known even now during covid we have what we call the mvp of military virtual programming which is sort of the virtual engagement of the entertainment department. So that's definitely something we still do. But you know the uso has a care package program where you can send a care package to a loved one who's deployed. We also have something called uso to go where our programs department literally has put together a uso center in a bunch of boxes and they ship it to wherever people aren't whether they're at a tiny little fob somewhere whether they're out training in the desert or anywhere uso. To go is is a great program where we really are going out to where we are needed Of course our centers. Our uso centers are probably the biggest program that there is They always offer free food and drinks at tv lounge. Free wifi just a place to relax and again whether you're in the airport and you're feeling like you're gonna vip amount or you're at an installation somewhere. They are a place that you know you can always go to see a friendly face We have the bob. Hope legacy reading program which is a program where a service member can read a book and film it record it and send it to a loved one who might not be in the same location which is a great way to stay connected during a deployment We have the uso transitions program which used to be called. The pathfinder program. People might recognize that name. It is completely focused on not just the active duty service member but also their spouse and their family members who are getting ready to transition out of the military and so we work with them in the time leading up to their separation from the military and then for the year afterwards to make sure that they are fully prepared for life after the military whether that's a career thing or maybe a social thing or just getting ready for life when you're when you're no longer part of the military So mean i could go on and on about them but every center has information on both local programs and global programs. So you can find out more about this. At any uso center. I appreciate you mentioning the unlike taking notes over. Here pathfinder program. I i remember you know i recognize it from the pathfinder program. I so i just so cool that you guys focus on the transition also for the military spouse when it comes to making that shift from active duty into civilian world because my husband and i talk about it all the time. We still have a few more years to go but thinking about that transition and how the dynamics chefs from him possibly being the primary breadwinner to perhaps my turn to kind of shifting those roles but also having folks like the uso in our corner to empower us in help make that transition a little bit smoother. So it's not like land in seven forty seven blizzard really sounds Encouraging to me. So i'm personally going to have to look into that leading up to the time where our roles kind of shift So obviously in twenty virtual is the big new thing and not really by choice more like by necessity elizabeth. What is the. Us's military virtual programming. How did that get started. Our military virtual programming is essentially taking everything that we used to do in person for celebrity entertainment and moving it virtual nam. So if you go to uso dot org forward slash vp military virtual programming. You can see not only a list of all the people who joined us for talk but also the recordings so we again. We have had celebrities. We've had chefs. We've had a bill nye. The science guy out roker. We've had anyone that you can imagine who loves to share their support of the military. They come on again. It's on zoom. They are interviewed by a member of our team and they take live questions sometimes on camera and sometimes just through. Qa box from fans from viewers. Around the world. I was just watching all with al roker a couple of weeks ago and they had people come on from insurers turkey. They had people coming on from germany. I mean who doesn't love al roker. We've all grown up. What do the weather on the today show and again. He's just one. I think we've had over sixty four different. Mvp engagements and and this is something that was just born this year. I won't say out of desperation but certainly out of necessity. Think for a while. We've been looking at how we can reach more people and the entertainment tours are amazing but often they go to either secretive locations or very small locations just to bring that little bit of extra joy to those who are harder to reach location through the military virtual programming we took everything virtual and we took those celebrities. Who might be you know taking a helicopter. Way out into the middle of afghanistan and we. We've interviewed them in their homes and we've put it out there for everyone to see again. People can join live or they can watch the recording afterward. And it's just been a really really neat program. I went to the website that you said. Uso dot org four slash mvp. And i am so excited. Like i'm looking at all the upcoming events you guys do so much as like yes just entertainment team for our just today so you know looking at some of these things like three events today and three events tomorrow. Holy cow that is in kuala. You guys are busy. And i love it. That is so neat. And i think when i got on this website. I'm pretty sure. Clint black was the first guy to pop. Up is ma'am it's fine. I'm fan girl. And i love that guy. He's still cool all right. I'm focused. i'm focused elizabeth. Our time together is about to wrap up but again remind our listeners where they can go to find more empowering formation about all things. Uso a military spouse programming. Yes the information is at your fingertips so if you pull up. Uso dot org forward slash military spouse or go on facebook and search for the uso military spouse facebook group. You can find information on all of our programs and any events that are coming up. I would also encourage people to find their local. Uso facebook page. I am fairly certain. That every single uso around the world has its own facebook page. Just type it into the search box and you can find out what's happening locally. And if your uso center nearby is open certainly go in and find out what's happening such good information you guys have guys only have the breadth like a cross. Which have such deep intentional programming and actions. Just it's like a giant web everything's connected but there really is something for everyone when it comes to mill spouse programming and all those resources are so empowering elizabeth which we really appreciate here at army network because as you know empowerment is one of our pivotal cornerstones for all things army wife network and so one of my favorite parts of the show is when we get a chance to ask our guests. What empowerment means to them. So can you tell us how you would complete this sentence. Empowerment is love it to me. Empowerment is something that comes with. Good company will think that being empowered means you can tackle challenges on your own and maybe some people can but to me empowerment is feeling you have the resources support knowledge and confidence to achieve your goals. I've often heard many times in life. It's not what you know. it's who you know. There is power in our connections. I think establishing that tribe and which you guys are doing on so many fronts is very very empowering especially in these times as the pandemic continues and a lot of us are still dealing with that 'isolation giving opportunities to connect virtually with military spouses literally around the globe with celebrities around the world. Just creates such a mazing unique opportunity for military spouses to feel empowered. And so elizabeth. I a i i'm rambling but i am. It takes a lot to make me. But i am so overwhelmed in the most wonderful way with everything you guys are doing for military spouses. It makes us feel special and it really does make us feel empowered. So thank you so much for sharing all this information with us You've won me over even more than before. We started this commerce. We wish you all the best especially as we ramp up to this holiday season. That is gonna look like nothing we've ever experienced before and so we just thank you so much for coming on our show today. Thank you for having me. i appreciate it. We wish you all the best. And now we're gonna back into our studio with our hosts for more empowering un shen thanks to elizabeth lee for sharing power and resources about uso military spouse programs with us this week again if you would like to connect with us military spouse programs check them out online via twitter at the underscore uso instagram and facebook at the uso or on their website uso dot org forward slash programs forward slash military's dash spouse stash programs. Thanks for that reminder jennifer. I'll definitely be following on social media now. What an inspiring show that wise to hear elizabeth speak about making sure we aren't alone as mill spouses really is. What is most important for us since we really can feel pretty isolated sometimes with this lifestyle also listening to them talk about the coffee. Connections makes me really want to go to one stat. When shrida said she was multitasking and adding herself to the uso spouse facebook group. I did the same. I'm so excited. I'm feeling so empowered and really ready to make more connections. What did you think of the show. Amanda i really have to say that i did not realize how many resources the uso military's bounced program provides. I know the uso in the airports on my husband and i have utilized many of those during many of our trips. But i'm really embarrassed to say that. I didn't know that it extended past that on that note a quick. Shout out to the uso. Inside of the seattle tacoma airport. Similar to rita's experience in denver. I too had an incredible experience at the uso. At seatac. i won't go into the details for time sake but the volunteers were more than accommodating and i will forever be grateful for them a during my trip. I was traveling alone with my son and it could have gone all wrong but the volunteers that uso really made sure that wet right so with that being said i too am very excited about the coffee. Connections live being virtual. I think really enhanced is the ability for military spouses to get involved to not have to get dressed up to go somewhere to feel awkward going alone. I think being online. Although that is the new way of things. I think even as an old way it really allows military spouses to engage and feel comfortable because sometimes we are stuck alone and going places that can be very very intimidating so i am very excited to look into that and hopefully join in on the next live and really dig into their website to find out what other resources i can use to help. Improve my life as military spouse. Yes me too. And i feel like i ready for my next trip on. An airplane guys are making me feel really good about it. S we definitely have used used always been to the us. Oh and so many airports in it really. It really is like vip lounge. I think elizabeth made that comment and it definitely feels like that and it really. They really take care of their their military service members as well as houses. That's awesome to feel so appreciated. It's time to take off our full battle rattle and refit for our next show. In the meantime you can join us. Every thursday at noon eastern for our weekly facebook live mill spouse empowerment moments. You can also catch the audio version via our podcast at army wife network tune in for our next full length episode of army wave. Talk radio on monday when our command team member sharia knob lock interviews operation home fronts chief operating officer bob thomas to talk about the organization's pandemic response and holiday services. It's going to be another empowering show before we sign off. We invite you to join army wise network team. If you're interested in joining our band of bloggers or being a guest on this podcast. Email us at info at arnie wife network dot com. It doesn't matter. If you're in a season of hurry up and wait are embracing the suck or keeping calm and soldiering on. We are here for why. Oh you engage. Educate encourage army wave talk. Radio is your source for military life empowerment. This is your army wife network command team signing out. Thank you for tuning tuning into army. Wife talk radio. The views and opinions expressed in our show. Our personal awt are is in no way affiliated with the department of defense or any other branch of the armed services and inclusion in. Our show does not reflect endorsement by the dod any local government or their agencies until the next episode head over to www dot army wife network dot com to connect with all of our empowering resources engage educate encourage wfan is your source or military life empowerment.

Uso rosa parks mill chrissy Amanda Elizabeth lee amanda uso headquarters sixty seconds us navy jennifer Amanda macneice elizabeth Us seventy eighty degrees john wanda bryant facebook Paul lawrence eighty dollars Canley canley
The Cases For Reparations: How 2020 Presidential Candidates Address The Issue

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

48:28 min | 2 years ago

The Cases For Reparations: How 2020 Presidential Candidates Address The Issue

"This message comes from on points sponsor, indeed, if you're hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes, set up screener questions then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast. From WB. You are Boston and NPR I'm magnetic Roberta, and this is on point forty acres and a mule that was promised to newly freed slaves at the end of the civil war. But following Abraham Lincoln's assassination. President Andrew Johnson reversed that order the land went back to former confederate owners leaving many African Americans to struggle as sharecroppers the question over what the United States owes the descendants of enslaved black-americans has lingered ever since now. More than one hundred fifty years later, twenty twenty democratic presidential hopefuls are drawing a line from slavery to racial inequality today, renewing calls for reparations, but what would a policy to address the legacy of slavery, actually, look like. And after generations, what would reparation solve or what problems might create this hour on point reparations for slavery and the twenty twenty election, and you can join us. What do you make of the proposals from the twenty twenty democratic? Potential candidates. Do you support the concept of reparations for slavery? Or would it only? Exacerbate existing divides has the US done enough to heal the moral wounds of slavery, or do you even challenge the notion that there is a debt to be repaid at all join us anytime it on point radio dot org or Twitter and Facebook ad on point radio will join us. I from Philadelphia Pennsylvania is Aaron Hanes wack national writer on race ethnicity for the Associated Press. She's covering the twenty twenty presidential election. Aaron welcome to on point high Magna. Thanks for having me. It's great to have you first of all start off by giving us sort of your broad impression about are. You surprised by how often the the the question of reparations has been coming up to democratic presidential candidates this year so far? Well, I have to say I am surprised that it is such a central part of this early twenty twenty conversation because as you probably know the issue really was more of a fringe topic for years, but it really entered the mainstream in two thousand fourteen with Tana hoc- coats is essay in the Atlantic. The case for reparations are Bernie Sanders was asked about reparations in two thousand sixteen and if we remember President Obama was actually against reparation so more from a pragmatic standpoint. But now you have several candidates that are signaling their support. But like you said no specifics have really been offered by most of them. Right. So it's quite a change in terms of how high profile Democrats are willing to engage with this question. I mean, let's listen to a little bit from just this week. This was a CNN townhall in Jackson Mississippi on Monday and Massachusetts democratic Senator and presidential candidate. Elizabeth Warren endorsed a house Bill to create a commission to study reparations for slavery today in America because housing. Discrimination because employment discrimination will live in a world. Where for the average white family has one hundred dollars the average black family has about five dollars. So I'm believe it's time to start the national full blown conversation about reparations. Senator Elizabeth Warren at a CNN townhall in Jackson Mississippi on Monday, Aaron Hanes whack. I mean, she said Warren said it's time to start a full blown conversation about reparations in this country, which maybe that's exactly what's going on. But I- does that mean that we're hearing full-throated support for the idea of reparations from these candidates what we are hearing support? But again, it is really a question of what that support is going to translate into and you mentioned house Bill forty which Senator Warren has signalled her support for and that Bill has actually been proposed every year since nineteen eighty-seven in the US house. It was long sponsored by former congressman John Conyers of Michigan and the bills new sponsor is congresswoman Sheila jackson-lee out of Texas. Now, I recently spoke with her, and she has reintroduced this Bill in this new congress, which has a democratic house majority, and is awaiting a judiciary hearing a committee hearing on the issue. So we'll see where that goes. But they're. Could also be for these senators who are running in twenty twenty and who have voiced their support for reparations. They could certainly sponsor a companion Bill in the Senate, even though the Senate does not have a majority, but but that would certainly be a way to signal their support. And you know, even another potential avenue is for a new democratic president to establish a study commission on reparations, not unlike the Kerner commission report that was created by president Lyndon Johnson after the race riots that happened in urban centers during the late nineteen sixties. So there are a few different ways to really get beyond just voicing support for this issue. Okay. But on the other hand, I mean, if really what we're hearing candidates talk about is a support for a study commission, for example. I mean is that is that just sort of playing politics to to the base without really promising anything at all and without without saying. Okay. Well, if the study commission comes out with a particular set of definitions of the scope of the problem here are the actual solutions or actions, I might support. But I think the experts that I've talked. To you about reparations people who have long toiled on this issue really do say that that the solution really begins with a study that would determine the scale and the scope of the harm that was done to black people during an after slavery. And that study could really inform how to remedy that harm. You know, we talk about systemic racism, which now, you know, the candidates are really rooting in slavery and everything that has come after that. But you know, that's a stomach racism stretches across so many different areas of American life from housing education to wealth to, you know, the economy just disparities are all can be traced back to slavery, and you know, so reparations cannot necessarily mean just one particular area of American life. But, but it would take study to really kind of figure out just how broad you know, the injury has been to black people in America. Well, let's listen to come la- Harris Senator come. Harris of California and also democratic presidential hopeful has said about this on the radio show the breakfast club last month. She agreed with the host of that show that reparations would help to address the legacy of slavery. People aren't starting out on the same base. In terms of their ability to succeed. And so we have got to to recognize that and give people the lift up, the Senator comma Harris of California, Aaron Hanes wack toes, a little bit more about a Harris's approach to this has she been more specific than than that what we just heard in terms of her support for for reparations. No, I wouldn't say more specific what I would say is that people like Senator Harris Senator Booker also have certainly discussed policies that that they feel could disproportionately benefit black Americans. Senator Booker, for example, has talked about baby bonds, which would you know, create? Money that would that that that that children would get that could help them, you know, later in life or. His marijuana Bill. Certainly we know about the marijuana disparities in our criminal Justice system in so policies that that would disproportionately benefit black Americans. But obviously when we talk traditionally when we have talked about reparations what we are talking about our policies policies that specifically target African American so a policy that. Would help African Americans or maybe even help them to an outsized degree is not necessarily the same as reparations if that makes sense. Yeah. Okay. So let's listen to one more presidential hopeful here. This is former US secretary of housing and urban development Julian Castro telling MSNBC last month that if he were elected president as we were talking about those the task forces and the commission that he would do just that he would set up a task force to study reparations for slavery. It is interesting to me that under our constitution. And otherwise that we compensate people if we take their property shouldn't we compensate people. If they were property sanctioned by the state. So I believe that that that is a conversation that's worth having. And I see that is right and wrong. I don't see that. It's political or non-political Julian Castro there, Aaron Hanes whack Castro. They're making the point that he doesn't see this as a political or non-political question. But I do want to dwell in the politics of this moment with you for for another minute or two here, for example, ha in we're have we have candidates democratic presidential candidates talking about this. I mean, how far is this embrace of the concept of reparations going across the Democratic Party. Will it will be in a party plop in the party platform, for example? Well, that's certainly a good question and one that we should continue to pay attention to as as twenty twenty continues. But nationally, I should mention, you know, this rep the idea of operations is still something that many Americans are opposed to. There was a twenty sixteen poll that showed something like sixty. Eight percent of Americans said the country should not pay cash reparations to African Americans. And not surprisingly those results broke down along racial lines with something like eight and ten white Americans opposed to reparations and six and ten blacks being in favor of reparation. So the country is still very divided on this issue. And so that may inform how politically appealing it is to to the party as as as as part of their national agenda. I mean, I see from your reporting here, the DNC chairman, Tom Perez is kind of being he's a quick accounting on this same that it'll be discussed to right during the course of the presidential nominating process. So how Republicans though looking at at the fact that the Democrats are embracing the concept of of reparations. What we're Republicans that. I've spoken to are saying, you know, that they welcome a conversation around reparations possibly because they know how how divisive it is. And and just the idea that taking money as some people see reparations as taking money away from white people and giving it to black people. I will only exacerbate the racially divided political climate that we now find ourselves in. And so this certainly could emerge as a wedge issue in twenty twenty once we once we get to the general election or maybe even before well and Erin Hanes. Well, we've got just a minute left here to go in and a wanted to underscore something. You said a little earlier how much or how significant the change is that this has become a central question amongst at least leading Democrats here because as you pointed out Barack Obama himself when he first became president United States was opposed to the idea in his very Obama esque way, sorta turned to it towards the end of his presidency. So so what does that tell you? Though is it that Americans at least some Americans are more willing to engage in this conversation is at the attitudes about race of have changing what sort of the underlying shift that's going on here. Well, I think what we are talking about is as more people are coming around to the notion of systemic widespread racism in America, an end, the the fact that that is institutionalized in many areas of our society. You know, the question is how did we get there? And and the answer, certainly, you know, for most folks would be a slavery, it it is rooted in slavery. And so, you know, it it is a remarkable that you know, as recently as two thousand three reparations was a joke in, you know, Dave pills comedy skit. And now we are having serious conversations about the idea of reparations in a presidential election. We'll Aaron Hanes Weck national writer on race ethnicity for the Associated Press covering the twenty twenty presidential election. Aaron thank you so much. For joining us today. Thanks for having me Magna have a great day you too when we come back with here from to folks about their views, a reparation, and whether or not should go from concept to actual concrete reality, and how that would be this is on point. This message comes from on points sponsor, indeed when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast. With indeed posted job in minutes. Set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates. And when you need to hire fast, accelerate your results with sponsor jobs. New users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR, podcast, terms, conditions, and quality standards apply. This season unin visibility. Should we empathize? With our enemies fem ords should die have machines control, our emotions, I should be creeped out. But at this lake will thank God. I live in this day and age, no, easy answers. Just the right questions. Invisibility ah back on March eighth? This is on point magnet crowbar bardy. We're talking this hour about reparations for slavery. And how the concept has moved from the fringe of the political conversation in America to squarely in the middle of the conversation or the political conversation for at least democratic presidential hopefuls in twenty twenty. And we want to dig deeper beyond the politics into what we're talking about. When we're talking about reparations for slavery. What would reparations plan look like and whether or not it's truly needed today in two thousand nineteen in America. We got a lot of comments already coming in online here on Facebook, Margarite, Martin says it's about time reparations are the bare minimum America was built by enslaved black people white people need to educate themselves on the realities of what our wealth and access have been built on. None of this has ever been made. Right. Never whereas over on Twitter ice flame, twelve says. While it may be the right thing. It would. Undoubtedly stoke racial tensions. Many whites believe they are being forgotten and left behind this change could affirm those beliefs and lead to more radicalization and harm. We'll joining us now from Durham North Carolina is William Garrity, professor of public policy African and African American studies and economics at Duke University. He's also director of dukes Samuel DuBois cook center on social equity and co author of the forthcoming book from here to attorney black reparations in the twenty first century. Professor dirty. Welcome to on point. Thank you for having me on. It's actually from here to equality from here to quality. Okay. So no beach scenes in your book. Deepest apologies. I'm gonna fix that right now. Okay. Well, also with us from New York is John mcwhirter, professor of English and comparative literature at Columbia University, contributing editor to the Atlantic. He's written numerous arguments against reparations for slavery. We'd better linked to his two thousand one new Republic article on that that link on point radio dot org. Professor mcwhirter. Welcome to you. Thank you very much make enough as a professor dirty. Let me just first start with you. We'll sort of dig into what what a plan for reparations might look like, but I just want to get your sense. Are you surprised by how much it's being discussed amongst democratic presidential hopefuls this year? Yes. I certainly didn't anticipate this. I think that there's a number of proposals and policies that are being considered this year that surprises surprise me, including the the the baby bonds. The proposal that Aaron Hanes swag mentioned which has been largely developed, but from work that I've done with Derrick Hamilton who is currently at Ohio State, and that's a proposal to provide trust the counts to each newborn infant in the United States a universal program. I also worked on the idea of having a federal job guarantee, and that's on the table in terms of conversations right now. So so I'm kind of surprised at the at the at the turn towards consideration of a set of bold policies that would really transform America. Question to you, professor mcwhirter. I mean as Aaron Hanes wack was saying in the previous segment, she sees it as sort of a the a broadening acknowledgement of the stem effects of the legacy the systemic legacy of of slavery and racism in America. So that perhaps it does make a little sense that reparation is being more vigorously and seriously discussed now, what do you think? I don't get this Meghan Magna. I'm worried that I must be getting old. I'm only fifty three. But we're talking as if this is brand new, and it really isn't. And I don't mean that you can go back to nineteen Seventy-three two things that people don't read anymore in the late nineties and for a few years after the year two thousand this country was engaged in a vigorous debate about reparations. Randall Robinson's book the debt was the big hit any aware black person in the country read it or pretended to there was a big big debate. And I hate to sound condescending. But I'm beginning to wonder whether maybe people about under forty now just too young then to realize it this is not a time. When America is suddenly waking up to this notion and having a conversation about it. We already had it and reparations frankly was soundly defeated as viable notion. And this was not just by ignorant, white people who were tired of black people acting up. We talked about this. We talked about simple questions as to. Who counts as black? We talked about questions as to if you gave the money to organizations, which organizations would they be and more to the point. What would the organizations do that we could know would have a significant effect as opposed to the sorts of things that have been tried in the past? And so nobody blew a horn. But it was clear by about two thousand and two that the conversation had been had. And that really it's not that nothing needs to be done. And we'll get to what needs to be done to help black people and to make up for the very real sins of the past. But the idea that there would be something called reparations and blazoned in the sky and offered as a grand apology, it simply didn't work, and then all of a sudden in two thousand fourteen we were told that this was a brand new idea. And today this way that the media is framing the discussion as if America is finally having a real discussion about this. It simply isn't true we did this twenty years ago. And I think the discussion now is. Is going to come out. Exactly the way it did then. So let me just respond to that. Because to me, what seems different now and feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but what seems different now is. Yes, that discussion was had maybe almost a generation ago as you point out. But now, we have aspirants to the White House, very, very enthusiastically. Supporting the notion of at least, you know, coming up with the commission to to examine the modern day harms of the legacy of slavery. So that's the difference is it's become politically viable discussion to have and not necessarily seen as something that is completely out of the realm of possibility does that not seem different to you. Professor mcwhorter with all due respect Magna. No, I really don't see any. It was not considered out of the possibility of respectable discussion in the year, two thousand lots of very influential people were very seriously discussing it not presidential candidates because the culture certainly has changed and we have a welcome -ly leftist or even liberal sleet of interesting democratic candidates. All. That is very welcome. But the issue really is our people really talking about support for an idea of this kind are is this really a kind of genuflection that ambitious people feel that they have to make where the way today that you say that you're concerned about black people's plight. And that you acknowledge the ills that were exerted upon black people in the past is to say something like we need to talk about reparations fifteen years ago. What you said was we need to have a conversation about race in. It was always clear that the conversation about race was really supposed to be a conversion where people were made to understand what black people go through. Now. The new way of saying that is to say we need to have a conversation about a research proposal about reparations. I don't see anything proactively sincere in this. And I wish we would just get on with doing the things that we know really do help black people whether or not they are labelled reparations with a capital. Our in our company by some kind of concert. Okay. So professor dirty. What do you think it'd be? See this as as polit- as White House aspirins genuflecting. It's a pretty courageous act of genuflecting given the degree of opposition to reparations that. The John MacArthur says we are confronted with. And I and I would say that there is there is not an enormous wellspring of support for reparations. But I think conditions have changed in the early nineteen nineties about four percent of white Americans indicated that they would support a reparations program for black Americans today Ameris poll that was conducted a couple of years ago indicates that it's closer to twenty to twenty five percent of white Americans. And if you look at millennials it's close to half of millennials who actually endorse reparations program for black Americans. I think that the real issue is that what's unique about this particular moment is that we do. In fact. Fact have a series of obsequious presidential candidates who are actually talking about this issue that it's not verboten in the national conversation anymore. It used to be certainly knowing what folks who've talked about reparations in the early nineteen nineties were confined largely to the black community. It was not a conversation later that rest held on on on a national scope. And and now that is the case I'd also add that I think it's an act of courage on the part of some of the political candidates to come forward and say that they're in favor of reparations when a minority of Americans have indicated support for it. But I think it's an indication that these are folks who are willing to take on the true mantle look leadership and engage in advocacy and education for the purposes of. Putting us in a position to write a moral claim that has never been met in the United States and to address the need for a genuine national reckoning on the issue of racial injustice, and one other thing I'd like to add this is not a question of compensation exclusively for the sins of slavery. I think what we really need to address in the context of reparations program is the long and cumulative trajectory of racial injustice that has been delivered upon black American descendants of folks who were enslaved in the United States. This stretches from slavery to the present moment, and it includes the Jim crow period of legal segregation as well as ongoing dimensions of racism, which include the the police killings of unarmed. Blacks, mass incarceration. And from my perspective as an economist most, particularly the enormous, racial wealth that that that's that. Senator Warren talked about in her remarks the other night. Well, professor make word I'm certainly want to respond to that. So go ahead. Well, I would just say that. I completely agree with professor charity that we cannot pretend that we need to only talk about slavery, and then say well that was four hundred years ago. No, it's slavery. Its Jim crow. It's redlining and you can expand it up into next week. But this is the crucial issue now reparations the ideas supposedly that America has never faced up to any of those things but America did. And I'm just going to say very briefly affirmative action in all of its manifestations is reparations. And if you say that it only affected white women than why does everybody scream, bloody murder the minute. Anybody tries to criticize affirmative action. It's been very good for black people. We all know it welfare expansion in the late sixties a chapter that doesn't get told much that was done for poor black Americans, and it put a whole lot more of black America on welfare which had good and bad reprecussions the community reinvestment act in the early seventies. It doesn't make for good reportage. It's kind of boring in itself. But that. Was aimed at improving inner city black communities talk about awareness raising. Don't forget that article the times ran last week where it turns out that woke white America is often woke her than a lot of black people that would have been unthinkable in the nineteen Ninety-one. Professor Dougherty refers to or even ten years ago. Things have happened. I'm not against reparations. My point is not despite my snotty voice that we just need to get over it. Nope. Black people don't need to get over anything. It's that reparations started with the great society and beyond in the mid sixties and very quickly. This is the point if you say that those things didn't work well enough who knows now what would work better how you change these things even if the injustice was in the past even if the injustice is interested in it's clear, what created it, including the wealth, gut who knows now what you could do other than great society type things that would work. And if we don't then my question, very simply is what are we talking about? And that's why I say that this is a. Reflection. And I don't think that genuflection in two thousand nineteen is brave. What was going to happen to Elizabeth Warren was a house gonna fall on her with separate Carl's? I'm gonna say something mean about her. She would have been just fun. It is just a genuflection that makes a white person sound like they care about black people or black candidate sound like they care about the people left behind. I don't see the point professor dirty. I'm minute come back to you just second but professionally quarter to that question of who knows now what would work better is that not exactly the aim of these commissions that are being proposed to study the true the true again. A better sense of the true extent of the harm done by the legacy of slavery and systemic racism for the past two hundred and fifty years. So that that better policies can be crafted, it's a nice idea. But let's face it academics and policy makers for the past fifty five or sixty years of basically, Ben doing that study and extended form, and what really do we know? Creates that kind of magic. What exactly where we expecting this commission to come up with? Because if it would really sound kind of like black lives matter has come up with a slate of about nine policies that would supposedly helped the black community. It's noble work. I understand it. It's not there's anything wrong with it. But what it basically is is what somebody would have come up with in about nineteen sixty seven. It's the great society over again. And the simple fact is that the great society programs really didn't make much difference. And if anybody doubts it, I urge you to study a book on Bedford Stuyvesant in Brooklyn by Michael Wordsworth. It gives a granular description of what the great society was like on the ground, and frankly, bedside today has all sorts of problems. And so I understand the logic of all this. And if anything the theater of all of it, and I do mean that word, but what really are we talking? What would the commission find? What is it that we have somehow missed during all of his time that now a bunch of people put their heads together and come up with something that's been just ignored for the past fifty years. We know nothing happen. And so we need something. Would really help poor black people be less bore. And I don't think that it's this frankly and professor Dougherty. I don't mean that your book and your work is somehow invalid. But I mean the way that we're talking about all this now. And frankly, these things these candidates are saying because they have to it's performance art, it's not policy. Professor dirty. I mean, he's given you to respond to go ahead. Yeah. Pull that was inevitable that he would. So so let me start by saying that in a previous case of reparations that was enacted in the United States, the reparations payments that were made to the Japanese American community after being subjected to incarceration unjust incarceration, during the course of World War Two the the the prelude to that. Reparations program was the formation of a commission, and it was called the commission to study and develop it was called the commission on wartime relocation and internment of citizens, and that commission was responsible for documenting the narrative, the sound and accurate narrative of the conditions that Japanese Americans were subjected to during the course of World War, Two and. To provide a design of proposals for restitution. And so I think as a prelude to the development of comprehensive reparations program for black Americans. It's appropriate to have a similar kind of commission a commission to study and develop reparations proposals. For African Americans of the sort that is is embodied in the legislation the house resolution lesson legislation house resolution forty I think that commission would have a responsibility for also crafting a comprehensive narrative about the history of racial injustice, and in so doing they could draw up on the research that has been developed not just over the course of the past fifty years, but over the course of the entire sweep of time from from from from the end of the civil war to to the present moment, we have. Phenomenal historical record that can be drawn upon to develop the case in full one of the most important works would be W E B do voices black reconstruction in America stand by here for just saying it had got to take a quick break. We'll be right back. We're talking about reparations and the discussion of it in two thousand nineteen this is on point. How do we perceive our experience as humans who are we today? And who could we be tomorrow? I'm guy Roz on the radio. Our we go on a journey through the big ideas that animate our world each week. It's the Ted radio hour from NPR. This is on point. I Magnin taco bardy. We're talking this hour about how the discussion over reparations for. Slavery has come into the center of the political conversation for twenty twenty democratic presidential candidates. And what that means about our national discussion of reparations or over reparations. I'm joined today by John mcwhirter. He's a professor of English and comparative literature at Columbia University, contributing editor at the Atlantic as well William Garrity is also with us. He's a professor of public policy African and African American studies and economics at Duke University. And we're going to get to call here in a second. But professor dirty. They're sexually something that professor mcquarters said in the last time that I wanted to to hear from you on and professor Mike Boorda was making the point that the United States. I in the past has done things to to meaningfully assist African Americans. He talked about affirmative action welfare expansion the great. Society. And you know, that there are many more things that could be done. And professor mcquarters said like if the if the true goal is to meaningfully do things to assist African Americans now and today, I'm wondering professor dirty. If you think that putting that all within the context of reparations calling reparations actually makes it more difficult to get the policies passed that would assist African Americans in in in the way that you believe is needed. So let me make two comments and one of those comments is the the welfare expansion that was associated with the great society was a corrective for the exclusion of blacks from the social safety net that took place when the new deal programs were inaugurated. So it was not a a a newly introduced social policy that. Suddenly was designed specifically for black Americans. It was a correction of a process of exclusion from the same set of services for close to thirty years or more. So so that's that's one point. I'd like to make the second point. I'd like to make is that the types of social programs that have been introduced that presumably will be of assistance to black Americans have focused on income. As focused on income rather than wealth. And this is a critical distinction because it's the wealth disparity that is the most dramatic in terms of racial differences. Senator Warren's comment was something to the effect of the typical black American household has five dollars for every one hundred dollars net worth that's held by the typical white household. This is a disparity that is not tackled at all by -firmative action welfare expansion or the community reinvestment act, and it's what I think needs to be the central focus of reparations program. So if we want to talk about a central target of a reparations program, the objective should be to address the magnitude of the enormous, racial wealth gap, and this cannot be accomplished by universal programs exclusively, and in fact, one of my complaints about. The the positions that have been taken by some of the candidates most explicitly by Kamala Harris is that it propagates confusion between universal programs that address poverty and inequality for everyone and reparations for black Americans which would be a program that would be particular to the long unmet climb for racial Justice on the part of black American descendants of persons enslaved in the United States. I'm actually for both types of programs. I'm I'm an enthusiast for universal programs that would address poverty in any quality for all Americans. But I also think it's imperative that we have a program of reparations that focuses specifically on the enormous racial wealth gap that that that that has been perpetrated since the failure to provide the formerly enslaved black folks in the United States with the forty acres that they were promised. So I don't see the universal programs and a reparation program as being substitutes for one another. I don't see them as being mutually exclusive if anything they are complementary. Okay. Well, so John mcwethy let me turn to you here. But I guess what I was getting at is. I can hear I hear and understand everything. Professor dairy is saying, but I'm also maybe this is just too narrow minded Emam thinking of the political feasability of launching these programs when when you say when even just when you mentioned reparations, you get responses such as from I'm seeing here from Republican strategist whit Ayers who says the idea that you resolve long-term resolve long-term, racial inequities by taking money from white people and giving it to black people it will make racial relations worse, not better. And Republicans would love to have that debate. I mean, well, you know to tell you the truth if we could get something like this through and it made a lot of white people mad. Well, that's just too bad. But the truth is I don't understand here. I'm tr-. I imagine. You come from a distant nation, you've learned English recently. And you're listening to the way we're talking about this sort of thing. So let's let's talk about the wealth the wealth business, and I think we need to use clear language instead of a tendency that I think all of us have to slip into a kind of a liturgical code first of all if we're talking about fixing the wealth, gaps specifically who's flack we've been talking about that since nineteen Seventy-three and the answer is there's no way to determine which families are black in which aren't there. So many fuzzy lines that aside, which is part of why reparations never really gets off the ground. It's not just racism. It's that it's been too long. There's been too much mixture. But then seconds is the most important thing is the idea is it that there are so many black families who lack any substantial wealth. And so what reparations would do is send those families? And I don't mean the word checks as disparagement checks or some sort of money transfer. So that they automatically have as much wealth as the typical. White family. Now, I don't know if we need to call it taking money from white people. But it's the idea that the government fills up black America's check accounts, so that they have this wealth because some people would say what we need to do is instruct and teach and make it easier for black people to attain wealth through their own efforts. Now, many people would call that Republican or bootstraps. I'm not sure because I don't think we're really talking about anything that's going to happen. But many people would say that. But is this idea that we're going to put money in black checking counts because if that's the idea let's start saying so and to be honest. Yes. That would be a very hard sell politically. But the way to deal with it being a hard sell is not to couch it and all of this flowery language about who built the capital and slavery redlining. And Jim Cohen pretending. We've never talked about it before and using an abstract word like wealth, if the idea is to send money into every black whatever that is Bank account in the country. So that black people have as much wealth as whites say it put it forth. Let's. Have a real discussion and see where it goes. And frankly, I don't think it will go anywhere. But let's do that fast. Physics to not a wealth is not an abstract idea though. I mean, it is it is very measurable go. Go ahead. Yeah. So so wealth is not abstract. It's fairly straightforward. It's the difference between the value of what you own and what you owe. It is a measure of the the value of your property your personal property, which is a resource that can offset losses in income. It's a resource that makes it possible for you to become a homeowner and acquire additional wealth. It's a resource that enables you to move into a high quality neighborhood a neighborhood that might actually have very good schools for your kids to attend it gives you the capacity to leave bequest to subsequent generations. So it is a critical resource. It's more important resource and income, and it's not something that's particularly abstract at all. So what's your policy proposal? I would go further. I would go further to say that I'm actually quite quite happy to hear John mcchord or. Make observations that suggests that reparations is something that is morally sound, but that most of his objections are on logistical grounds. I think that's another important reason why we should have the commission that has been posed to try to address all of those logistical considerations. One of the logistical considerations. That he infacy is is this notion about who would be eligible for perations because there would have to be some sort of blackness litmus test well in the work that I've done there hasn't been any sort of blackness litmus test as a basis for eligibility for reparations there's been two criteria and individual would have to demonstrate that they had an at least one ancestor who was enslaved in the United States. And then the second condition would be for at least ten years before the enactment of Iraq. Reparations program. They would have to demonstrate that they had self identified as black African American colored or negro. So that there really two conditions and ancestor who was enslaved in the United States and some demonstration that the individual had lived their lives in the United States as somebody who was black identified, but there's no DNA test here. There's no external assessment of who is black and who isn't charity for eligibility. Criteria can be handled. Forgive me for forgive me here. In fact, you know, I mentioned you have to forgive me for interrupting because out of respect for callers who have been waiting for some of them for like, forty five minutes, and we only have five minutes left here. I just wanted to don't don't don't want to block people on no apologies necessary from either of you. But I do just want to get at least one or two people in. Okay. So let's go to Karl who's calling from Tulsa, Oklahoma, Carl you're on the air. I have a beautiful instrument. They're looking in nineteen forty four. My father served in the navy. Could only be a stool Nessim forty years later. I feel on the navy served as product technician work, the two presidents. My daughter's residents would move surgically. What America has done enough? So black people he would do more harm to the divisiveness company blacks limo, haunting cells in ever before in type, and nobody ever talks about that black on black Friday and white America did elect a black. President Michel statement is HAMAs. More was America needs to plug after. There is time for us to do with lot of doesn't know anything else. Be attained gave work educates putting money in full second account will only straws to stuff. I mean, I hear all the political rhetoric going around about revelations. But at this they. Housemate for everyone who wants to get America dozen us eating thing. Karl thank you so much for your call a sneak one more in here, if we can let's go to Jimmy who's calling from Savannah, Georgia. Jimmy, we've just got a little bit of time left. But go ahead and share your thought. Yeah. I think you know, rations if we're gonna do it. It's it's it's really multicolored issue more than one one ethnic group such as advocate Americans are black Americans. You know, you look at eight hundred nineteen hundreds where there would be job ads, and it would say I need not apply here, or there would be job ads that would say white would get they mix. Grows at the time, would you pay less and all? Fade lesson and Italians were at the bottom of the run. And eventually you look at with with the Chinese that built the railway system, you know, all their backs. The the the converse from the east coast to the west coast was built on the backs of Chinese. But no one ever talks about that. So everything should be thrown out on the table. We should put our cards face up and discuss everything for reparations. Jimmy. Thank you so much for your call their John MC mortar and William dirty. We've just got three minutes left to go. But professionally mcwhirter let me turn back to you there. I mean, what do you? We just happened to hear from two callers who who seem to be saying that. Well, I mean Carl was saying he doesn't think that African Americans require reparations at all. And then to the other callers point that if we're going to do it. We have to open up our perspective on exactly who's deserving of them. And have an honest conversation across races, your quick thought on that, man. I know we don't have much time. And I I think professor Dougherty will. Particularly good on, you know, instructing those, callers and maybe different perspectives. They might have. But I want to say something in terms of my contribution here. Just to make sure I understand what wealth means within the context of this discussion. I'm not saying that the issue of disparities of wealth is itself some sort of abstraction by no means what I mean is the language that we use in talking about this such that if we say their wealth, gaps we don't immediately follow it with therefore we should pump money into the accounts of black families across the United States. We should say what the proposal is don't just keep mentioning wealth disparities and saying wealth disparities over and over without saying what you really intend. I think our discussion should be very concrete and direct rather than genuflected and elusive as if we're trying to soften the rest of America up for the real thing. Let's talk about the real thing. Now, professor David who just got two minutes left. So I mean, what would what would be a one of your real policies real policy proposals? Now. So one of the things that I will divulge from the book is the we're advocates of a portfolio for a perations, which is the development of fun that could be used for multiple purposes, both for institution building purposes as well as purposes of neighborhood improvement, so that we can talk about addressing public wealth in the black community. But also, we think it's important that there is a payment made individual black Americans for both substantive in symbolic reasons. And so there's going to be a multiple to -plicitly of uses of the funds, and that's something that can be fully resolved by the Commission's decisions. One other comment my research center, the Samuel voice cooked center on social equity has a major report that examines the causes of the racial wealth gap. It's called what we get wrong about closing, the racial wealth gap, and with respect to the first caller. I'm very impressed by the accomplishments of his family, but this doesn't translate into the same outcomes for all black Americans across the board. In fact, black heads of households who have a college degree who have produced the effort and motivation to have that type of academic achievement. Have two thirds of the net worth of white heads of household who never finished high school. So effort motivation is not adequate to close the racial wealth gap. We need something else. Well, William dirty is a professor of public policy African African American studies and economics at Duke University, and director of dukes Samuel D boys, cook center on social equality. Professor dirty. Thank you. So very much for being with us this hour. Thank you for having and John mcwhirter, professor of English and comparative literature at Columbia University and contributing editor at the Atlantic. Professor mcmurdo. It was a great pleasure. To have you on the program? Thank you so much. Thanks for having me magnum. I'm making talker. Birdied this is on point.

America United States professor Senator Elizabeth Warren Aaron Hanes professor of English and compa black community Atlantic Professor mcwhirter Professor Dougherty NPR professor of public policy president Duke University Columbia University Senator Twitter
Democracy Now! 2019-07-04 Thursday

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59:05 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-07-04 Thursday

"To from a guy that is democracy so now what did he american slave is your fourth of july science day the reveals him more than all other days of the year the gross in justice in which he is a constant to him you're celebration is a sham what the slave is the fourth of july frederick douglass eighteen fifty two independence day addressed performed by james earl jones then acclaimed writer tennis coach makes the case for reparations slave mcgrane for two hundred and fifty years on the show when they enter this country could have extended how comfortable life liberty pursuit of happiness hall regardless of what america had other principles in mind for century after the civil war black people were subjected to relive this campaign of her campaign but extended well into the lifetime majority leader mccomb township code testified at his start hearing on reparations to mark june thirteenth anniversary the freeing slaves africans in texas actor danny glover also testified all that and more coming up this is democracy now democracy now dot or the warren peace support i'm amy goodman today in this special broadcast we begin with the words of frederick douglas born into slavery around eighteen eighteen douglas became a key leader of the abolitionist movement on july fifth eighteen fifty two in rochester new york he gave one of his most famous speeches what to the slave is the fourth of july he was addressing the rochester ladies anti slavery society this is he actor james earl jones redoing historic addressed during a performance of howard zinn voices of the people history of the united states this is the late great people's historian howard's in frederick douglas once a slave became a brilliant and powerful leader jose untie slavery movement in eighteen fifty two it was asked to speak in celebration of the fourth of july fellow citizens pardon me and allow me to ask why am i called upon to speak today what have i or those i represent to do with your national independence the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice embodied in that declaration of independence extended to us and then my therefore called upon to bring a humble offering to the national alternative confessed to benefits unexpressed develop gratitude for the blessings resulting from your independence to us i am not included polluted within the payload this glorious anniversary your high independence only reveals the measurable distance between us the blessings which is you this day rejoice another enjoyed in common the rich inheritance of justice liberty prosperity and independence because we've got your father's is shared by you not by me the sunlight the life and healing do you has brought strikes and death the me this fourth of july eight who's your who's not mine you may rejoice i must mourn the dragon manton inspectors into the ground and when they did temple of liberty and qualify him showing you in joyous anthems inhuman mockery and sacrilegious irony do you mean citizens the mock me by asking me to speak today what do you american and slave is your fourth of july i answer a day but reveals him more than all other days of the year the gross in justice and cruelty which he is a constant and threw him you're celebration is a sham you're both the liberty and on whole new license you're national greatness swelling vanity you're sounds rejoicing empty and heartless your denunciation of titans brass funded impotence you'll shots of liberty and equality hallo mockery your prayers hymns your sermons and thanksgiving's with all your religious parade in solemnity other him near bombast fraud deception in piracy and in poughkeepsie a thin veil the cover up crimes but would it would displace a nation of savage's there's not a nation of you're guilty a practice is more shocking and bloody they're not the people of these united states at this very hour at a time like this scorching irony not convincing argument is needed for that idea bility and could reach the nation's air i went to date pour forth a stream a fiery a stream of biting ridicule you'll blasting reproach weathering saw tests on stern review boy it is not light that is needed but fire you did not the gentle shower thunder we need the storm but well when and you're earthquake the feeling of the nation must be quicken the conscience of the nation must be aroused the propriety of the nation must be startled the hypocrisy of the nation must be exposed used in crimes against men will be brooklyn and the night shift that once james earl jones repeating the words of frederick douglas we turn now from that famous addressed in eighteen fifty two what the slave is the fourth of july two more recent history the june hearing on reparations for slavery the first of its kind in over a decade a house judiciary subcommittee held a hearing as lawmakers consider bill titled the commission to study and develop reparation proposals for african americans act the bill was introduced by democratic congress member sheila jacksonlee of houston after former congressman john conyers champion debt for decades without success they took place on june eighteenth the day that commemorates june nineteenth eighteen sixty five when enslaved africans in galveston texas finally learn the emancipation proclamation proclamation abolish slavery this year also marks the four hundredth anniversary of the transatlantic slave trade ahead of the hearing senate majority leader mitch mcconnell was asked by spectrum reporter even the canned whether the government traditional public apology for slavery this west mcconnell's response i don't think reparations through something that happened years ago for him none of us currently living responsible is a good idea of we've you know tried to deal with our original sin of slavery about fighting a civil war by passing a landmark civil rights legislation we elected an african american president i think we're always a work in progress in this country a but no one currently alive was responsible for that and i don't think we should be trying to figure out how to compensate for first of all it'd be pretty hard to figure out who to compensate we've had waves of immigrants is well who come to the country inexperienced dramatic a discrimination of one kind or another so no i don't think reparations are good idea that with senate majority leader mitch mcconnell will award winning author ton of hussy coats testified at the historic congressional reparations hearing and took direct dane at mcconnell's response yesterday when asked about reparations senate majority leader mitch mcconnell offered a familiar reply america should not be held liable for something that happened a hundred and fifty years ago since none of us currently alive are responsible this bottle proffer as a strange theory of governance that american accounts somehow bound by the lifetime of its generations but well into the century the united states were still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers we on a treaty is the date back some two hundred years despite no one being alive who signed those trees many of us would love to be taxed the things we'll slowly in individually responsible for but we are american citizens and that's bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond individually and personal reach it would seem ridiculous to dispute invocations of the founders of the greatest generation on the basis of a lack of membership in either group we recognize lineage as a generational trust that's inheritance and the real dilemma pose about reparations is just that a dilemma of inheritance it's impossible to imagine america without the inheritance of slavery as historian at baptist is written in slave meant quote shaped every crucial aspect of the economy and politics of america so there by eighteen thirty six more than six hundred million almost half of economic activity in the united states derived directly or indirectly firm the cotton produced by the millions of slaves by the time they insulate or emancipated they comprise the largest single asset in america three billion in eighteen sixty dollars more than all these other assets in the country combined the method of cultivating this asset which neither gentle cajoling north persuasion but torture rape and child trafficking and slave mid range for two hundred and fifty years on these shows when it ended this country could have extended its hallowed principles life liberty and the pursuit of happiness all regardless guardless of color but america had other principles in mind and so forth century after the civil war black people were subjected to eight relentless campaign of tara a campaign that extended well into the lifetime majority leader mcconnell is tempting to divorce this martin campaign of tara of plunder from in slave meant but the logic of enslavement of white supremacy respects no such borders and the god of bondage what's loss full and the gap many is who they ties and convict leasing vagrancy laws in debt peniche redlining and racist gr bills poll taxes in state state sponsor of terrorism regret the mr mcconnell is not alive for apple maddix but he was alive but they electrocution george standing he was alive with a blinding of ice at woodward he was alive to witness cut talk crecy in his native alabama and the regime premised on electro fact majority leader mcconnell cited civil rights legislation yesterday as well he should because he was alive to witness the harassment jailing in betrayal of those responsible for that legislation by government sworn to protect him he was alive but the red lining up chicago and the looting of black homeowners up some four billion dollars victims of that plunder are very much alive today i am sure they love a word with the majority what they know what this committee must know is that while emancipation dead both to the door against the bandits of america jim crow which the windows wide open and that is the thing about senator mcconnell's something it was a hundred fifty years ago and it was right now the typical black family this country has one temps the wealth of the typical white family black women die in childbirth it four times the rate of white women and of course the shame of this land of the free boasting the largest prison population on the planet which the descendants of being slaved make up the largest share the matter reparations is one of making amends indirect redress but it is also a question of citizenship in hr forty this body has a chance to both make good on its two thousand nine apology for slavery and reject fairweather patriotism to say that a nation is both it's credits and it's devas that if thomas jefferson matters soda sally hemmings that if d day mattis sodas black wall street that valley forge matters sodas for pillow because the question question really is not whether we will be tied to the some things about pass but whether we are courageous enough to be tied to the whole of the bunch of that was award winning author tallahassee coach testifying before a house judiciary subcommittee in june his seminal two thousand fourteen essay the case for reparations help spur new calls to make amends for slavery he'll join us in a minute but first actor and civil rights activists danny glover also testify at the hearing thank you mr coats it's not often that you hear the words of young man and they live in your emotional memory historic memory as he's just there at this moment thank you so much i am deeply honored to be here today offering my testimony at this historic meeting about the right demean of a crime against humanity that is foundational to the development democracy a material will be in in this country a national reparations policy is immoral moral democratic an economic imperative i sit here at the great great grandson of a former slave mary brown with three by the emancipation proclamation on january first eighteen sixty three i had the fortune of meeting as a small child i also said here's the grandson recent may on lynn rufus mac humbly my maternal grandparents were both foreign before plessey see breast is focusing supreme court decision in eighteen ninety six and thoughts nificant portion of their live they work sharecroppers intendant formless in rural georgia until they were able to save enough money the purchase of small farm system forms the site despite much progress over the centuries this hearing is yet another important step in the long end heroic struggle of african americans just pure reparations for the damage is inflicted by in slave myth and kohl's emancipation and show exclusionary policy many of these organizations who were present today at this hearing are amongst the historical contributors to the present national discourse congressional deliberations and democratic party presidential campaign policy discussions about reparations we also invented the work of congress men john conyers which shepherding putting this legislation be adoption of hr forty can be a signature legislative achievement especially within the context of the united nations international decade kate of people of african descent we should also note that the common market nations and the care of being community carol com reparations commission chair by professor hillary beccles who is here with us today as exercise a leadership role firm which we as a nation ten benefit us sustain direct affect the policy actions and full collaboration with african americans and progressive citizens allies if the ultimate proof of the sincerity of on national commitment to repair the damage is legally and often religiously sanction in humanity of slavery segregation and current structural racism that limit for put democratic participation and material advancement of african americans an about countries progress as they thinking of justice and equality i closed skews me with insightful and still relevant words of dumped the martin luther king junior nineteen sixty and i quote why is the issue of equality still so far from solution in america a nation which professors itself to be democratic inventive hospitable to new ideas rich productive an ultimately powerful justice for black people were not flow into society merely from court decisions nor from fountains stuns the political over to nor will they do token changes quelled all the time to tempt to us you're earning millions of disadvantaged black people white america must recognize the justice for black people cannot be achieved without radical change in the structure of society the comfortable being french the privileged cannot continue to tremble at the prospect of change in the status full thank you that was danny glover economists julian malveaux also spoke the journalist abby well said that lynching was the first example sample of white supremacy because it was a pool of terrorism it definitely ability of african american people to participate in the vibrant entrepreneurship of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century with a chilling message that are nommik success says could be punished by the rope even tomic damage the black people post reconstruction can be summarize in three ways number one we were denied the ability to participate in our nation's economic growth the homestead act of eighteen eighteen sixty two did not include four lean slave people within ten percent of the contra tip casa del continental usa land with distributed to recent immigrants but not black folks sort of forty acres and a mule give it to somebody else not us we these folks were able that only the get lands within to get grants when the federal government to develop their lead meanwhile african american people were denied the right to these wealth transfers secondly we were denied the right to accumulate we attach the paper that i mentioned talks about how are accumulation cyncially stymied by lynching the first lynching that i'd be wells examined was one when a black man had the nerve the nerve open up a grocery store near white man stole so the white man had a brother lynch have three people less because of economic envy listen to those words ecconomic envy this is how black people have been suppressed and their ability to accumulate tulsa oklahoma wilmington north carolina long stories and i don't have any time to talk about i want you all to look at the paper that i submitted and to think about the many ways that black people who try to participate try to encourage tried to be american simply tried to be he could make actors were oppressed because they had the nerve to think it worked so my brothers over here who say they're they're american dream it's some people's america nightmare let's just be clear now number three public policy hostility those public policy hostility to black people gr bill legislation truncated opportunities african american veteran federal housing administration reinforce redlining and segregation as a special policy of the federal government you people talk about racist is if they're individuals yes sir but the fact that individuals there individuals vigils who are buttressed by the federal government legislation so let me simply say hr forty is important nor has developed ten point plan but more importantly as you my brothers and sisters on this congress go forward that may there be racial justice audit of any new legislation that dombi implications thank you that was kind of miss julian love when we come back award winning author tallahassee coats joins me and democracy now is near main check for the study our oh no no no joy don't need any i wanna know a while well as well news shimmer prayer for cleaning the water by poet musician joy harjo who's become the first native american poet laureate this is democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report i'm amy good and then when their main shape as we continue to talk about the colfer slavery reparations we spend the rest of the hour with a ton of hussy coats who testified at wednesday's hearing he's the author of several books including we were eight years in power and american tragedy tragedy he's also the author of between the world and me for which he received the two thousand fifteen national book award for non fiction he's now a writer in residence at new york university china hosted coaches seven oh two thousand and fourteen essay the case for reparations help spur new calls to make amends for slavery today he joins us for they our kind of say thanks so much for being with us and you talk about the origins of this chairing the first first in a dozen years in the field that is being considered in what you hope to come up this did you ever dreamed up this is what would come of well it's been going on for decades but five years ago you intensified the discussion and lasting peace reparations yeah no it's it's been a i be honest it's been absolutely fascinating to watch i i think the thing that people want need understand a about the fight for reparations is precisely how how old it is i mean this this goes back to a belinda roy who who sued the state of our eyes it royal a back in you know a pulse colonial times after after the american revolution up to kelly house in the nineteenth century into a james forming a senior leader in snick making his demand for reparations up through a in cobra and people like a professor charles ogle tree so this this is eight eight eight long long fight and then i published the case for reparations in india atlantic i you know my whole was to just make my injury a in into that fight i didn't expect it to quite get here 'em i think this is definitely progress i don't think this is anywhere near maybe in a goal but i i think yesterday was progress tallahassee a you made of course a number of extremely powerful remarks doing your testimony among which she said quote it's impossible to imagine america without their inheritance of slavery so far are international audience and others who aren't quite as familiar with this history could you explain what you mean by that it's impossible to understand america without an hatton well sure you know the the to a great crimes in american history is obviously the destruction of this country native american near destruction us they not the destruction the new destruction at his country's native american population of theft of their land an owen to work that land was brought in a native africans into this country beginning in in sixteen nineteen 'em those twin process these profoundly all to the the the shape of the world a n made this country possible obviously first of all you you know the land on which you know america and americans currently reside a land of native americans but the people brought in to to to break that land a just transformed the profits it's a derived from slavery are more extreme than i think are are commonly acknowledged as i said yesterday a in eighteen sixty a the combined worth four million enslaved black people in this country some three billion dollars nearly seventy five billion in today's a share of dollars a cotton in eighteen sixty with this country's largest export not just the largest export the majority of exports i out of this country so from a financial perspective just the economics of it it's it's absolutely impossible to imagine america a without on slate muddy onset of the civil war the greatest a preponderance the greatest population a per capita a million as a multi millionaires in this country within the mississippi river valley wasn't in boston wasn't in chicago wasn't in new york the richest people in this country were slaveholders most of our earliest president's were slaveholders and the fact that they were present at a is not incidental to the fact did they they're slated to to their slave holding a that what's how they built their wealth that without thomas jefferson built as well that was how george washington built his wealth a indie visual slaves were they equivalent of say only home today they were a people but turned into objects of extreme well so just from the economic perspective there's that and just forgive me for extending a little bit but there's also the fact of what america actually is culturally our greatest export today is entertainment in his in his out culture it is impossible to imagine american culture a without jackass delta blues without hip hop is impossible imagine american cinema without regrettably birth of a nation it's impossible to imagine american literature at this way without james ball went without tony morrison all of these other the primary secondary a territory fruits of slavery in so if you strip slavery out of america restrict black people out of american you really don't have in america tallahassee coats i want it to go to a clip of you speaking at this historic hearing yesterday before the house judiciary committee chair answering a chairman jerry nadler it's been said a single looted to repeatedly throughout this conversation that somehow wealthy african americans are immune to these effects but in in addition to the wealth gap that sided one thing that that folks should keep in mind is that quote unquote wealthy african americans not quivalent of quote unquote wealthy white americans in this country average average african american family in this country making a hundred thousand dollars just you know decent money she lives in the same kind of name average white family making thirty seventy five thousand dollars a year lives and and it's totally tied to the legacy of enslavement and jim crow end vr v as again put any idea in mind the white people and black people somehow deserving of different things if i injury injury princess even after actually committee acc stabbed you you may suffer complication along after that initial actual stabbing if i shoot you he suffered complications long after that initial shooting that's the case with african american people well with in living memory of this country the still suffering from the effects of that very much so that is kind of how it cuts speaking at the hearing and win that i wanna go back just a clip of what they a senate majority leader mitch mcconnell said i don't drink preparation sure something that happened years ago for him none of us currently living a responsible is is a good idea of we've tried to deal with our original sin of slavery by fighting a civil war about passing landmark civil rights legislation a collective african and so i wanna point out that they question that he was asked about reparations about apologies for slavery was asked by young african american reporter named even can spectrum his comment just being heard everywhere but the reporter herself is only being talked about on democracy now and the significance of this time i say and if you can talk about the bills that's being considered i mean you herself said when you start in your historic peace five years ago and the case reparations you yourself warrant condensed yeah first of all i wanna thank you for a you know a shout out that reported that that actually has meaning because you need a black reported there in the first place we asked the question to set all of this in motion so that's true no no no i i you know and to be honest with you a for instance the previous answer i just gave you on eighty economic seven slave meant a and its relationship to to to this country i would not have been able to give you that answer that i think of when i started in two thousand fourteen he was at that point for reparations but you're referring back to something i wrote in two thousand twelve when i was a you know again i wanna maybe give you that answer i i didn't have that level of of of knowledge and beyond that i didn't have the level of knowledge on how it persisted veg sense segregation jim crow etc you know in a hundred years after about red not not not in that degree of of of detail a and i didn't know how this a extraction as i call it of wealth from the african american community a laundered through the state into the white community you know a through through redlining duty f h h loan program through the geography i i just didn't have knowledge of that and once i saw that it's like wow this is persistent you know a a pattern of of of of abstraction that needs a really really radical anti at that point reparations originally total total sets me a but i will add but it made sense there plenty of people long before it made sense to me and kind of how could you talk about i mean how do you think conversations about reparations envy american public you have changed since the publication of atlantic piece you know i'm i'm not you know that that that he's got a lot of attention i'm not totally convinced that that's why this is happening right now hey i just you know just really wanna say again that people have been fighting this battle for a long time and so it's like you put drops of water in a glass and eventually you know the glass tips over and you see some sort of larger affect i was building on the world you know when published in two thousand fourteen only what ten fifteen years ago you know there's been a random robinson's the debt you know as i mentioned earlier the efforts of charles look so they've been all of these little you know sort of africa didn't get the same degree of covers that's the first thing and i also think having your first block president's followed up by you know someone who are referred to his first wife president has had a tremendously radicalizing affecting a lot of people can you talk about i mean this discussion session about reparations immediately last night on the talk shows on what do they talking about giving checks who exactly would be involved on who would get the money how would this be determined go back to when abraham lincoln signed a bill emancipating the painting and slave people on the slave owners around washington dc being given reparations for each in his last person that they freeze what was it three hundred dollars a person right i i can't i can't remember the the number but yeah you're exactly correct and in fact lincoln offered that several he did this this idea of what we call compensated emancipation at the time and he offered it to several of the of the border slave states delaware i believe maryland kentucky also that that was a plan to to compensate they actually slaveholders then i should say that that's a global pattern throughout history the country of haiti having the temerity to liberate itself from slavery was forced to pay reparations france the country that axiom slave the people that so this isn't a global pattern with people in slave it it is a only four questions of power that you know we find ourselves able to countenance a v idea that are people who have dundee enslaving should have been compensated and i was fine and not just people who were enslaved people who are suffering affects of that afterwards a should not be compensated talking about and i just i cannot cannot at one just one quick thing also this whole thing about a who should get a check and should we cut checks you know i understand those questions that's great those people should support hr forty though is that that's where they shot forty does it tries to get that figured out and get that mass figured out and figure out the best way to what if we don't actually have a study we can't actually answer those questions you can't ask a doctor to make a diagnosis before there's an actual examination those people who have all of those questions just reportage off where they should be his biggest supporters but townhouse because i want to go back to some of these enduring legacy of slavery in the u s a the house budget committee held a hearing on poverty in america reverend dumped william barber co chair of the poor people's campaign pain called for a model budget framing the epidemic of poverty as a quote moral crisis is in a society where a person constitutional duty to us stablishment justice and promote the general went down down the channel weatherman that we will not allow the injustice of poverty forty three point five percent of people are popular the lower end people here who could teach this the science and we would walk away from a constitutional values and walk away from a spiritual adviser that is dangerous for nation not to the reverend doctor barber is wearing a sash that says jesus was a poor man and i just wanna point out so you were having this charing on june eighteenth and the budget committee is having this historic hearing on june eighteenth and you're actually speaking it exactly the same time that hearing home unaided three days of the poor people's campaign of course picked up from the last year of a doctor martin luther king's life is he led the poor people's campaign democracy now is there on monday the trinity university when doctor barbara doctor lucille harris question nine presidential candidates about about this issue of the connections of poverty and racism saying this issue of extreme poverty was not raised once in one of the presidential debates of two thousand sixteen when you talk about this trajectory from slavery yeah where describing today yeah i mean again i you know i think in this moment you know one of the reasons why you know the sort of a a you know all of these questions they may have been you know off the table in two thousand sixteen or off the table in in two thousand eight it it's not that 'em people were raising now you know it's not that you know people were were making the point but i i just think you know in in reaction to to to what's going on to this country in this country right now people are just much much more open you know in in in in terms of poverty and an end race in this country again you know one of the things i really really wanna distress it's it's the level of poverty specifically to see many african american community is not accidental it's not accident this was a this is part of the process the process of enslavement involves stealing something from someone it involves taking someone something from someone jim crow laws that first and foremost staff if i if i tax you or if i tell you you have to be a loyal oil to this country in an input fealty to its laws but then i don't give you the same degree of protection i don't give you the same access to resources that i give to another group of people i effectively stolen something from you all have stolen your tax money stolen your you'll feel tr stolen you're you're you're loyalty so when the state of mississippi for instance you know a a tax is black people and then builds you know one facility of education and another facin one facility of education for whites and then in syria facility for blacks that staff that stuff if i build a public pool system in until you can use that public pool system that staffed a and so that that that that is a long history of this country that doesn't in again conservatively servative lee until you know a nineteen sixty eight and so they're people who are very very much alive who've experienced that who is suffering maybe after effects on effects that are and that's when you know as far as i'm concerned you know the whole movement around reparations is about and are you know suspect got in here you know a doctor every barbara's comments but i suspect there's there's quite a bit of overlap there too well i wanna ask tallahassee about up what may be a change in perception of a the position that the african american community in the u s is in and a possible change in what ought to be done about it a recent survey by the associated press found that fifty two percent of americans believe the government doesn't put enough resources sources in improving the conditions of african americans but only thirteen percent think the government is obliged to compensate for pots racial discrimination your response to that and the distinction between between the two i think a people again i think people have you know i said this yesterday i think people are very very uncomfortable when we start talking about the things in america's past a they do not credit us a again we have no problem at all taking credit for the things that you know people who are no longer here you know who do a our in our past we have no problem taking credit for those efforts a you know you take somebody like mitch mcconnell who does not want to be responsible for you know enslavement that happened a hundred and fifty years ago but yet and still wants the rights to operate his you know operated business will operate his you know his career any building that was built by slaves people are and so we we have no problem taking the credits the benefits are awful what was done in the past but when you start talking to people about acsi paying that you know a a backup ashley you know some sort of even even this around that they're you know a lot of discomfort comes up i understand that i would like to also you know take a only you know my my paycheck and not have to pay my bills i would like that to that that would be great you know but i think if this idea of patriotism and citizenship is you know to mean anything you know you can't you know as i say b b b fairweather frontier country you can't decide that you're past only matters you know the two one invoke you're country is land of the free when you wanna go invade iraq for instance a and then you know when you're being called to be responsible for what made you know a possible country could be called landed a free in the first place the act like you know you you you you don't owe anybody you're not you're not part of its especially you know as i said yesterday when when a lot of this happened in your own lifetime isn't the pass it happened while you are alive mitch mcconnell was twenty six years old by the time the voting rights act a past you know so this is while we're in a lifetime of living people today i wanna go tacoma here's the columnist prequalified undergraduate at columbia university who spoke out against reparations i understand that reparations or about what people are owed regardless of how well they're doing i understand that but the people who were owed slavery are no longer here and we're not entitled to collect on their debts reparations by definition finishing are only given to victims so the moment you give me reparations you've made me into a victim without my consent tallahassee coats can you respond to calling he testified at the same hearing that you laid off yeah i mean i i think the testimony was that a one should not receive payment a that would probably prop properly be do a to be in slaved a but this country tree is to this very day reseeding payment that was due to its in slavers that's that's the way inheritance works you know in this country are however one might feel about that if i assembled a massive money i have the right to pass that on my kid market has the right to do whatever and then pass it on to their kid and so there's something fundamentally in just if i if secure that money by taking it from one group and then i passed that money or into my kid my kid by the way continues continues to do injustice to the descendant of of of of that other group a and were allowed to continually collect i i don't want to fall into this this this trap and i'm really really tried to make this clear yesterday just in in within slavery reparations isn't just about enslavement there were two hundred and fifty years of enslavement that period of theft after their with a hundred years of tara that period of stuff and you know i would argue in fact a our prison system of mass incarceration emerges right out of that and so a you know this notion that that that a nation a somehow only a m especially when we're talking about it's debits that that that that it only lasts through the lifetime of its present generation is it's clearly ridiculous plus a the state itself would fall apart if that were true of all about trees were broken when this generation doubt at all about taxes and responsibilities if we said to pinch and as you know we will no longer pay you because the people that you know made a decision about those wasn't a no longer live we would have a huge problem as i said yesterday to this very day or at least i should say recently as two thousand seventeen we would pay attention to the heirs of civil war widows i mean this is a tremendous then we would recognize all ties with the us when it comes to certain things but not other things in tallahassee cuts we have to break and i also wanna point out tenacity speaking to us from washington dc where he testified yesterday any speaking in front of an image of the capital which was built spy enslaved people tallahassee coach writer in residence at new york university author of a number of books including we were eight years in power and american tragedy that includes his case against reparations this case for reparations we will be back with tallahassee ban them by my well no on a cold and dry all day when i saw the bird land all day mining no may be the miami by by by oh my god will the circle being broken by the staple singers this is democracy now i'm amy goodman with their main shea democratic presidential contender joe biden is under fire for fondly reminiscing about his civil relationship with segregation of senators in the nineteen seventies in nineteen eighties speaking at a fundraiser the car live hotel in new york city tuesday night biden express nostalgia for his relationship with the late democratic pro segregation senators james eastland of mississippi and her mental image of georgia biden reportedly said quote i wasn't a caucus with james eastland he never called me boy he called me son biden said biden went on and just say a guy like herman challenge one of the main guys ever know you go down the list of all these guys well guess what at least there were some civility we got things done binding which widely criticized by other democratic presidential contender she was asked on wednesday if he would apologize are you guys like for the girls were what call for it he knows better is not a racist photo my body i've been involved in civil rights my whole career period period period biden spoke after senator cory booker had issued a statement leading quote vice president biden relationships with proud segregationist are not the model for how we make america safer and more inclusive place for black people and for everyone frankly i'm disappointed pointed that he hasn't issued an immediate apology for the pain his words dredging up for many americans he should booker said other candidates also weighed in senator bernie sanders tweeted i agree with cory booker this is a specially true at a time when the trump administration is trying to divide us up with this racist appeals new york mayor bill de blasio posted a photo of his family on twitter and wrote quote it's two thousand nineteen and joe biden is longing for the good old days of civility typified by james eastland diesel thought my wall multi racial family should be illegal whites were entitled to the pursuit of dead in words senator kamala harris said quote yes it concerns me deeply if those men had their way i would not be in the united states senate senator elizabeth warren said quote i'm not here to criticize other democrats but it's never okay just celebrate segregationists never found assay coats your thoughts on moose water so it's just more of the same i mean you you know joe biden is how giants i i don't i don't i mean joe mansion precedent you know 'em you know obviously i don't think i'm breaking any news here if he ends up being a nominee better him the in him then trump but i you know i i think that's a really really low standard a i think when you have somebody who is celebrating their relationship the ability of you know a person who saw no problem depriving entire population of african americans in their state of the right to vote on the right to participate as american citizens the fact that person was polite to them i mean it's nice that a eastland never called a time i knew i was never called joe biden boy it's nice the joe biden has had that privilege but the fact of the matter is joe biden owes his very presence in in in the race right now to first black president to brock obama and if it were up to east and if it were up the tamaz rock obama would not only not being the white house he actually would not exist and so i i don't i don't know what is going on in your brain where you know you you decide to celebrate the fact that these people were polite they could afford to be polite because the the the major opposition you know in in the state that being african americans would wasn't affectively at that time in no time to the you know most of their career wiped out of the political process in any race as as as and electorate joe biden says that 'em he's been involved with civil rights his entire career is worth remembering joe biden oppose bussing and brag about it you know in the in the nineteen seventies joe biden is on on the rocket is being to the right of actually a a new democrats in the nineteen nineties on the issue of mass incarceration one more people sent sent a sentence to the death penalty wanting more jails and so i you know i i just i i'm not surprised prior i mean this is who joe biden news dealers that saying somebody shows you who i believe them this is who joe by news tallahassee what about your assessment of these other candidates in the democratic presidential field right throwing again you're you're holding will be launching you met with elizabeth warren or did yes i did can you talk about that a a no no roger stone but i see a water you pay particular attention to these candidates i mean it was interesting yesterday after biden made his comments owners on tuesday night and said you know eastland didn't call me a boy he calls me son now again senator eastland who talked about african americans see inferior race what's called the voice of the white south south on yes as you pointed out obviously he didn't call him boy a joe biden is white by you were the first to people to speak out on as far as i could tell were first cory booker and then he referred to corey immediately us korean said corey should apologize to him joe biden and then a as well you had comma harris speaking out they african american senator from california and then of course warren and biden rather warren and bernie sanders and the blasio but what are you looking for in these candidates the stands a you want to see them taking a i think i would like to see somebody a i listen i it's it's understandable a where a large portion of this country is 'em they wanna see somebody who could beat trump i get that in there is you know a a feeling i think among certain people that joe biden came out white man donald trump 'em i'm not convinced that i don't think anybody got white men donald donald trump 'em i i hope that what will see eventually is something more than i can beat donald trump donald donald trump should be before i get that beating donald trump is extremely extremely important i get that but i i just hope that that's the floor you know and and not the ceiling well one of the leading contenders is a senator bernie sanders in the twenty twenty the upcoming elections so i'd like to go to him being questioned about the issue of represent of reparations by the views sunny halston earlier this year by humbling to believe at a time of tremendous disparity the wealth capra example between the white community in the black community is like ten to one health disparities terrible environmental disparities a terrible machine comes the so i think what we gotta do is pay attention to distressed communities black communities latino communities in white communities all over this country as president pledged to do what do you mean by reference reparations preparations for saint defend what does that mean exactly money i think right now are our job is to address the crises facing a big american people in our communities and i think there are better ways to do then just running out attract so that's a senator bernie sanders on your response kind of see to to his position on reparations i i think i should i should say before far as my understanding is that a set of the sanders now support hr forty i think i think that that that's where we are now so i'm you know obviously pretty pleased about that you know i i listen when we had this dust up a few years ago with ours repeatedly told was a you know it's not class you know or race it's both and i agree so i think all of the things that you know a bernie sanders just listed about paying attention to distress communities shouldn't be done and we should also have reparations 'em so i i don't see those two things as conflict it's not clear to me why you know both can't be on defacto is never clear to me why both can't can't be on the agenda why can't why can't you know associate themselves with the massive gas in well they don't just exist any african american community but exists you know and communities across the country and at the same time recognize that there's something specific about the gap in the african american community just tied to the specificity of of american history but you know as as i said i'm happy senator sanders now supports hr forty i think that's progress and finally where does this bill go from here and talk about he's in its name hr forty where it comes from yeah i mean obviously you know i come from a the field border given by a general a sherman a whole a forty acres and a mule this is a reference to a back to that i i don't know where this goes i don't know where this goes i'm shocked where he said that repeated i'm i'm surprised even here i am a writer and journalist you know a soon to novel that's those are my preoccupations 'em that that's my a a this physician a i'm not a very good forgot prognosticator i would not have told you that you would have had a black president in two thousand eight i would not have told you that you know they would have been hearings on the house floor on on reparations on hr forty i would not have predicted any of that so i don't know where we go i think you know in my mind you know i try not to get too high and and try not to get too low as as as it said 'em in my mind this is this is still a generational struggle and uptown seadogs back to you know the the the generations after i'm gone will begin to will continue to fight this battle and it's always been a generational generational struggle tenacity katrina thank you for being with us writer in residence at new york university

frederick douglass america danny glover amy goodman frederick douglas new york james earl jones writer tennis mccomb texas rochester fifty years hundred years eight years forty acres five years thirty seventy five thousand d
Dems Grill Trump Insider Hope Hicks in Private Hearing

The Beat with Ari Melber

44:49 min | 1 year ago

Dems Grill Trump Insider Hope Hicks in Private Hearing

"We have a lot tonight's show. Democrats say they're making headway and their investigations of the Trump White House with hearings about obstruction this week in a star witness today, later tonight, Democrats taking on a charge civil rights battle. My exclusive guest is Senator Cory Booker later in the hour and a pioneering media executive and Trump critic is going to walk us through how to cut through Donald Trump's reality TV campaign as he does his reboot, but we begin with Democrats scoring their biggest interview so far in this obstruction probe. Hope Hicks, the first Trump Stafford ever, sit down, which did you share your committee since the mole report came out now she sat for seven hours, but both inside and outside the closed-door interview, she really wasn't saying much. Hope to the president of structure. The White House letting you answer any questions too. Why is the White House limiting their testimony so much? No comment from someone who, of course, was widely credited as a real messenger for the Trump campaign for a long time. Now, the White House says Hicks has quote, absolute immunity from testifying. And Democrats say she just didn't answer the questions. The witnesses has been directed by the White House, and the president, not to answer questions is almost every question. I've observed she is refusing to answer. He must have me a simple as where's your office? Located objection is ridiculous. I'm joined now by NYU law professor Melissa Murray, who's also a clerk to judge so to my own E, J Dion columnist for the Washington Post EJ, as student of Washington, which is well known for some theater a what was accomplished today. Well, not a whole lot. I mean on the one hand, they did get a witness a but what you really saw was the length to which the Trump administration is willing to go to block any testimony before congress. I mean, they'll make up any reason to say that somebody shouldn't testify, they might as well say, they're exerting a privilege privilege, which is they have the privilege to say that somebody can't say anything whenever they feel like it. EJ. This like stacks on stacks. It's privilege. I guess sounds right? This is I mean, I think this is a really awful precedent. You cannot imagine when there's a democratic president, again, someday Republicans ever, ever accepting something like this. And obviously this is getting in the way of the strategy that needs e Pelosi has in mind. She and at the moment, a majority of house members don't want to move quickly to impeachment, they'd like public hearings. This was a closed hearing and they like people to come to testify and the harder. The Trump administration makes it for people to testify, the more the ratchet up pressure to move to an impeachment inquiry, which at the moment, the house doesn't want. So let me ask you one more thing about that, before I turn to the professor here. I wonder if what we're seeing today is potentially politically positive for the Republican White House, in the short run and really substantively negative for all of America. Because you could argue that what, what you just saw was in their political interest that their side says, great hope Hicks is defying almost a little bit of, like trolling, and the dams are, are waiting around and complaining, and that's maybe a political benefit in showroom. But in the long run, as you just said, he what is it going to happen, if the basic system that for hundreds of years has worked, partly yes, with legal enforcement, but partly by tradition where there is good faith oversight and testimony of the executive branch if that is just going to be blown up over a thing that Donald Trump claims he, he's not afraid of which is, which is oversight and impeachment. Right. Obviously, it is sort of beneficial to them, although I do wonder for people in the middle watching all of this saying, gee, wino-, they let anyone testify, but you put your finger on it. When you use the word tradition until Trump came along, we didn't fully realize how much we count on norms, which are not written into law. They are. Things we just assume that people in power will live by because we're a Democratic Republic, and what it's going to do for one thing is force, congress someday to codify, a whole bunch of things we took for granted. But yes, this is very dangerous because you can't have a government with divided powers between the executive and the legislature without having accountability. And they're trying to block all accountability. Presbytery EJ is exactly right. We have relied historically, on a tradition of negotiation and accommodation between these two political branches. And what Trump is ultimately doing and requiring everyone to take what is known as absolute immunity, which actually doesn't exist in this particular circumstance. It's to force this into the courts to have slurred walkers with it as well. I mean Egypt during the Washington you're doing the law. There is a thing called executive privilege. You're saying this absolutely unity is was so executive privilege. And the way the Trump White House is using it as a species of executive privilege is absolute immunity. But the whole. Idea, here is that executive privilege is like a scalpel. It allows individuals who are close to the president who are senior aides to refuse to testify about certain episodes or conversations all in the name of preserving the confidentiality of White House, and the candor of White House communications absolute immunity, which is what hope Hicks is, asserting is running through her lawyer is a blanket, refusal to testify, and that's wholly different. So if executive privilege is a scalpel. Absolute immunity is like a hammer saying we're gonna shut all of this down. And that's something we haven't seen before the only judge to have ruled on a question of absolute immunity and executive privilege was in two thousand eight judge Bates from the district, who was doing this in the context of Harriet Myers, and White House testimony with regard to the firing assistant or the firing of US attorneys so that you couldn't have this and have a system of separated powers. It is absolutely antithetical to the idea of divided government to have the executive stonewall in this way. Both these stay with me. I want to. I want to bring in someone who actually knows a whole picks personally and work with her for a time. Former Trump campaign adviser same numbered. Thanks for being here. Thank you. What do you think of the position hope is in? How is she feeling today? I think she and the president or feeling that this is a win the minute eyesore that they allow the Jerry Nadler's that she's allowed to give closed door testimony. They had the best of both worlds. Remember there was a press coverage about whether or not hope would quote unquote, the fi the White House by the president now that she's out she agrees to show up. And at the end of the day, she doesn't answer any of the questions that she that, even she's quoted in the Muller report, and at the same time the president to his base is able to send out tweets trying to get out a narrative that will be covered on another network that she is being exploited. She's being harassed and this isn't fair, Dr. And so, do you think that this is the thing where some people are out of the orbit and the relatively independent, or they move on other people? They're out of the Trump orbit, and they seem just in lockstep your view, knowing knowing the players here is that hope is one hundred percent team Trump right now. Right. Well hope is one hundred percent team Trump. Yes. But then look at somebody like Tom again, doesn't personally like the president Jones. Stay still is a has a client in the Trump campaign. He's being called a liar by the president. He's being constantly attacked presences. He didn't. He never personally liked him yet. He's also defying the subpoena, and asserting Zeca privilege does that surprise you. Yes, it know what surprises me is that the once again, the House Judiciary committee has not come up with a strategy of really showing the American people what they're doing look. I don't work for them. It's not my job to do this. But I mean, the idea that you can have last week, a cable news show. Let's say with John dean, and then when you have an actual witness. Who gave testimony that really goes to the heart of the obstruction issue? You don't even you have that behind closed doors. Why would you even agree to that? So you're arguing let the other panelists and your argument in a way you think just in the pure theatre that which is, as you know, what your old boss to hold Trump cares about, they got out worked because having hope under oath in public being that evasive might have made them look bad. You're saying it was kind of a mulligan that she got to do in private one hundred percent. And look Trump Trump said publicly he said, I fought Jerry before I'll beat him again, to use his words. He's laughing at Gerry and he's making this very sad. There's certainly theater of the absurd quality to all of this. It would have been better to have hope Hicks come before the committee, and be questioned and stonewall, it would have been really a bucket of testimony for the American people to see it would have underscored this view that the administration is hiding something and is not cooperating. But inside of you have this closed door. Testimony. You have now they're saying that she gave up some things, things that might be useful. But we really don't know he won't find out until forty eight hours later when the transcript is released. I think the whole idea I just want to underscore, the point that all of you made, which I think is right. If you have the president's people objecting even apparently to questions like where is your office, this would not look good? And there'd be footage on the news tonight. And people would say, this really does look like a cover up. They are obstructing. We saw none of that. I think they have to go back and say, if we do any more of this. We gotta have public witnesses who either answer the questions or are seen as not answering them. And by the way on privilege, you know, it's one thing if your president, and I'm giving you advice on a war, and we kick that around some of that is legitimately per village. You honest advice of, but they are issuing they are demanding a kind of privilege that was just never conceived of. And yes, there are always negotiations between the executive and the legislature. But it just never goes this way. Blanket war. We're sort of wrapping up where we started. But it's very important is this all it takes to beat the whole system. I mean the constitution. Lays this out, you know, you go to Washington as as, as you do EJ, and you cover these stories or Melissa, and I spend time around law schools, where they say, well, this is I feel like it's the end of Star Wars here, where you have the death star. And it turns out there's just one little spot you can drive through shoot. One little Pellett and the whole thing explodes. I mean they just figured out that you just tell everyone to stole role, nobody to talk and eat up a year. I mean is this is this, the end of Star Wars EJ, and then Melissa, and then we'll go there's a shot clock here. The shot clock is the election year and show delay delay delay for the Trump White House is a great thing. They would love to push as much of this as they can't in the election year, and then say, see, they don't want the voters to make the choice themselves so delay is their best option and they're pursuing it. It's also important to remember. Here that executive privilege qualified immunity. These are not specifically enumerated in the constitution, the Republicans like to go on and on about all the things that are not in the constitution. This is also not in the constitution. So we really rely on norms customs to develop our actually going to recognize these kinds of privileges in order for separation of powers to work. And when you have something like this, where someone is not observing norms, not observing customs. You're going to kick this back to a court who's going to have to decide what the boundaries are, and that's where we're headed. The White House counsel, all this time was maybe Skywalker. You've seen Star Wars. Yes. All of them, but you're more of a WWE guy by like stores to okay? I'm glad we thinking job, who would who who's Java though. You don't wanna pick it. I never want to set you up to say anything that could be misconstrued as rude, the Skywalker comparison being fundamentally positive. Although as I point out. They want to blow up a whole ship. A lot of people get hurt Sam Nunn, Melissa Marie JD on thanks to each of you coming up later in the show. My exclusive interview with Senator Cory Booker. The presidential candidates back on the beat. And boy, does he say he's got something he wants to say the Republican congress later family, speaking out after this disturbing video the police confrontation in Phoenix. It's an important story. We'll bring you at Taunton. Is he coats giving Mitch McConnell a history lesson on race in America? Black people were subjected to relentless campaign of terror campaign that extended well into the lifetime of majority leader, McConnell and later. I'll talk to one of the pioneers of reality television about Trump is recycling. His greatest hits here in the new campaign, and also the first pictures from inside Paul manafort's. Trump Tower condo. You'll see that later on the show is he prepares for his next trial, Ari Melber. You're watching the beat. MSNBC. This episode is brought to you by Cox with contour TV from Cox. You can find all your favorites all in one place. It does it have the YouTube, you Bet El what about that met flicker thing net flicks too. And although superhero movies, contour has all the latest titles on demand, and oh my grandkids love that big green guy. I prefer the one with the hammer myself. Okay. I think we're done here now. Get all your favorite apps shows and movies, right? On contoured TV from Cox. Could be national news on many nights in America but is often crowded out by Washington controversies. And of course politics, take a look at this controversial video of Phoenix police using aggressive tactics. This was on a family with small children, who pose no apparent physical threat. The officers drawing their guns, telling the parents, they were going to get shot police interaction began after a daughter walked out of the store with adult, and the footage is sparked protests, a lawsuit by the family and an internal investigation with the Phoenix police chief conceding that what you're about to see in this program is quote disturbing. I'm gonna play this tape for about a minute. So you can see the context of this, escalating interaction. Right now. Well, sir. Not here. Really? And here's the family, speaking out last night. No kiss. You see that knows deceasing terror like that. She has not been the same just made me sick to my stomach. I had nightmares of barrels at point at my face and not just think how I couldn't say that's wrong. In all over what? These are not isolated incidents. They just tend to get more political or media reaction when they happen to be videotaped. Consider other reason events off duty officer shot and killed an unarmed man with disabilities at a Costco last week in California, the same week that Indiana police shot and killed a African American man knows dispute over whether or not he had a knife now officers in that Indiana town where body cameras. But they say that the camera wasn't recording during that incident. So we don't have video of it, and the wider numbers show. Excessive force is not evenly distributed in America. It's more likely to be used by police against the poor minorities. And the mentally challenged all of this is rooted in a much deeper debate about America's criminal Justice system. Is it working just fine? The way it is the way you just saw, or does it need reform? Professor, Michael, Eric Dyson. We'll give me his answer in this segment before I turn the floor over though, I do wanna know how all of this adds up because the videos and the activism and the pressure there signs, it's. Work. Many big cities have ousted as and mayors over these very issues. Donald Trump has actually concluded that enough Americans think the criminal Justice system is so flawed he's trying to position himself as being four bipartisan reform. In fact, he just hosted reformers, and Kim Kardashian for an event a few days before launching his reelection campaign. My whole journey with criminal Justice reform started about a year ago when I came to see the president. After speaking to Ivanka Jared who really fought for me to get here. Everyone wants the community to be safe and the more opportunity we have, and that they have, and the support that we help give them the safer, everyone will be joined into law groundbreaking historic reformed who are criminal Justice system, the first step act. We had tremendous conservative support, and tremendous liberal support. It was very bipartisan very bipartisan, not a log. He's referring to takes people at the end of the road of our system after arrest attention trial, conviction incarceration, and shorten some of their sentences for nonviolent offenses. What about fixes at the beginning of the road into the system, people who are forced into it through profiling or excessive force or interactions with the police may be the ones committing a crime. What about starting at the root of a system that forces more people poor people black, people Brown people into prison than any other democracy in the world? I'm joined now by Georgetown professor. Michael, Eric Dyson, author of what truth sounds like I posed that question to you, sir. Yes, sir. You're absolutely right. As usual. This is a problem of the route. This is a problem of the deeply entrenched and persistent bias in America, and the extraordinary support for a system of criminal injustice to disproportionately poor Brown and African American people to talk about this at the end of the process, where people have rotted in jail or spent a long time there and therefore, get out a bit earlier doesn't speak to the fact that what we saw on that tape is remarkably distressing. It is a distraught family being besieged by people who are Stinson really, are there to protect insertive. What protection was there? What service was there? This is a family whose four year old daughter happened to pinch a dial or some such and then at four years old. She has no moral compass, no conscience than this consciousness. She didn't know that she was stealing a Dow, so to subject her to the vicious. Practices of law enforcement at that level was itself distressing enough. But you and I love Sean Carter. And we know that Jay Z said bin Laden been happening in Manhattan back. Then back win. The police was al-qaeda two black men. Right. So we understand that people thought that's hyperbolic, that is exaggerating. This is terror in America, my friend for African American Latino. And so people usually you say that you, you, you say that and that line applies and you say the terror there, we quoted some of the parents talking about that. Same word sir, Terry. Absolutely. And we'll put up on the screen against some of the some of the video. What is important to you that people know if people watching this at home say, well the police in my community. I haven't seen the MAC like that. I haven't seen them treat apparent like that or scream at people or draw gone, or say, I mean again, quoting one of these officers screaming at one of the parents, give me your child that certainly not in the traditional police handbook for a stop. That doesn't involve a weapon. No, it's not and see two things here. First of all, for those who contend that there, just a few bad apples, and the bunches great. This gives the lie to that. How many videos have to surface, how many examples of the lethal intensity of law enforcement when apply to African American Latino people? The police seemed to have an asterisk assigned to those people of color, the laws, don't apply. Generality genial deportment and kind and gracious behavior, toward them. Seems to fly out the window. These people were being treated as if they had stolen. A million dollars right on the spot. Did they beat somebody on the head that they had somehow killed somebody and now they're being treated, and let me say this number two white criminals who have murdered six and seven and eight people? They were apres hinted without incident, Dylann roof who killed nine people in a church in South Carolina treated to Burger King on the way to being locked up. So my point is that there is a wide chasm of perception and practice in this country around the issue of race. And when we started the police department how many more reports do we have to have issued that says that there's a deep end infected the culture of policing in this country. And it's about the demonization of black people, and Brown people, and it's about not seeing them as human you know what we do. We can't simply say let's root out the problem at the police level, because they are people who grew up in a culture in a college of racial animus, toward blackness, that then manifests itself, when they become police people, but we have to call it out. Thank God for Kim Kardashian and van Jones and criminal Justice reform and bail reform, that's on the ladder in at the end be we've got to teach. We've got to root out and again you do what I tell you to do. What is the power trip here? What is the fascination the erotic intensity assigned with dehumanizing blackness seems to be a criminal pornography? This is criminal Justice pornography. This is police pornography, the kind of fascination with and fetish of dehumanizing blackness before the world and, again, this happens time, and again, across this country on video video on tape off tape, and what we have to do is to challenge themselves. I ask every white American out there who says, oh, my God. This doesn't happen to my kids. Why doesn't it? It doesn't happen to your kids by, in large, not that it doesn't, but by and large, because there is not a racial assignment of privilege or person hood or the assignment of a kind of stigma and dehumanisation that happens with. African American and Latino people. And until we address that until we have a day when we really come at it at the root level of this kind of thing will happen time, and again, and we'll have many more shows and people will die and nothing will change its. Well put it's an issue. You've worked on written about and thought about, and we wanted to put it in this context as we hear talk about criminal Justice reform. What does that mean? Right. And what's, what's being addressed a professor Dyson? Thank you, as always. Thank you, my friend later in the show night. Senator Cory Booker joins me exclusively, but I inside Donald Trump's campaign branding and the so-called reality show, and we're back in thirty. Donald Trump has finally launches twenty twenty campaign, and he's leaning on the message that got him here. Free pass. They gave to Hillary at her aides after they set up an illegal server, I've seen firsthand how the system is rigged. The system is rigged. Corrupt media pushing completely false allegations and outright lies the fake news. We'll say headlines he didn't fill up the arena. News, viewers, and Trump critics may find some of these lines basically stale, but it's worth noting that many Trump loyalists are pumped, there was this giant rally, and the arena was full of fans. A long line lots of maga- hats, lots of branding. We also saw on camera these far right groups. The proud voice marching outside. We should note, the southern poverty Law Center calls them a hate group, which often associates with and supports white supremacists. That's another vision that we've seen, but there's more than just that take a look at what the Wall Street Journal has unearthed revealing this campaign branding book for twenty twenty which shows laser focus on certain things. The font size the spacing, the only certain colors that can be used for certain Trump events, images of Trump, that are designed to convey, compassion, or strength, especially online. And that's not all if you looked at those lines that we just showed and thought there, he goes, again, or it stale consider how some of this plays out in local media markets. Here's the Orlando Sentinel, headline. It's right on brand keep America great and those color, schemes in the branding book while they reflected in that photo, which would look to be exactly the photo that the Trump campaign wants or look at the Miami Herald, Trump energizes, Orlando rally as he launches reelection bid, folks reading that are getting the Trump vision, I take a look at this. This is something you may not always see on the news. But we pulled it this is from a pro Trump group on Reddit, where hundreds of thousands. Sometimes millions of people interact, and it says the basic bottom line. Maga- message I pledged to vote for this man again. And I trust him more than any media company on the planet, you can ignore some of this stuff, if you want, you can tune it out, if you want it's America, you can pay attention, whatever you want journalistically were showing to not, because it is all true. And even all okay. When you look at the proud voice. But because this is part of the larger production of how Donald Trump is running for reelection. And it is certainly a television and internet production. Meanwhile, consider who he put in charge of his campaign, very interesting. Not a Washington insider, not even a family member like he likes to do in certain things. No, he took the person in charge of digital from last time and made him in charge of the whole thing. And here's what he's saying. The president's going to win this, I've always said, the president won the first election lily with his airplane and a cell phone and a Twitter account this time that we have to do somewhere mobilization. I'm joined by media innovator, Michael Hirschhorn. He actually created the concept of celebrity reality TV of each one with hits, you might remember like flavor of love. I love the eighties and celebrity rehab. He also writes, for the Atlantic and is a Trump critic thanks for coming back. Thanks for having me. I'm never gonna live down the flavor of labor thing. Clearly, well, why would you want to? It's true, your keys to decoding this production. Right. I think what's really interesting is that the show is now itself. The pitch right? We want to keep the show going. So if you think about this in terms of. From a TV network perspective, which I think, is how the Trump people think about it. It's what's the spin off? What's the next season? And what's interesting is what's disappeared, right? What's disappeared? Our economic arguments. Inclusive, holistic arguments for why on a policy basis he should be you should be reelected. He himself is now the argument he wants to keep the show going. And so the question is in terms of decoding this going forward is what is he going to do in order to keep us captivated? And that's where it starts to get a little concerning. When you look at say that mean that we showed right that's something that people share on the internet proudly. They want it to upset you, they, it's like coming to the family reunion and being like, yeah. Fake news. I trust him more than you're meeting. It's designed to upset. Do you view that as something that's ever penetrable in any way or those people sharing that stuff have made their mind? Well, I think it's I think what Trump has always done has been denied denied than admit it, right. So the argument in two thousand sixteen was this is really about economic insecurity right now. It's, it's about your opportunity mostly as white guy, but not. Supposedly as a white guy to there was a fantastic piece of video before the event of this white guy, ripping his shirt off, and shaking, basically shaking is his boobs in front of the protesters that to me is the perfect metaphor for what Trump is Trump's appeal is right now. I'm going to put on a show you can act, however, you want, and you can just go on up setting the other side as much as you want. Now is that an effective strategy? I don't know that may be a way to really Rev up the core. Whether that can build out, I don't know, because I don't see how anyone who's not already a Trump supporter is now going to become a Trump supporter, based on this. And do you think they're digital traction is a kind of accident that they improvised or something more thought out from guy was given a lot of thought to free press because they're outspending Democrats on Facebook right now massively, and the, the Democrats still don't understand digital the Republicans and Trump picked up from where Obama started in two thousand eight and put a vastly larger percentage of their. Banned in two thousand sixteen and they're already doing it. They've already spent well into the seven figures on Facebook this year for next year alone, which I think, is about a ten to one outspend of Democrats. Democrats continue not understand the digital is where the election is going to be fought. It's fascinating. You say that it's a reminder when there's so much sort of almost dismissive, or smug, views of what Trump is doing how he sounds, and we'll be the first point out. I mean, these are very original lines, you steal them from Reagan reboot them. Right. And yet as you point out there's a there's a whole production echo to all of that. Michael, thanks for coming back on the beat thinks still ahead, our exclusive interview tonight with Senator Cory Booker, who was a witness today at this historic hearing in congress. He joins me shortly. And we'll tell you what it costs to have this view from Paul manafort's old condo inside Trump Tower. June team today. Commemorating when black Americans in Texas learned. They were freed many activists invoke this day for civil rights causes from immigration to education anti-poverty programs to larger ideas like reparations for slavery, which has long been considered radical by both political parties in America. For example, rock Obama consistently argued against reparations for slavery in preference for broader reforms. When it comes to reparations, would you take it a step further in terms of apologizing for slavery or offering reparations to various groups have served in the past about repeat again, that the best reparations, we can provide are good schools in the inner city and jobs for people who are unemployed, but something's clearly shifting today, United States Congress held its first hearing on reparations in twelve years and to be clear. Many black leaders have been pushing this like deed longest serving black congressman John Conyers who propose reparations Bill every session for thirty years, he was back in that room today. So it was influential author Tana hissy coats, laid out the case for reparations in twenty fourteen essay and here five years later, he went from banging on the door to serving as a star witness in rebutting, Mitch McConnell's argument today, that reparations are necessary for something that he argues doesn't relate to anyone who's currently alive. Black people were subjected to a relentless campaign of terror campaign that extended well into the lifetime of majority leader McConnell, we grant that Mr. McConnell was not alive for apple Matic's, but he was alive for the electrocution of George Steny, he was alive for the red lining of Chicago and the looting of black homeowners of some four billion dollars victims of that plunder, are very much alive today. I am sure they love a word with the majority leader. Powerful and in another development that departs from most house hearings the first witness of the day was sitting Senator co-sponsor of this reparations commissions, Bill who spoke forcefully about the stakes. It is a cancer on the soul of our country and hurts the whole body, politic. I am brokenhearted and angry right now, decades of living in a community where you see how deeply unfair this nation is still to so many people. There's idea that it's just about writing a check from one American to another falls far short of the importance of this conversation. What I believe we will truly talk about joining me now is that Senator and presidential candidate Cory Booker. Thank you for being here. You sounded quite strong. In what you had to say there, and your testimony. Why are you doing this? And why now. I've lived and worked most of my life in a low income communities black and Brown communities and have been dealing with historical headwinds of segregation of red lining of health disparities of public policies being stemmed from Washington. Like GI Bill social security were designed to exclude African Americans from the terrorism that reigned in our country for generations, all way back to slavery. This is a conversation that we have not fully had in the United States of America, and how the roots of savage inequalities. Still being made manifest today because of a lot of that structural inequities baked into our system, and dealing with this issue, and finding real, practical solutions to address those inequities and disparities baked into from our history is something that we must do. And now is the Mon. You're leading on this Bill. Senator Bernie Sanders opposed reparations the last time he ran. He now supports this Bill, but also said he's not sure that writing a check is the answer. My question to you is one. Do you to have the same vision on this right now in two should the democratic nominee of the democratic platform in twenty twenty four slavery reparations? Well, first of all, I mean, that's what's become a lot of people don't like the word because it Vokes this imagination that people have to be whipped up by opponents of somehow, this is going to be about one person writing a check to another person. And that's not what this is about. It's about how can we continue as? A nation to have the kind of deep systemic inequalities that we have that stemmed from income to health disparities to our criminal Justice system. This is about actually leveling the playing field. It's not about paying somebody off and to reduce this to this idea that we're going to write some check and then be done with this issue is so wrong, your Bill basically would put a small amount of money into create a commission to study this, if you are running for president, if you have these ideas is that enough or is it time to put the money directly into the program wise still studied at this point? Diminished amount of resources to study it and have, which will be historically, the first conversation literally, the first commission we've ever created to see how to address these issues we have commissions in Washington. And you know, this Ari to study wall kind of stuff. I think a lot of it's less urgent than what we're talking about right now. And there are practical things. Look at the end of the day, you've talked about putting resources into things my baby bonds legislation actually about having every child born in America's birthright having interest bearing account there for them and then money placed in every single year depending upon the. That wealth of your family would give the lowest income American kids upwards of fifty thousand dollars by the time they're eighteen do things that create wealth. Your baby proposal is not based on a slave reparations model that, right? That's for potentially everyone, as you know, President Obama said that, that idea like you, you just sit mentioned is exactly what should be done, but not something that is somehow specifically tied to race or slavery, walk us through why essentially you break with Obama there. Two things. One one thing is we're bringing this commission together to study exactly what it would mean I think, for you or I to prejudge what some of the best minds in America, clocked to at the end of this process is folly. Let's see what cut would practical things people come up with. Maybe we'll look like things like our baby, my baby bonds legislation. But right now, I don't have time to wait. So I am putting forward legislation like this. That actually is very conscious of race. And the racial impact it will have is Columbia, University said, it would virtually eliminate the racial wealth gap, and yeah. It's designed that every low income child would have it. But, you know our that African Americans are disproportionately low income. So again, people want to try to cast this in some divisive way, enrolled, the understanding that we have common cause in this, and that there is an urgency in America, because when an African American kid worn in a segregated community, defacto segregated community. It doesn't have. It's below the poverty line that actually affects the wellbeing of all Americans because nine out of a hundred four kids in America wanted to college. A chance to nurture their genius all bereft of the possibility and the potential of that child. This is hurting all of America, the criminal Justice system, which you, and I, both know is deeply racially despair it and its impact as Villanova university, says, literally, we had incarceration rates that were the same as our industrial peers. We'd have twenty percent less poverty in America. And so when I do things like the crack cocaine powder, K disparity something I pushed for in the legislation that I lead. And we pass on criminal Justice reform, ninety six percent of the people that are being liberated from prison because of that disparity are black and Latino. So I'm very conscious on a lot of these bills that we're pushing about the impact of will have on communities of color and communities like the one in which I live, and we need to start having a much more nuanced conversation about this, that just saying this is about one person writing. Check to another person and wiping our hands of that collective responsibility that we have to make our nation more just and fair. Right. And, and the writing a check references to how Senator Sanders had recently described it, it striking here. You, you laid out like that cetera as you mentioned, particularly some of those disturbing statistics and to watch a US government hearing today, discuss reparations with you, and these other witnesses. I mean that itself as you say is somewhat groundbreaking. I wanna get you while I have you as a candidate on some other big issues, as you know, the Senate is in this fight over eleven funding. I wanted to give you a chance to respond to what? Senator Mitch McConnell, just said in response to John Stewart we've never failed to address this issue, and we will address again, I don't know why he's all been out of shape, but we will take care of the nine eleven victims compensation fund members have a lot of things going on at the same time and it sounds to me like he's looking for some way to take offense. There's no way. We won't address this problem appropriately. We have in the past, we will get your view. That if you were one of those families that is struggling right now where you had a family member who did something heroic as one of those guys lives just miles away from nine eleven that knows folks that were in those buildings. Knows some of the heroes that stormed into those buildings. And we're there to, to protect America to defend this country to save lives. Must be a sense of urgency to say to this nation that when you are a hero, we have your back and so to act in a blase fashion that this should be just normal functioning of Washington, and not see this is making a statement to all of America's about what happens in times of national crisis when we are tact. And when those people stand up, we should make a clarion statement right now that we got your back Mitch McConnell, should step up and show, the same level of commitment to our heroes that they deserve. What's happening now? It's just shameful shameful the way that we're slow walking this or not dealing with it when we know we put that on the floor of the Senate. It would get probably a hundred votes, if not something close to that. And those families what have the resources and the security big deserve, they earned in an act of national an a time of national. Disaster. Very, very well. Put such such a big issue when we've all been watching kind of one of those times, a lot of people are wondering what, what's taking so long? We had a first responder on the show this week, who said we'll Mitch McConnell is making it take a long time. That was his view. I wanna ask you before I let you go about the Trump Justice department intervening in Paul manafort's prison assignment to Rikers island before awaiting trial in New York. Have you ever seen a Justice department either administration intervene at this way, this high level and does it concern? You I mean look this Justice system. Bryan. Stevenson says a right we have a criminal Justice system that treats you better, if you Richard guilty than if you're innocent, and this is just to me, yet another. Example of, of the unfairness in the system that I have kids from communities like mine that have criminal convictions for doing things at the last three presidents admitted to doing can't find jobs. Can't get loans from the Bank can't get business licenses. And here's somebody who was patently been involved in what I believe is treasonous behavior and his in his having a president glad of his way to try to give him an easier easier path as opposed to him being like others in the criminal Justice system. I'm just I'm just it's it's exhausting. It is frustrating, and obviously, it makes me angry. Yeah. Well, I was curious what you would think about all that giving your work on it Senator Cory Booker. I mentioned with, with some admirations that you seem to be busy at both of your jobs legislating today in the US Senate. Obviously, keeping busy in your other job as a presidential contender, and we'll be watching you on the debate stage. So thanks for making some time for us on the beat, sir. REO which will be going with the opportunity to talk to us. Thank you, sir. A little more on that Paul Manafort story, I was just discussing. Well, his Trump Tower condo. These new pictures, will explain next. Today. We got the very first fuse ever inside. Paul manafort's old condo and Trump Tower is owned by you tax payers, because the government has listed this condo on the market now for three point six million dollars. It's been criminally sees the condo has these views of central park, and Fifth Avenue. It was forefeited formerly last month. Manafort did keep some other famous possessions from this whole escapade, including the ostrich jacket, which comes in at fifteen k and a python jacket which goes over eighteen k these are some of the few items that would be a waiting, Paul Manafort when he is finally released from his prison sentence, seven and a half years with the feds, and we don't know how long because we haven't had the trial, yet in New York. We'll be right back. That is for us. We'll be back here tomorrow night at six PM eastern. Thanks as always for watching. Hi, it's joy Reid. 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