13 Burst results for "Congo Democratic Republic"

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"So kudos to you since your your time leaving devon What have you been focused on. Is it data management for other oil and gas companies as a consultant. And what are you up today. After devon i was working the same methodology for other companies. And i was doing a lot of getting into a new realm of the oil industry working with revenue and government agencies because i was managing a lot of o b o data so trying to corral a bunch of other operators to come into a government entity like occ or the texas railroad commission and to show him to get their data correctly to those organizations. As i was working at ulta mesa. Occ came to me and said how can we make our data better of what you are giving us. You are always coming to us and telling us this is wrong. This is wrong. How're you finding this well. I used to dad tool to run my analytics against what was in our source of record. And i mirrored the two together through the dad tool using analytics to show on. This is not what we have so basically it was data management and a lot of mentoring. That's what i like to do. And that's what i've been doing after so can hear what you're doing now. I'm looking back at your your career and you know. Overseas data management engineer. Sounds like to me. You've you've You've been able to do a little bit of world travel what's What are some of the cool places you got to go to chevron around the world the cool place. I was was in the north sea area and that was pretty nice because of the new experience going overseas. It was also an adventure. But i wouldn't say it was coolest him but it was in the congo. I was actually in the republic congo democratic republic of congo. Yes i was at point. You are dealing with a obio situation where we had operating tracks within the katina marine and we were dealing with the government of The democrat congo and chevron that time and i was managing our olbia operations of production revenue reported to the government and that that took me quite a while and that was a that was an experience and a challenge but it was a lot of fun as well. Where were you living over there. No i living just go back and forth or did you go over there. I was going back and forth on on special projects. And then i was in lagos for a while doing big same thing. We were working with seismic at that time. I was managing a lot of seismic data and the three d. data for drew extensive drilling program so managing a lot of that seismic data at lagos. And all of these places where chevron had field offices and then. I had to go to luanda with angola and i was doing the same thing. Data management air. So i went to venezuela is well and did data management for chevron lake maracaibo.

luanda chevron venezuela today texas railroad commission occ two angola devon congo maracaibo north sea ulta mesa chevron lake katina democrat
"congo democratic republic" Discussed on The Unimaginary Friendcast

The Unimaginary Friendcast

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on The Unimaginary Friendcast

"I don't care if you're sick or not if you're going to cove it i don't wanna see your fucking face and i don't want you to breathe on me and that's just good manners. Do you still have more. Oh yeah sorry. I'm gonna go really fast. We have to be near to address david. Alternative meat is booming. I don't know if this good or bad because i love meat and meat. Consumption dropped three percent worldwide. Which doesn't sound like a lot but it's never dropped in the history of the world. that is a lot. that's incredible. Yeah yeah. I wonder why i want i want cloned me. You guys know this. I clinton i don't want to eat animals anymore. I have to don't through. I wanna eat cloned to me Japanese scientists retrieve of christine hunk of rock from an asteroid. Which i didn't know that so the first time we actually got something. So we're gonna be mining asteroids. You're gonna see a completely different world and guess what member one of the projections from last year was is that if if we start mining asteroids could open us up to what aliens alien microbial life forms so we're going to see You know schmo virus and beloved virus and our povich viruses and all kinds of like alien viruses. Who'll and i didn't know this either white. This we all heard. This spacex launched Reusable launch just done so they can go there and come back which is amazing which. I don't know why it took them so long. 'cause fucking science fiction has been doing that for years and they launch crude crude crude spacious spacious with crews that was hard to say and usa and china both launched robot missions to mars. Which i didn't know that and india india is going to launch its first spacecraft in two thousand twenty. One space race is back on bitches. That's good the future is all about space mother. Fuck up bitches. He didn't even mentioned that. Polio was officially eradicated in africa. Just now i mean this year in twenty twenty really. I thought it was a long time ago. So it's just. I guess there's just two countries where the virus is still a threat which is pakistan and afghanistan. So we're really really close. And they're anti vaccine anti-nazi there and apparently the last bowl a patient. This year was sent home from the hospital in the in congo democratic republic of congo which they had a huge outbreak there. Those are good things. Good scotland was the first country to make a lady products feminine napkins and such free. So wait why because there's a big movement or give explain the sewage. Why should they be free. Because you're basically like maki like exploiting something that like you have no control over so you can't just free bleed everywhere. So you need to buy products and companies are making millions and.

christine hunk clinton david india democratic republic of congo Polio usa china africa pakistan afghanistan scotland maki
"congo democratic republic" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

07:00 min | 2 years ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Thirteen ten KFI K. And so many folks under the mistaken impression that the national populist movement actually began as president trump road down that golden escalator. Presidential aspiration knots been around. Longer than that. Six thirty seven, now thirteen ten, Kfi a thirteen ten KFI DOT COM northern Colorado's voice mornings with Gail live and local via the collision specialists studios joined this morning by. James Guskey Co. author of they're not listening. How the elites created the National Populist Revolution Ryan Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me, you bet I appreciate your taking the time, so let's just kind of start at the very beginning with this is the national populist revolution. So basically after the Cold War and in the nineteen eight late nineteen eighties. In Washington and academia in the media kind of career a new mission America. America's nations always news in Michigan from the being the Soviets to expanding West, and the new mission for America was basically a Neil liberal agenda. The fact that we would spend time money energy exporting exporting democracy abroad opening markets, but they're make the world more liberal I think. I mean small l liberal, not liking not not just like liberalism, to to the theory that America is just an idea, not natural nation with an actual people. All these things are moving really heavily in the late nineteen eighties and and that was rejected overall by people and only in America, but around the entire globe because it wasn't just American leaders that have this idea. It was a least globally. Push An. Idea, so national populism is really the convergence convergence of human movement. It's nationalist who oppose globalism oppose global organizations, and they want more control over sovereignty and immigration and populous, who are really an economic between working class people, and the you know one person I guess quote, Unquote. It just so happens that the one percent and the people pushing globalism happen to be the same people, so if the convergence of those movements into one. Now. It's interesting because they're of course has been a narrative predicate. Attached to national populism, one of a roots in racism or white supremacy or xenophobia your thoughts. Right well, this is why I wrote this book. Honestly because I cover the national pop movement on six continents, so immigration's a big big issue. I I have it on I think it's a third of the book the but we start actually in Angola. Angola the nation in Central Africa has a gigantic illegal immigration problem that they have been dealing with very successfully for the last five years, and they've report hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens. Where are the illegal aliens from Angola from there from the Dominican Republic? From the Congo. Democratic Republic of Congo and they're all black. There's no racial difference whatsoever. It's a cultural difference economic difference so the Racism Margaret. Argument is complete nonsense. the second countries like Chile Chile. Has Illegal aliens other South American countries once again? All the same race has no difference in racial terms, whatsoever in India has a huge illegal immigration problem and works in immigration on our building wall from other South the Southeast Asian countries Israel certainly has has the immigration so the whole idea that you know racial idea is a complete bogus argument. We sit there and destroy from. From the GEICO the UK has a problem with illegal aliens from the Ukraine. So if it was just a if it was just a racial term, they wouldn't have problems with people of the same race where breaking the loss xenophobia You know it's another. It's another term that there's they're encouraged to in order to just describe the idea outright, when in fact, people on the entire will really care about preserving culture and preserving things. The. Idea that you know deletes have that an immigrant from you know Ecuador has the or France, or wherever have the same believes the same values and the same idea, the role of government and the same culture as a ninth generation with very farmer is a lie. It's no one will believe that at all, except for people who are delusional, but that's what the League became, and so for decades. The American public has asked for certain things like Hey i? Want were low levels. Emmigration I want no more wars for democracy. We go fighting abroad. I want an economy that is more favorable towards working class people. People, all of these things have been demanded. And in fact, politicians have ran on those promises and just never deliver a decade after decade after decade and finally after having small victories like you know victor or him being elected in Hungary in nineteen, Ninety, eight, the Swiss People's Party in Nineteen Ninety nine Switzerland the Danish People's Party in Denmark and thousand one after all these small victories were happening across the entire globe. Then trump's elected. Brexit happened and people are shocked, but they shouldn't be shot. They seen this coming away was building, and they were completely shows thicker head in the sand and ignore it. Six, forty, three now thirteen ten KFI thirteen ten, Kfi K. A. Dot Com joined by Ryan. DUSKY CO author of a great, New Book Ryan Yeah. You've got over seven hundred citations in that book. This book is so thoroughly researched they're not listening. How the elites created the national populist revolution. You did do your homework on this. I'm a NERD and I. WE I Work God love you for that. Because, you know why. I didn't go to college I didn't and I assume naturally. Everyone would sit there and say oh, it's bogus. He's talking about so I even I thought. Maybe they didn't have to have a citation. I found one just to have it and all of a citation are. I went to the place that liberals talk about a lot of active stations. A lot of studies you know I looked for for where their arguments were where they're. You know institutions provided arguments that I agreed with and where and that made my case.

America KFI Angola Kfi Democratic Republic of Congo Kfi K. A. Dot Com president James Guskey Co. Congo Swiss People's Party Danish People's Party Washington Chile Chile Dominican Republic Central Africa GEICO Gail Colorado India
"congo democratic republic" Discussed on Counting Countries

Counting Countries

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on Counting Countries

"And eight guys to come saved my ass. I was prepared to walk out in. That would have been no problem but I still would have left my car behind and that was going to be a problem. So that's why I stuck around with the car but it. That was a wakeup call. And then again I went in. Let let me let me jump in here so that. I mean that's a fascinating anecdote meaning. I'm sure by the time the trip in Africa ended. You were an expert in getting your truck gotta the sand and it was a very very easy and common thing for you to do. But I'm imagining you in the sand with your truck isolated by yourself basically at the beginning of your in your having to set off your beacon. I I mean I guess that's the point imagining and he you're saying to yourself like Oh my God you. I'm in the beginning of my trip and I'm already reaching out for assistance to the. Us Embassy to the mortician army. What's going on there in one way it was more of Is More of an experiment to make sure that the stupid beacon that is paying for is garment in reach device actually worked part of it because I knew that I was only about fifteen kilometers away from the road so I knew that if I got up at two. Am I could walk out and be there by sunrise or so and and and be on a road by sunrise and not be exposed to the desert heat. So I knew I wasn't my life wasn't threatened I had enough water and food and I knew I could walk out of there but you're right. It was a wakeup call to say you know. Don't get too cocky. This is tough and when I went to Atar which is in northern Mauritania. It was once a super touristic region back before the Islamic Jihadist. Kind of ruin things for Mauritania but I went there and I was the only the time I did. You get to go to a tar. Rick is that near Monolith that area monolith. I don't Know Yeah. I think I drove through there. I mean like I was in Ching shingle at Iwo Dane. An yes yes Chinguetti. Yes so anyway I it was. I got stuck in the snow in the snow in the in the sand there as well And but that time I had a local guide with me and so together we got out of the sand but I got myself stuck in the Senate and you you kind of assumed by the end of my journey. I figured out how to get. It's always hard but we'll give your listeners. One tip decrease the air pressure in your tires. That's how you get out of the sand. So it's totally counterintuitive. But if you release the air and get your tires to be not flat but pretty pretty flat then you should be able to float out of San now. Obviously you're GONNA WANNA have a compressor which is allows you to put the back in your tires. Ideally with you so you want that in Africa In the worst case I guess you don't have one in the you'll have to drive with flat tires to the next Service station to fill the air back in. But that's that's the tip that I didn't know when I was in Mauritania that you release the air out of your tires to get totally counterintuitive. It sounds like a stupid as shooting holes in your boat to get out of difficult situation out of your boat. I'm like really do you WANNA do. Let the air out of your tires okay. Anyway I could literally probably spend a couple of days with you going over this journey but I'm GonNa jump around and the Democratic Republic of Congo is a challenging country to visit on many different fronts. And I mean I like. It is a very brave or courageous individual. I don't think I'd ever want to drive by myself through that country so just share with us some stories or insights into driving your see. Yeah so I drove twice. One time was a simple journey. I was in the Republic of Congo. The capital Brazzaville and right across the river lessen the climate or way the Congo river is the capital Kinshasa. It's the two closest capitals in the world for YOU TRIVIA BUFFS. Cintoss on one end and you have Brazzaville on the other end of the river. They share that so they can see each other the two capitals of Republic of Congo Democratic Republic of Congo. So given that I thought putting my car and ferry should cost maybe fifty bucks or less three hundred fifty dollars what they want to charge me after much bargaining They wanted five hundred or six hundred to begin with so then. I just decided I'm gonNA drive about two hours. South Down Stream of the Congo river across another place where the only charged me fifteen dollars to put on a barge across the Congo River. And that was my first experience. I drove back to Kinshasa and but the second time I went through the RC that was relatively tame because those are all around Kinshasa which is the capital. The second time was much more challenging because we my wife and I at the time Rejoices Our Name. We were together entering. It sounds like when I said at the time I'm still married to her by the Uh so she and I went to. I think we were in Uganda. That's right we entered into the DRC through Uganda. I we want to try to enter in from Rwanda but that that that was going to be. It'll be fine. Once you get to Goma but then to go north it was going to go through some very sketchy territory. So we decided to go as far north and then we couldn't. We need to somehow get to Cameroon. And that's where my wife's from and somehow we had to cut through the DRC and that was a mud-filled paradise I've never seen so much mud in my life and but.

Congo river Republic of Congo Democratic R Congo Mauritania Kinshasa DRC Uganda Africa Rwanda Cameroon Goma Iwo Dane Rick Brazzaville Us Embassy Atar Senate San now mortician army
"congo democratic republic" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

"Of this disease historians in the morning show. Felt the coolest thing to waste time with yesterday. Are. reread what him. Animal live streams. Go online and watch animals live. No. I do. The best is like with all the quarantine stuff going on a lot of the zoos of set up cameras. So you watch the baby's do things. They're taking animals on field trips to see other animals. It's great. Online to self magazine has a self dot com, whatever they have a full list the Cornell Lab Feeder Watch Kamat sucker woods we can. You can watch the birds chirping right L.. The Wollongong Grove Panda Cam from China the Kitten rack you cat cam from kitten rescue sanctuary in La. The polar bears. International, Cape, West Cam from Canada the puppy playroom at Warrior Canine Connection. Cam the Monterey Bay Aquarium Jellyfish Cam. The Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary, Cam and the grace gorilla forest corridor cam from. From Congo. Democratic Republic of Congo I just sat there for hours. Is Looking watching all these animals? It was so great and it really relaxes you. That realize does they're so cute? The penguins going around the aquarium to meet the other animals. Maybe my favorite, just staring at the Beluga, whales. Like what are you? What are you? What the hell you. The? Related. It's so funny. It's the so great what you can find online that you know what six months ago. We would have thought what a waste of my time now you're going. Wow, this is my highlight of the day. It's really cool. Check it out just a search for doing a search anywhere for animal cams. See what you can find. On Ashley. Actually online twenty four. We're talking about breaking up. Not Not really text, but on camera like Zoom, and whatever you actually broke up the on snapchat. How'd that word? It was Kinda Awkward, but I know. My message got through. Did. You put a graphic on it like vomit coming out of your mouth or something here I, mean you? Know I was very angry for the fact that I was pretty much ghosted for four days saw I saw. My messages are being read and I got no response so I finally had enough and I said. Don't text me anymore I. Don't want to deal with this anymore. Right there, so wow, look, you know what? Now. How long ago did that happen actually? About two weeks ago. Oh okay. Are you happy? You did it no matter how you did it, you did it. Are you happy you did it? I feel okay about doing it not so much. The circumstances on probably did it, but yes. Yeah. Yeah I think if you're going to break up and you need to do it now. There is no other way I mean you can't see them. You can't take them out to put on a public and say I quit you. Goodbye so you? All right so I wonder if Ashley and everyone I'm wondering if this is the time where people. Oh, my God always wanted to break up with them, and now is the time I can do it here on my phone. This is fabulous. What Gandhi? What do you think? I think ghosting someone right now. I think ghosting someone in general is horrible ghosting somebody right now is extra mean because all of us have less than not crap to do so. How are you ignoring someone? You're going out of your way right now to ignore someone ghosting. Acceptable just do it. I'm too busy. To? Can't fit breaking up with me and your schedule Nate. What do you think is the best way to break? If you can't see them face to face I? Really feel like a phone. Call is the best way because if you're doing zoom. That's just awkward all around. I don't think anybody wants to be on all core thing. Did look at the person when the Grey Cup with them because of phone. You do have a little bit of a personal connection, but it's not that personal right because. You're breaking up with someone. It needs to be personal. Don't you think? This is so awkward and that camera screen. Right well, Ashley Thank. You very much. You go find a new someone who's GonNa. Take better care of you. Okay? Someone's not GonNa Ghost. You thanks for. You take it easy. You deserve better than that, but nate that typical thing. It's easier to. Put a note on the door and runs. They don't see. At least and not go ghosting. It's a follicle. WORC-, move, don't be a what's. Out. You know what you're GonNa do to stay safe. You're going to drive by someone's house and scream out the door. Break up like you..

Wollongong Grove Panda Cam Ashley penguins Nate Congo Monterey Bay Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary Warrior Canine Connection self magazine China Cornell Lab La Gandhi
"congo democratic republic" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"The spread of this disease historians in the morning show felt the coolest thing to waste time with yesterday. I reread what him. Animal Live. Streams go online and watch animals live. No lutely I do. The best is like with all the quarantine stuff going on a lot of. The zoos have set up cameras. So you watch the babies do things. They're taking animals on field trips to see other animals. It's great online to self magazine has a self dot com whatever they have a full list the Cornell lab feeder. Watch Kamat sucker woods. We can you can watch the birds chirping right out the Wollongong Grove Panda Cam from China. The kitten rack you cat cam from kitten rescue sanctuary in La. The Polar Bears International Cape West Cam from Canada. The puppy playroom warrior. Canine Connection Cam. The Monterey Bay Aquarium Jellyfish Cam the lone Pine Koala Sanctuary Cam and the grace gorilla forest corridor Cam from from Congo Democratic Republic of Congo. I just sat there for hours is looking watching all these animals. It was so great and it really relaxes you that relays does. They're so cute. The penguins going around the aquarium to meet the other animals was maybe my favorite just staring at the Beluga whales. Like what are you what are you? What the hell you either long related. It's so funny. It's just so great what you can find online that you know what six months ago. We would have thought what a waste of my time. Now you're going wow. This is my highlight of the day. It's really cool. Check it out just a search for doing a search anywhere for Animal. Cams see what you can find on Ashley Actually Online Twenty Four. We're talking about breaking up not not really text but on camera like zoom and whatever you actually broke up the guy on snapchat. How'd that word? It was Kinda awkward but I know my message got through. Did you put a graphic on it like vomit coming out of your mouth or something here. I mean you know I was Very angry for the fact that I was pretty much ghosted for four days so I saw my messages are being read and I got no response so I finally had enough and I said don't text me anymore. I don't want to deal with this anymore right there. So wow look you know what now. How long ago did that happen actually about two weeks ago? Oh Okay are you happy. You did it no matter how you did it you did it are you. Happy you did it I feel okay about doing it. Not so much the circumstances on oh I did it but yes yeah. Yeah I think if you're going to break up and you need to do it now. There is no other way. I mean you can't see them. You can't take them out to put in a public and say I quit you goodbye so you all right so I wonder if Ashley and everyone. I'm wondering if this is the time where people oh my God always wanted to break up with them and now is the time I can do it here on my phone. This is fabulous. What Gandhi what do you think? I think ghosting someone right now. I think ghosting someone in general is horrible. Ghosting somebody right now is extra mean because all of us have less than not crap to do. So how are you ignoring someone? You're going out of your way right now. To ignore someone ghosting acceptable. Just do it. I'm too busy to fit breaking up with me and your schedule Nate. What do you think is the best way to break? If you can't see them face to face I really feel like a phone call is the best way because if you're doing zoom that's just awkward all around. I don't think anybody wants to be on all four thing. Didn't look at the person when the Grey Cup with them because of phone you do have a little bit of a personal connection. But it's not that personal right because you're breaking up with someone. It needs to be personal. Don't you think this is so Awkward Camera Screen Right? Well Ashley Thank you very much. You go find a new someone who's GonNa take better care of you okay. Someone's not GonNa Ghost you. Thanks for you take it easy. You deserve. Better than that but nate nate doing that typical thing. It's easier to put a note on the door and runs. They don't see at least not ghosting. It's a follicle a Wussy move. Don't be a what's out. You know what you're going to do to stay safe. You're going to drive by someone's house and scream out the door. You.

Wollongong Grove Panda Cam nate nate penguins Pine Koala Sanctuary Cam Ashley Congo Democratic Republic of C self magazine Polar Bears International Cape China Canada La Gandhi
"congo democratic republic" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Slopes on make your operate ski choice to relax Refu- after a day of fun on the mountain and we have a great selection of grab and go meals if you can't stay in shock but we hope that you can stick around the Warren store but funky friendly in almost world famous now back to the Nave Graham Show on Wbz FM and am and we are back in in I Guess Start Wolf still with us. He is a retired professor of economics from the University of Vermont and we're talking about Vermont's declining population he. He is He wrote an interesting column and bt digger Dot Org this past week about the About the fact that Vermont's population has declined in the past decade and looks looks to continue to in the twenty. Twenty six are just starting to starting to unfold this week folks and Also wanted to introduce just I Connected via telephone with Amelia Virgin Ovitz Shah Persian Ovitz's she is with the US Committee on Refugees Fiji's on immigration office in in the Burlington area and Amelia. Thank you so much for joining me. How am I doing on the pronunciation so far? Good morning everyone Not so great. It's a Mula Madonna which Amila Mirjana Vich okay but no offence taken. Good morning everyone okay. Okay we are talking about Vermont's two declining population and if it occurred to me I really wanted to get on the phone. Someone who has worked with Folks coming newly into Ron newly any of the United States settling here in our little state and And Get your perspective on on what what what what role Immigrants Refugees might be able to play in trying to stem the decline in Vermont's population and Give us the overall picture of right off the bat here. Yes thank you so. US Committee for Refugees as an immigrant. is the only refugee resettlement program in the state and We've been around for forty years. According to our data a close to eight thousand refugees have come into the state since about nineteen eighty nine And that number is is certainly larger larger. Because we've been around since nineteen eighties. So I'm just looking at our data over the past ten years. A on on average bridge about two hundred employable adults have come into the state. And what does that mean so refugees when they come in they receive you. You know. We're a one stop shop. We provide case management employment support English Language Training Volunteers Support and etc.. But but really the goal is early economic self sufficiency so all employable adults age eighteen to sixty five are expected to go to work arcus quickly as possible and and they have The refugee resettlement As I said through the refugee resettlement about you know on average two hundred employable adults have come into the state and have entered the workforce. Now when you say two hundred employable adults is is that per year or that's that's per year annually. Yes so the total number our number has sort of been between Three hundred and twenty five to three hundred and fifty not individuals coming into the state over the past decade An out of that number about two hundred were employable adults. I see okay so so other folks coming in with them would have been say family members children and so on. Yes exactly okay. Art Wolf Lemme ask you Two hundred inflatable adults a year coming into Vermont through this program How how big a ripple is that in the overall state economy? Well well there's about three hundred thousand jobs in Vermont so it's a it's a pretty small number but it's a positive number and you know we're given the numbers we were talking about Any any addition addition to the labor force in Vermont End of the population. In general I I think a really good thing. So this is Given that We have Fewer birth I than than deaths and given that people are leaving Vermont for other states faster than they're moving in here Getting immigrants here is a is one in potential solution to that That demographic problem an art I wanted to circle back because I did say before the break. I had one more question about that. That topic pick of of birth rates especially among younger Working Women in Vermont and if I were an employer looking beyond my next quarter arteries recorded early results. You know my my bottom line that I'm reporting to shareholders or whatever I might say to myself you know the famous line from from Henry Ford is he wanted to build cars for his own workers And and I might say to myself I want my female employees to give birth and and have children and have these children grow up to be my customers. My workers And so I'M GONNA I'm GonNa be a supporter of things like maybe paid family leave or even have a have a program that goes beyond whatever you know if the legislature passed a search thing and because I see the long term in benefits of having more people Is anybody thinking like that out in our economy. And should they well I I. I don't think Henry Ford Ever said that It may be one of those quotes that are attributed to someone that they never said But I don't think I don't think Businesses think that way nor do so. I really think they should You know they're concerned about where their workers are gonNA come from You know thinking about your workers workers having babies so that twenty years from now they were. It was pretty long term thing. That's good planning. I'd say well the other hand you've got workers who are retiring and they're already working for you. Maybe an easier way to get future. Workers like for next year is to make it more attractive for someone who's thinking about retiring to stick around for another another year or two there is that there is always that strategy as well. Maybe maybe you know they can think of things like I dunno reduced ours vacation time. I don't know what exactly but it seems like there. There there needs to be there needs to be so some more out of the box thinking out there so maybe my idea of planning ahead. Twenty years is too far out of the box but But Gee whiz that's kind of the way the world works at least one level so anyway we'll a meal I wanted to also just you know. Keep you in the conversation precision here and ask you in terms of the the refugees who came here say back in in your early days in the nineteen eighties. I gather they'd be having children by now. Who are out in the workforce correct? Yeah that would be accurate The refugees that arrived in the eighties and nineties and Are you know having children now. Who are you know? Part of the workforce. Yeah Yeah and and are they is have you. Are there any discernible. Patterns or studying looking studies looking at patterns to say X. Percentage of the children of refugees are staying in Vermont. Or you know they wanNA move someplace else more job opportunities to warmer weather or whatever. Yeah that would be a great study to do. I'm not aware of one and As of now but just on ignobly Refugees come here to stay. They come you know here and start a new life and you you know want To to build a new life and good opportunities for themselves and their children so certainly I know of you know a number of families that have arrived years ago whose children graduated from Colleges and are now you know working in professional positions since but also you know sort of in the same vein. I should mention that You know there is a number of Refugees who who are graduating from colleges who are not able to access off for whatever reason professional positions and are leaving the states which which is the shame chain. That is interesting that That folks are coming to Vermont. Maybe intending to stay here but discovering that for whatever reason the it doesn't look like as as fertile ground for it. They wanted to do as maybe they hoped. And so they're saying okay. Well I'll go try some other part of the country. Then that's right so we the refugee program you know. We're working with area employers to to you know improve their ways and processes and hiring processes and sort of work Conditions namely in terms of you know cultural awareness Maybe some mentorship and and and Training so you know those who are Entering workforce are are staying and had an incentive to stay day. Yeah now you from. I believe he told me that you came from Bosnia in the mid one thousand nine hundred ninety s of course there was a lot of a lot of war strife and so on in that part of the world Back then there were quite a number of people who came from from Bosnia to Vermont. I know in the central area certainly You know my my kids grew up with with with Children and families who would come over and and and you you obviously are now in a professional position yourself Elfin and have made a light. You've been here now. A quarter century. I guess that's correct. Wow It's a nice round number. Congratulations on the on the anime. Maybe it's not the exact date anniversary but a quarter century is quite a long a long okay and and and and so tell me a little bit about the the parts of the world. which have been most productive? I mean can take a couple of guesses but I'd rather have expert The parts of the world which which is the most productive in terms of sending refugees to Vermont interesting. How you put it the most productive I've it's you know? Refugees of our forcibly displaced due to war and violence and A lot of people most I refugees actually have spent you know all of their life pretty much from you know early age young age to you know their twenties and thirties. He's until they actually arrived to the United States. I should actually say that most refugees will live and die in refugee camps. It's really that less than one percent percent that will have an opportunity to be resettled. Yeah I I think my my choice of words. There was not good and I apologize for that I was thinking is the proper way to put it sorta most contributory or where. Where's the where I was trying to get to? I think where the bulk of the refugees in Vermont coming from Zimbabwe to describe it from all corners corners of the world I will just name a few countries so Burma Bhutan Burundi Rwanda Sudan Somalia Syria obviously Bosnia Vietnam Iraq Kossovo Congo Democratic Republic of Congo and Congo Brazzaville and others. Wow so it really is quite a range in in quite a Quite a mix of cultures and It it and tell me a little bit about out the I don't know the I mean it must be a tough thing. Frankly for somebody from Congo to come to remind of course. The climate is completely different They are they are looking to get settled. The they're they're usually a person of color I would think in they are looking to get settled in a community which is still predominantly white And just all of the sort of cultural differences in terms of kind of you know how people live. That's gotta be a hard process. Yes it is certainly..

Vermont US Committee for Refugees University of Vermont Bosnia United States Amelia Virgin Ovitz Shah Persi Amila Mirjana Vich professor of economics Congo Refu Fiji Nave Graham Show US Committee Henry Ford Congo Brazzaville Wolf Lem Ron Burlington Amelia
"congo democratic republic" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

10:31 min | 2 years ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"On it United healthcare health plan benefits may vary he nine sixty seven you know for our Facebook audience and periscope and Twitter we just a TV we just played a video of Kristoff of before the one of the U. N. bodies given what's called an oral intervention at world inventions you actually the only submit a written document you actually advocate you make it you make a an oral intervention we've been talking about Planned Parenthood but let me tell you this we've got our Europeans are full of justice has NGO status non government non governmental organizations that is officially before the United Nations now we fought for that it did not come easily it took us about two years to get it we had a fight and fight and fight I I'd conducted the final push on that and did the the of your quality hearing I guess of of our mission and we fought hard and we we got it we won we had a fight for it and were able to do a lot of things you just saw a little bit of an on again if you were watching on Facebook periscope the interesting thing here is the the book that's been presented that our team has published out of our European center for law and justice which is comprehensive it's up to almost three hundred pages it's called law and prevention of abortion in Europe we've been talking about abortion the United States we're doing this on a global basis and the issue Christophe of abortion comes up within the United Nations contacted me it does come up in the United Nations correct of course wanting yeah go ahead now you've been talking of the plane turned to the and since the beginning of the show and that very active at the U. N. there are many NGOs than parenthood Mario stops and other NGOs that are fighting for making an abortion yeah in international human rights as a matter of fact which is why it's important that's where we are there to fight back and in any most in any document the U. N. is potentially publishing they try to have the health meant my maternal health and sexual and reproductive rights included it so it's the vocabulary they're using to pushing abortion and they're doing everything they can to have every country allowing providing for for bush so family we talk about you know we talk about the halls of Congress you're you're you come up against Planned Parenthood all the time but you are you're one of our designated individuals with within the United Nations you're you're right in there too she's got the record on that no doubt about it had a team of five a just a few weeks ago it New York the General Assembly arguing for religious liberty including the right to life Jay this is something I think is really important for members to hear one of the things that we hear all the time we were up at the General Assembly is look it's just too hard to get the world to pay attention to these issues issues of life issues of human rights I do what we tell them when they say that is let me show you a video or transcript of our European counterpart Kristoff inserting these issues into the chambers were just an NGO yet we make the case you are a member state there is no excuse for you not advocating for these issues just like we do J. Kristoff is absolutely right it's a regular issue but it is an up hill climb to get member states to engage on them it's white so important we have that consultation status you know one of the things during that we deal with on this and I want to get into the particulars of this you when you mean rights council of the United States pulled out of the you you when you when rights council yeah that's right the U. in the US pulled out of the U. N. human rights council in twenty eighteen for two reasons one because we do want to keep finding all these anti Israel resolutions and it was like a mini version of the journal simply say anti Israel anti US as we go through you know go through these members that are now on there even if you go through the current members that are on there I mean selling these three year like Libya Sudan Venezuela who are new to it are the only bad actors on there you can go through a look at the set Angola Congo Democratic Republic Congo I'm just not this really stable places Pakistan Afghanistan not stable you you look through and you say this is another reason why why are we spending all this money there and then you throw in a Libya which is a failed state Sudan which had the overthrow of a dictator who was wanted by the international criminal court for war crimes but now the overthrow of the dictator is a military dictatorship which is seen happen time and time again in these African countries so they're going to be the only human rights have been this way let's starving their own people with Maduro who we don't even recognize as the leader and and they get elected now to room there's also another reason Kristoff brought this to my attention that the U. S. left which is a little more technical but it's pretty clear the human rights council decided that you have to have a two thirds vote of the forty seven to remove anyone from the council who is violating human rights so so what's the big there's more people on the council who are human rights violators in art yes so that means there's like so how does that work so in other words to remove somebody two thirds have to go ahead do you have to vote against this country so with the Arabic majority or if you just have to have some alliances and you you keep your seats and the other thing is that there are forty seven seats and they have to have a balanced representation per region in the world so you have to have a thirteen people I guess from Africa about the same number from South America so they end up head being compelled to elect violate human rights violators even rights violators make up a majority okay because of the two thirds Rockwell and in western Europe only get seven seats in the Eastern Europe gets six Latin America and the Caribbean gets eight so they get they get more than western Europe we're include US is included in like western Europe so when you add up Eastern Europe Latin America Asia Pacific like China China is a lot of the dictatorships being me a Myanmar others just keep going to that list and Africa which until about half the countries are dictatorships of oars or at least phony democracies even when there's been or for failed states like Libya is a failed state they have leaders but there's no leadership it is a war zone and again to day and also is it now a military dictatorship after finally getting rid of Omar al Bashir wanted for war crimes and crimes against humanity and genocide he's now being tried by the military that he once led in Sudan but the military took power even though the people push them out and so that's not a good situation for the people you don't you west you looked at some of the statistics on the anti Israel aspect of us that was one of the reasons US withdrew and withdrew our dollars in the first year that the human rights council was organized two thousand and six all of their deliberations that first year two thousand six they only condemned one nation the entire year even though there were atrocities in mass killings in a lot of places like Sri Lanka and India and other places Libya that year they only condemn the nation of Israel in April of two thousand six a Palestinian suicide bomber blew himself up in a Tel Aviv restaurant for example killing eleven people ages sixteen to seventy three the Palestinian organization claimed it was self defense and because of that defense the human rights council took absolutely no action in its first ten years of existence the human rights council has condemned Israel sixty two times twelve years ago they have a they have an agenda in it varies but there are certain common agenda items on the right yeah item number seven every year when they meet is to examine the human rights abuses of Israel it is laughable that the human rights council puts all the council that they not only don't call out nations that abuse humans they put people who are human rights abusers on the council it is like taking a man who beats his wife and putting him on a community board to prevent domestic box I guess who else utilizes the U. N. human rights council not just human rights abusing states yes we're talking about the first half hour international Planned Parenthood foundation there also an NGO and you would think they be with the population fund other places like that which is rife with the funding abortion we also stopped funding that as the US government stopped funding that finally which pays for international portions which violates our laws also Mexico City policy but guess who guess who wants to make abortion a human right of course the international Planned Parenthood foundation we have to fight them here's Kristoff so you can all hear what he's doing did you mostly heard talk about individuals persecuted for their faith and but this is about fighting back on life at the human rights council if the U. N. the European center for law and justice for the poor thank you Mister president the shelves they would like to alert member states to the current time great to universal right to abortion indeed the human rights committee in its last drop general comments and article six on the right to life is trying to impose the legalization of abortion and euthanasia against the will of states parties against the letter of the text and in contradiction with its mandate the draft fails to mention the right to life of the unborn child and presses states to legalize abortion on demand and was out the meditations and the limits on abortion is seen by the committee as a potential violation of women's rights as to euthanasia the committee's openly promoting assisted suicide it is absurd and unacceptable to draw from the rights to life all rights to kill an innocent human being our rights to be killed the sales a must remind this committee that its job is to interpret the international covenant on civil and political rights not to create new rights or obligations article six was never intended to give grounds to the idea that the life of the unborn is not worth of protection quite the contrary interpreting the article in a way that creates our rights to abortion violates both the covenant and the Vienna convention on the law of treaties the sales a invites state parties and the committee to reaffirm that the rights to life the most precious one is to be promoted for every human being from conception to natural death thank you so there you have it that Chris off with with us in our studio today but actually at the United Nations I think even rights council standing up for life so your support for the work of our institutions allows us to do that so in Geneva or in San Francisco.

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

10:18 min | 2 years ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Our Facebook audience and periscope a Twitter we just a TV we just played a video of Kristoff of before the one of the U. N. bodies given what's called an oral intervention at world eventually you actually the only submit a written document you actually advocate you make it you make a an oral intervention we've been talking about Planned Parenthood but let me tell you this we've got our European center for law and justice has NGO status non government non governmental organizations that is officially before the United Nations now we fought for that it did not come easily it took us about two years to get it we had a fight and fight and fight I I'd conducted the final push on that and did the the of your quality hearing I guess of of our mission and we fought hard and we we got it we want but we had a fight for it and were able to do a lot of things you just saw a little bit of an on again if you were watching on Facebook periscope the interesting thing here is the the book that's been presented that our team has published out of our European center for law and justice which is comprehensive it's up to almost three hundred pages it's called law and prevention of abortion in Europe we've been talking about abortion the United States we're doing this on a global basis and the issue Christophe of abortion comes up within the United Nations contacted me it does come up in the United Nations correct of course wanting yeah go ahead now you've been talking of the plan turn to the opening since the beginning of the show and very active at the U. N. there are many NGOs planned parenthood Mario stops and other NGOs that are fighting for making an abortion the in international human rights as a matter of fact which is why it's important that's where we are there to fight back and in any most in any document the E. U. N. is potentially publishing they try to have the health meant my maternal health and sexual and reproductive rights included it so it's the vocabulary they're using to pushing abortion and they're doing everything they can to have every country allowing providing for for bush so family we talk about you know we talk about the halls of Congress you're you're you come up against Planned Parenthood all the time but you are you're one of our designated individuals with within the United Nations you're you're right in there too she's got the record on that no doubt about it had a team of five a just a few weeks ago it that New York the General Assembly arguing for religious liberty including the right to life Jay this is something I think is really important for members to hear one of the things that we hear all the time we were up at the General Assembly is look it's just too hard to get the world to pay attention to these issues issues of life issues of human rights Ajay what we tell them when they say that is let me show you a video or transcript of our European counterpart Kristoff inserting these issues into the chambers were just an NGO yet we make the case you are a member state there is no excuse for you not advocating for these issues just like we do J. Kristoff is absolutely right it's a regular issue but it is an up hill climb to get member states to engage on them it's white so important we have that consultation status you know one of the things during that we deal with on this and I want to get into the particulars of this you when you mean rights council of the United States pulled out of the you you when you when rights council yeah that's right the U. in the US pulled out of the U. N. human rights council in twenty eighteen for two reasons one because we do want to keep funding all these anti Israel resolutions and it was like a mini version of the general assembly's anti Israel anti US as we go through you know go through these members that are now on there even if you go through the current members that are on there I mean it's not like these three year like this Libya Sudan Venezuela who are new to it are the only bad actors on there you can go through and look at the say Angola Congo Democratic Republic calling I'm just not this really stable places Pakistan Afghanistan not stable you you look through and you say this is another reason why why are we spending all this money there and then you throw in a Libya which is a failed state Sudan which had the overthrow of a dictator who was wanted by the international criminal court for war crimes but now the overthrow of the dictator is a military dictatorship which is seen happen time and time again in these African countries so they're going to be on the rise of Venezuela starving their own people with Maduro who we don't even recognize as the leader and and they get elected now to room there's also another reason Kristoff brought this to my attention that the U. S. left which is a little more technical but it's pretty clear the human rights council decided that you have to have a two thirds vote of the forty seven to remove anyone from the council who is violating human rights so so what's the big there's more people on the council who are human rights violators than art yes so that means there's like so how does that work so in other words to remove somebody two thirds have to go ahead do you have to vote against this country so with the Arabic majority or if you just have to have some alliances and you you keep your seats and that the other thing is that there are forty seven seats and they have to have a balanced representation per region in the world so you have to have a thirteen people I guess from Africa about the same number from South America so they end up being compelled to elect violate human rights violators even rights violators make up a majority because of the two thirds Rockwell and in western Europe only get seven seats and Eastern Europe gets six Latin America and the Caribbean gets eight so they get they get more than western Europe we're include US is included in like western Europe so when you add up Eastern Europe Latin America Asia Pacific like China China is a lot of the dictatorships meet me a Myanmar others just keep going to that list and Africa which until about half the countries are dictatorships of or so or at least phony democracies even when there's been or for failed states like Libya is a failed state they have leaders but there's no leadership this is a war zone and again to day and also is it now a military dictatorship after finally getting rid of Omar al Bashir wanted for war crimes and crimes against humanity and genocide he's now being tried by the military that he wants let in Sudan but the military took power even though the people push them out and so that's not a good situation for the people you don't you west you looked at some of the statistics on the anti Israel aspect of us that was one of the reasons US withdrew and withdrew our dollars in the first year that the human rights council was organized two thousand and six all of their deliberations that first year two thousand six they only condemned one nation the entire year even though there were atrocities in mass killings in a lot of places like Sri Lanka and India and other places Libya that year they only condemn the nation of Israel in April of two thousand six a Palestinian suicide bomber blew himself up in a Tel Aviv restaurant for example killing eleven people ages sixteen to seventy three the Palestinian organization claimed it was self defense and because of that defense the human rights council took absolutely no action in its first ten years of existence the human rights council has condemned Israel sixty two times twelve years ago they have a a they have an agenda in it varies but there are certain Herman agenda items on the right skills item number seven every year when they meet is to examine the human rights abuses of Israel it is laughable that the human rights council puts on the council that they not only don't call out nations that abuse humans they put people who are human rights abusers on the council it is like taking a man who beats his wife and putting him on a community board to prevent domestic violence I guess who else utilizes the U. N. human rights council not just human rights abusing states yes we're talking about the first half hour international Planned Parenthood foundation there also an NGO and you would think they be with the population fund other places like that which are rife with the funding abortion we also stopped funding that as the US government stopped funding that finally which pays for international portions which violates our laws also Mexico City policy but guess who guess who wants to make abortion a human right of course the international Planned Parenthood foundation we have to fight them here's Kristoff so you can all hear what he's doing did you mostly heard talk about individuals persecuted for their faith and but this is about fighting back on life at the human rights council if the U. N. the European center for law and justice of the poor thank you Mister president the city has a would like to alert member states to the current temp great to universal right to abortion indeed the human rights committee in its last drop general comments and article six on the right to life is trying to impose the legalization of abortion and euthanasia against the will of states parties against the letter of the text and in contradiction with its mandates the draft fails to mention the right to life of the unborn child and presses states to legalize abortion on demand and was out the mutations and the limits on abortion is seen by the committee as a potential violation of women's rights as to euthanasia the committee's openly promoting assisted suicide it is absurd and unacceptable to draw from the rights to life all rights to kill an innocent human being our rights to be killed BCS A. must remind this committee that its job is to interpret the international covenant on civil and political rights not to create new rights or obligations article six was never intended to give grounds to the idea that the life of the unborn is not worth of protection quite the contrary interpreting the article in a way that creates our rights to abortion violates both the covenant and the Vienna convention on the law of treaties the survey invites state parties and the committee to reaffirm that the rights to life the most precious one is to be promoted for every human being from conception to natural death thank you so there you have it that Chris off with with us in our studio today but actually at the United Nations at the human rights council standing up for life so your support for the work of our institutions allows us to do that so in Geneva.

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Right. Thank you very much rang. A new group of migrants have been showing up at US borders says the president is threatening to throw out illegal immigrants starting next week. Let's find out. With this is all about from NBC News Radio. Correspondent Bill Zimmer who are these migrants that are showing up at the US border their new group. Yeah, they are coming from central Africa. And just to give you an idea domes reference on this from two thousand seven to twenty eight teen a total, a total of twenty five migrants over that eleven years span, we're taking into custody at the nine sectors on the US other border the border patrol areas there. So a total of twenty five over eleven years. Well in one reason week over five hundred were taken into custody along the southern border coming from basically Congo Democratic Republic of Congo, and Angola. This is a little bit unusual, of course, and at present so many problems at the southern border as well where we are used to those Central American migrants coming up through Mexico to the southern border. But now, you have people showing up who speak French, and Portuguese, so you need are. Other interpreters, you may need other documents in other languages for these people as well it, so it is creating not only overload of an already overtaxed system, but new problems as well. And there is an increasing fear that Ebola could be a problem. Now it's so far unfounded, but in the Democratic Republic of Congo, that's one of the spots where we have had Ebola outbreaks in two thousand nineteen so there's some new issues that border patrol is having to confront with these migrants coming over from central Africa. Well, that's awfully frightening. And why are they coming through the southern border wise? Why not somewhere else? The, the normal route of for these people wanting to get out of these countries is either to go to northern Africa and work their way into Europe. Well, a lot of those routes have been choked off due to restrictions Libya is, is one that they normally had gone to that has been restricted now and Turkey, believe it or not had been a common root for these people. Restrictions now in effect. They're cutting down on these passages across the Mediterranean. So now they're looking other ways. So what ends up happening here is they work their way to Angola. And then fly to Ecuador because there is no visa requirement in Ecuador. They can fly their visa free then take that normal route that we've seen from Central American migrants up to the southern border of the United States. Many of these people have valid asylum claims. They are trying to escape some terrible violence in that part of the world. And but still nonetheless, it is creating some interesting issues once again for an already overtaxed system. NBC News Radio. Correspondent bill. Thank you very much. Five thirty eight. Another American tourist is dead. After vacationing in the Dominican Republic a fifty five year old New Jersey man found dead in his room last Thursday at the terra Linda resort in the northern part of the Caribbean country. The man's brother Jason Allen has the family called for a wellness check after not hearing from I don't know who to blame and I and I rather not, you know, guess cause you, you drive, yourself crazy with that. But I do think that something is often thinking needs to be investigated and yeah, so NBC news reports. The man is the ninth American tourists mysteriously suddenly pass away while visiting the country. The string of death stretches back months and deaths are isolated to one location toxicology results for several of those tourists are still pending Ridgefield New Jersey police being credited for saving a man's life. Who is in this house that exploded yesterday morning to see this officer hug oop georgia'll was the first person on the scene. And he says they. Heard moaning from the back of the house. And so they started digging through the rubble define.

NBC Democratic Republic of Congo United States New Jersey Angola Africa Bill Zimmer Ecuador Dominican Republic Ebola Mexico Libya president Ridgefield Turkey Europe Mediterranean Jason Allen
"congo democratic republic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:32 min | 3 years ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Year the bras Ville declaration was agreed to help protect the area. And so I'm Lewis who led the discovery has been given nearly five million dollars of research funding to build up a detailed picture of the expanse. They're a treasure trove by diversity with some of the highest densities of lowland gorillas in the world. Living in swamp. Very high densities of forest elephants and the rest of diversity of the smaller animals. We don't know very much about. These are really unexplored region. So this probably huge variety of endemic fish and also small plans, but we don't really know anything about those because this is an area that we're just beginning to explore and it is a vast area, which is also unusual in terms of the footprint of humanity's behavior. Yeah. These swamps up pretty inhospitable environments for people, and they're really intact into the huge area. The area we MAC of peatland. That's permanently underwater is around one hundred forty five thousand square kilometers. So to put that in context, roughly the size of England is extraordinary to think of that amount to explore now, you came on the program a couple of years ago, we're gonna put a link on the website. You gave a wonderful description you and you'll call Greta dog of finding this area and exploring it, but you since then you've got a huge amounts of money to go back and really dig into it in a meaningful way when we'd put the numbers together. And we did field work and used satellite data to extrapolate. We saw the north area of forested peatland, but we didn't know very much more about it apart from our central estimate was there was about thirty billion tons of carbon locked up in the Pete, and that's round three years worth of fossil fuel emissions of the entire globe. So really important to keep it there. If we're going to meet climate change commitments. Now, we have a big uncertainty on that he could be much lower than that could be much higher than that centrist. So we really need to understand a bit more about it to more feel work. Explore more areas across the enormous. Region. And then if we want to influence policy about what happens to this region that we need to not only know that it's there and carbon stored and how big it is. But we also need to understand how it functions. So is that Cobb and stable what happens if people go in and log it what happens if people go in and start trying to do agriculture. What's going to happen to the bite of us can happen to the carbon? So we have a interdisciplinary team ranging from ecologists who study the past. So we want to know how this peeling formed in the first place and it began forming around ten thousand years ago, and then slowly pitas been accumulating carbon. It's been taken out of the atmosphere. And then we need to understand better about the distribution of carbonated distribution of the swamp over the central Congo basin. Twin expeditions over a wide area. And then we need really detailed understanding of the processes, so. How much common is coming from the atmosphere into the trees? And then how common is then being transferred into the into the Pete into the carbon in the soil and to do that we have detailed measurements every month. We have people going into this warmth to make these measurements. So it's a fairly continuous. Monitoring. We need to understand not just when I've been there in the dry season when you can easily walk on the peatland we need to go in in the west season. And see what it's like then. So we get a picture of the whole annual cycle. And then we can use this data to build a mathematical representation of appeal, and so we need to build a simulation of the peatland inside the computer. I mean, it sort of goes to the heart of all this biodiversity stuff. We're talking about in the program that knowledge is so important you actually have to go there and do very tedious possibly sometimes even difficult measurements. But that's the only way, you know. What's to preserve? Yeah. We're scientists we have to make measurements. We have to observe the real world as we see it. And then we have to try and understand it and understand the processes to then build our simulation in the computer. And that is sensual because if for example is the climate changes, we need to know if that Cobb and the stool. Is stable and we can only do that. If we build a version of a simplified version of this peatlands inside global climate change models to see the impacts simile. If government policy is to start having logging concessions on some of these peelings, we need to know what happens when you start to build roads through them. How do you affect the flows of water in his reading could you kill Jerry's of peatland by building roads in the region. And we can only do that. If we have these measurements on the ground to start with the description, you gave us time was of this sort of untouched area. But there are people there, but it would be that kind of development that would change things. How true is that rich description is actually their development going on? It is very on isolated remote and currently intact ecosystem, and there are very small numbers of people living because there's not much dry land for people to live on. And then most people official folk in a us. Using the peatlands in a sustainable manner. But once we publish the map, lots of people started contacting me saying did I know about this plan for the future or this other plan for the future. Whether it was potential logging concessions in the Democratic Republic, Congo oil exploration concessions and plantations for oil palm in the Republic of Congo. Now, what we've seen in the tropics in another large area of peatland in Indonesia has been an environmental disaster. On Indonesia's recognizes environmental disaster because they have drained peatlands is enormous carbon emissions and in the dry season. When it's very dry, the catch fire, and when it's really dry like years like in two thousand fifteen sixteen there was fire across Indonesia that led to Hoffa million people going to Austin across the region with spiritually problems now then trying to re wet there peelings to stop those negative environmental problems and to slow down the damage this being done and in Congo Republican Congo Democratic Republic, there's a chance to do things really differently. But that's where by scientists and the wider international community needs to come in and really help these two countries to do development in a different way that these countries can develop without the destruction is going with it in places like Indonesia, so I'm Lewis professor of global change science that leads unit. Versity on a project on very follow one of the fundamental lessons from the diversity assessment. Is that nature is how friend we heard of one example of that from Australia and only the weeds, I should call them. So cold weeds good for the soil because they stabilize it. Georgina Kenyans report begins by a small dam, stabilized, willow trees..

peatland Congo Indonesia Congo Democratic Republic Pete Cobb Lewis Australia Greta England Democratic Republic Jerry professor Hoffa official Austin
"congo democratic republic" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:58 min | 3 years ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Providing greater care for greater Cincinnati after back to back road games last week, the Bearcats next two games are at home Sunday against Wichita state. That's a one o'clock tip at fifth third arena. Then next Thursday against UCF the preseason favorite in the conference. That'll be a seven o'clock game a week from Thursday. And we'll be back here at the Montgomery in boathouse. Next Monday night for another episode of the Cronin radio show. All right time for questions from the audience. Here we go pay attention. This is the question of the people. What? You're representing the people. On the bench. This is not about the non scholarship players again. Okay. But on the bench. There's you. There's like a bunch of coaches, and then they're the players aren't out on the floor. And then there's some other gods. Right. Who are those other guys ready? I'm ready because people all around me think they know and they make up all these names. I wanna know for sure who they are on behalf of the people some of the people on behalf of the people. So on the end, you would have the most important people that keep us healthy. Gene. Our trainer Dr Mike Don worth who? Who is our team doctor who used to there's pictures of Mike with no shirt on in the front row. You see games in the nineties, by the way, our team doctor? Cheer cheer, wildly at the old shoe, then you would have Mike Ray felt our strength and conditioning coach you jakulan Parker. Who's who's a staff member can't be called a coach former player, obviously, then TJ Wolff? Who's our academic lays on on our staff played for me at Murray state does a tremendous job. And then the last one we Mark burger non coach who's assistant to the head coach who's got the worst job in the world because he's gotta be near me all the time. And here every time I'm upset. But he does a tremendous job for us. So the other three guys would be assistant coaches. So those are the guys that you would be referring to anybody behind me would be security. And then if there was a guy even further behind me that was wearing two different shoes exit Houston. Was he lost one of his shoes? Those are not the gentlemen to whom. I am. Well, there's nobody else. Yes there. There are some guys who don't play every week, and they have bear cat stuff on who are. You're talking about players. Yes, you're talking about prince Gilliam and Hartnett. Now, tell me when they'll be a redshirt eligible. They will be able to play next eligible to play this year, and we should expect from them. Well, I would I would tell you liquid net is a tough hard nosed guys a great passer. He's six eight. He's got a great attitude. Great personality. Tremendous team guy won two straight state titles at no. In maryland. Okay. So then prince Gilliam is six six and a half six seven explosive offensive player, and he was in high school in Fresno, California. He's from the Congo Democratic Republic of the Congo as well. So they're both red shirt this year. It's hard to play thirteen guys in in basketball. So we so I just you know, we we try to develop guys there's no point in wasting a year. But when it comes to redshirt in our program, that's a player choice. We're not football where we put Richard. You know, it's different there. Eighty five scholarships in basketball. Those those were both player choices on those guys part. Cindy are the people satisfied. The people are sad people rested their case. Got furthest back is a guy that had two different shoes on it to Houston game because he left one of his shoes at the hotel in Memphis would be my dad. Thought about purchasing new dress shoes in Houston at the next destination. But I think I helped talk him out of it. No, he was definitely going to do it until I've remembered that he had my coat with my American Express in it. And once I got that back this. He was not going for the notion. Houston. You answered the wrong question. Extremely well. Before then we got around understanding that it was about the redshirt about the tremendous staffed. Yeah. Exactly now, I actually have a follow up. Police. Hold on for just a second. When it comes to the people immediately next to you. So Darren Savino is typically in that first seat right next to you. Mark burgers, often in the next seat. Is there rhyme or reason there do you want this coach there that coach in the next spot? Does that matter? Well, DARREN'S always been the, you know, it doesn't aided Steeler of calls from the other bench. So that would be the guy closest so he has a point. Yep. Clear line of sight of the other coach calling plays marks. It. Mark's been with me for a long time. And he's giving me foul. Trouble and substitution. I knew I liked you compared to Bella check for a reason. Still in signals. Yeah. So. You know, so Antoine Jackson scouted. We break it up. And it's just so happened. You know, he's always had Houston in Memphis. So he hit a lot of work this week. He did a tremendous job on both games. All right Elise. Your next that people are out. Starting to feel like I'm on trial. Here you starting to feel like Michael Corleone godfather to. I don't know who that Elise..

Houston prince Gilliam basketball Mike Ray Memphis Wichita state Mark burger Cincinnati UCF Cronin Congo Democratic Republic Montgomery Dr Mike Don Darren Savino Congo Bearcats TJ Wolff Elise maryland Antoine Jackson
"congo democratic republic" Discussed on FT World Weekly

FT World Weekly

12:56 min | 3 years ago

"congo democratic republic" Discussed on FT World Weekly

"You know, I certified management accountants worked so well with robots because we both love bowling, karaoke nights, taco Tuesdays. And actually, it's because you can crunch numbers faster than any human being could which means Siham as like meek and set strategy and make decisions faster than we ever could. And that my friend is why we worked together like hand and glove except hand as an office and glove dozen. Yeah. Well, hand has a CNA and glove doesn't so the CNA certification. You've got earn it. Visit CNA certification dot org for details. Hello and welcome to world weekly from the financial times. I'm getting Rachman today. We're looking at a country in the midst of dangerous political crisis. I'm talking not about Britain or the US, but Congo Democratic Republic of Congo held presidential elections last month, which briefly held out the prospect of a peaceful political transition in a country with a tragic recent history, but it appears that the elections have been stone and the country is now once again poised on the brink of disorder joining me here in the studio east Africa correspondent Tom Wilson on the line Africa editor David pilling chum. A lot of the evidence of fraud has actually come from research by the F T. Can you explain what you found? Yep. Suddenly said last week last Thursday to be specific the Congolese electoral commission announced that opposition leader Felix shisha caddy had won the vote defeating the president could be happening success and not of the opposition celebrated. That is a great victory is. It's the first time inferior opposition nita's defeated or one presidential election, and it could have led to the first transition of power at the ballot box. But almost immediately alarm bell started to be raised specifically by the Catholic church, which ran the biggest election observation mission in the country. They had already been briefing diplomats at that point that in fact, a different opposition leader Martin for you had one and the day after the electoral commission announced their results, they came out publicly on the record and stated that the electoral commissions tallies. Did not reflect the information that it had gathered from forty thousand observers around the country. So Mr. for you took that information and petitioned the constitutional court immediately calling for a recount of the vote, and those a lot of reaction among the diplomatic and political sphere in Congo financial times along with two other meteorologists nations then received a data from a whistle blower purporting to be the files downloaded from the electoral commissions sensual vote. Database. We analyze those and found that Mr. for you to one fifty nine point four percent of the vote, according to that data defeating the proclaimed Witter features to Kenny by a massive margin. He anyone nineteen percent of the vote. According to those figures why USA conference because a rod those figures run to forty nine thousand lines of code. I used 'electronic voting machines. Exactly they did for the first time the electoral commission introduce toy voting machines in December. Ironically, the opposition candidate for you to in particular, criticized the potential use of those machines warning that they might be used to rig the vote. The irony is that it seems that those voting machines may deliver Mr. for you do the transparency's now demanded because we're told that the data leak that we've received are the 'electronic tallies that was stored by those voting machines and sent to a central database the whistleblower that we spoke to confirmed there had been downloaded from that database, and then our data analyst here at the F T was able to process them number one. On the way in which the data was presented the volume of the data the orderly way in which the figures had been laid out on the page, the use of commerce separated values all let strongly to the idea that this has been exported from listing system would have been very very hard to Tampa with. But most importantly, we were then able to run that data against the tallies that the Catholic church is observers had made an even though the Catholic churches tallies represented a sample of forty three percent of the vote so not all voting stations. But forty three percent randomly distributed across the country. We found it almost direct correlation with the results from the purportedly. Okay. So you're satisfied that the F T and others have. Now nailed the Lexus effectively being stone. Do you think anything will happen now, or do you think that this fraud in lection, ultimately is likely to stand that is the million dollar question right now? And it's a hugely pivotal moment for Congo. It's probably not helpful to guess. But I think we'll be need to consider the fact that the power now sits with the constitutional court which has to validate the announced results within one to two weeks. That constitutional court was set up by President Kabila it stacked with Kabila loyalists. And so people's confidence that that court would then decide to overrule the electoral commissions decision and either corporate recounts rerun of the election is very very low. It would be unprecedented in Congo. It wouldn't be unprecedented in Africa. The Kenyan constitutional court did exactly that in the last election. But in Congo, people main very skeptical whether that's possible and David I mean, looking bit further back I in Congo has had really a very tragic history. More or less since independence. And indeed the statistics of the numbers of people who've died or lost a lot of direct or indirect in war in Congo already. Staggering on them they are. And I think it's important that to realize that congress had a tragic history, not in a sense dependence. But before independence, I mean, remember this was the position of king Leopold. The second postal position. And it was turned into a giant rubber plantation where farmers who didn't meet their quotas had their arms chopped off. This has been a nation that was brutalized run from the start and had a very difficult birth and said really the modern world of the modern nation state with almost no graduates because even though it was taken over by Belgium as a former colonial Leopold still a very brutalized place. And so yes, it's had a very difficult history. It's a vast country two-thirds the size of Europe with virtually no roads, very difficult to get around. So you have different groups in different parts of the country ready with very little interaction. And there's been lots of militias has been lots of outside interference. There's been lots of interest in Congo because of its vast mineral resources, and so the extractive relationship that Congo has suffered at the hands of the rest of the world has really continued into the modern age, and that is what. Congo suffers from now you've really had in the sense kind of collusion between the elites that control Congo or control bits of it because you can never really control the whole country and outside interests, which have been more interested in congas mineral resources, it's copper an increasingly it's cobalt, which is running our iphones, and we'll run our electric cars. So it's not still essentially the background explanation for why Mr Kabila is unwilling to cede power to somebody who would actually cost him out of infants because there's so much money at stake. I think so yes, I mean, Mr Kabila has been in past seventeen years. I think he's got used to it. I think maybe he could disappear and he'd be fine. But there's a whole entourage around him whose wealth whose position really depends on the patronage networks that he has set up and for them. There would be nothing worse than a genuine change of a thirty. And so I think there's been an unholy. Struggle to stay in power. And if they can't stay in power than to make sure that they can control whoever is in power, nothing that as the backdrop to what's been going on, and Tom obviously the moment, it looks like Martin Luther was the person who won and to a lot of hopes would be invested in if somehow he could emerge as the Victor. And yet Congo has had a history of people coming to power, indeed Kabila's father and people saying well at lost as a political change. And then the next ruler wasn't that much better? And some people have raised question marks about fire, you lose relationship to very rich businessmen. And so on you know, the man what you make of him. All mine to actions with Mr. feeder to date of demonstrated that he seems to be a man of character. He had a career in the private sector for thirty years. He worked for Exxon Mobil for most of that time returned to Congo to start a political career to stop to the millennium was elected to parliament in two thousand six and since then it's been a very staunch and quite an honorable critic of the government's the first time I met him. It was in a tiny political party office with no electricity. He was sitting in the dark shuffling papers doing the typical day to day. Grunt welcome politics. And that is really what he's done for most of the last decade. And he was only really thrust into the limelight in the past twelve months as a potential consensus candidate for this office group of political opponents, and I do believe that that is potentially his strength. And there's no telling what he would be like as the president yet. And we all know the potential of power to corrupt and change us. But the one of the potential opportunities for. Congress. The fact that on coming to power didn't have a huge support base. He was a consensus candidate. And thus he would have to rule and govern in a conciliatory inclusive way David Geffen without some took Leamy. What about the argument that Congo after all these years of war exploitation, and it's huge size that you mentioned is lack of infrastructure, essentially, it's almost ungovernable I suppose that is one way of putting it it certainly a very hard task for anybody. And however Gouda person mutton failure is an I don't know him. So I can't vouch me. But even if he were an absolutely impeccable leader with a good plan, you know, he'd be taking on a hugely difficult task. We also have to remember that to some extent he is representing the people who are behind him, for example, moist consume be who was the governor of ca- Tanga state note, Mr. cocoon big was very close to Joseph Kabila. President until they fell out and some people say that Mr. zombie is a very good businessman. Ran ca tangle well, other say he's pretty much cut from the same cloth. One shouldn't expect too much more from him than others. So all I'm saying is don't hold your breath. Both in terms of the groups who have come forward to seize power, and in terms of the country that they will be faced with because as you've mentioned the has some of the worst statistics in terms of child mortality in terms of longevity and crippled health service and a very poor school system. It's really a very difficult place. I suppose one could say is that half properly governed the only way is up, and there are resources, I mean resources have been the curse of many countries. But that is a wealth in Congo that properly harnessed does provide a basis, of course, it's. The Congo river, huge hydroelectric potential, for example, if you had these leadership you could begin to turn the country around, and it's so big and so important that that could be very influential for the whole continental. So that made the whole southern and central part of the continent, which raises come doesn't it? The question of will waters, the rest of the southern half of the continent regional leads Asians make up on this because it's in nobody's interest to have a massive failed state there is there any sign that they're going to try to intervene, or is it just too much to take on so far the messages have been completely mixed. The starting point would be to say that if any of the regional groups the African Union or the Southern African Development community came forward and demanded on mass recount that would be quite unprecedented in Africa for the African governments to turn normally the policy is we don't interfere in elections unless there have been serious human rights violations for them to step in and challenge. What on the face of dukes like an opposition victory? Anyway, would be unusual that said. Clearly elements within the African landscape who are not happy with what they've seen was particularly mixed messages coming out of South Africa, where there appears to be a split between president Ramaphosa who would appear to be more open to an intervention, according for a recount and members of his foreign ministry who have seemed to side more strongly with the regime in the interest of maintaining stability, we will know much much more after Thursday when Sadak and the other regional groups will meet to the African Union that's going to be an absolutely vital meeting and whatever statement comes out of that will have huge impact. Okay. And find what from you, David. I mean, it's notoriously hard to predict how these things are going to play out. But it looks like this is a new period of instability for Congo, which historically has ended in violence is

Congo President Kabila Democratic Republic of Congo president Congo river Catholic church fraud Africa US Tom Wilson Martin Luther Congolese electoral commission congress David Siham African Union