11 Burst results for "Congo Forest"

"congo forest" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

11:24 min | 2 months ago

"congo forest" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Welcome back to been there haven't done that tonight we are if you're just tuning in we're here with sewage and the vice president of planning and design and the chief architect at the wildlife conservation society which is the WCS a stem of aquariums and zoos around New York City so how was the one aquarium design evolved over the years but it's actually come a long way when you think about zoos menageries way back we have evolved into being educational experiences and so when you think about the actual design aspects of that back in the day up people would look at animals in cages and it was very above you know we would objectify animals and and and nowadays we want to tell a much bigger story a much bigger story about the animals where they live the habitats and ecosystems that they are from and also tell a broader story about conservation so when you when you come to the Bronx zoo or the New York aquarium or any of our other zoos in New York City hopefully what you're going to get is an experience in nature that inspires you to care about nature but also can bring you to different places and give you a sense of some of these places around the world right and if people are so inspired to go see more of these animals in their natural habitat disease in aquariums do put on trips through companies like classic escapes to bring the members out to global destinations absolutely we've actually worked with classic escapes over the years on on many of our trips I understand you would say to go way back we do go way back and you know the funny story I have about Stacey is I was in Madagascar are working on a project with our Madagascar country program they're designing an interpretive center in a very remote parts of Madagascar the entrance too much well in national park and I went out to this little island in the bay called nosey Maggie B. no nobody lives on this island it's tiny and there was a boat there and wondering who might be on the island and of course who do I find there Stacey Fiorentina's what a shock that was really strange recognizing the person you found on an uninhabited island it was it was very bizarre but you know she gave us a really important piece of news is about the tsunami that had just hit so given that we were on the coast and there are all these impacts it was it was interesting but to to to get off the boat and find Stacey there was quite a shock yeah they say small world but you know it was that finally led so I mean that that ties into what you're saying about the evolution of these enclosure designs you have to go out to places like Madagascar are and you mentioned that the the Congo forest at Bronx zoo I I don't think you you probably did go into the Congo but I'm guessing nearby maybe wonder Uganda so I am I have to say that one of the things for me growing up as a kid in the Bronx was that I never imagined I would get to go to any of these places right so do to me was the place to go to see animals and to see it or to get a sense of of these places so the fact that I could travel now and go to some of these places because that's where I get a lot of the inspiration that's we all get inspiration to create these X. these nature experiences at the zoos and at the aquarium it is just amazing to me and so what what I love about what we do is that we provide those nature experiences for new Yorkers we can give them a sense of of what's out there and hopefully inspire them to travel but also inspired them to care about nature so when you're when you're in a place like Madagascar and I imagine you're researching closures there for animals that are indigenous to Madagascar that you have but one of your issues maybe lemurs maybe so actually when we built the Madagascar exhibit at the Bronx zoo well it was the same time that we were working on that visitor center that where I rented to Stacey in the end so one of the things that that I did while I was there was to travel to the different habitats that we would be representing in our Madagascar exhibit at the Bronx zoo so actually if you go to the exhibit a lot of the the big images there are the ones that I took off from that trip so we we not only you know went to the habitats and got a sense of what the overall look you know what the overall look and feel of the habitats was with the trees the rock oracle that but took detailed photographs of of the rock of of different trees so that we could use those as reference photos when we were reproducing those habitats not for the aquarium I imagine the photograph talk of you that you were referencing was all taken under water it was and I'm not a diver on that particular scouting no but actually we went out is funny we went out on a on a on a trip with a New York times reporter who dove and did a whole story on underwater New York with us and so we got to you know see his images we got to take some video ourselves and then there's a a photographer Keith Allen Bogen who has done a lot of work of of photographing underwater New York and he shared all of his images with us so we had great reference material it almost sounds like you could have an entire separate museum just with the wildlife and nature photography that you've collected over the years well yeah I mean I that's a whole different way to look at it yes potentially when when you're doing this this research and you're seeing the animals interact with their environment I'm just curious because the enemies in corals and such are made out of cement did the fish in any way know that they're not real doesn't matter to them so the rock is actually made out of concrete and the and anemones and corals are made out of a rubbery type material so they kind of give a little bit there it's not like there so it wasn't their hard corals yeah I mean you have the real ones and habitat for the fish need to have a symbiotic relationship with them but when it's just there for atmosphere it's it's as close as it would get to nature and the fashion ever know the difference I won't you know you'd have to ask and I will tune in next holiday started on for his complaints about his really I know that you mentioned the conservation aspects to of the animals and I know that a lot of issues will occasionally do re introduction when it's K. a possible or rescue one of your sea lions has a brand on his back what's the story there so he was he was up from a a dam on the west coast where he was a he was catching salmon that the fishermen really wanted so basically at that point he was he was branded and you know relocated he was taken out of the competition right he he was putting on quite a show outside of that we wasn't there for the feeding times but he was breaching the water in spring at at the at the onlookers he seemed to really enjoy the attention felines are great exhibit animals because they are always doing something yeah and it's the only species that we have it all five of our parks in New York City oh really yeah okay why would I did get to see the otter feeding and they're very fine an active one of your honor's is kind of a lumbering old man so he has a special PVC ladder that he uses to get up on the rocks because it's not as agile as he used to be but they said I think he was seventeen years old which is older than their life expectancy in the wild so a lot of these two animals do enjoy longer healthier life because they're taken care of yes that's true when of when you return from a trip and you have all of these photographs what's the first step to creating the design for a new enclosure but you know I think collecting images of a you know sort of wide angle images right they give you a sense of the overall feel of a place that's really important to share with the team because it's you know it's it's a whole team of people that work on this I'm here representing that team but it you know with every project that we do we have outside consultants and then you know we are lucky enough to have an in house design department which very few zoos have or Koreans and so I bring back those images and I share them with the team was you know obviously my experience to give people a sense of the visit because again that's really what we're trying to do is to take that experience in the wild and replicated as much as we possibly can to have any other zoos or aquariums around the world giving you inspiration lots of them I think there are pieces of of of experiences at different a coram is that have inspired different parts of the shark exhibit certainly zoos around the world as well I mean it and you know it it's an important part of my education as a professional to visit as you were in a cramped wherever I am in the world so that's that's what we do on vacation that and go to natural places because you never know when you're going to find a moment of inspiration so it's never really vacation for you well I guess that's how a day and say so let's talk a little bit about some of the projects the WCS has assisted with her owns outside of the U. S. right so you know our our our conservation program is global as I said earlier we're in nearly sixty countries and and five oceans so you know every once in a while the conservation staff will call on us to help with designing a visitor center or an interpretive trail or maybe do some master planning for one of the parks you know we work in a variety of different places around the world so in some cases there and reserves that we helped to create and in other cases it's not so you know so the situation is always different one time back in in the nineties we were invited to help the Kenya Wildlife Service designed a parking which is at the entrance to Nairobi national park and it really was essentially showcasing the habitats of Kenya because a lot of the people that live in Nairobi don't get to see any of their wildlife heritage they don't get to see lions they don't get to to see impala or Sievers really so the average canyon workaday city person has never seen any of these animals well I don't know about the average person but a lot of them haven't sex because it really surprising well it's an urban environment and you know it's tough too and the national park is right there in the middle of the.

chief architect New York City vice president of planning
"congo forest" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

07:26 min | 3 months ago

"congo forest" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"Tell us a little bit about what makes the forests in Kenya. Unique got several types of forests on one of them is the continuation of the Congo forest. Yeah the one in Kakamega and that the makes it but that we do look of the forests forests are highland forest or call mountain forests of coast forests and we have a dryland forests so those types of photos and publicist for example the highland forests good water catchment forests the coastal forests. Muslim groups are good for breeding of fish and other sea. Wildlife under drill. Forests are good for the norma auto for the pastoralists because the provide day for the fall. The animal Shed onto what the catchments in some cases. Yeah so for Kenya important father. We know that Sunday like seventy percent of the people in Kenya US field for their cooking on hitting that uncomfortable forests and of course we get the Optima from the forest question industry so for really an in the country yes so could you give us a little. Bit of an overview of the state of forests in Kenya pistol forest in Kenya is but it could be better under one of the reasons let Forest some good is because we have not had a new Ford police since nineteen sixty eight under thinking. I did six eight. Were probably less than ten we're talking about for seven million Kenyans which means they need land for Landfall abundance of amends unlawful. Commercial crops which means this land is being taken away from the forests therefore are in a crisis in this country because we don't have a proper policy on the proper direction on how do this expanding population right and most of northern Kenya is arid and semi-arid issues and so most of our forests are from central down to to southern parts of Kenya. If you talk about Puerto Rico close before the forest with a high trees all kind of them you not see the sun match. Yes but The drill on Forest Sarah so important may be may have cut trees but The team better does where we get most the chuckle for example right. Yes on this where we also get the Gum Arabic. And what are some of those policies that you think would be helpful to improve our forests health yup for example in this country the dry land? One Nastase forests not looked after in then north hip. Bliss came must be Got He gotTa Mandela Doc. Nice therefore nobody attention to them not managed under sobek not improve. Then we've got the natural forests in Monday's areas like mega on Kenya. Monday have gone on them out again. This forests I looked up at by communities living close by US possible settlement areas. So this not good. I think to be managed properly and I should also say that In Kenya when took photos money. Talk about the plantation forests. We got about one hundred actus in area and went not talking about the Airbus. Two million of metro forests. This hour left unmanaged. I think that would policy could manage them have them for timber and Houston for the of indigenous fruits under For Life. Hey I really like listening to you talking about forests I can hear the passion in your voice and I really appreciate what you're doing for our forests protecting it and helping manage it because we're we really need that type of help right now and it makes me wonder what do you love about. Trees will popsy because from the fuck that the one vehicles to forest in Nikolai translator. County the river by everyone nearby woodlands under also bonds untruths unto think. Ub School holidays probably win that forest everyday so the forest landscape Hyundai climate in the stereos but we also had a lot of useful for respondents. Those honey out of the forest. What of course We had read. And we had billy materials and When I was in my first from job bill do tim. House stood up to now well so really forests because your livelihood was based on the proper management of or Yes yes plus job. My listen my message. Job I worked in the forest sector could see that the environment or for his country produce many jobs if we look at them properly and we were talking about that earlier to. Could you tell us about how you see? An opportunity for us to create more jobs through reforestation will probably got something like fifty thousand hectares of land which needs to be replanted and If you look at the number of siblings that need two thousand dollars plus dimes. Listen one thousand civilians. That's a fifty million siblings would be needed. The People Produce Could benefit from that sort of input in addition with planted trees along our highways Hyundai Just did tendrils on either side of the Highway. That could be a lot a lot of siblings indeed and again. That's sort of highway. But it's the highway with also create jobs and then then while harvesting or have distinct those jobs that they would be expecting harvesting and then of course Could be used to make up in us by the forest industry so that would be one with good jobs and the limit at the town's Giora Malo Bug on while what we call for towns or so mutants towns now because of lack of hope for this time of night more or less than jobs in those towns because they're gonNA get trees to run meals so the problem..

Kenya Congo forest Forest Sarah Forest Hyundai US Kakamega Airbus Puerto Rico Ta Mandela Doc Ub School Bliss Houston Ford billy House tim
"congo forest" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

13:27 min | 3 months ago

"congo forest" Discussed on Gastropod

"So you're used to be covered in these dense wet deciduous forests which is very different from what we see today where really hardly any of this primeval force exists anymore for her book feasting. Wild jeanneret actually visited one of the last tiny slivers of European primeval forest. It's in Poland. And it really is just a shadow of its former. Self Europe's forests were so vast that actually we think that the root of the word wilderness came from descriptions of these places the roots of the words wild and wilderness. I'll go back to untamed animals. The forest was a place. Teeming WITH ANIMALS UNGOVERNED BY HUMAN HANDS UNGOVERNED BUT NOT UNTOUCHED FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS. Europeans would go into the forest to find dinner day all kinds of animals wild boar venison there is something called the RMC which is the precursor to domesticated cattle. There was for a spice in moves the animals so abundant here. That really there was no form of hunting restriction it was abundant but it was also really valued killing a huge wild animal and then being able to share it was a sign of how wealthy and powerful you are. King said to have lots of wild game. At all their banquets. Animals would be breezed in rosewater and spices. Sometimes they would be covered in gold leaf and brought to the table hole and kind of carved up in front of the guests so while it was very much a form of status for kings so by the Middle Ages Those Morris. Were already starting to shrink between one thousand. Ad and thirteen hundred thirteen hundred. Europe's population grew by about fifty million people and all of those people needed to eat so there was increasing. Need to cut down the forests in order to grow grain and various crops and then also would was used for everything it was used for building houses and making carts by the fourteen and fifteen hundred. Europeans began sailing around the world. They first set forth to trade and then to stake their claim on foreign lands is colonialism spread across the globe. There was demand for very large old growth trees to create the ship. Masts that were needed and as early as the eleventh century The demand for wood was really threatening the forest where these kings went out and hunted the game meat that was so important to their diets and their status. Gina races that originally European forests had mostly being treated as common land. Anyone could hunt there. But as far back as ancient Rome the elite had sat down laws saying yes anyone could hunt but only as long as they weren't trespassing sort of by Default European kings and noblemen were the ultimate owners of the forest so as European king started to see their game meat being threatened by the need for Forest Land Day set out some very similar conservation measures whereby the king really restricted access to hunting in his forest. This is really the beginning of modern conservation lives whereby people were kept out of the forests. It's weird to think of royalty preserving their hunting grounds and keeping out the poor folk as the blueprint for the conservation movement. But jeanneret says these laws were really some of the earliest forms of environmental legislation forests. Were no longer for everyone to use as they pleased they were just for the Kings. They had very large administrative networks to manage this for so the forest wardens would they would hand out hunting licenses. They would make sure that game. Animals didn't starve winter or in times of drought. Sometimes they would prepare the venison for royal feasts and they would mete out. Punishments punishments were usually for poaching and they were definitely not just a slap on the wrist. If you ignored the game laws you could have a trial by hot iron and if you were found guilty then your eyes would be torn out or you were castrated. So poaching really big deal. The kings went to great lengths to prevent people from poaching and this had an impact on how people related to the natural world around them. The forest said always been wild in earlier centuries in Europe. They'd even been places of spirituality. But at this point the forests started to become scary rather than sacred. The authorities deliberately painted a picture of forests filled with outlaws and rebels dangerous rule breakers people who posed a threat to society with the stories. The authorities told a violent outlaws in the forest. Some of those were based on reality. There were people breaking the rules in the forest but they were breaking them because they thought the rules were unfair and they were hungry for poor people. This was one former getting food. And any time there was an economic downturn hunting would rise poaching would rise in the forests and so people did find it as an active resistance against the sort of forms of power and some of the rebels who broke the rules and hunted in the forest. They actually became folk. Heroes like Robin Hood and his band of Merry men. So Robin Hood was stealing from the rich and giving to the poor but this also came out of this idea that the force were not necessarily landscapes that poor people were allowed to access or use the resources of and so it wasn't active resistance to go in there and to get in game animals and feed yourself on one level. This is a story of power who could hunt and eat the wild game and wendling European forests and who couldn't that it's also the story of the impact that split between rich hunters and bore poachers had on how Europeans thought of wild food and the whole concept of the wild and wilderness. This is a very particular way of thinking of wild meat. As game to be hunted for sport by the elites and otherwise off limits and this is a template that the Europeans took with them as they colonized countries around the world so when the first European colonists arrived in the Congo Basin they sort of carried this cultural baggage of seeing forest as these dark empty wastelands without people so even though there were a long history of human habitation and numerous groups living in the Congo Basin forests. The European comments kind of didn't see them and there was this real sense of Europeans thought of this landscape as Darkest Africa. Take David Livingston. He was a Scottish missionary and explorer. Who is obsessed with finding the source of the Nile? He did a an exploratory expedition across the Congo wilderness. And he described Congress for us as suffocating wilderness and people waste that seem to have an oppressive silence so in May of eighteen eighty five. The you know quote unquote international community. Which is England France Germany Belgium and Italy? They recognize King Leopold the second of Belgium as having a sovereign claim over much of the Congo and five years later these same countries created what was effectively the first international conservation law this lowest passed in the early nineteen hundreds and it was called the Convention for the preservation of wild animals birds and fish in Africa. Local people couldn't hunt or trap or fish in certain areas of the country. The law was modeled. After the way European forests had become protected game reserves for rich people rich people in particular but of course just like in Europe the forests in Africa weren't actually pristine empty wildernesses before there were plenty of people who depended on them. There were a lot of different groups. Living in the Congo forest somewhere. More nomadic hunter-gatherers others were farming communities living within the rain forest but for all of these groups wild meat provided a very essential source of food. So there were all kinds of animals being eaten everything from various kinds of antelope to forest buffalo wild boar monkeys. You know just hundreds of different animals that communities ate in the forest there were cultural. Taboos around eating certain species particularly ones that were long lived and slow to reproduce like elephants which could and did occasionally provide a lot of meat was considered a sacred act to kill an elephant similar with eating bonobos which are great ape. That's very similar to us. There were beliefs that there is a direct link to that ancestral spirit world so all of these cultural beliefs had an ecological basis to really help conserve animals that had large social complex social groupings or were slow growing and thus thunderbolts over hunting still. All kinds of animals were traditionally eaten and Jeanneret told us they were all usually prepared in a similar way because of the heat and humidity in equatorial rainforests. Fresh meat really rots quite quickly and so after animal was disemboweled the hunters would warm smoke. The animal for many hours over low fires and overtime the neat develops this thick strong crest on the outside and because of the humidity of the forest it has to be retried over the small fires every four or five days so this method of cooking is great because actually kills off any potential viruses that might be in the meat due to so many hours of exposure to heat but from a coronary perspective. All of this slow roasting also means that the neat when it's finally reconstituted usually in some sort of rich stew is incredibly delicate and it just falls to pieces in your mouth. This is still a wild meat is prepared today. Jeanneret tried some wild boar cooked like this when she was reporting in the Congo and it's usually cooked with tomatoes and spices. And it's almost like a beef Bourguignonne or something. It's just very tender and it. Has This really incredibly? Smokey taste very complex flavor but in the colonial period thanks to European restrictions Congolese people no longer had as much access to their traditional wild meat they resorted to starches and tubers and wild meat became rare which made it even more desirable and then after World War. Two there were a number of independence movements across Africa in the Congo. A man named Mobutu Sese. Seko became the leader and eventually the dictator in nineteen sixty five. We in the. Us actually backed him because he was against communism so he had a really heavy hand in a lot of aspects of cultural life and even though he had these western backers really wanted to rid the country of any sort of colonial influences. So he really. He wanted to return the Congo kind of to this authentic country and he renamed it a year. He outlawed wigs and he told his citizens to sort of dress. Speak and eat in an authentic manner and as a result this sort of desire for these wild meats that had been so much part of the cultural history for so many groups became really popular again and his military was hugely involved in transporting the wild meat game particularly into cities and people in cities who had salaries were willing to pay more money for these traditional meets so demand for wild game really shot upwards some of the old taboos to disappear at this point if you had money to afford elephant then eating elephant became a status symbol rather than a sacred communist dish of ruled tightly for a couple of decades but his grip started to weaken in the nineteen eighties and then by the ninety s civil war broke out the left people desperate and starving all across the country. An almost five point four million people died so another four million people were displaced from their homes. And what happened during this was that the widespread circulation of weapons in the forest became the norm so suddenly forest where you might have had traditional hunters using twelve gauge shotgun to you know go hunting suddenly there tons of AK47's in automatic weapons circulating throughout the forest. So the wild meat trade really got caught up in the civil war and people went hungry and long taboos against for instance eating bonobos. Those disappeared civil war lasted nearly a decade and during that time thanks to the widespread hunger and the guns and the military gangs trading while meet the wild animal population of the Congolese. Forest was decimated. One forest reserve literally lost an estimated ninety percent of all its animals after the war. International non-profit strode up to try to help the country heal a lot of the groups. Were concerned about the citizens of the Congo. But some were focused on the forests in the wildlife and they felt that people shouldn't really be eating that wildlife anymore. These environmental nonprofits worked with the government to try to restrict hunting in nature reserves. The NGOs had more of an American attitude to wilderness as opposed to the one in traditional American conservation..

Kings Congo Europe jeanneret Congo forest King Leopold Congo Basin Robin Hood Poland RMC Rome David Livingston Darkest Africa Africa Gina
Eating the Wild: from the lost primeval forests of Europe to Robin Hood

Gastropod

08:10 min | 3 months ago

Eating the Wild: from the lost primeval forests of Europe to Robin Hood

"Used to be covered in these dense wet deciduous forests which is very different from what we see today where really hardly any of this primeval force exists anymore for her book feasting. Wild jeanneret actually visited one of the last tiny slivers of European primeval forest. It's in Poland. And it really is just a shadow of its former. Self Europe's forests were so vast that actually we think that the root of the word wilderness came from descriptions of these places the roots of the words wild and wilderness. I'll go back to untamed animals. The forest was a place. Teeming WITH ANIMALS UNGOVERNED BY HUMAN HANDS UNGOVERNED BUT NOT UNTOUCHED FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS. Europeans would go into the forest to find dinner day all kinds of animals wild boar venison there is something called the RMC which is the precursor to domesticated cattle. There was for a spice in moves the animals so abundant here. That really there was no form of hunting restriction it was abundant but it was also really valued killing a huge wild animal and then being able to share it was a sign of how wealthy and powerful you are. King said to have lots of wild game. At all their banquets. Animals would be breezed in rosewater and spices. Sometimes they would be covered in gold leaf and brought to the table hole and kind of carved up in front of the guests so while it was very much a form of status for kings so by the Middle Ages Those Morris. Were already starting to shrink between one thousand. Ad and thirteen hundred thirteen hundred. Europe's population grew by about fifty million people and all of those people needed to eat so there was increasing. Need to cut down the forests in order to grow grain and various crops and then also would was used for everything it was used for building houses and making carts by the fourteen and fifteen hundred. Europeans began sailing around the world. They first set forth to trade and then to stake their claim on foreign lands is colonialism spread across the globe. There was demand for very large old growth trees to create the ship. Masts that were needed and as early as the eleventh century The demand for wood was really threatening the forest where these kings went out and hunted the game meat that was so important to their diets and their status. Gina races that originally European forests had mostly being treated as common land. Anyone could hunt there. But as far back as ancient Rome the elite had sat down laws saying yes anyone could hunt but only as long as they weren't trespassing sort of by Default European kings and noblemen were the ultimate owners of the forest so as European king started to see their game meat being threatened by the need for Forest Land Day set out some very similar conservation measures whereby the king really restricted access to hunting in his forest. This is really the beginning of modern conservation lives whereby people were kept out of the forests. It's weird to think of royalty preserving their hunting grounds and keeping out the poor folk as the blueprint for the conservation movement. But jeanneret says these laws were really some of the earliest forms of environmental legislation forests. Were no longer for everyone to use as they pleased they were just for the Kings. They had very large administrative networks to manage this for so the forest wardens would they would hand out hunting licenses. They would make sure that game. Animals didn't starve winter or in times of drought. Sometimes they would prepare the venison for royal feasts and they would mete out. Punishments punishments were usually for poaching and they were definitely not just a slap on the wrist. If you ignored the game laws you could have a trial by hot iron and if you were found guilty then your eyes would be torn out or you were castrated. So poaching really big deal. The kings went to great lengths to prevent people from poaching and this had an impact on how people related to the natural world around them. The forest said always been wild in earlier centuries in Europe. They'd even been places of spirituality. But at this point the forests started to become scary rather than sacred. The authorities deliberately painted a picture of forests filled with outlaws and rebels dangerous rule breakers people who posed a threat to society with the stories. The authorities told a violent outlaws in the forest. Some of those were based on reality. There were people breaking the rules in the forest but they were breaking them because they thought the rules were unfair and they were hungry for poor people. This was one former getting food. And any time there was an economic downturn hunting would rise poaching would rise in the forests and so people did find it as an active resistance against the sort of forms of power and some of the rebels who broke the rules and hunted in the forest. They actually became folk. Heroes like Robin Hood and his band of Merry men. So Robin Hood was stealing from the rich and giving to the poor but this also came out of this idea that the force were not necessarily landscapes that poor people were allowed to access or use the resources of and so it wasn't active resistance to go in there and to get in game animals and feed yourself on one level. This is a story of power who could hunt and eat the wild game and wendling European forests and who couldn't that it's also the story of the impact that split between rich hunters and bore poachers had on how Europeans thought of wild food and the whole concept of the wild and wilderness. This is a very particular way of thinking of wild meat. As game to be hunted for sport by the elites and otherwise off limits and this is a template that the Europeans took with them as they colonized countries around the world so when the first European colonists arrived in the Congo Basin they sort of carried this cultural baggage of seeing forest as these dark empty wastelands without people so even though there were a long history of human habitation and numerous groups living in the Congo Basin forests. The European comments kind of didn't see them and there was this real sense of Europeans thought of this landscape as Darkest Africa. Take David Livingston. He was a Scottish missionary and explorer. Who is obsessed with finding the source of the Nile? He did a an exploratory expedition across the Congo wilderness. And he described Congress for us as suffocating wilderness and people waste that seem to have an oppressive silence so in May of eighteen eighty five. The you know quote unquote international community. Which is England France Germany Belgium and Italy? They recognize King Leopold the second of Belgium as having a sovereign claim over much of the Congo and five years later these same countries created what was effectively the first international conservation law this lowest passed in the early nineteen hundreds and it was called the Convention for the preservation of wild animals birds and fish in Africa. Local people couldn't hunt or trap or fish in certain areas of the country. The law was modeled. After the way European forests had become protected game reserves for rich people rich people in particular but of course just like in Europe the forests in Africa weren't actually pristine empty wildernesses before there were plenty of people who depended on them. There were a lot of different groups. Living in the Congo forest somewhere. More nomadic hunter-gatherers others were farming communities living within the rain forest but for all of these groups wild meat provided a very essential source of food. So there were all kinds of animals being eaten everything from various kinds of antelope to forest buffalo wild boar monkeys. You know just hundreds of different animals that communities ate in the forest there were cultural. Taboos around eating certain species particularly ones that were long lived and slow to reproduce like elephants which could and did occasionally provide a lot of meat was considered a sacred act to kill an elephant similar with eating bonobos which are great ape. That's very similar to us. There were beliefs that there is a direct link to that ancestral spirit world so all of these cultural beliefs had an ecological basis to really help conserve animals that had large social complex social groupings or were slow growing and thus thunderbolts over

Kings Europe Congo Forest Robin Hood King Leopold Congo Congo Basin Poland Africa Rome Jeanneret RMC Darkest Africa David Livingston Gina England France Germany Belgium Belgium Congress
"congo forest" Discussed on Detour To Neverland

Detour To Neverland

11:21 min | 5 months ago

"congo forest" Discussed on Detour To Neverland

"Yeah I should plug it again here but I but the original pre show that you would see as you're in the queue before you got onto symbol one at the very beginning of this episode so hope you enjoyed that if that was a previous version of the ride that you wrote again that kind of set that tone. This is serious. Their actual animal lives at stake. This is why we're here. This is why you're on this The word just left me preserve because we are protecting the animals. It was from the beginning. It was kind of pumped into the story line without you even knowing it and it's even if you stop and if you like to take in little details and stuff if you are walking around the Harambee village part of Africa any stop and look at some of the different signs. It mentions a lot about coaching in. There's a lot of different things in that part of it too and again. They did that very intentionally to set up the ride in kind of put that out there. Yeah so seen breakdowns. After you see the really cool ratio with the game warden As you're about to get on to the ride vehicles you're starting of course it's just an extension of Haram Bay village so they mentioned that they're picking you up from Harambee village and they also drop you off in her village. At the end you boarded onto your safari. Truck formerly known as symbol one is still call at symbol one symbol one two s where you're greeted by your tour guide. They do still kind of make a jungle cruise esque joke saying that. You'll be gone for key leaks weeks. Which is interesting that that's still kind of part of it. The first scene that you've come to is the Congo forest and that's where you can see Bongo copy in other like animals. Yes all of those kind of Boris. Type Animal Yeah next you go through a series of different watering holes that are actually falling river that is called. Berry original Safari River. I'm surprised that I have a better name than that. I've never heard them mentioned that now. In different watering holes you can see hippos. You can see crocodiles and you can see black rhinos. The hippos are actually separated male and female interesting. That's why you always see one bloat of hippos on one side and one bloat on the other side because they keep them separated rhinos. Same thing that particular. The black rhinos are individual her solo. Whatever you wouldn't say it creatures so he or she just hangs out by themselves and is very interesting once you leave the watering hole accuracy. All those crocodiles. They don't have much space in the crocodile container so I wonder how much space they actually. But they're almost piled on top of each other. Sometimes they must not any Linux space. Then I mean they don't really move much if you ever watch them they don't really move much. Yeah so after you leave the watering holes. That is where you enter the African Savannah which I never realised until reading about it. You're actually in the African Severe Savannah from that point forward all the way through the end. That's still considered Savannah territory. So of course there. You can see things as giraffes and Coley Thompson. Gazelle wildebeest African dogs warthogs Cheetahs. Ostriches elephants booming. Goes and many many more before your first entering the safari or the Savannah area. You do see a Baobab tree. You don't want to spoil her. Skip ahead fifteen seconds the Baobab Tree. Both of them are not real unfortunately they would not survive in Florida environment so that both of the bailout trees that are made out of concrete and I think that's interesting because they always mention the Baobab tree that is always a point of conversation. I feel like guides. I guess just because it is kind of like a staple feature of African savannahs. You know it's a very common tree in that area which I guess. That's why they always mentioned him. But I guess fake I do think it is interesting that when you say Savannah typically you would just think of that. I really open area where you can see the giraffes specifically the African wild dogs are over on your left the Ankle Cadillac out there the wildebeest Thorne and so forth. But I don't know why the rest of it is still considered Savannah when you do go back through some forest areas and and things like that the Cheetah's I wouldn't consider that Savannah but technically I don't know so most. A lot of those animals are kind of their own specific enclosures again. You can't really see them as much the word hogs or by themselves. The Cheetah's are by themselves in those other ones like that and then opens back up a little bit. That's normally where you see the rest of the rhinos and the ostriches and things like that but after you continue through the rest of the Savannah you pretty much inning with the elephants. And the flamingos. Drop you back off into Harambee village and you are left with climbing and equality. Rainy is told by the guides to say go. Well I think it may it just means goodbye in Swahili. Although don't they say they don't WanNa say goodbye? Kind of you know again like the fluffier way of saying it again Phoenix Time. That's kind of my point that it's it's a little Disney five right there because direct translation from Swahili to English is good bye. Yeah maybe there's an implied like goodbye. We'll see you again but I'm not too fluent in Swahili. And they were not balloon at all so it's basically the scene breakdown which is really short. Break Down for twenty two minute ride but again. You're just kind of being guided through seeing the different enclosure seeing the different areas. And you really can't be too specific when talking about the scene breakdown because it is so different every time you never know what you're going to see how close the animals are. GonNa get what they're going to be doing which again just contributes to. Why so many people love this ride? It almost always a really long way away always for sure. So let's take a quick break era message from our partners and then we'll be back to give our personal history and our Neverland Score. Social media can be your best friend or worst enemy when trying to build out your brand. Unfortunately we've been on both sides of that when trying to figure out how we can spread exposure or the podcast. Some days we love it some days. We hate it but luckily tools like tailwind outb- remove some of the stress involved with social media. We sit down on Sundays. We plan out what our post are going to be for that week. Power going to promote the episodes and what message we WANNA try to share within the community being able to do that ahead of time has removed so much of the stress where we just have to worry about engaging taking other users content talking to people and doing things like that which is what we enjoy about the aspect of social media. That's something that you think you would benefit from it. You can head to detour to narrow land dot com forward slash tailwind again. That's detoured and overland dot com slash. Tailwind at link is also in our show notes. There you can sign up for a completely free trial. You don't to put in a credit card or anything tested out for Pinterest or instagram. And see if it's something that would help you and your routine or your brand all right. We're back as far as personal history. Our connection with this ride. I feel like we've talked about it a lot but for me growing up and even today as much as I can. This ride is a must do if I'm going to spend the whole day in animal kingdom. I'd say this is one of the rides. I always try to get a fast pass four and it's not necessarily because the line is terrible but I mean everyone loves a good bass past Personally I enjoy the idea of always being something different. I love seeing all the animals and especially just an opportunity for up close encounters. I think my favorite memories on this ride include getting to have some of those up close encounters with the giraffes. We've been on there before where they have literally come right up to the window which is super cool and also the rhinos. Because they're one I feel like it can be hit or miss with them. They can either be up walking around which we don't see often at least for me. I haven't seen it often. Or they're just kind of laying there and we did actually have to stop and slow down because the rhinos really crossing over the pathway before and I thought that was really cool. Yeah I would agree with that. That's kind of along the same notes as kind of my love for this attraction. Just the the excitement of not knowing what you will not see kind of. Gets you excited each time to be able to go on it other attractions and Disney? You know exactly what to expect to expect it when the light is gonNA flash you know on and so forth with the Jaro Safaris. You don't get that whatsoever. There is the sequence of events of the different scenes that you go to but as far as predicting what the animals will do. You can't do that I think for me is some of the best people watching that you can do as well on this ride because especially someone saying wearing a first visit button or a little kid or whatever it might be even like grandparents like get super excited on this ride and.

Savannah Harambee Disney Baobab Tree Africa Safari River wildebeest Thorne Coley Thompson Congo forest Haram Bay Jaro Safaris Florida Pinterest
"congo forest" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

12:55 min | 1 year ago

"congo forest" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Welcome back to Ben there haven't done that tonight we are if you're just tuning in we're here with su chan the vice president of planning and design and the chief architect at the wildlife conservation society which is the W. C. S. system of aquariums and zoos around New York City so how was it one of querying design evolved over the years. but it's actually come a long way when you think about the uses menageries way back we have evolved into being educational experiences and so when you think about the actual design aspects of that back in the day of people would look at animals in cages and it was very you know we would objectify animals and and and now a days we want to tell a much bigger story a much bigger story about the animals where they live the habitats and ecosystems that they are from and also tell the broader story about conservation so when you when you come to the Bronx zoo or the New York aquarium or any of our other issues in New York City hopefully what you're going to get is an experience in nature that inspires you to care about nature but also can bring you to different places and give you a sense of some of these places around the world right and if people are so inspired to go see more of these animals in their natural habitat diseases in aquariums do put on trips through companies like classic escapes to bring the members out to global destinations absolutely we've actually worked with classic escapes over the years on on many of our trips I understand you would say to go way back we do go way back and you know the funny story I have about Stacy is I was in Madagascar are working on a project with our Madagascar country program they're designing an interpretive center in a very remote part of Madagascar the entrance to mush well in national park and I went out to this little island in the bay cold knows the magazine no nobody lives on this island it's tiny and there was a boat there and wondering who might be on the island and of course who do I find there Stacey Fiorentina's. what a shock that one. really strange recognizing the person you found on an uninhabited island it was it was very bizarre to you know she gave us a really important piece of news is about the tsunami that had just said so given that we're on the coast and they're all these impacts it was a it was interesting but to to to get off the boat and find Stacey there was quite a shock yeah they say small world but you know what that's like. so I mean that that ties into what you're saying about the evolution of these enclosure designs you have to go out to places like Madagascar are and you mentioned the the Congo forest at Bronx zoo I I don't think you probably did go into the Congo but I'm guessing nearby maybe or wonder Uganda so. I am I have to say that one of the things for me growing up as a kid in the Bronx was that I never imagined I would get to go to any of these places right so they do to me was the place to go to sea animals and to see you know to get a sense of of these places so the fact that I could travel now and go to some of these places because that's where I get a lot of the inspiration that's we all get inspiration to create these X. these nature experiences at the zoo's and at the aquarium it is just amazing to me and so what what I love about what we do is that we provide those nature experiences for new Yorkers we can give them a sense of of what's out there and hopefully inspire them to travel but also inspire them to care about nature so when you're when you're in a place like Madagascar and I imagine you're researching closures there for animals that are indigenous to Madagascar that you have but one of your zoos maybe lemurs maybe so actually when we built the Madagascar exhibit at the Bronx zoo it was the same time that we were working on that visitor center that where I ran into Stacy hence the and so one of the things that that I did while I was there was to travel to the different habitats that we would be representing in our Madagascar exhibit at the Bronx zoo so actually if you go to the exhibit a lot of the the big images there are the ones that I took off from that trip so we we not only you know went to the habitats and got a sense of what the overall look you know what the overall look and feel of the habitats was with the trees the rock work all that but took detailed photographs of of the rock of of different trees so that we could use those as reference photos when we were reproducing those habitats not for the aquarium I imagine the photo photography that you're referencing was all taken under water it was and I'm not a diver. on that particular scouting no but actually we went out is funny we went out on a on a on a trip with a New York times reporter who dove and did a whole story on underwater New York with us and so we got to you know see his images we got to take some video ourselves and then there's a a photographer Keith Allen Bogen who has done a lot of work of of photographing underwater New York and he shared all of his images with us so we had great reference material it almost sounds like you could have an entire separate museum just with the wildlife and nature photography that you've collected over the years well yeah I mean I that's a whole different way to look at yes potentially when when you're doing this this research and you're seeing the animals interact with their environment I'm just curious because the and enemies and corals and such are made out of cement did the fish in any way no with that they're not real doesn't matter to them so the rock is actually made out of concrete and the and anemones and corals are made out of a rubbery type material so they kind of give a little bit there it's not like they're so it wasn't there a hard corals yeah I mean you have the real ones and habitats for the fish need to have a symbiotic relationship with them but when it's just there for atmosphere it's it's as close as it would get to nature in the fashion ever know the difference I won't you know you'd have to ask and I will. tune in next challenge the shark. on for his complaints about his really. I know that you mentioned the conservation aspect two of the animals and I know that a lot of issues will occasionally do re introduction when it's a possible or rescue one of yours sea lions has a brand on his back what's the story there so he was he was of from a a dam on the west coast where he was a he was catching salmon that the fisherman really want it so basically at that point he was he was branded and you know relocated he was taken out of the competition right. he he was putting on quite a show outside of that we he wasn't there for the feeding times but he was preaching the water in spring at at the at the on lookers he seemed to really enjoy the attention felines are great exhibit animals because they are always doing something yeah and it's the only species that we have it all five of our parks in New York City really yeah okay by what I did get to see the honor feeding and they're very fine an active one of your honor's is kind of a lumbering old man's who has a special PVC latter that he uses to get up on the rocks because he's not as agile as he used to be. but they said I think he was seventeen years old which is older than their life expectancy in the wild so a lot of these you animals do enjoy a longer healthier life because they're taken care of yes that's true when of when you return from a trip and you have all of these photographs what's the first step to creating the design for new enclosure. but you know I think collecting images of of you know sort of wide angle images right they give you a sense of the overall feel of a place that's really important to share with the team because it's you know it's it's a whole team of people that work on this I'm here representing that team but it you know with every project that we do we have outside consultants and then you know we are lucky enough to have an in house design department which very few zoos have or Koreans and so I bring back those images and I share them with the team was you know obviously my experience to give people a sense of the visit because again that's really what we're trying to do is to take that experience in the wild and replicated as much as we possibly can to have any others use our aquariums around the world giving you inspiration lots of them I think there are pieces of of of experiences at different aquariums that have inspired different parts of the shark exhibit certainly zoos around the world as well I mean it and you know it. it's an important part of my education as a professional to visit as you want to cram wherever I am in the world so that's that's what we do on vacation that and go to natural places because you never know when you're going to find a moment of inspiration so it's never really vacation for you I guess hello day and say. so let's talk a little bit about some of the projects the WCS has assisted whether owns outside of the US right so you know our our our conservation program is global as I said earlier we're in nearly sixty countries and and and five oceans so you know every once in awhile the conservation staff will call on us to help with designing a visitor center or an interpretive trail or maybe do some master planning for one of the parks you know we work in a variety of different places around the world so in some cases there and reserves that we've helped to create and in other cases it's not so you know so the situation is always different one time back in in the nineties we were invited to help the Kenya Wildlife Service design a park which is at the entrance to Nairobi national park and it really was essentially showcasing the habitats of Kenya because a lot of the people that live in Nairobi don't get to see any of their wildlife heritage they don't get to see lions they don't get to to see impala or Sievers really so the average canyon workaday city person has never seen any of these animals well I don't know about the average person but a lot of them haven't that's because it really surprising well it's an urban environment and you know it's tough to and the national park is right there in the middle of the city but it's just you know not everybody owns a car and you can't walk through that national park when you say you're designing an interpretive trailer an entrance are you talking about something that's all indoors are you helping create something through the landscape so the the the ruby safari walk was a landscape driven design essentially we took you through the different kinds of habitats that you would find. in Kenya and showcase the animals that you would find in that habitat how do you showcase the animals in in naturalistic exhibits okay so the animals are are in the exhibit so you're walking through yeah yeah exactly okay so it's it's a whole park it's basically a small zoo that's part of the national park okay well when you were saying a national park in Nairobi I'm just picturing these wide planes for game drives but these are these are designed enclosures where you're guaranteed to see the wildlife as you go through yes it's more well not guaranteed because we call them choices. but essentially you know similar to is you setting and and for some canyons this is there wait for some days you know people from Nairobi that's their way to see the wildlife in Kenya sure sure groups definitely use it a lot I haven't actually been there in years now what's your first trip to Africa through WCS yes it was I was working on that project that's quite an introduction was a welcome to Africa please showcase all of our indigenous wild it wasn't quite that abrupt it was an evolving program but it was an amazing amazing experience and that was back in in the mid nineties sure yeah.

Bronx seventeen years
"congo forest" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"congo forest" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"One of the biggest problems we have even with them a program such as the green belt movement is how to raise money and raise enough money not only to respond to the activities in Kenya. But today responded to the activities in the whole region. Right. I have been giving an example of the just to give people an idea of the environmental charge that we have in Africa. I mentioned the Congo forest. Ecosystem I want to mention the fact that when the. When the commander Koren's and his colleagues went to the space centre with chartered discovery. Yes. They had a very interesting experience on their way back this. They said that they saw a thick blanket of dust over Africa and that dust was due to deforestation. It was due to DVD Titian. It was due to cut division of land. Literally moving vegetation from the round. And exposing the saw okay now, the charge for the African people is to plan to those trees. Now, I'm trying not. But I think I need Bano. Okay. Say plan. Help one gallon plaid. And then I might get them. I'm really glad I gave you on the radio. I wanna ask you one more question. We started at talking about growing up and in within your culture. Trees were holy places. They created holy places. And you had a Catholic upbringing you read the prophet Jose. When you were fighting some of your Darcus battles. I I want to ask you about your image of God head you think about that's a hard. I don't usually ask people direct question like that. But that'd be really curious that your response to what is your work with trees? All the work. You've done the battles. You've an you know in your your new awareness of the importance of democratic spaces. Irene head is all of that flow into your understanding of. Yeah. Well, this is a question here. Well, you know, as you know, I'm not a theologian. So I would like that you Jains about my concept of God. But when I was. In the in a Catholic school in my in yeti, which is what I was doing my primary education. I was actually in. Being taught by sisters of the concert. Our all of the console Atta who come from Iran, by the way, and and the founder decent became Betty FAI, by the way. So they're on the right track. And at that time, I must say that religion was extremely superficial. In the way that God was presented to us because got was presented to us in the way. He appears in the Sistine Chapel. Okay. By my Quadra. So. At that time. It was. I would say very superficial presentation of God almost like a human person and with the mind of Iran person. You almost felt like God is somewhere in Rome or somewhere in the sky in the clouds. And then of course, you remember, I my own background, and I was already removed from my own background because my parents had already converted into Christianity from Kikuyu culture. Yes. But there was all. But there was always that inference of for example, the fact that they believed that God leave on Mount Kenya. And and they had a a great reverence to mount Cain..

Africa Iran Kenya Mount Kenya mount Cain Congo forest Sistine Chapel Irene head Koren commander Quadra Rome Jose Betty FAI Atta founder one gallon
"congo forest" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"congo forest" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Go and a lot of like international players playing wrong in the u turn rabble forces still fighting he the northeast area actually the lesson because he law himself all the entire of those things in the in the peak Wasser, he's a cat coat area, you remove areas beyond he's those the rebels as well antique forces. They just moving around by themselves. So a lot of problem, I think to input cons together. So that's megaton pay or is in trouble as a reach the media coverage of this election. I notice of there are as many as twenty seven or twenty eight candidates for this race. So Dr her in in a Cup of eastern cities of the country. Like, I said voting didn't take place on Sunday due to insecurity. So what do you think are some of the biggest sources of insect? Curiosity in that country. Our? As for the government who postponed of election in certain areas. While if they Kilty another is like Evora profiles again in some area. So, but it is also the point that has been happy against by those opposition parties, they are using the government. They this is another technique flying to postpone the lasting find pick the power Hugh in their hunt. So let's now I don't see those a very like to authority tactics. Tactics resources comes very comb teacher of what's going up. We all know I see pressure. is a big to. One of the biggest ones are you the African continent. So sedation is also later sump it shoe affor-, whoever who will become the new president's can you put your fingers on on a Cup of main challenges that he will have to cope with right away. Yeah. I think no matter who coming out as the practice and things that you needed Chinese for him. Well, the house will get rid off. Yeah. Those tales five maybe we see during the campaign before and the Durie, and then there are lots of violence happening. So after the election results three tell me out badly lately. Other losers decibels, we're not satisfied with this. They will feel angry outrage to develop a, you know, boarding south on the stage. And then how little preventing those wide thing. Tommy out. This is number one. I think for anyone becoming the pressure that of course, there near the music huger Welby, the tiny of economic development the halt who make the people you'll ninety again and call to maintain goes the ability like hall of call who is rabble forces. She's northeast of part. Of the county and the house who makes people those those com Don than they can y'all. So those are the Chinese for the comes. So presidents could be actually has promised. The are Congo's forest smooth transition of power since the country's independence from I guess from Belgian in the year nineteen sixty so I think based on what you what you said. Just now, that's that's very difficult to achieve that's unlikely. Oh, yeah. Of caught. Well, they reveal the history of the I will say this time to has suffered a law on conflict the in the people people war, even the father of the team president villa? Husino kill the one he was. Any of those previous laughing has entry top. Who is the wireless. Still seeing a lot of stairs wiler. So this has a cost those big warriors. So way has very courses those up to mystic new about the thing and the results of the election and the coming day. Dr Who and pain from Chinese Academy of social sciences speaking with my colleague, ding, hone commu up Jonah's Burs numbers are expected to fall to lowest level since two thousand. You're listening to today's stay with us..

president Chinese Academy of social scie Wasser Dr Who Evora Don Hugh Jonah Congo Tommy Husino
"congo forest" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"congo forest" Discussed on KCRW

"The fighting for every nation on earth. Not being reimbursed in many cases at all. If they want us to do the fighting. They also have to pay a price, and sometimes that's also a monetary price. So we're not the suckers of the world. Trump's decision to withdraw from Syria and reduce forces in Afghanistan comes despite the advice of his military commanders. Scott Horsely NPR news, the White House. The Trump administration says it will keep a tent city holding thousands of migrant teenagers open longer than I thought department of health and human services. Spokesman Mark Webber says the tornado Texas facility that was supposed to close at the end of this month will now stay open through early twenty nineteen the government also plans to house more migrant teens at another temporary shelter in Florida. Wall Street futures are lower this morning following a record day. The Dow added almost five percent yesterday finishing one thousand eighty six points higher the largest single day point gain ever the S and P five hundred hundred five percent. The NASDAQ gained five point eight percent. Charles lane with member station. W S H U has more investors have been spooked by trade wars rising oil prices and perceived volatility coming from the White House also rising interest rates Michael Pinto runs. Macro. Investing firm. He points to almost every central Bank in the world signaling that a plan to hike rates. So the cost of capital has gone up significantly. Look at the number of share buybacks, which were trillion dollars. There are not going to be anywhere near that level in two thousand nineteen still Pinto and others say investors, acted rashly in recent days and more looking for any excuse to stop the selling, and they got it with Amazon and MasterCard both announcing that this year shopping season was the best ever for NPR news. I'm Charles lane. In Asia markets ended the day in mixed territory. The Nikkei up three point eight percent. You're listening to NPR news from Washington. In Democratic Republic of Congo. Protesters in the city of Benny and the eastern part of the country ransacked Ebola isolation. Centre a senior health official tells Reuters news agency that it's possible. Patients in that facility fled these protests. Come after a decision by Congo's electoral commission yesterday to exclude the cities of Benny Tambo and the surrounding areas from voting in Sunday's presidential election because of the outbreak and militia violence, the BBC's guy is co any reports voting has been pushed back to March in those cities. I've.

Michael Pinto NPR Charles lane White House Congo Benny Tambo Trump Scott Horsely Mark Webber Asia Reuters Benny Afghanistan Texas Syria
"congo forest" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"congo forest" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Additional experienced personnel are needed in the field to lead response operations and develop and implement strategies as dictated by changing information. However, CDC staff were recently pulled from the field in the DRC owing to US government concerns about security these concerns need to be addressed. So that CDC staff can return security arrangements should be made to ensure that any deploy teams could operate safely in affected areas. Pregnant women and the Ebola crisis a perspective article by Lisa Haddad from Emory University school of medicine Atlanta on August, first the ministry of health of the Democratic Republic of Congo reported. The emergence of another Ebola virus outbreak as of November thirteenth. There were three hundred forty one cases and two hundred fifteen deaths making this the world's third largest Ebola. Outbreak today, the public health community learned several lessons when west Africa experienced the largest ever Ebola outbreak beginning in twenty fourteen current prevention and control measures have benefited from these lessons and are directed toward a coordinated response, including improvements in cross-border surveillance, laboratory capacity case management, infection control at health facilities, cultural. Alie sensitive.

Ebola Outbreak CDC US Democratic Republic of Congo Emory University school of med DRC Lisa Haddad Africa
"congo forest" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"congo forest" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"The capitol and it's it's hot you know we're right below in you explain it perfectly the the equator runs right through the middle of that country we fly in its hot and i get off and we we go in there ars a big city the kinshasa the capital it's a it's a huge city millions of people by no infrastructure at all so you know you're driving down the roads and there's you know they don't follow traffic laws they don't have lights they don't have any of that kind of staff they just you know we ever get that urged to go oh down the road in just drive to do whatever what are you do not as fun is that seem actually frightening berger of everybody's doing now you're might lose your life area there driving like maniacs all over the place people hanging out how out of the cars and sitting wherever they can get a ride they want to get a ride from one place together however they can get there if they got stand on the bumper of truck they're gonna stand on the bumper of a truck right sermon thirdworld type of countries accuracy exactly so but within your mission is obviously to go right you go in a word we to go to the forests and the congo forest is the secondlargest to the amazon forest in the world and it's got the congo river which is the secondlargest river to the amazon river second largest in the world so we take another flight from that capital kinshasa up north now we're above the equator and were in the forest now and this djaminha is where this is here and we get here and you know you go from you know buildings that air belt with break and staff in kinshasa to mud huts to no electricity no vehicles you see a motorbike every once in a while go owen by and this is kind of the beginning of our off trail you know track into where we're going to find these what pygmy people is what they are we were looking for dwayne had a calling to go and find these pygmy people and bring the gospel to them because they these are the people i was telling you about that have no connection to the.

kinshasa berger congo river secondlargest river amazon river dwayne amazon owen