8 Burst results for "Congressional Oversight Initiative"

"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:35 min | 5 months ago

"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Million documents. Hundreds of witness interviews and the consensus from Democrats and Republicans in the Senate Intelligence Committee is that Russia aggressively tried to influence 2016 presidential campaign, and the Trump campaign was happy to accept Russian help, they said. So in 1000 page report this week, the committee also reportedly made criminal referrals to federal prosecutors believe in a number of people have lied or maid. Contradictory statements to investigators were going to turn now to Justin. Rude. He's a former congressional investigator now director of the project on Government Oversight. Thanks so much for being with us good to be with you. According to officials who spoke with the Times, The Washington Post NBC News the intelligence Committee Told the Department of Justice that Steve Bannon, Erik Prince Sam Clovis Alternate Associates appeared to have made false statements to the committee and that Donald Trump Jr and Jared Kushner had made statements that were contradicted by other testimony. How often does a congressional committee make a referral like that? But they're not common, but I would say they're not infrequent. It's hard to say for sure, because sometimes these pearls are made publicly. Sometimes they're made privately. These obviously we've made privately so it's hard to have AH, clear accounts, but it's not uncommon, especially at the end of a lengthy investigation like this one toe have examples of Witnesses say you feel may have not have been fully forthcoming on there's a matter almost house. You need to refer that to Department of justice and ask them to look look into a little further. Would you have any concern based on what we do know now that the Justice Department is ignoring Congress or slowing down the process? This is not a normal year. That is not a normal administration for sure make that difficult to see inside a black box of the situation like this. Certainly there are concerns from politicization of the Department of Justice. But I would also say that historically speaking when Congress makes with pearls to the Department of Justice for anything but particularly around obstruction, or or false statements, types of concerns If the figures of the subjects of those girls are connected to the administration administration officials regardless of whether they're Democratic Republican, the Department of Justice rarely takes those cases up frequently. These were for Those are much more successful if they target a private individual. Well, what a tradition. Why don't they traditionally picked them up old fashioned politics? It's hard to convince the Department of Justice to go after a member of their own administration on DH while I think false statements, serious charge, and certainly any federal investigator would tell you get in. I think there are people have gone to prison for lying to Congress, right? Oh, absolutely, and in recent history as well, So I think that we should probably point to that evidence as well. You got Michael Cohen, who pled guilty to a charge of lying to Congress. He had Roger Stone, who was convicted of making false statements now, But those were coming through the Mueller team. The special prosecutor's team and these referrals are going to the U. S Attorney's office here in D. C. Which I think has a little bit of a body a record. I think Congress just heard from members that office in June. I believe about interns around politicization there. In the cases of Michael Flynn and Excuse me and Roger Stone sentencing. So, so it's tough to read whether or not it's going to move forward. I would say that while the Department of Justice don't get these referrals from Congress from committees from members because it's just a letter anyone any member of Congress or the Mini can write one of these letters. I think they tend Give credence to these work world become, as this one does from the Senate Intelligence Committee, which is to say first that's being made on a bipartisan basis by the by the chair and vice chair of the committee is coming at the end of an extensive and detailed investigation. That's just one person's opinion. Kind of popping off. They you assume have AH, decent. Body of records to refer to and the third one is they didn't publicly They didn't try to politicize it so that I think a lot of watches gives credence in some real gravity. Well, thanks very much for being with us. Justin Road, directs the Congressional Oversight Initiative at the project on Government Oversight. We're very grateful for your time. Thank you, sir. For having me At

David Copperfield Mr Dick Dickens David UK Laure Zelig Armando Charles writer
Russia worked to help Trump in 2016 election: Senate panel

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:35 min | 5 months ago

Russia worked to help Trump in 2016 election: Senate panel

"Million documents. Hundreds of witness interviews and the consensus from Democrats and Republicans in the Senate Intelligence Committee is that Russia aggressively tried to influence 2016 presidential campaign, and the Trump campaign was happy to accept Russian help, they said. So in 1000 page report this week, the committee also reportedly made criminal referrals to federal prosecutors believe in a number of people have lied or maid. Contradictory statements to investigators were going to turn now to Justin. Rude. He's a former congressional investigator now director of the project on Government Oversight. Thanks so much for being with us good to be with you. According to officials who spoke with the Times, The Washington Post NBC News the intelligence Committee Told the Department of Justice that Steve Bannon, Erik Prince Sam Clovis Alternate Associates appeared to have made false statements to the committee and that Donald Trump Jr and Jared Kushner had made statements that were contradicted by other testimony. How often does a congressional committee make a referral like that? But they're not common, but I would say they're not infrequent. It's hard to say for sure, because sometimes these pearls are made publicly. Sometimes they're made privately. These obviously we've made privately so it's hard to have AH, clear accounts, but it's not uncommon, especially at the end of a lengthy investigation like this one toe have examples of Witnesses say you feel may have not have been fully forthcoming on there's a matter almost house. You need to refer that to Department of justice and ask them to look look into a little further. Would you have any concern based on what we do know now that the Justice Department is ignoring Congress or slowing down the process? This is not a normal year. That is not a normal administration for sure make that difficult to see inside a black box of the situation like this. Certainly there are concerns from politicization of the Department of Justice. But I would also say that historically speaking when Congress makes with pearls to the Department of Justice for anything but particularly around obstruction, or or false statements, types of concerns If the figures of the subjects of those girls are connected to the administration administration officials regardless of whether they're Democratic Republican, the Department of Justice rarely takes those cases up frequently. These were for Those are much more successful if they target a private individual. Well, what a tradition. Why don't they traditionally picked them up old fashioned politics? It's hard to convince the Department of Justice to go after a member of their own administration on DH while I think false statements, serious charge, and certainly any federal investigator would tell you get in. I think there are people have gone to prison for lying to Congress, right? Oh, absolutely, and in recent history as well, So I think that we should probably point to that evidence as well. You got Michael Cohen, who pled guilty to a charge of lying to Congress. He had Roger Stone, who was convicted of making false statements now, But those were coming through the Mueller team. The special prosecutor's team and these referrals are going to the U. S Attorney's office here in D. C. Which I think has a little bit of a body a record. I think Congress just heard from members that office in June. I believe about interns around politicization there. In the cases of Michael Flynn and Excuse me and Roger Stone sentencing. So, so it's tough to read whether or not it's going to move forward. I would say that while the Department of Justice don't get these referrals from Congress from committees from members because it's just a letter anyone any member of Congress or the Mini can write one of these letters. I think they tend Give credence to these work world become, as this one does from the Senate Intelligence Committee, which is to say first that's being made on a bipartisan basis by the by the chair and vice chair of the committee is coming at the end of an extensive and detailed investigation. That's just one person's opinion. Kind of popping off. They you assume have AH, decent. Body of records to refer to and the third one is they didn't publicly They didn't try to politicize it so that I think a lot of watches gives credence in some real gravity. Well, thanks very much for being with us. Justin Road, directs the Congressional Oversight Initiative at the project on Government Oversight. We're very grateful for your time. Thank you, sir. For having me At

Department Of Justice Congress Senate Intelligence Committee Investigator Government Oversight Justice Department Roger Stone Congressional Oversight Initia Intelligence Committee Justin Road Russia NBC Michael Cohen Clovis Alternate Associates Donald Trump Jr The Washington Post Jared Kushner Erik Prince
"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:34 min | 5 months ago

"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Well, thanks very much for being with us. Justin Road, directs the Congressional Oversight Initiative at the project on Government Oversight. We're very grateful for your time. Thank you, sir. For having me At least 550,000 mail in ballots have been rejected in this year's primary so far, according to a new analysis by NPR that is far more than the total number of ballots rejected in the 2016 general election. And that may bring alarm bells about what might happen this November, when tens of millions more voters are expected to cast ballots by mail. NPR's Pam Fessler joins us, Pam Thanks so much for being with us. Hi Scott. The alarms. I suppose we're in the air. The beholder. Many fear widespread disenfranchisement because of Rejected ballots. Many see that uses the frailties of mail in voting. Let's start with what you know about why so many mail in ballots have been rejected, well, the rejected for several reasons. And by the way, Scott the numbers we have are on the low side because not every state has been reporting them most of ballots that are rejected because the envelope blacks, a witness or votre signature. Or else the votre signature doesn't match the one that the election office has on the record, And the second big reason is that a lot of these valleys just arrived too late. Most states require that they be in by election Day. But as we've been hearing in the last few weeks, there have been a lot of delays, a mail delivery and of course, we have so many more people voting by mail this year because of the pandemic and many of them for the first time, so that's led to a big spike in the number of rejected ballots. And is there a pattern to whose ballots are being rejected? Well, the research is pretty limited. But what we do know is that first time absentee voters as well as young voters and voters of color are more likely than others to have their ballots rejected. And that's often because you know, quite simply there unfamiliar with the rules. And there's also some variability and how these rules are imposed, especially for things like whether signatures match which could be pretty subjective. Daniel Smith is a political scientist at the University of Florida studied his state's March prime Ari, where more than 1% of mail in ballots were rejected, and he found that black and Hispanic voters were disproportionately affected, and in some cases, their ballots were twice as likely to be rejected that nose of white voters, and he says, this could make a big difference in the general election, even just in Florida alone if you have 1% of maybe up to six million votes You're talking of tens of thousands of votes that potentially are going to be rejected, and they're not rejected evenly across the electorate. Pam November is getting closer. What kind of impact could there be? Well, it could affect not only the outcome of the presidential race but also congressional and other contests. If they're close, President Trump won the state of Wisconsin in 2016 by just under 23,000 votes. But more than 23,000 absentee ballots were rejected in Wisconsin's primary in April, and there will likely be many, many more people voting by mail in November. And the types of voters who are more likely to have their ballots rejected these young, first time black and Hispanic voters. They tend to vote Democratic. So that certainly has Democrats worried, especially as they're encouraging their supporters to vote by mail this year because of the pandemic and a new survey by the Democracy fund and you see, Lola finds that 48% of those who plan to vote for Joe Biden said they'll likely vote by mail compared to only 23% of Trump supporters..

NPR Justin Road Pam Fessler Scott Congressional Oversight Initia Wisconsin Government Oversight President Trump Joe Biden Trump Democracy fund University of Florida Florida Daniel Smith Lola scientist
"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:50 min | 5 months ago

"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Scott Simon. Three years more than million documents. Hundreds of witness interviews and the consensus from Democrats and Republicans in the Senate Intelligence Committee is that Russia aggressively tried to influence 2016 presidential campaign, and the Trump campaign was happy to accept Russian help, they said. So in 1000 page report this week, the committee also reportedly made criminal referrals to federal prosecutors, believing a number of people have lied or maid. Contradictory statements to investigators were going to turn now to Justin. Rude. He's a former congressional investigator now director of the project on Government Oversight. Thanks so much for being with us good to be with you. According to officials who spoke with the Times, The Washington Post in NBC News, the intelligence committee Told the Department of Justice that Steve Bannon, Erik Prince Sam Clovis Alternate Associates appeared to have made false statements to the committee and that Donald Trump Jr and Jared Kushner had made statements that were contradicted by other testimony. How often does a congressional committee make a referral like that? But they're not common, but I would say they're not infrequent. It's hard to say for sure, because sometimes these referrals are made publicly. Sometimes they're made privately. These obviously we've made privately so it's hard to have AH, clear accounts. It's not uncommon, especially at the end of a lengthy investigation like this one toe have examples of witnesses you feel may have not have been fully forthcoming on the matter. Almost how's Ginny to refer that to Department of justice and ask them to look look into a little further Would would you have any concern based on what we do know now that the Justice Department is ignoring Congress or slowing down the process? Um, this is not a normal year. This is not a normal administration for sure. Don't make it difficult to see inside a black box of a situation like this. Certainly there are concerns from politicization of the Department of Justice. But I would also say that historically speaking when Congress makes referrals to the Department of Justice for anything but particularly around you Obstruction or or false statements, types of concerns. If the figures of the subjects of those girls are connected to the administration administration officials regardless of whether they're Democratic Republican, the Department of Justice rarely takes those cases up frequently. These were girls are much more successful if they turned in a private individual. Well, what a tradition. Why don't they traditionally pick them up old fashioned politics? It's hard to convince the Department of Justice to go after a member of their own administration on DH while I think false statements, serious charge, and certainly any federal investigator would tell you get in. I think I mean, there are people have gone to prison for lying to Congress, right? Oh, absolutely and and in recent history as well, So I think that we should probably point to that evidence as well. You've got Michael Cohen, who pled guilty to a charge of lying to Congress. He had Roger Stone, who was convicted of making false statements. Now, But those were coming through the Mueller team, the special prosecutor's demon and these referrals or going to the U. S attorney's office here in D. C, which I think has a little bit of, uh, spotty a record. I think Congress just heard from members that office in June. I believe about concerns around politicization there in the cases of Michael Flynn and Excuse me and Roger Stone sentencing, so, so it's tough to read whether or not it's going to move forward. I would say that Well, the Department of Justice does get these were girls from Congress from committees from members because it's just a letter anyone any member of Congress or the Mini could write one of these letters. I think they penned Give credence to these work world become as this one does from the Senate Intelligence Committee, which is to say first it's being made on a bipartisan basis by the chair by the chairman, vice chair of the committee is coming at the end of an extensive and detailed investigation. This is just one person's opinion kind of popping off. They you assume have AH, decent body of records to refer to and the third one is they didn't publicly They didn't try to politicize it so that I think a lot of watchers give gives the treatment from some real gravity. Well, thanks very much for being with us. Justin. Rude directs the Congressional Oversight Initiative at the project on Government Oversight. We're very grateful for your time. Thank you, sir. Hey, for having me. At least 550,000 mail in ballots have been rejected in this year's primary so far, according to a new analysis by NPR that is far more than the total number of ballots rejected in the 2016 general election. And that may bring alarm bells about what might happen this November, when tens of millions more voters are expected to cast ballots by mail. NPR's Pam Fessler joins us, Pam Thanks so much for being with us. Hi, Scott. The alarms. I suppose we're in the air, the beholder. Ah, Many fear widespread disenfranchisement because of Rejected ballots. Many see that uses the frailties of mail in voting. Let's start with what we know about why so many mail in ballots have been rejected. Well, the rejected for several reasons. And by the way, Scott the numbers we have are on the low side because not every state has been reporting them most of ballots that are rejected because the envelope blacks of witness or votre signature or else the votre signature doesn't match the one that the election office has on the record, And the second big reason is that a lot of these ballots just arrived too late. Most states require that they be in by election Day. But as we've been hearing in the last few weeks, there have been a lot of delays. A mail delivery And of course, we have so many more people voting by mail this year because of the pandemic and many of them for the first time, so that's led to a big spike in the number of rejected ballots. And is there a pattern to whose ballots are being rejected? Well, the research is pretty limited. But what we do know is that first time absentee voters as well as young voters and voters of color are more likely than others to have their ballots rejected. And that's often because you know, quite simply there unfamiliar with the rules. And there's also some variability and how these rules are imposed, especially for things like whether signatures match which could be pretty subjective. Daniel Smith is a political scientist at the University of Florida studied his state's March primary. Ari, where more than 1% of mail in ballots were rejected, And he's found that black and Hispanic voters were disproportionately affected, and in some cases, their ballots were twice as likely to be rejected than those of white voters. And he says, This could make a big difference in the general election, even just in Florida alone if you have 1% of maybe up to six million votes. You're talking of tens of thousands of votes that potentially are going to be rejected, and they're not rejected evenly across the electorate. Pam November is getting closer. What kind of impact could there be? Well, it could affect not only the outcome of the presidential race but also congressional and other contests. If they're close, President Trump won the state of Wisconsin in 2016 by just under 23,000 votes. But more than 23,000 absentee ballots were rejected in Wisconsin's primary in April, and there will likely be many, many more people voting by mail in November. And the types of voters who are more likely to have their ballots rejected these young, first time black and Hispanic voters. They tend to vote Democratic. So that certainly has Democrats worried, especially as they're encouraging their supporters to vote by mail this year because of the pandemic and a new survey by the democracy fund and you see Ella Finds that 48% of those who plan to vote for Joe Biden said they'll likely vote by mail compared to only 23% of Trump supporters. There are efforts of foot aren't there to try and avoid so many rejected ballots in November, right actual lot, but but most of it's happened in in in courts on Democrats are suing at about half the states trying to get these rules eased. So, for example, that people don't need to have witnesses sign their ballots or that ballots only have to be postmarked by election Day, not actually received by election Day in order to count. They'd also like election officials to contact voters if there are any errors on their mail in ballots, so they have a chance to fix them. Republicans are fighting these changes. They say loosening the rules will undermine the integrity of the election by removing safeguards against melon voter fraud, even though such fraud is extremely rare. NPR's Pam Fessler. Thanks so much, Thanks allowed. Scott..

Department of Justice Congress Scott Simon Senate Intelligence Committee Government Oversight Pam Fessler NPR Roger Stone Justin investigator Congressional Oversight Initia Donald Trump Jr The Washington Post Justice Department Russia NBC News
"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:58 min | 5 months ago

"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Weekend edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Three years more than million documents. Hundreds of witness interviews and the consensus from Democrats and Republicans in the Senate Intelligence Committee is that Russia aggressively tried to influence 2016 presidential campaign, and the Trump campaign was happy to accept Russian help. I said So in 1000 page report this week. The committee also reportedly made criminal referrals to federal prosecutors, believing a number of people have lied or made contradictory statements to investigators were going to turn out of Justin Rude. He's a former congressional investigator now director of the project on Government Oversight. Thanks so much for being with us good to be with you. According to officials who spoke with the Times, The Washington Post in NBC News, the intelligence committee Told the Department of Justice that Steve Bannon, Erik Prince Sam Clovis, all Trump Associates appeared to have made false statements to the committee and that Donald Trump Jr and Jared Kushner had made statements that were contradicted by other testimony. How often does a congressional committee make a referral like that? But they're not common, but I would say they're not infrequent. It's hard to say for sure, because sometimes these referrals are made publicly. Sometimes they're made privately. The's obviously were made privately. So it's hard to have Ah, clear accounts, but it's not uncommon, especially at the end of a lengthy investigation like this one toe have examples of witnesses who you feel may have not have been fully forthcoming. Onda the matter almost house, You need to refer that to Department of justice and ask them to look look into a little further. Would. Would you have any concern based on what we do know now that the Justice Department is ignoring Congress or slowing down the process? This is not a normal year. This is not a normal administration for sure make that difficult to see inside a black box of the situation like this. Certainly there are concerns from politicization of the Department of Justice. But I would also say that historically speaking when Congress makes referrals to the Department of Justice for anything but particularly around obstruction, or or false statements, types of concerns If the figures of the subjects of those girls are connected to the administration administration officials regardless of whether they're Democratic Republican, the Department of Justice rarely takes those cases up frequently. These were Those are much more successful if they turned in a private individual. Well, what a tradition. Why don't they traditionally picked them up old fashioned politics? It's hard to convince the Department of Justice to go after a member of their own administration on and well, I think false statements, serious charge, and certainly any federal investigator would tell you get in. I think I mean, there are people have gone to prison for lying to Congress, right? Oh, absolutely, and in recent history as well, So I think that we should probably point to that evidence as well. You've got Michael Cohen, who pled guilty to a charge of lying to Congress. He had Roger Stone, who was convicted of making false statements Now that those were coming through the Mueller team, the special prosecutor Stephen and these referrals or going to the U. S attorney's office here in D. C. Which I think has a little bit of a spotty a record. I think Congress just heard from members that office in June. I believe about interns around politicization there in the cases of Michael Flynn and Excuse me and Roger Stone. Sentencing. So, so it's tough to read whether or not it's going to move forward. I would say that while the Department of Justice does get these were girls from Congress from committees from members because it's just a letter anyone any member of Congress or the Mini can write one of these letters. I think they tend To give credence to these referral become as this one does from the Senate Intelligence Committee, which is to say first it's being made on a bipartisan basis by the shit by the chair and vice chair of the committee is coming at the end of an extensive and detailed investigation. This is just one person's opinion. Kind of popping up. They you assume have AH, decent. Body of records to refer to and the third one is they didn't publicize. They didn't try to politicize it so that I think a lot of watches gives gives credence in some real gravity. Well, thanks very much for being with us. Justin. Rude directs the Congressional Oversight Initiative at the project on Government Oversight. We're very grateful for your time. Thank you, sir. Hey, for having me. At least 550,000 mail in ballots have been rejected in this year's primary so far, according to a new analysis by NPR that is far more than the total number of ballots rejected in the 2016 general election. And that may bring alarm bells about what might happen this November, when tens of millions more voters are expected to cast ballots by mail. NPR's Pam Fessler joins us Pan, Thanks so much for being with us. Hi, Scott. The alarms. I suppose we're in the air, the beholder. Ah, Many fear widespread disenfranchisement because of Rejected ballots. Many see that uses the frailties of mail in voting. Let's start with what you know about why so many mail in ballots have been rejected. Well, the rejected for several reasons. And by the way, Scott the numbers we have are on the low side because not every state has been reporting them most of ballots that are rejected because the envelope blacks of witness or votre signature or else the votre signature doesn't match the one that the election office has on the record, And the second big reason is that a lot of these ballots just arrived too late. Most states require that they be in by election Day. But as we've been hearing in the last few weeks, there have been a lot of delays and mail delivery. And of course, we have so many more people voting by mail this year because of the pandemic and many of them for the first time, so that's led to a big spike in the number of rejected ballots. And is there a pattern to whose ballots are being rejected? Well, the research is pretty limited. But what we do know is that first time absentee voters as well as young voters and voters of color are more likely than others to have their ballots rejected. And that's often because you know, quite simply there unfamiliar with the rules. And there's also some variability and how these rules are imposed, especially for things like whether signatures match which could be pretty subjective. Daniel Smith is a political scientist at the University of Florida studied his state's March prime Ari, where more than 1% of mail in ballots were rejected, and he found that black and Hispanic voters were disproportionately affected, and in some cases, their ballots were twice as likely to be rejected than those of white voters. And he says, This could make a big difference in the general election, even just in Florida alone if you have 1% of maybe up to six million votes..

Department of Justice Congress Senate Intelligence Committee Scott Simon Government Oversight Justin Rude Roger Stone NPR News investigator Justice Department NPR Congressional Oversight Initia Florida Russia Trump Associates Donald Trump Jr Michael Cohen
"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:51 min | 5 months ago

"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Three years more than million documents. Hundreds of witness interviews and the consensus from Democrats and Republicans in the Senate Intelligence Committee is that Russia aggressively tried to influence 2016 presidential campaign, and the Trump campaign was happy to accept Russian help. He said. So in 1000 page report this week, The committee also reportedly made criminal referrals to federal prosecutors, believing a number of people have lied or made contradictory statements to investigators were going to turn out of Justin Rude. He's a former congressional investigator now director of the project on Government Oversight. Thanks so much for being with us. Good to be with you, Scott. According to officials who spoke with the Times, The Washington Post in NBC News, the intelligence committee Told the Department of Justice that Steve Bannon, Erik Prince Sam Clovis, all Trump Associates appeared to have made false statements to the committee and that Donald Trump Jr and Jared Kushner had made statements that were contradicted by other testimony. How often does a congressional committee make a referral like that? Shot. They're not common, but I would say they're not infrequent. It's hard to say for sure, because sometimes these referrals are made publicly. Sometimes they're made privately. Um, these obviously were made privately, so it's hard to have Ah, clear account. It's not uncommon, especially at the end of a lengthy investigation like this one toe have examples of witnesses who you feel may have not have been fully forthcoming on the matter. Almost house you need to refer that to Department of justice and ask them to look look into a little further. Would. Would you have any concern based on what we do know now that the Justice Department is ignoring Congress or slowing down the process? This is not a normal year. This is not a normal administration for sure. So it makes it difficult to see inside a black box of the situation like this. Certainly there are concerns Ron politicization of the Department of Justice. But I would also say that historically speaking when Congress makes referrals to the Department of Justice for anything, but particularly around these Obstruction or or false statements, types of concerns If the figures of the subjects of those referrals are connected to the administration administration officials Regardless of whether they're Democratic Republican, the Department of Justice rarely picks those cases up frequently. These referrals are much more successful if they target a private individual. Will What a tradition. Why don't they traditionally pick them up this old fashioned politics? It's hard to convince the Department of Justice to go after a member of their own administration. Oh, And while I think false statements in a serious charge, and certainly any federal investigator would tell you that it is, I think I mean, there are people have gone to prison for lying to Congress, right? Oh, absolutely, And and in recent history as well, So I think that we should probably point to that evidence as well. You've got Michael Cohen. Who pled guilty to a charge of lying to Congress. He had Roger Stone, who was convicted of making false statements. Now, But those were coming through the Mueller team. The special prosecutor's team and these referrals are going to the U. S attorney's office here in D. C, which I think has a little bit of us body a record. I think Congress just heard from members that office in June. I believe about concerns around politicization there in the cases of Michael Flynn and Excuse me and Roger Stone sentencing, so, so it's tough to read whether or not this is going to move forward. I would say that while the Department of Justice does get these referrals from Congress from committees from members because it's just a letter anyone any member of Congress or the Mini can write one of these letters. I think they tend Give credence to these referrals Come as this one does from the Senate Intelligence Committee, which is to say first it's being made on a bipartisan basis by the shit by the chair in the vice chair of the committee is coming at the end of an extensive and detailed investigation. This is just one person's opinion, kind of popping off. They You assume have AH, decent. Body of records to refer to and the third one is they didn't publicize. They didn't try to politicize this so that I think a lot of watchers gives the credence in some real gravity. Well, thanks very much for being with us. Justin. Rude directs the Congressional Oversight Initiative at the project on Government Oversight. We're very grateful for your time. Thank you, sir. Thanks for having me. At least 550,000 mail in ballots have been rejected in this year's primary so far, according to a new analysis by NPR that is far more than the total number of ballots rejected in the 2016 general election. And that may ring alarm bells about what might happen this November, when tens of millions more voters are expected to cast ballots by mail. NPR's Pam Fessler joins us, Pam Thanks so much for being with us. Hi, Scott. The alarms. I suppose we're in the air, the beholder. Ah, Many fear widespread disenfranchisement because of Rejected ballots. Many see that uses the frailties of mail in voting. Let's start with what we know about why so many mail in ballots have been rejected. Well, the rejected for several reasons. And by the way, Scott the numbers we have are on the low side because not every state has been reporting them most of ballots that are rejected because the envelope lacks a witness or votre signature or else. The votre signature doesn't match the one that the election office has on the record, And the second big reason is that a lot of these ballots just arrived too late. Most states require that they be in by election Day. But as we've been hearing in the last few weeks, there have been a lot of delays and mail delivery. And of course, we have so many more people voting by mail this year because of the pandemic and many of them for the first time, so that's led to a big spike in the number of rejected ballots. And is there a pattern to whose ballots are being rejected? Well, the the research is pretty limited. But what we do know is that first time absentee voters as well as young voters and voters of color are more likely than others to have their ballots rejected. And that's often because you know, quite simply there unfamiliar with the rules. And there's also some variability and how these rules are imposed, especially for things like whether signatures match which could be pretty subjective. Daniel Smith is a political scientist at the University of Florida studied his state's March primary, where more than 1% of mail in ballots were rejected. And he's found that black and Hispanic voters were disproportionately affected, and in some cases, their ballots were twice as likely to be rejected that nose of white voters, and he says, this could make a big difference in the general election, even just in Florida alone if you have 1% of maybe up to six million votes You're talking of tens of thousands of votes that potentially are going to be rejected, and they're not rejected evenly across the electorate. Pam November is getting closer. What kind of impact could there be? Well, it could affect not only the outcome of the presidential race but also congressional and other contests. If they're close, President Trump won the state of Wisconsin and 2016 by just under 23,000 votes. But more than 23,000 absentee ballots were rejected in Wisconsin's primary in April, and there will likely be many, many more people voting by mail in November. And the types of voters who are more likely to have their ballots rejected these young, first time black and Hispanic voters. They tend to vote Democratic. So that certainly has Democrats worried, especially as they're encouraging their supporters to vote by mail this year because of the pandemic. And a new survey by the Democracy fund and you see, Lola finds that 48% of those who plan to vote for Joe Biden said they'll likely vote by mail compared to only 23% of Trump supporters. There are efforts of foot aren't there to try and avoid so many rejected ballots in November, right actual lot, But But most of it's happenin in courts on Democrats are suing at about half the states trying to get these rules eased. So, for example, that people don't need to have witnesses sign their ballots or that ballots only have to be postmarked by election Day, not actually received by election Day in order to count. They'd also like election officials to contact voters if there are any errors on their mail in ballots, so they have a chance to fix them. Republicans are fighting these changes. They say loosening the rules will undermine the integrity of the election by removing safeguards against Malin voter fraud, even though such fraud is extremely rare. NPR's Pam Fessler. Thanks so much, Thanks allowed. Scott..

Department of Justice Congress Scott Senate Intelligence Committee Government Oversight Pam Fessler NPR Justin Rude Roger Stone investigator Justice Department Trump Associates Donald Trump Jr Congressional Oversight Initia Russia NBC News
"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:41 min | 5 months ago

"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Three years more than million documents. Hundreds of witness interviews and the consensus from Democrats and Republicans in the Senate Intelligence Committee is that Russia aggressively tried to influence The 2016 presidential campaign, and the Trump campaign was happy to accept Russian help. He said. So in 1000 page report this week, the committee also reportedly made criminal referrals to federal prosecutors believe in a number of people have lied or made contradictory statements to investigators were going to turn out a Justin rude He's a former congressional investigator now director of the project on Government Oversight. Thanks so much for being with us. Good to be with you, Scott. According to officials who spoke with the Times, The Washington Post in NBC News, The intelligence committee told the Department of Justice that Steve Bannon, Erik Prince Sam Clovis, all Trump Associates. Appeared to have made false statements to the committee and that Donald Trump Jr and Jared Kushner had made statements that were contradicted by other testimony. How often does a congressional committee make a referral like that? But they're not common, but I would say they're not infrequent. It's hard to say for sure, because sometimes these referrals are made publicly. Sometimes they're made privately. These obviously were made privately, so it's hard to have AH, clear account. It's not uncommon, especially at the end of a lengthy investigation like this one toe have examples of witnesses that you feel may have not have been fully forthcoming on the matter, almost housekeeping to refer that to Department of justice and ask them to look look into a little further. What would you have any concern based on what we do know now that the Justice Department is ignoring Congress or slowing down the process. This is not a normal year. This is not a normal administration for sure. And so it makes it difficult to see inside of a black box of a situation like this. Certainly there are concerns von politicization of the Department of Justice. But I would also say that historically speaking when Congress makes referrals to the Department of Justice for anything, but particularly around these Obstruction or or false statements, types of concerns. If the figures of the subjects of those referrals are connected to the administration administration officials regardless of whether they're Democratic Republican, the Department of Justice rarely takes those cases up frequently. These referrals are much more successful if they target a private individual. Well, what a tradition. Why don't they traditionally pick them up this old fashioned politics? It's hard to convince the Department of Justice to go after a member of their own administration. Oh, And while I think false statements in a serious charge, and certainly any federal investigator would tell you get in, I think I mean, there are people have gone to prison for lying to Congress, right? Oh, absolutely and and in recent history as well, So I think that we should probably point to that evidence as well. You've got Michael Cohen, who pled guilty to a charge of lying to Congress. He had Roger Stone, who was convicted of making false statements. Now that those were coming through the Mueller team, the special prosecutor's team and these referrals are going to the U. S attorney's office here in D. C, which I think has a little bit of us body a record. I think Congress just heard from members that office in June. I believe about concerns around politicization there in the cases of Michael Flynn and Excuse me and Roger Stone sentencing, so, so it's tough to read whether or not this is going to move forward. I would say that while the Department of Justice does get these referrals from Congress from committees and from members because it's just a letter anyone any member of Congress or the Mini can write one of these letters, I think they tend Give credence to these referrals Come as this one does from the Senate Intelligence Committee, which has to say first it's being made on a bipartisan basis by the by the chair in the vice chair of the committee is coming at the end of an extensive and detailed investigation. This isn't just one person's opinion kind of popping off. They you assume have AH, decent. Body of records refer to and the third one is they didn't publicize. They didn't try to politicize this so that I think a lot of watchers gives credence to some real gravity. Well, thanks very much for being with us. Justin. Rude directs the Congressional Oversight Initiative at the project on Government Oversight. We're very grateful for your time. Thank you, sir. Thanks for having me. At least 550,000 mail in ballots have been rejected in this year's primary so far, according to a new analysis by NPR that is far more than the total number of ballots rejected in the 2016 general election. And that may bring alarm bells about what might happen this November, when tens of millions more voters are expected to cast ballots by mail. NPR's Pam Fessler joins us Pan, Thanks so much for being with us. Hi Scott. The alarms. I suppose we're in the air. The beholder. Many fear widespread disenfranchisement because of Rejected ballots. Many see that uses the frailties of mail in voting. Let's start with what you know about why so many mail in ballots have been rejected. Well, the rejected for several reasons. And by the way, Scott the numbers we have her on the low side because not every state has been reporting them most of ballots that are rejected because the envelope blacks of witness or votre signature or else the votre signature doesn't.

Department of Justice Congress Scott Simon Senate Intelligence Committee Government Oversight Justice Department NPR News investigator Justin Roger Stone Congressional Oversight Initia Donald Trump Jr Russia NPR Trump Associates Jared Kushner Michael Cohen Michael Flynn
"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"congressional oversight initiative" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And certainly the prevention part of it is doing better and doing well not as good as we'd like a debate. But the second part the returns of children. Has been a failure. And it's only a failure due to lack enforcement is again is one said earlier if we would just say GSP is at risk. And we mean, it we would have their attention full more, and they would make a change in this dilatory tactics as well as their their their injustice is being meted out to left behind parents. And again, there's always the issue of reciprocity. We try in this country to honor our, hey convention obligations, and that's to not, hey countries as well. But our idea is that it is the rule of law custody leads to be determined that the place of a visual residents, a not in some far off court of law somewhere where a judge may not be he literate and not know the the issues like parental alienation and the damage it does do to children. So we need I think perhaps to do a letter to the president the President Trump. And include your testimonies, and some of the other very very high profile cases that make the case for robust and rigorous enforcement. And it also had to go to secretary punt Pao's. Well, I've raised it at the highest levels of myself. But when you hear what you had to say here today. You can't help but be moved mightily to do far more. And hopefully, the president will have that same view enforcement has been the problem Cincinnati, and it's time for that to change the pivot day should be today. So if any of them, I distinguished panelists are any of you would any final comments or or. Okay. So thank you. We will work with you. It is bipartisan. I'm happy to say. And my hope is chosen will be home soon. Republican Chris Smith from New Jersey chairs the foreign affairs subcommittee on Africa, global health and global human rights live coverage from Capitol Hill testimony today from Geoffrey Morehouse, executive director of the group of bring abducted children home, one curricula father of two children of -ducted in Ecuador and Michelle Littleton mother of three children abducted to Lebanon, the first witness Jeffrey Morehouse, talked his son abducted to Japan. Smother headlines today from the Associated Press, British Prime Minister, Theresa may, postponing parliament's vote on her European Union divorce deal or Brexit. They say to avoid a shattering defeat facing exceptional protests. The French president Emmanuel Macron promising to speed up tax relief for struggling workers and scrap a tax hike for retirees in here in the US. Prosecutors say they have resolved the case against women accused of being a secret agent for the Russian government a sign that she likely has taken a plea deal information was included in a court filing today in the case against Maria. Patina prosecutors allege that she gathered intelligence on US officials and political organizations she's charged with conspiracy and acting as an unregistered foreign agent for Russia. Next on C span radio, a look at how the House Democratic party when they become the majority in the next congress will handle oversight and investigations. The national press foundation held a discussion today, but what to expect from congress and the White House in the coming year? This panel runs about an hour. From your laptop awesome Evers who founded American oversight and twenty seventeen after serving in the State Department on oversight and transparency issues. Then we've got Andy, right? He's a senior fellow and founding editor of just security. He's a research scholar at New York University school of lies well pertinent to this discussion he served on Obama's White House counsel and west after accurate to the house oversight committee. And then we've got Justin rude. The director of the congressional oversight initiative at pogo. He was also a senior investigator on two Senate committees. He brings reporting skills to his work having worked at ABC news and also CQ roll-call in the past. So we're going to start with Austin. And then our other panelists are going to give us a brief overview of their version of our vision of how oversight might work in the new congress. And then we'll take your questions. Thank you very much. Good morning, everybody. Again, my name is Austin rivers and the executive director of American oversight. American oversight is a nonpartisan nonprofit government..

congress president investigator executive director research scholar punt Pao White House US Austin rivers House Democratic party Associated Press Maria Chris Smith Geoffrey Morehouse New Jersey secretary Jeffrey Morehouse Africa director