35 Burst results for "Confederations"

"confederations" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

03:51 min | 7 months ago

"confederations" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Was that, hey, everybody's going to vote in favor of this because see if I make money from world cups and that's money that gets redistributed to the nations. Pink Victor had a slightly more nuanced view on this on the entire planet. Everybody's focusing on one thing, right? The two year World Cup. You know, whereas there's a whole menu of things here that we need to discuss. Primarily the calendar, you know, everything is underpinned by a proper calendar. You know, and the two year woke up, we've given our feedback to FIFA. We these are the questions we need to answer. How does that affect the ecosystem that we currently have in our confederation? Because a lot of things we didn't have 5 years ago on concrete gap, but now we have Nations League a more robust gold cup, a more robust champion state. How does that affect our ecosystem? I'm not going to scream at the top of my lungs to say, you know, it's the worst idea in the history of man. I just want to know, I just need to know this information. And to be honest with you, these are discussions we've had even along the way. We used to have a Confederations Cup, got pulled away. Confederations Cup was a big deal in my confederation, because it gave something to the winner of the gold cup to go to. You know, we even had discussions 5 years ago about a global nation. You know, some of the confederations around the table. And that kind of died down, but, you know, some of those principles were well worth discussing. So I think the principle of having something between the current World Cup cycles that is a national team event that is a FIFA event, whatever you want to call it, I think that principle, I'm not sure too many of the people around the table were rejected. He laid out an idea and you know he was clear to say this, these are my ideas. So if you have other ideas, please share them with me. And it's one thing to say, you don't agree with his ideas. And there's something that I don't agree with. Absolutely. But it's something to just set there and just say you don't agree with it, but not also sort of invest in the dialog because I think as a sport, we need to invest in a dialog. Some of it has to be disruptive as well. Because disruptive dialog has always good. And the sport has a history of that. I mean, look, we still have no substitutes in the game of football. Then we went to one. Then we went to three and now it took a pandemic to get the 5. Right? The slow football moves. We need to survive. We need to have these dialogs. You know, we've been clear with FIFA. We not only said listen, you know, the principles of dialog and the principles that they're trying to change. I think I have no issues with. Do I have issues with certain things? I'll give an example, specific example. On the whole calendar with a 7 matches and one month for us a Concacaf, that's going to be problematic. I want because one month doesn't work. It needs to be spread out a little bit more. And also, you know, right now, the member associations have ten matches a year that their national team can play. Going to 7 is a reduction of 30% on your inventory. Can you tell me any other stakeholder in football that is reducing their inventory by 30%? It's absolutely for me. That's a non starter. Now, reducing the windows that those ten matches are played, that's a different story. Because that then hits on the issue of less travel for the players, mandatory rest period. I'm all for that. And some of the concerns that have been brought forward by a lot of my peers and colleagues are absolutely valid. But I don't feel anyway, that FIFA has rejected those concerns. In fact, I've heard not only arson, but I heard the president say, hey, listen. I'm not here to force anything done anybody. So I have my opinion, but I need to hear from my members. And so I think some members are spoken louder than others. Fair enough. But I think everybody's starting to have their turn, including the stakeholders, clubs, leagues. Whatever..

Confederations Cup Pink Victor FIFA Nations League World Cup gold cup football
 Sponsors asked to defend support for Beijing Winter Olympics

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 8 months ago

Sponsors asked to defend support for Beijing Winter Olympics

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting sponsors have been asked to defend support for the Beijing winter Olympics Human Rights Watch has asked leading sponsors of the Beijing winter Olympics to explain why they remain largely silent about alleged human rights abuses in China in an online briefing the rights group said it reached out to all but one of the I. O. C. so called top sponsors in lengthy letters almost six months ago the only reply came from Ali ons last month saying we stand behind the Olympic movement earlier this week the international trade union confederation issued a scathing report alleging genocide and crimes against humanity in the Xinjiang region of northwest China the Beijing games open February fourth hi Mike

Mike Rossi Beijing Winter Olympics Human I. O. C. Winter Olympics Beijing International Trade Union China ALI Olympic Xinjiang Mike
 Tens of thousands demonstrate in Rome against neo-fascists

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 9 months ago

Tens of thousands demonstrate in Rome against neo-fascists

"Tens of thousands of union members and other Italians gathered in Rome to stand up against rising fascism the week off the right wing extremists forced their way into the headquarters of Italy's most powerful labor confederation while protesting a covert nineteen certification requirements for work places the head of the CGIL union confederation led the protests with other labor leaders under the slogan never again fascism organizer is to put the crowd assembled in front of the St John Lateran basilica for the protest a hundred thousand strong some participants waved flags reading seedbox a direct retort to the protesters armed with sticks and metal bars who trashed C. G. I. els Rome headquarters on the ninth of October they

Cgil Rome St John Lateran Basilica Italy C. G. I. Els
Study: 2.7 million European Union workers can't afford heat

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 9 months ago

Study: 2.7 million European Union workers can't afford heat

"According to labor organizations study released almost three million European union workers comp for two to heat their homes amid a rise in energy prices the European trade union confederation which represents a forty five million members says that fifteen percent of the E. U.'s working poor equivalent of nearly three million people lacks enough money to turn on the heating wholesale prices for gas and electricity have surged across Europe raising the prospect of increases in already high utility bills and further painful people could took a financial hit from the corona virus pandemic I'm sorry I shockingly

European Trade Union European Union Europe
We Will Never Know What Was Said During the Constitutional Convention

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:16 min | 10 months ago

We Will Never Know What Was Said During the Constitutional Convention

"In today's time it's easy to feel disconnected to the brilliant so the clairvoyance or the wisdom of our founding fathers or the framers september seventeenth. Seventeen eighty seven was the last day of a heated constitutional convention that lasted almost the entire summer and went from may twenty fifth to september seventeenth. Hundred eighty seven. It was held in private and and secret. George washington presided over the chair as the chair of the constitutional convention. Now we have some notes from the constitutional convention but most of the back and forth debate and the commentary. We will never know exactly what was set alexander hamilton john. Jay james madison. They were going at it. You see the articles in confederation at articles of confederation which were written after the successful revolution or separation from the british. Were posing problems there. Shays rebellion inability to commerce between states to mint currency. It became more and more clear that some form of a federal government was necessary. The question is what kind of government do we want to form

Alexander Hamilton John Jay James Madison George Washington Shays
September 17, 1787: The History Behind This Significant Day

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:57 min | 10 months ago

September 17, 1787: The History Behind This Significant Day

"Today is a day that every single child in school should take pause and be leads through and told the great american story of how we got here. Today is a beautiful day. There's a lot wrong with our country right now and i wanna take a pause to remember what happened on this day in seventeen. Eighty seven september seventeenth. Seventeen eighty seven was one of the most significant days in human history. It was definitely one of the most significant days in political history. Almost never before had this idea of self government been tried. The romans tried it in some capacity and failed and eventually became an empire. The greek strident and city states. But never before. Did a people attempt to embark on a form of government. We're the people were the sovereign. The idea of self government independent judiciary the ideas of freedom and equality in the rule of law that are the ultimate principles to build that society. In today's time it's easy to feel disconnected to the brilliant so the clairvoyance or the wisdom of our founding fathers or the framers september seventeenth. Seventeen eighty seven was the last day of a heated constitutional convention that lasted almost the entire summer and went from may twenty fifth to september seventeenth. Hundred eighty seven. It was held in private and and secret. George washington presided over the chair as the chair of the constitutional convention. Now we have some notes from the constitutional convention but most of the back and forth debate and the commentary. We will never know exactly what was set alexander hamilton john. Jay james madison. They were going at it. You see the articles in confederation at articles of confederation which were written after the successful revolution or separation from the british. Were posing problems there. Shays rebellion inability to commerce between states to mint currency. It became more and more clear that some form of a federal government was necessary. The question is what kind of government do we want to form now. A sloppy way to talk about the american stories say we had two founders one in seventeen seventy six and one in seventeen eighty seven that is not true there is an a divine connection between the truths of the declaration of independence and the laws of the constitution of the united states

Alexander Hamilton John Jay James Madison George Washington Shays United States
"confederations" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

03:22 min | 10 months ago

"confederations" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"And certainly like a woman could sue that they're violating your constitutional right. And i think rovers wade was decided wrongly but to the extent that it is the president. Then i think that they would win. That texas overstepped. And i've always felt that these laws that go so far as to effectively ban abortion or very close to banning abortion are meant to spark an overreaction vat that the federal like doma than the supreme court said. The defense of marriage act is so wrong that we're not allowing even states to regulate marriage like that which is a tenth of violation. I really feel like this is asking the supreme court to say a state cannot. Although they ca- they previously have broad powers to regulate abortion. I think this will be an opportunity for the supreme court who isn't hearing it. At this time for procedural reasons they will hear it and and when they hear it. I don't think it will stand up to scrutiny. However the way it's being approached by the biden administration merrick garland the department of justice sued texas right now and said that law meads to be negated because it is in itself unconstitutional. And i don't know it was very hard for me to see what they were saying. They saying that a judge couldn't hear the civil cases or the law to be thrown away like that's a tricky one. And how would the department of justice enforce anything. Would they send in a national guard. The fbi like it's very tricky to have enforcement from the federal government on a state law. You know it's a little talking like would they send the national guard civil rights desegregating schools. Like what would what is their remedy. Some of the things that we're talking about is that they would take away federal funding to those states anyway. I've got a few more things that are going to fall out of this. But what's your reaction so far. No my reaction is hearing you describe the law as it is. I will first off. It's good to hear that it's because they like to play it as it's very against the women so they like they're suing the women that's how the the media is playing the law whereas it's against abortion providers and they can't see the women i think right. Yeah and so. That's how the media wants you to think it is. It's attacking the women directly. So the but i'm struck by how freaking crafty it is. It's very funny. There is a guy. I think his name might have been john mitchell but i could be getting that wrong where he's like being credited as being mr crafty here and that the intention was to craft their way out of constitute you know so that they can have an unconstitutional law. That couldn't be struck down. Upfront it is crafty. It is i. I can though the brain brainpower that goes into it. Yes it was good and the fact that it's gotten this far unless it's a setup and under other circuses. It wouldn't get that far because you normally don't have standing and that's important like you can't you can't just willy nilly fight other people's lawsuits for them to people can't fight the same suit so whoever files the suit. I has dibs on the ten thousand dollars that they're allowed to kind of soothe abortion provider for. It's it's weird. I don't think it's gonna hold up. You have probably won't but still i. I appreciate the craft. That's that's fascinating..

rovers wade supreme court biden administration merrick garland department of justice texas mr crafty fbi federal government john mitchell
"confederations" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"confederations" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Real young. Look that nine players twenty three or under you see. There's a real lack of cats a real lack of experience in this team. The one thing. I think we have to point out here in terms of why the big boys aren't here. You look at the schedule this turn it wraps on august first the premier league the bundesliga though season start her on august thirteenth. So if you're a player and you're to be with this team you would be missing. Significant parts of eric important preseason. I don't think though this gives us less reasons to watch. I think there's a real sense of urgency for guys if we are going to call this a bt mercy team then spots eighteen to twenty three when it comes to those world cup qualifiers. You're looking at names like roll down the jet a cost a cannon guys who you know are probably going to get called up. But what's their role here they're going to have to dominate here. They're going to have to lay claim to one of those final spots on the roster. The other thing that i think is interesting when we start calling this team is it does throw a little shade. Probably deservedly so with the gold cup itself. I remember tournaments. Two thousand thirteen two thousand seventeen mexico's involved in the confederations cup. And when mexico would send a team it really took some of the star power really took some of the meaning out of this tournament. I don't know that the us men's national team is disrespecting the gold cup but by not sending the eighteen. They're certainly making it less important. That's a topic of conversation in the circles of mexican press today. Why is the united states. Men's national team sending this second rate team in there is. Why aren't they forced to sunday. First rate team in eighteen like the mexican nash teams of the past. You mentioned you mentioned what was copa america. All these different tournaments where they had to send their b squad to play and what was the fallout gold cup. Well that's not the case here. I will argue back then. You had something to play for. You had half a ticket to was the confed cup. You don't have that anymore. So essentially you put up with this tournament out of thin air and you say it's to increase relevancy in zone for these smaller countries to help these neighboring countries with his the cap nations league you have that tournament. The eighteen plays in that they actually went for the us. Men's national team and now greg has a choice. What do i do with this congestive calendar. Where do with these players who are still trying to win themselves. They position in europe athar club teams in my eyes. He made the correct sison. Yeah look the gold. Cup has a lot to compete with european championships. Go by medica. Now we throw in the nation's league and it makes it a tougher and tougher event to get excited about still though her lots to play for here. Let's talk about the players who may have the most to gain.

gold cup confederations cup mexico us eric confed cup copa athar club greg medica europe
Karim Benzema Earns Real Madrid Draw Against Chelsea

ESPN FC

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Karim Benzema Earns Real Madrid Draw Against Chelsea

"The back of the english newspapers dominated by chelsea's one one draw against rambler. We can pull this off a young a lot on the back. Page and stop in spain. Marker going with a draw to keep dreaming meanwhile benz emma is. It was an interesting game wasn't in the spanish capital dominated once again from a strike as perspective about team verners. Miss chances yagan thomas to coming out afterwards and saying you know this. Is this kind of life. This is what's happening with him at the moment. How much trust have you within him again. That he can find the back of the net once again. Maybe soon i've total trust in him because he knows where to be in the right time and right now maybe there. He misses one and that specific moment. So so that's something to deal with for strike. Oh and you have to kind of just think about the next opportunity comes along like you know michael jordan said so he missed more shots than east called and t-mobil no. It's just like you know if you fail moments it makes you only stronger and the kit is good. The kid has a tremendous amount of drive and talent and he knows where the ball will fall in the box and he can also know makes things happen himself of his speed and going at people. So i'm i totally have trust. And t mobile. He will go through that stage and who knows. Maybe he's causing the next game in the second leg or he's goals in the final of the champions league you know. He was very young when he was twenty. One being meaning the golden boot at the confederations cup in russia in two thousand seventeen and he scored one hundred goals in the gym bundestag already. And he's only twenty five to kit is good and a kid will prove it but obviously it has to deal with the criticism when you miss a big chance. That's normal night. Goalkeepers do as well when they make a mistake. You know the the all over them but I hope that he gets plenty of opportunities going forward.

Benz Emma Yagan Thomas Chelsea Spain Michael Jordan Mobil Russia
A History of the Industrialization and Commercialization of Niagara Falls

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:08 min | 1 year ago

A History of the Industrialization and Commercialization of Niagara Falls

"And we're going to start off with a little bit of a brief history of industrialization and commercialization at niagara because this whole barrel trip was part of a much bigger story of tourism and dare-devils at this natural wonder so niagara falls is a collection of three waterfalls on the border between the united states and canada ontario. On the canadian side and new york on the us side in. They're on the niagara river between lake erie. lake ontario. the falls are the horseshoe falls the american falls. And the bridal veil falls sometimes horseshoe falls is known as canadian falls. Most of the horseshoe falls on the canadian side of the border. Paul american falls and bridal veil falls are both in. The united states horseshoe. Falls is the biggest of the three. It's the one that's shaped like a horseshoe like its name suggests and it's what comes to mind for a lot of people when you say niagara falls. Yeah it's impressive in persons. It's it does have sort of the iconic aspect to it. The area around niagara falls has been home to a number of iraq orient speaking indigenous peoples leading up to the seventeenth century. A confederation known as the neutral lived on what would become the canadian side of the river. And this name comes from the french describing them as neutral in conflicts between other iroquois nations and confederation so this is a guess it pronunciation because we couldn't find a clear one but the When roaring on or winrow lived on the other side and the neutral confederation and the wind row were allies until sixteen thirty nine after that a combination of wars epidemics and other factors led to both of them being dispersed by and absorbed into other iroquois tribes and nations. There are descendants of these people. Surely living still today but there's a whole complicated history of all the various iroquois and peoples that are not a monolith so some people wound up going completely different parts of the country other sort of made their way into other tribes and nations.

Niagara Falls Paul American United States American Falls Niagara River Horseshoe Falls Lake Ontario Niagara Lake Erie Ontario Winrow Canada New York Iraq
"confederations" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"confederations" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"A And 11 after eight. Let's do our today in history for February, 9th In 17 78. Rhode Island became the fourth U. S state to ratify the articles of confederation. That was the advance of the Uh, the Well, move we got now Constitution. 18 25 After no candidate got a majority of electoral votes in the U. S presidential election of 18 24. The House of Representatives elected John Quincy Adams. As president of the U. S. 18 61 of the American Civil War. Jefferson Davis was elected provisional president of the Confederate States of America. By the Confederate convention in Montgomery, Alabama. 18 70 U. S president Ulysses Grant. Signed a joint resolution of Congress establishing the U. S. Weather Bureau. 18 89 president Grover Cleveland signed a bill elevating the Department of Agriculture to a Cabinet level agency. 18 95 William G. Morgan created a game called Men to net. Would soon came to be referred to as volleyball. Internet. Why they call it that. In 1900. The Davis Cup competition was established. 1942 in World War two, The Joint Chiefs of Staff held their first formal meeting to coordinate the activities of the U. S. Army and Navy. 18 42 year round. Daylight saving time. Also known in his war time is reinstated in the U. S. As a wartime measure to help conserve energy resource is In 1950 the second red scare, US Senator Joseph McCarthy accused the U. S Department of State of being filled with Communists. It was quite a big thing back in the early fifties. By the way, I was a little kid, but I remember that calling everyone out at as a communist. Oh, yeah. Anybody didn't agree with them, You know now what do they call him? Fascist your fascist Now then you're a communist. 1964 remember this to the back. We've got it on our Web page. The Beatles made their first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show. Performing before a record setting audience of 73 million viewers across the U. S. Well, actually, the one on our block is the Elvis video. It's got all them. Okay. Got a bunch of different people that appeared on the Ed Sullivan show. But this is waiting. Nettles made their debut today's In What year? Was it 1964? Yeah, well, they made their debut on the edge, Sullivan show. Yeah, and it was a huge deal back then. 1971 Satchel Paige became the first Negro League player to be voted into the US's Baseball Hall of Fame. I saw him pitch in an exhibition game in California when I Was a kid and came back from Japan. And we spent a day in San Francisco, and they had the We got what? I think the team was a San Francisco seals or something like that. And they played an exhibition game a bunch against a bunch of major league all stars to think what he would have done if he were able to play in Major League baseball his entire career. I know it would have been a big, big deal. Bob Feller was in that game, too. Let's see him well, anyway. 1986. Haley's comet last appeared in the inner solar system. And that is our today in history for February knife, it's 8 15, and we go to the newsroom and Chris treatment. The FBI and the Secret Service are looking for a hacker who tampered with water supply of the city of old Tamar. The hacker boosted the level of sodium hydroxide or lie from 100 parts per million, two more than 11,000 per million. Officials say. While that's potentially dangerous, the plant operator saw what was happening and was able to stabilize the situation. The second Senate impeachment trial of former president Trump gets underway today. A single house article of Impeachment accuses me now former president of inciting the deadly mob attack at the U. S. Capitol on January 6th. Trump headlined a huge rally near the White House before the assault on the Capitol. Trump's attorneys will argue that it's unconstitutional to try the former president since he's no longer in office. United Arab Emirates Hope spacecraft is expected to reach Mars is orbit this morning the probe's part of the first interplanetary mission ever launched by an Arab country. It's been described as a climate satellite designed to study how energy moves through the Red Planet's atmosphere throughout the day and over the course of every season on Chris Trackman News, radio W F L A Now let's check sports. W.

president Ed Sullivan Show Trump US House of Representatives Rhode Island Satchel Paige San Francisco United Arab Emirates Bob Feller Jefferson Davis volleyball William G. Morgan John Quincy Adams U. S Department of State Major League Chris Trackman
"confederations" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"confederations" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"You must be crazy. Used a d. Og and if you was my man i would have been kicked you out of my house by now. This is what had happened all right a little soccer note before we go to our number three you might have heard the threat of this european super league that these big teams would break off and just play against each other nonstop. Well there has been a statement by fief it today and six of their confederations uefa. Concacaf a cfc. Af coma ball and ofc. They've all put their names on it. Basically every soccer federation on the planet it says in light of recent media speculation about the creation of close european superleague by some european clubs. Fica and the six confederations once again would like to reiterate and strongly emphasize that such a competition would not be recognized by either fi fo or their respective confederation. Any club or player involved in such a competition would as a consequence not be allowed to participate in any competition organized by fiba or the respective confederation. So what that means is if you want to play in that breakaway super league. You could not play in the world. Cup cannot play in the european championships. If your european all this assigned off by the fever president gianni infantino the little infant of uefa ahead alexander sarah fan and even out here in concacaf with toyo milton yanni they all put their name on it and they do think that they're going to be reforming the champions league and the way we look at it. But the this whole breakaway thing. Joe sports. Alona jus- you vent is just man united. You can forget that unless you don't wanna play in the world cup. I'm rick tidwell..

gianni infantino today toyo milton yanni rick tidwell six Joe Fica fi fo uefa world cup champions league fiba Alona jus european super league european championships six confederations number three each president super league
Political Myth Buster

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:50 min | 1 year ago

Political Myth Buster

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries. I'm your host kid chrome today. i'm gonna bust a few political myths. Some of these myths have been around for a hundred years and some more recent. I the current ask of this writing usage of the term whistle blower. This does not refer to an individual it is in reference to an act the protection individual. That hasn't his or her possession information that may implicate another individual usually not restricted to the president of the united states. In some kind of illegal act. It is the whistle blower protection act of nineteen eighty nine a federal agency violates whistle blower protection act if agency authorities take or threaten to take retaliatory personal action against any employees because of disclosure of information by that employee or applicant long story short or in a nutshell. The whistle blower is not an individual. It is a whistle blower act of one thousand nine hundred eighty nine that protects individual with some kind of planned destined information. Now let's move on our great great political myth. That's been around a long time as a jon. Hansen was the first president. Not george washington. The answer is found by looking back what was happening with the continental congress in and around eight seventeen eighties on november fifth. Seventeen eighty one. Congress elected hanson as president. That would be president of congress. Under the articles of confederation. The united states had no executive branch. The president of congress was mostly ceremonial in position. But the office did require hanson to serve as a neutral discussion moderator handle official correspondence and signed documents. Hanson found. The work tedious considered resigning after just one week citing his poor health and family responsibilities colleagues urged him to remain because congress at that time lacked a quorum to choose a successor out of a sense of duty. Hanson remained in office the maryland assembly re elected him as a delegate on november twenty eight seventeen eighty one and so has continued to serve as president of congress until november. Four seventeen eighty two. He died one year later. Here's another great political myth. The myth is that impeachment remove a president from office. Fact is that impeachment has never removed a precedent. Impeachment is generally speaking a gathering of evidence wants presented this evidences debated one party like a defender ends up questioning the factual aspects of the evidence. And the other party must like a prosecutor attempts to demonstrate the reality of the evidence when a conclusion is reached and articles of impeachment involved determined and only after a long process. Can the president be made to stand trial. Impeachment is the process necessary to send a president to trial in this final myth. I use the current president to make a point of myth is that normal of political behavior are durable and resilient. The political process is shaped by both formal rules like caucus math and electoral college and informal norms candidates participation in debates. But it's easy to forget that these informal norms only matter as long as we all believe in them. This election has been for many who closely follow. Paul takes lesson in. Just how powerful. These unwritten rules of behavior of bennett shaping previous campaigns and just how easily they can be shattered again and again the current president has shown a willingness to violate the accepted norms of campaigning. That candidates followed for decades to name. A few candidates do not explicitly insult each other during debates. If violence breaks out at candidates rallied to candidate will not condone that violence. Candidates do not directly criticize former presidents for their own political parties. And so on by violating those norms often. With very little consequence current president has demonstrated how fragile those norms really are and all presidents. How fractured certain norms and changed the way we look at the presidency and debates now is broken down several political miss in the simplest way and hope that through critical thinking and deductive reasoning. You can spot and resolve political myths on your own. Here are two tips for spotty myths. I question all political view. Sit agree with yours second. Don't believe everything you think

Congress Hanson Maryland Assembly United States George Washington Hansen Bennett Paul
"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"This week. We return to the Continental Congress, which had to flee from Philadelphia after the British took the city running the country from York, Pennsylvania really had impact on the members. We see a great many delegates around this time actually going home and ending their service in the Continental Congress. I've often wondered how much Faith decision to go home had to do with limited accommodations that were available in the city how much may have been frustration over the progress of the war and how much of it was simply that these guys had been at this for well over two years and really just wanted to get back home again. Congress did remain firmly in support of the war effort even before receiving the good news about Saratoga but losing the capital and fleeing Westward did have an impact wage also the continued lack of money and supplies for the Army was an ongoing source of frustration for many delegates. That's probably why the Patriots treated defeat us home like Jacob do say so harshly. They were all trying to fight off their own worries about the loss of the cause despite these fears or perhaps to combat them Congress. Did finally agree on a proposed Articles of Confederation. That was really a big step for Congress. They'd been debating these ever since well before they declared independence day and still had reached no consensus even after agreeing to the proposals. They would have to wait many more years before the states would actually ratify them. Still even having something that the delegates all found acceptable was a big step forward. There are very few books that cover the Continental Congress well, and I've already recommended a couple of them most of them focus on a limited period of time such as the time period leading up to the Declaration of Independence is a rather popular one. I've already recommend a few others that go a little deeper and cover other time periods. When the Continental Congress was in session and today's book recommendation follows in that line. It's simply called the Continental Congress by Edmund Cody Burnett. This is a fairly comprehensive book. It begins before the first Continental Congress and 1574 and ends with Congress passing over authority to the US Congress under the constitution in 1789. The book is well over seven hundred pages long. So it has time to dig into some considerable details one frustration. I had with the book though is and one reason. It's probably not terribly useful for researchers is that there are no footnotes or endnotes anywhere to be found. I guess you just have to take the author's word for it. So while the facts is very well-researched and has lots of information. It's not going to be much help if you're trying to verify anything that's been written in it. The other frustrating thing about this book is that it is impossible to find it was first published in nineteen forty-one. I believe with a reprint done in the 1960s. There are a handful of used copies available on Amazon, but even those are at crazy high prices for what.

Continental Congress US Congress Patriots Pennsylvania Amazon York Edmund Cody Burnett Saratoga Philadelphia Jacob Faith Army
"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"It would be the final Arbiter of any state boundary disputes any decisions by Congress to mature a treaty borrow money authorized expenditures increased the size of military engage in an act of war or even appointed commander of the army or navy would require a vote of at least nine states. In other words. It would require a two-thirds majority. If all 13 states voted the Articles authorized Canada to join the union if desired off any other state wishing to join the union would require the approval of at least nine states approval of the Articles would require ratification by all 13 States before it could go into effect. Any future amendments to the Articles would also require unanimous approval by all states as well as the approval of Congress itself Congress submitted the Articles page the states for ratification just as debate have been contentious within Congress. So it was in the state legislatures. One of the biggest sticking points for many state leaders, who was the authority given to Congress to set State boundaries many states had claims on land stretching all the way to the Pacific Ocean. Some also had boundary disputes with neighboring states State leaders had great concerns about letting Congress make decisions about how to resolve those disputes. Congress would likely make new Western States out of most their land and would use land sales to pay off promises to Veterans or raise other funds home value of those Western lands were seen as future income for many states. They did not simply want to give that wealth away at the same time many states without western land claims. Absolutely one of those lands turned over to Congress. They did not want to be next to huge states that dominated the continent and dwarfed their own limited. Land claims States would not ratify the Articles until the larger states showed a willingness to give up their claims to Western lands and it take in Congress well over a year to work out the proposed Articles of Confederation. The states would debate ratification for another nearly four years last holdout, Maryland would ratify the articles in 1781 not allowing them to take effect until then Congress would continue to operate under its own ad-hoc rules making up the rules as they went along and simply hoping that the stage would comply. Meanwhile Congress continued to publish the Articles even producing a French version to send Benjamin Franklin in Paris delegates. Hope that it would convince the French to recognize the United States as an independent nation as all this happened the war of course continued to rage next week the British under General Howe attack, Washington's Army at Whitemarsh, Pennsylvania Wage. Hey, thanks for joining the American Revolution podcast after show.

Congress United States commander Pacific Ocean Canada Benjamin Franklin navy Maryland Whitemarsh Pennsylvania Wage Paris Howe Washington
"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"Congress retain the power to set standards for coins and currency and it would be the final Arbiter of any state boundary disputes any decisions by Congress to mature a treaty borrow money authorized expenditures increased the size of the military engage in an act of war or even appointed commander of the army or navy would require a vote of at least nine states. In other words. It would require a two-thirds majority. If all 13 states voted the Articles authorized Canada to join the union if desired off any other state wishing to join the union would require the approval of at least nine states approval of the Articles would require ratification by all 13 States before it could go into effect. Any future amendments to the Articles would also require unanimous approval by all states as well as the approval of Congress itself Congress submitted the Articles page the states for ratification just as debate have been contentious within Congress. So it was in the state legislatures. One of the biggest sticking points for many state leaders, who was the authority given to Congress to set State boundaries many states had claims on land stretching all the way to the Pacific Ocean. Some also had boundary disputes with neighboring states State leaders had great concerns about letting Congress make decisions about how to resolve those disputes. Congress would likely make new Western States out of most of their land and would use land sales to pay off promises to Veterans or raise other funds home value of those Western lands were seen as future income for many states. They did not simply want to give that wealth away at the same time many states without western land claims. Absolutely one of those lands turned over to Congress. They did not want to be next to huge states that dominated the continent and dwarfed their own limited. Land claims States would not ratify the Articles until the larger states showed a willingness to give up their claims to Western lands and it take in Congress well over a year to work out the proposed Articles of Confederation. The states would debate ratification for another nearly four years last holdout, Maryland would ratify the articles in 1781 not allowing them to take effect until then Congress would continue to operate under its own ad-hoc rules making up the rules as they went along and simply hoping that the stage would comply. Meanwhile Congress continued to publish the Articles even producing a French version to send to Benjamin Franklin in Paris delegates. Hope that it would convince the French to recognize the United States as an independent nation as all this happened the war of course continued to rage next week the British under General Howe attack, Washington's Army at Whitemarsh, Pennsylvania Wage. Hey, thanks for joining the American Revolution podcast after show.

Congress United States commander Pacific Ocean Canada Benjamin Franklin navy Maryland Whitemarsh Pennsylvania Wage Paris Howe Washington
"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"At the time. He wrote it General Washington still hoped to prevent the British army from entering Philadelphia and was begging for more supplies. Lancaster was about sixty miles from Philadelphia. Probably at least two days March for the British army. However, the delegates decided it was not quite far enough off after tending to a little more business in that one day session Congress adjourned it ended the session in Lancaster with a resolution to meet three days later in the town of York, Pennsylvania. The new location will be twenty miles further from Philadelphia. It would also be across the Susquehanna River placing another natural barrier between Congress and the British Army in Philadelphia. Another reason for the move. Was that the Pennsylvania legislature was also meeting in Lancaster. The combination of the two legislative bodies was probably more than the small town could handle thus Lancaster had its one day as the nation's capital. York would become the seat of Congress for nine months on the first day in New York president Hancock received more correspondence from General gates with further updates. He fought them to General Washington since Gates was not keeping the commander up-to-date directly Hancock added his own note saying that he hoped to receive word from Washington soon that he had totally reduced General Howe's Army Washington, of course made that attempt on October 4th when he attacked at Germantown see episode 163 despite his failure at Germantown Congress nevertheless congratulated Washington on the attempt and ordered a metal struck in his honor. Despite the congratulations delegates were not optimistic John Adams wrote in his diary indicating his desire for a new military leader who could lie down Erica to Victory quote Heaven grant us one Great Soul one leading mind would extricate the best cause from the ruined that seems to await it off we have as good at cause as ever was fought for one active masterly capacity would bring order out of this confusion and save our country home around the same time Samuel Adams made a speech to the delegates where he said our Affairs are said to be desperate but we are not without hope and not without Courage the eyes of the people of this country are upon us here and the tone of their feeling is regulated by hours. If we as delegates in Congress give up in Despair and grow desperate public confidence will be destroyed and American Liberty will be no more having he's just been chased out of Philadelphia. The delegates really seem to be feeling on the ropes and desperate at the end might be near Samuel Adams ended his speech by seeking Hope from God to save the cause quote there have been great times since the opening of this war when we were reduced almost to distress but the great arm of a manip attendance office has raised us up..

Philadelphia Lancaster Congress British army Washington Samuel Adams Pennsylvania Hancock York John Adams Susquehanna River General gates General Howe New York Courage Germantown Erica Gates commander president
"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"At the time. He wrote it General Washington still hoped to prevent the British army from entering Philadelphia and was begging for more supplies. Lancaster was about sixty miles from Philadelphia. Probably at least two days March for the British army. However, the delegates decided it was not quite far enough off after tending to a little more business in that one day session Congress adjourned it ended the session in Lancaster with a resolution to meet three days later in the town of York, Pennsylvania. The new location will be twenty miles further from Philadelphia. It would also be across the Susquehanna River placing another natural barrier between Congress and the British Army in Philadelphia. Another reason for the move. Was that the Pennsylvania legislature was also meeting in Lancaster. The combination of the two legislative bodies was probably more than the small town could handle thus Lancaster had its one day as the nation's capital. York would become the seat of Congress for nine months on the first day in New York president Hancock received more correspondence from General gates with further updates. He fought them to General Washington since Gates was not keeping the commander up-to-date directly Hancock added his own note saying that he hoped to receive word from Washington soon that he had totally reduced General Howe's Army Washington, of course made that attempt on October 4th when he attacked at Germantown see episode 163 despite his failure at Germantown Congress nevertheless congratulated Washington on the attempt and ordered a metal struck in his honor. Despite the congratulations delegates were not optimistic John Adams wrote in his diary indicating his desire for a new military leader who could lie down Erica to Victory quote Heaven grant us one Great Soul one leading mind would extricate the best cause from the ruined that seems to await it off we have as good at cause as ever was fought for one active masterly capacity would bring order out of this confusion and save our country home around the same time Samuel Adams made a speech to the delegates where he said our Affairs are said to be desperate but we are not without hope and not without Courage the eyes of the people this country are upon us here and the tone of their feeling is regulated by hours. If we as delegates in Congress give up in Despair and grow desperate public confidence will be destroyed and American Liberty will be no more having he's just been chased out of Philadelphia. The delegates really seem to be feeling on the ropes and desperate at the end might be near Samuel Adams ended his speech by seeking Hope from God to save the cause quote there have been great times since the opening of this war when we were reduced almost to distress but the great arm of a manip attendance office has raised us up..

Philadelphia Lancaster Congress British army Washington Samuel Adams Pennsylvania Hancock York John Adams Susquehanna River General gates General Howe New York Courage Germantown Erica Gates commander president
"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"New historical novel first Do no harm in seventeenth-century Vienna nightwatchman Dietrich destroy the body outside of Steven Stone Cathedral a victim of disease and foul play the death toll Rises as Dietrich chases a cure and a killer in a world teetering between science and spirituality join readers on a journey of catastrophe and courage in first Do no harm. The book was released on September 25th. You can order your copy on Amazon or wherever books are sold. Hello, and thank you for joining the American Revolution today episode 169 Articles of Confederation. We last checked in with the Continental Congress in episode 141 as the delegates held a session in Philadelphia. They had just returned to Philadelphia from Baltimore in March 1776 and having fled the prior to December when they feared the British might invade Philadelphia from New Jersey when that fear passed they returned to Philadelphia then back in September of 1777 the British army, once again threatened Philadelphia This Time marching up from Maryland, the delegates fled the city as the Continental Army under George Washington attempted in vain to Halt the British advance. The delegates had adjourned in Philadelphia on September 18th with plans to meet in Lancaster. They could not simply move straight from Philadelphia to Lancaster. Thursday would be passing over the same ground where the two armies under Washington and how we're doing battle instead. The members took a circuitous route first travelling up to Trenton, New Jersey then over to Easton Pennsylvania from there. They moved West to Bethlehem and they remained in Bethlehem for a few days where many soldiers from the Battle of Brandywine and Lounge area battles were still recovering there were also Hessian prisoners of War there who needed to be moved South to prevent the enemy from liberating them. After a few days the delegates made their way west to Lancaster on September 27th the day after the British army marched into Philadelphia the odds against bet at the Lancaster courthouse to open a new session. They wrote A Few letters from various generals, including one from the 15th from General Horatio gates at Bemidji. It's getting ready for the big Showdown with burgoyne's army when he wrote the letter Gates had not yet fought the Battle of Freeman's Farm but was optimistic about the Army's chances of factory Congress read another letter from General Washington from the.

Philadelphia British army Lancaster General Washington Continental Army Vienna nightwatchman Dietrich New Jersey Lancaster courthouse Continental Congress Dietrich Horatio gates Steven Stone Cathedral Bethlehem Amazon Bemidji Trenton burgoyne Maryland Congress Easton Pennsylvania
"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"confederations" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"You today by the new historical novel first Do no harm in seventeenth-century Vienna nightwatchman Dietrich destroy the body outside of Steven Stone Cathedral a victim of disease and foul play the death toll Rises as Dietrich chases a cure and a killer in a world teetering between science and spirituality join readers on a journey of catastrophe and courage in first Do no harm. The book was released on September 25th. You can order your copy on Amazon or wherever books are sold. Hello, and thank you for joining the American Revolution today episode 169 Articles of Confederation. We last checked in with the Continental Congress in episode 141 as the delegates held a session in Philadelphia. They had just returned to Philadelphia from Baltimore in March 1776 and having fled the prior to December when they feared the British might invade Philadelphia from New Jersey when that fear passed they returned to Philadelphia then back in September of 1777 the British army, once again threatened Philadelphia This Time marching up from Maryland, the delegates fled the city as the Continental Army under George Washington attempted in vain to Halt the British advance. The delegates had adjourned in Philadelphia on September 18th with plans to meet in Lancaster. They could not simply move straight from Philadelphia to Lancaster. Thursday would be passing over the same ground where the two armies under Washington and how we're doing battle instead. The members took a circuitous route first travelling up to Trenton, New Jersey then over to Easton Pennsylvania from there. They moved West to Bethlehem and they remained in Bethlehem for a few days where many soldiers from the Battle of Brandywine and Lounge area battles were still recovering there were also Hessian prisoners of War there who needed to be moved South to prevent the enemy from liberating them. After a few days the delegates made their way west to Lancaster on September 27th the day after the British army marched into Philadelphia the odds against bet at the Lancaster courthouse to open a new session. They wrote A Few letters from various generals, including one from the 15th from General Horatio gates at Bemidji. It's getting ready for the big Showdown with burgoyne's army when he wrote the letter Gates had not yet fought the Battle of Freeman's Farm but was optimistic about the Army's chances of factory Congress read another letter from General Washington from the.

Philadelphia British army Lancaster General Washington Continental Army Vienna nightwatchman Dietrich New Jersey Lancaster courthouse Continental Congress Dietrich Horatio gates Steven Stone Cathedral Bethlehem Amazon Bemidji Trenton burgoyne Maryland Congress Easton Pennsylvania
US, UAE and China All Launched Missions to Mars This Month

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:29 min | 2 years ago

US, UAE and China All Launched Missions to Mars This Month

"We've also seen recent Mars missions from the United Arab Emirates and from China. There are others coming up. So why is there so much activity around this kind of mission lately? Well a some of it is just a function of orbital mechanics. It's of course extraordinarily difficult to traverse the distance between Earth and Mars and depending on where each planet is in this elliptical orbit. We can be as close as sixty one million miles or as far away as one hundred and thirty some million miles each one of those miles represents of course a pound of fuel that you'll have to cart along with you in order to actually make this journey. Every twenty six months or so earth and Mars are very closely aligned than it is possible that that moment to make the most economical journey across the void. That's what we're seeing right now this summer. This July and August is that moment of alignment between Mars and earth. And I'm sure there are geopolitical reasons for doing this right now as well right. It's very hard to separate space exploration from national EGO international diplomacy and the search for prestige. Which really we're talking bragging rights. It is a fact. That for the first fifty years of interplanetary exploration it has by and large been an American show the Soviet Union early on also send some things tomorrow but of course. That's a confederation. There's no longer with us. This has been an integral part American prestige. I think our ability to land on another planet to effectively plant our flag. We have encourage international cooperation with this sort of thing. But it's very different being a partner from being the lead sled dog and I do think the efforts we're seeing with both China the United Arab Emirates and then the European Space Agency which is partnered with Russia for a launch. That will now take place in twenty twenty two. These are moments of the kind of coming of age. Not all countries have been exploration countries. But more now are and more are now willing to put big money on the effort

United Arab Emirates China Soviet Union European Space Agency Partner Russia
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 2 years ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
How the Indian Act continues to impact the lives of First Nation people

Unreserved

05:43 min | 2 years ago

How the Indian Act continues to impact the lives of First Nation people

"So? Your original article on the Indian Act went viral. What kinds of responses were? Were you getting from the article lots of? Wow I didn't know that and you know sort of the moments, and we're still getting responses today you know on twitter and facebook where people are still saying you gotta read this book every Canadian Street this book and you don't know what you don't know. He'd be three times. You hear that you know we do our training workshops as well I do training for on sort of indigenous awareness. And one of the exercises that we have people do at the start of every session that they think of Dayton history and come up with a short sentence to describe it, and it's got to be specific Vo. To indigenous peoples and have a flip chart at the front and say you know we're going to put all of the old dates, the top the flip chart in the more recent ones at the bottom, and usually draw a line, know eighteen, sixty seven and another line when we pay treated the constitution that section, thirty, five and nineteen eighty two. And we get people to start putting their dates, and so what we find is shucks, Cartier and Columbus, discovering the new world and Vikings and things like that and you see a lot of recent date for two thousand ten winter Olympics things that are more. Recent oriented Ohka and those kinds of things, but always saw this gap in the middle, and it was usually between eighteen and sixty, seven, nine, hundred, eighty two. And it really just highlights what people don't know. There's a period of history there and a lot of those beats Indian. Activate fall right in that time line I would venture to say they don't know too much about the Indian Act. Most people have never even read that legislation. What is one element of it? That always surprises people for for a lot of people they think that people living on reserves and under the Indian Act live in some kind of Shangrila. Free housing free education, and they don't pay taxes. Those seem to be some of the bigger issues, but. When we when talk about things like, yes, they don't pay taxes. Section eighty. Seven of the Indian Act was put into place to protect their property from the erosion of taxes. Well, they were simulating. So that's what the Indian Act is post confederation assimilation policy tool, so we're going to protect their property from near Ocean of taxes on the face of it sounds really helpful, but you know we look at it, not more current context. It really just holds the Venetians back if If I wanted to go buy a truck for my car dealership, and if I had it delivered to the reserve, because I'm a status Indian I. Don't pay transactional taxes on that vehicle. If it's delivered to the reserve, that definitely is a benefit that people see, but what they don't see that as soon as I, declared the exemption reserves are also not subject to seizure under legal process, and so as soon as I declare the exemption, the financial services people no okay. Okay? He's a status India. Fife Thelma's the truck and he stops paying for it I can't go and take it back from him. If refuses to pay for very often, see the benefits, but they don't see some of the restrictions and some of the other things that are problematic with the Indian Act now, the Indianapolis passing mentioned in Eighteen, seventy six, and it impacts the lives of first nations people every day in almost every way it defines who has Indian status outlines chief. Chief and council systems influences the development of residential schools as a first nations person. What is one surprising way? The act influences your life. Today was just starting out my career working for a big firm here in British Columbia by then I'd had a post secondary education I was working for a really reputable solid organization, and we'll look at it from Capitol Lender perspective I I met the four CS of credit I was married had a job at a post secondary education. If I was a lender. I was the perfect candidate, but. They refused to loan me the money and wanted my wife who's not indigenous to cosign for the vehicle, which was quite interesting, just in terms of that whole understanding the impacts of you know trying to make way in the economic mainstream. Now I. WanNa get into one of the most long lasting impacts of the Indian act of the Canadian reserve system, many first nations across the country still live on reserves. Why did the government create the reserve system? The reserve system was really created as part of the old philosophy by the time we can federate Canada believed that the Indians as they're called in the Internet where a dying race of people that they're not going to be here for much longer They were going very rapid depopulation because of to the the that they didn't have immunity to, and they weren't fitting in economically info set the stage for this dine. Race people the best thing we can do to help them to assimilate and become like everybody else, and the feeling was that we would put them onto these reserves in the context of assimilation of reserves, really a holding pen. It's the place where we're going to put them until they. Didn't if simulated, that meant obviously that they were gonNA leave the reserves and go be like all other people in. Canada And they are reserves. People live on them. Don't actually own the land they live on. You can ask people hate the audio nuthouse. Legally technically speaking, the property is that of the federal government and the band is sort of the administrator of that in which people don't know right that they don't know that this is crown land actually, and it's held entrust as the term goes. Goes, and even though the government set aside this, you know this land to first nations, there are many instances where they went back on their word, and took acres away from

Twitter Federal Government Facebook Canada Fife Thelma Shangrila Indianapolis Dayton Vikings India Cartier Federate Canada Capitol Lender Olympics Administrator British Columbia Columbus
How the Indian Act continues to impact the lives of First Nation people

Unreserved

07:22 min | 2 years ago

How the Indian Act continues to impact the lives of First Nation people

"In two, thousand and Fifteen Bob Joseph member of the Guohua Anoc nation wrote an article about the many ways. The Indian act was destructive, first nation, communities and culture. The article went viral. He has since expanded that article, and in two thousand eighteen released the book twenty one things. You may not know about the Indian Act. He's guest today. Think of him as our INDIANAP- tour guide to help us better understand the impact of this historic legislation. Welcome Bob Thank you, thank you. It's great to be here. So? Your original article on the Indian Act went viral. What kinds of responses were? Were you getting from the article lots of? Wow I didn't know that and you know sort of the moments, and we're still getting responses today you know on twitter and facebook where people are still saying you gotta read this book every Canadian Street this book and you don't know what you don't know. He'd be three times. You hear that you know we do our training workshops as well I do training for on sort of indigenous awareness. And one of the exercises that we have people do at the start of every session that they think of Dayton history and come up with a short sentence to describe it, and it's got to be specific Vo. To indigenous peoples and have a flip chart at the front and say you know we're going to put all of the old dates, the top the flip chart in the more recent ones at the bottom, and usually draw a line, know eighteen, sixty seven and another line when we pay treated the constitution that section, thirty, five and nineteen eighty two. And we get people to start putting their dates, and so what we find is shucks, Cartier and Columbus, discovering the new world and Vikings and things like that and you see a lot of recent date for two thousand ten winter Olympics things that are more. Recent oriented Ohka and those kinds of things, but always saw this gap in the middle, and it was usually between eighteen and sixty, seven, nine, hundred, eighty two. And it really just highlights what people don't know. There's a period of history there and a lot of those beats Indian. Activate fall right in that time line I would venture to say they don't know too much about the Indian Act. Most people have never even read that legislation. What is one element of it? That always surprises people for for a lot of people they think that people living on reserves and under the Indian Act live in some kind of Shangrila. Free housing free education, and they don't pay taxes. Those seem to be some of the bigger issues, but. When we when talk about things like, yes, they don't pay taxes. Section eighty. Seven of the Indian Act was put into place to protect their property from the erosion of taxes. Well, they were simulating. So that's what the Indian Act is post confederation assimilation policy tool, so we're going to protect their property from near Ocean of taxes on the face of it sounds really helpful, but you know we look at it, not more current context. It really just holds the Venetians back if If I wanted to go buy a truck for my car dealership, and if I had it delivered to the reserve, because I'm a status Indian I. Don't pay transactional taxes on that vehicle. If it's delivered to the reserve, that definitely is a benefit that people see, but what they don't see that as soon as I, declared the exemption reserves are also not subject to seizure under legal process, and so as soon as I declare the exemption, the financial services people no okay. Okay? He's a status India. Fife Thelma's the truck and he stops paying for it I can't go and take it back from him. If refuses to pay for very often, see the benefits, but they don't see some of the restrictions and some of the other things that are problematic with the Indian Act now, the Indianapolis passing mentioned in Eighteen, seventy six, and it impacts the lives of first nations people every day in almost every way it defines who has Indian status outlines chief. Chief and council systems influences the development of residential schools as a first nations person. What is one surprising way? The act influences your life. Today was just starting out my career working for a big firm here in British Columbia by then I'd had a post secondary education I was working for a really reputable solid organization, and we'll look at it from Capitol Lender perspective I I met the four CS of credit I was married had a job at a post secondary education. If I was a lender. I was the perfect candidate, but. They refused to loan me the money and wanted my wife who's not indigenous to cosign for the vehicle, which was quite interesting, just in terms of that whole understanding the impacts of you know trying to make way in the economic mainstream. Now I. WanNa get into one of the most long lasting impacts of the Indian act of the Canadian reserve system, many first nations across the country still live on reserves. Why did the government create the reserve system? The reserve system was really created as part of the old philosophy by the time we can federate Canada believed that the Indians as they're called in the Internet where a dying race of people that they're not going to be here for much longer They were going very rapid depopulation because of to the the that they didn't have immunity to, and they weren't fitting in economically info set the stage for this dine. Race people the best thing we can do to help them to assimilate and become like everybody else, and the feeling was that we would put them onto these reserves in the context of assimilation of reserves, really a holding pen. It's the place where we're going to put them until they. Didn't if simulated, that meant obviously that they were gonNA leave the reserves and go be like all other people in. Canada And they are reserves. People live on them. Don't actually own the land they live on. You can ask people hate the audio nuthouse. Legally technically speaking, the property is that of the federal government and the band is sort of the administrator of that in which people don't know right that they don't know that this is crown land actually, and it's held entrust as the term goes. Goes, and even though the government set aside this, you know this land to first nations, there are many instances where they went back on their word, and took acres away from communities. In your book, you outline how parts of Vancouver and the surrounding area were taken back by government to create the city as it is today. Can you explain how that happened? Yeah, so there was a lot of that. Initially, we put them onto reserves often for the most part left them where they were situated, which is maybe different from the US for they relocated people, thousands of miles sometimes from. From but they put them onto these reserves I think about a place like Vancouver today there's lots and lots of people and urban sprawl, but in those days there wasn't much there, and so they put up Nice generous reserves with good allotment, but then we went back and took it away because they weren't being enterprising people's. You know they're supposed to use those lands and put them to their highest and best youth. It's Kinda this really weird argument, right? We want them to assimilate, but we don't want to compete with them in the markets and so. So, we take away, their one of the things is their ability to sell off her, or they can't sell without written permission from the Indian agent or the Department of Indian Affairs and

Bob Joseph Department Of Indian Affairs Vancouver Guohua Anoc Twitter United States Federal Government Indianapolis India Shangrila Dayton Fife Thelma Vikings Canada Federate Canada Facebook Cartier British Columbia Olympics
"confederations" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"confederations" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"In the nation partnership with the federal and the state governments providing free meals to seniors in need of a chance for restaurants to hire back some employees is still working with FEMA on ways to provide nutritious meals to our seniors to get them delivered but also to get them prepared we started thinking about building a partnership with our restaurant industry will provide three meals a day seven days a week to seniors who are eligible and with a high risk of exposure to the coronavirus below the poverty line or a compromised immune system of the covers all season the National Guard in Los Angeles other parts of California to help seniors overall National Guard medical teams have been deployed at least for assisted living and skilled nursing facilities in Los Angeles county California governor Gavin Newsom says they're monitoring the states more than twelve hundred skilled nursing facilities with daily calls but he notes there are thousands more licensed assisted living facilities so far he says more than five hundred facilities have experienced cases of the virus just over twenty seven hundred patients and staff have the virus that we're currently monitoring within our license system he says the National Guard is just part of a larger effort to track and isolate infected individuals it's just a Rosenthal and finally here tonight the community invited to help farm workers in San Diego donated items through a drive thru caravan in Carlsbad tomorrow from Chavez's volunteer with the farmworker care coalition we're just trying to be proactive and also show our appreciation to farmworkers adventure whether the fact you know all about while we're taking at home there's folks that toiling the soil just like folks that are working at the grocery store just as the hats sunscreen gloves hygiene items non perishable food gift cards are all accepted tomorrow ten thirty in the morning till twelve thirty in the afternoon in the parking lot of the Carlsbad outlet center in front of ruby's diner you can also donate online at your confederations art or work we'll check in the.

Euro 2020 Championship postponed to 2021 over coronavirus crisis

BBC World Service

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Euro 2020 Championship postponed to 2021 over coronavirus crisis

"Yesterday European football's governing body UEFA did indeed as widely trial decide to postpone your I. twenty twenty two euro twenty twenty one and the confederation of African football is put back next month's African nations championship for locally based players at the request of the organizes Cameroon elsewhere Sierra Leone is called a whole pool sporting activities with immediate effect I don't actually have a case of coronavirus registered in the country just

Uefa Football Cameroon Sierra Leone
White Nationalism in the White House: Katie McHugh Kept Receipts

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

08:28 min | 2 years ago

White Nationalism in the White House: Katie McHugh Kept Receipts

"It's no secret that members of the trump administration up to and including trump himself are parroting the views of white nationalist and white extremist groups. These organizations are tied into outright media outlets like Breitbart and others where they spread this propaganda to the masses. We're going to try something a little different today. I'll be joined by a guest. Co Host. Hossan Ahmad is an immigration attorney and anti white nationalist activist from Virginia. Hossan has been deeply involved in obtaining the archived writings of John. Panton one of the men. Behind the current white nationalist movement in America Hossan connected me to Katie McHugh. Katie is a former white nationalist. Who has renounced her views in his working. Hard to undo the damage. She did when she held them. She's a former staffer for Breitbart and other alt-right media where she was in constant correspondence with Stephen Miller at the trump white house. She's exposed those emails and the deep ties of Miller into the white nationalist movement in America voice box he's overlap between trump's message white nationalist ideology he has shown us that the majority of Americans support are sort of message. You know what yeah make. America great again fell the wall. Pick these people out. This is my country. This this all belongs to me. Trump demurred when asked whether he'd condemned supportive comments from former Ku Klux Klan. Leader David Duke. I have to look at the group I mean. I don't know what group you're talking about. You wouldn't want me to condemn a group that I know. The person is dead and nineteen injured after a speeding vehicle drove into a group of protesters. Your leader downtown Charlottesville very fine people on both sides so we just got a new batch of emails from Breitbart reporter Katya Q. The Southern Poverty Law Center has made public excerpts of emails sent by White House. Senior adviser. Stephen Miller was a key figure shaping immigration policy or president trump the email messages for fifty thousand sixteen. Show Miller support white nationalist website and ideologies. My name is Katie mccue. I've exposed eight far-right extremists in the past fifteen months by working with civil rights groups and legendary nonprofits. I'm very excited now. In the stage of my life to help the most vulnerable in society including people of Color immigrants those who practice Islamic faith and those who this car presidential administration opposes the mouse and seeks to punish through use of authoritarian policies. Sorry Not Sorry so katy you spent a bit of time in the alright. What is the difference if you can explain to US between the alright a white supremacy and white nationalism? What are some of the core beliefs that you're aware of as part of this movement? Well I can say I think we should begin with aristotle here. I don't want to sound pretentious but everything is on a trajectory this is also just basic calculus so one of the things. Aristotle spoke about was habit and one thing you witness with the outright because the media treated them as a truly humorous force that's just online and it's backing Donald Trump and it's young people. The fact is everything that they said. Ironically I'm making air quotes eventually became ironic so whenever people thought they were quote unquote trolling about saying the nineteenth amendment should be repealed and you had white supremacist media figure. Richard Spencer eventually meeting. No I don't believe women should have the right to vote all these memes and things you see on twitter and the way that these mobs were organized so much so that they became. It was almost like blunt force trauma when it came to harassment for media figures. They were not joking. And in the case too with someone like Stephen Miller who's one of the most powerful people in the US government especially when it comes to people who are not white. So who is Stephen Miller? And why is it so important that we understand his thinking? Stephen Miller is one of the closest advisers to president trump. He is the architect of trump's immigration policy and also has the president's ear on foreign policy matters. Stephen Miller for his entire career had anti immigrant. Leanings for some people philly with the alright because it's an amorphous group and doesn't have a membership roll with you. Know I mean. They viewed on white people and people who practice the Islamic faith as not only dangerous individuals but an existential threat to the country. And this does tie into eugenics which unfortunately America has a very dark history with eugenics Ray Science and a history which John drew from and help shape the anti immigrant agenda that has sought renewed energy from the emergence of the outright and renewed energy from the trump campaign and which we now see the full force turned against the most desperate vulnerable people in the world for punish purely because of their country of origin their ethnicity in the face that they practice kitty. You seem so articulate and passionate and human and when we paint these pictures are head of the other side we sort of create these villains. I think I WANNA be respectful for your privacy and safety but I was wondering if you could talk a little bit about how you got caught up in the movement so that we can have a better understanding as to how other people get caught up in the movement. Thank you for asking that because I think that everyone's path is different but buying could help explain some of the groundwork for other young people currently trapped in this. Who Don't quite know how to get out. The outright on the far-right are very much like a gang. You know there's a no snitching policy and I think that many many young people especially let's say trump does not win reelection in twenty twenty this year. A lot of young people are going to wonder. How do I get out of this? And how do I reconnect with other people again and have a healthy loving life full of good friendships? Good connections across backgrounds. So I will just say that I'm from Pennsylvania regular conservative town and I was raised like I think the joke is. You're born a lapsed Catholic. So that was my upbringing. Regular childhood must very nerdy was constantly reading and I was politically inclined. People always talk about two thousand four election. People were very excited about George W Bush. Because it's a Red County and two thousand eight of course with the banking crisis. Things got much more serious and of course the Iraq war still going on so I was chatting with one of my best friends. Her Dad and I was regular Republican fully supporting the Iraq war in in the war in Afghanistan and he said well. Why don't you read this person named Joe So brand? Joseph O'Brien was a former senior editor for national review. He was fired by William F Buckley because he could not control his anti-semitism. I ate him alive. Almost like a neurological virus and I'm eighteen. I had never met someone of poop practice. Jewish faith Jewish background nothing. I didn't understand anti-semitism and I was reading the Essay. That was recommended to me. Call the reluctant anarchists sing. How all government is evil in the constitution has already been so violated. We just need to go back to something. Like pre articles of confederation. Okay this is very important to understand. Is that there is a serious libertarian. Too Far right pipeline very serious and the far right of course is just steeped in. Eugenics steepen utterly discredited on Justifiable Race

Donald Trump Stephen Miller Breitbart America United States President Trump Hossan Ahmad White House John Katie Aristotle Katie Mchugh Panton Ku Klux Klan Virginia Katie Mccue David Duke
Miami: Marlins Park To Host 2021 World Baseball Classic Games

Brian Mudd

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Miami: Marlins Park To Host 2021 World Baseball Classic Games

"Good we're following breaking news coming out from Marlins park turns out Marlins park in the three oh five will have an expanded role in the twenty twenty one world baseball classic including we just found out hosting the semifinal and championship rounds of the international event the world baseball classic essentially the World Cup of baseball it's this international baseball tournament sanctioned by the world baseball softball confederation and put up in conjunction with MLB and MLB Players Association so this is pretty exciting yeah it's cool I I'm at first it was all these things with the when they started it is goes back well over a decade now a little bit skeptical you know is that just gonna be another thing try to make some money but it really is fun because you see so many players go play almost in like an Olympic environment for baseball I. N. they they've made to reach a major league kind of realm and you know it it is it's a really really need

Marlins Park Baseball MLB Mlb Players Association
"confederations" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"confederations" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"President trump says the legal case involving political consultant Roger stone should be tossed the president complains that the Russia probe was fraudulent and badly tainted and that stones case should be thrown out in November stone was convicted of witness tampering and lying to Congress Mr trump's latest tweets follow last week social media messages that were denounced by Attorney General William Barr he said the president's tweets were making it impossible for him to do his job stone is scheduled to be sentenced on Thursday great Claxton the White House meanwhile the president issued several commutations and pardons yesterday some to some high profile people like former Illinois governor rod will go away that you went home after the president commuted his sentence for corruption Mr trump also pardoned former New York police commissioner Bernard Kerik so called junk bond king Michael Milken and former San Francisco forty Niners owner Eddie DeBartolo junior billionaire Mike Bloomberg will try to make the case tonight that he's the best candidate for Democrats Crisco Gary is an associate professor at the department of politics at Saint Anselm college he's wondering if the former New York City mayor will be out of practice he was a candidate for mayor in two thousand nine that saw well over a decade ago at this point and he'll be on the stage with a bunch of people who've been debating each other since last summer so I think it's quite possible that she did that she'll be rusty so what does Bloomberg have to do that question put to Jeffrey berry a political science professor at Tufts University more than anything else he has to convey a sense that he's presidential but he could be the person on the stage people ought to look around and say yeah I could see him in the oval office Shelly after Washington on Wall Street right now the Dow.

Jeffrey berry Niners San Francisco New York Illinois Attorney witness tampering Russia consultant Washington Shelly Tufts University professor Roger stone Bloomberg Saint Anselm college associate professor Crisco Gary Mike Bloomberg
African football body CAF in disarray, audit reveals

BBC World Service

04:37 min | 2 years ago

African football body CAF in disarray, audit reveals

"Hi Connie we're going to talk about the confederation of African football because an old it into the state to the continental governing body has revealed an organization in a state of disarray really both with regard to finances and government governance calf meets on Friday to discuss the order to along with plans for major reforms of the body and the continental game itself the BBC's piers Edwards has seen a copy of the old it prepared by the accounting firm PWC he told us first of all why the report was commissioned well the report came about fool two reasons firstly cast executive committee approved it early last year but the real reason it went head was because of the unprecedented decision to instill faith sector general from assume or as a general delegate for Africa that was in a bid to improve governance and calf and as I understand it was a condition of the general day to go well that's the old it would take place and it started just a few months after her appointment in August last year so that's why the report came about what does it say about the running of calf what is sure to paint a picture of an organization in Kelso council described as unreliable and untrustworthy lower ranking stuff labeled de motivated and who works in the general organizational structure of calf is also criticized effectively described as I'm fit for purpose now the executive committee which is a faithfully caps board is described as hindering progress since it was found to delay critical business decisions by any meeting four times a year and in terms of general organization the orders as the basic math is such as stuff attendance and holidays a not even registered on the subject of money is says it is incredibly hard to to order if cap for the very simple reason that most of the organizations that payments are made in cash and that includes is payroll to stuff for the old it raises more serious questions and in particular a questions the validity of at least twenty million dollars worth of payments which are said to either have a little supporting evidence unlike what will be deemed higher risk or of course both in the old it also reviews thirty five payments to the executive committee that was cast board effectively and found that none of those thirty five payments have the required documentation to clearly establish those payments legitimacy baby she's pairs had which has been looking at the order ten to the confederation of African football he told us what it has to say about calf president I'm at in particular well the auditors who price Waterhouse coopers want an investigation into what role president out among others had in the controversial decision to employ a little and gym equipment manufacturer in the southern from school to school still well they became a key supplier of schools where to calf now types who steals own is an old friend of Ahmad's attache and I'm AT has emphatically denied wrongdoing about this case in the past none the less some of the financial transactions between calf and tentacles still are described in the old it as being highly suspicious so that's the day tell the question now is what all calf going to do about this report will cancel executive committee is G. three very shortly on Friday and that's to address both the order and the recommendations of a joint FIFA calf tall schools which is cool for wholesale changes in the way cath is both structured and run and among these changes is the desire to effectively remove administrative power from the executive committee and to change how that committee that we knew were rations are determined which the order says is county being done by a committee members themselves well half of the knowledge that things happy mum badly saying they are now tackling historic problems that dates back in decades but with the executive committee members would address the recommendations remains to be seen that's a baby she's pace at which you can read more about the order timed cast response on the BBC sport website two other lines regarding the confederation of African football this morning the governing body has sealed an agreement with Egypt the country where it's always been based which gives it the same legal rights as other international non governmental organizes calf says the deal gives it quote immunities and privileges similar to those granted to international organizations and diplomatic missions and ahead of that meeting on Friday which as well as governments will discuss important footballing reforms African legend someone letter has made clear his opposition to the idea of moving the Africa Cup of nations to a full yearly cycle from every two years the shift has been talked up by FIFA boss John Infantino when would be warmly welcomed by European clubs who wouldn't lose that place because so often but that's okay who's close to both Infantino and trust president Ahmet told the French broadcast RFI that the move would not be in Africa's

Football Connie
UK formally leaves the European Union three years after Brexit referendum

Doctor Health Radio Show

07:10 min | 2 years ago

UK formally leaves the European Union three years after Brexit referendum

"I expect that dates the ladies shop the most incredible that a a is I got to try the people getting ready to celebrate a goal I lose with a country we across route the people we frequently establishment it's amazing that you've done this walk our audience through your your throughout the nation right here today nine from the most people know you and know your what you've done but walking through how many years have you worked on this project I first became concerned about what the European project man I didn't even know what globalism walls in those days but I first became concerned about it about the bureaucracy was winning a battle of a democracy about a one of the tires to a single currency dollar lady by Germany oppose worried about it back in ninety nine state of Illinois is buddy today I feel like cattle I just cannot stand aside and do nothing so I've now been campaigning on this for twenty seven years I'm also the father that pretty much full time pretty much seven days a week now do we went back the other day on the show and played your maiden speech from the European Parliament way you sounded and looked exactly the same as you do today shore just tell just tell our audience a little bit because I've I've heard in the press about some of the interviews you've given in the recent days about you being in the parliament how long you been there whether you're going to miss it all in all and of course you know that that's it for you in terms of the European Parliament but it's already to yell at about that and a little bit about what you see happening over the next year given that this this transition period for brexit well I walked into the European Parliament in nineteen ninety nine the three of us from you can collect it and we walked up the steps we've never been to the building before that we live in a Brussels before we did but what was the galley what we were doing if we walk through the door and that official that I'll I will let me pay easily so badly so we just got a political asylum with the beginning and then I woke up those same steps in June last year a little twenty nine of us I'm I'm not shows how the center of gravity in British politics I shifted what was considered to be we at all mad mad house become the mainstream so people can develop this country I guess that's the victory that I've been a Paul Solman unsettled and supported me although but if anyone one of the night I live in PM London time I'm gonna be in parliament square with a huge huge part of the old eyes which I call white full what was the night is the point of no return we are leaving this political union we are leaving the globalists supranational structure we never coming back about twenty what I was battle Wednesday on my last day in the debate before they threw me out of the chain but because I laid the union Jack them but never your bloody flags and leave I think she said rather the thought is that right now with the company what we did is we went straight to the buff okay okay yeah yeah I know we we try to get you on the show but but let me the better is a lot more level head said maybe the maybe another day yeah I think I was slightly over trained on that particular day but what was interesting was just listen to the speeches of a creek without power because they're all now saying who next alphabets of gum next alight journey will be sent rex it marks the beginning of the end not jealous of the European Union but if the whole global is project you know where big business big politics big banks that want to control our lives through big bureaucracy I we want nation states free markets free that would let let's say and I think we're winning how do you what happens in the next year how do you actually make a good because today is the beginning of it but I guess December thirty first is when the heart out is correct yeah I mean look I think in terms of history today's the big moment the rest is the tiles that the tide of course is very very important Boris Johnson I suppose because he's scared of me is has laid the right promises is now saying all the right things to be sticks to his promises that great I mean backing six they also the referendum I think people so I packed up my tends to go away what I'm saying to that everybody is all I am going to be that through this next process through this transition period through the next phase of the guys the engines are I will praise the prime minister the rooftops and he gets it right but I will sound the alarm if he gets it wrong so I'm gonna be on that case let's talk about praising alarm I want to mention you know about this globalist project and why this is such a important day in and Nigel I'd I needn't remind you that about the opposition party in the established order on the same day the night before I actually in accomplishes breaks it it's also going to be the acquittal of Donald J. trump by the established forces over here it's it's so amazing that would happen on the same day but I want talk about why way for second in this pandemic in coming out of Wuhan China but you know tied to the one belt one road in tight to the globalist projects and I think we've had two cases now in the United Kingdom why why his and a shock folks in the United States and also this pandemic it coming out of how we have a whole show no dedicated just that what what are your thoughts about that tight to globalism okay well let's start off with wildlife what is astonishing is if you look at the people who is all the advisory board to walk away in the United Kingdom what do you find you find the former bosses old L. cools little old friend of Tony Blair as friends of David Cameron's people around big businesses there on the gold you find people who were all confederation of British industry one of those globalists I have a group that all of our country they've been serving on the board you even find that this is astonishing former senior bosses of all civil service to be all the while lays bold I'm most stunningly able you find David Cameron our prime minister it was made to resign because look like that but it is now official interlocutor putting the Chinese and British governments Alice happened is Chinese money has corrupted completely corrupted the system and Boris Johnson of gone with the fly will miss one we've gone with what everybody around it is telling and I think it is into the judgment but one of the last judgment so I've ever seen in my life in this country I'm hoping we can buy the mechanisms are less it will just America that's not happy with this think about Australia right there in the call to make but he's very deeply intertwined with China even value in twenty twelve band while away from that digital fiber

The Battle of Yungay - January 20, 1839

This Day in History Class

03:32 min | 2 years ago

The Battle of Yungay - January 20, 1839

"The Day was January twentieth. Eighteen thirty nine the battle of Yoon Guy. The last battle of the war of the confederation occurred near Guy Peru. The battle resulted in the dissolution of the Peruvian Bolivian. Confederation in eighteen thirty six President Andres they Santa Cruz of Bolivia via united the two states Peru with Bolivia General Ramon Herrera was president and South Peru. Louise Jose Day Order Bego so with President in North North Peru and General Jose. Miguel Dave Alaska was made president of Bolivia. Santa Cruz declared himself protector of the confederation. A lifetime time and hereditary office many Western powers recognized the new Peruvian Bolivia and confederation but she lay which already had strained relations since with Peru. Over the course of cow and evolve. Padre Pio was a wary of the confederation and its potential power existing high tensions between Chile. Ah Peru plus dispute over customs duties in loans plus concerns over military and commercial power led to the war of the Confederation in August of eighteen thirty. Six Chile seized three of the Confederation's ships at CAL. Santa Cruz tried to negotiate with to a rather urban go to war to set up a treaty with several terms one of which was dissolving the confederation. Santa Cruz refused to dissolve the Confederation Racin and to lay declared war December of that year the next year Argentina also declared war the confederation though Chile and Argentina China did not join forces in the fight to was supported by Peruvians who were opposed to Santa Cruz but to lay suffered losses in the beginning. The first expedition from Chile led by Admiral Manuel Blanco and Kaleida was unsuccessful. In Collado was forced to sign a peace treaty and return to Chile but the government rejected. The treaty broke it. It organized a second expedition sending an army to invade Peru though Santa Cruz advance on the two lanes. The ladder gathered Peruvian dissidents to join their cause along the way in early January of eighteen thirty nine. Today's forces in Santa Cruz forces met at the battle between in which both countries have claimed a win later that month the two sides met at guy by a town in north central Peru. After six hours of combat to lead to feed it the confederates at the battle of new guy. On January twentieth eighteen thirty nine. This was the decisive battle of the war. Santa Cruz exiled himself and

Santa Cruz North North Peru President Trump Chile Guy Peru Bolivia South Peru Yoon Guy Peruvian Bolivia Peru Louise Jose Day Padre Pio Miguel Dave Alaska Admiral Manuel Blanco Ramon Herrera General Jose Argentina Collado
"confederations" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"confederations" Discussed on AP News

"Football confederation or AFC's as a pilot competition will be held to crown a women's club champion the Asian soccer bodies as the tournament a vital step forward in women's club football throughout the continent the establishment of an AFC women's club competition was recommended in twenty eighteen the AFC's as a four team event with the champions of Australia China Japan and South Korea will be played from November twenty sixth through the thirtieth. Cubans have celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of the release of the Beatles iconic Abbey Road fans came out to Havana's John Lennon park and stopped to take pictures next to the Lenin statue the park was established in two thousand on the twentieth anniversary of Lennon's murder it's become a tourist attraction and the gathering place for Beatle fans the Beatles were banned in Cuba during the nineteen sixties and seventies because they were considered a bad example for Cuban youth revolutionary leader Fidel Castro out love their music the Beatles became an underground phenomenon their music was widely shared on clandestine disks and albums and listen to in secret by fans around the island Castro eventually allowed Cubans to enjoy their music openly even allowing Beatles songs to be heard on local radio hundreds of people gathered at the park to celebrate Abbey Road which was the band's last recorded studio album together. well the whole fifty trees in Europe that exist no where else in the world threatened with extinction the International Union for the conservation of nature S. as in their latest assessment of Europe's bio diversity the fifty eight percent of the four hundred and fifty four tree species native to the continent threatened and fifteen percent critically endangered one step away from extinction. group also said invasive and problematic species of the top threat to European trees it cited urban development and unsustainable looking as other factors..

Beatles AFC John Lennon park Fidel Castro Cuba Europe Football Havana soccer Lennon South Korea Lenin murder Japan Australia International Union fifty eight percent fifteen percent
"confederations" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"confederations" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"So obviously there's the World Cup which determines the world champion, but each qualifying region has its own sort of pseudo World Cup. But just for the region, the United States is actually undergoing this right now in the in the Gold Cup the COPA auto. That's a Concha calf. There's globeop Medica, which is just South America, and they invite to Raynham countries, I would have a devil of a time trying to explain to you, why the hell Qatar is in the South American championship. So I'm not even going to do that. Johanns in it who's in America's region. So it's a North America the Caribbean and Central America. And what is winning this Cup through this qualifies for the World Cup for fun? So it used to be not only do you get his call yourselves champions. Although the Cup auto is not really prestigious because only legitimately only two to three teams have shot at winning it, even though Jamaica made the final last time, because United States is terrible now in men's soccer, but before it would guarantee you a spot in each qualifying regions champion would go to Confederations Cup. However, they're doing away with the Confederations Cup, which is oh, yeah. I know it's warm. Such a jerk. It's a warm up tournament for the host nation, the next World Cup is going to be in Qatar that's going to be held in the winter. It's gonna wreck havoc on all sorts of regular seasons out there. Also, so many slaves are dying building these stadiums, and it's just the worst thing possible, but I was watching go Biomedica and I like a lot of people started getting the notifications on the phone from Adrian. Motrin arouse sqi that Anthony Davis had finally been traded to the Los Angeles Lakers. It was used deal massive names. Good job by David Griffin. Rob Pelinka's not going to be there to pay this Bill. I gotta do it. I guess, because this is a lot to be doing for a LeBron James. That's what he's going to be thirty five. It's gotta be thirty five by the the next playoffs. However, with the injuries to Golden State that happened in the NBA finals, we were talking about it on Friday show. Now you have to get Anthony Davis here. Incentivized to go for it right now, because the warriors are no longer favorite, and then conferences now wide open Anthony Davis, and LeBron James just those two might be good enough to get you to the NBA finals. And I'm pretty sure that's all they have. Now, just those two, do you think that's the reason they made the deal, like, do you think that they weren't going to, and then they saw these injuries, and they saw door opening? Now I always thought that they were gonna make the deal. I don't know. They were probably more desperate to and maybe an additional first round pick thrown in that deal. They got to keep coups Ma which is I guess, good. They gave up Brandon Ingram. Lonzo ball Josh Hart. Number four overall every pick and every pick.

Anthony Davis LeBron James Confederations Cup Qatar United States South America Los Angeles Lakers globeop Medica Confederations NBA Rob Pelinka Adrian Central America North America David Griffin Brandon Ingram Jamaica Josh Hart
"confederations" Discussed on Civics 101

Civics 101

07:54 min | 3 years ago

"confederations" Discussed on Civics 101

"Courses plus dot com slash civics. I'm seeing the flaws of the articles of confederation. But were there any strengths to it? S Lindsay that exact question under the articles of confederation the continental congress was able to pass one very successful law. And that's the northwest ordinance. The northwest ordinance decided what we were going to do with the land that we had acquired through the treaty of Paris. At the conclusion of the American revolution this land that we got from Britain at the end of the war was called the northwest territory and includes most of modern day, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin. And the question that the delegates had to answer is what are we going to do with this land? Are we going to make it a colony are we gonna make it a territory? Can it be admitted as a state, and they saw the writing on the wall that if they left it as a colony the territory could eventually have another revolution. So this is another example of let's not do things the way that England. Did we don't want another little colony to break off and have a revolution? Right. Right. So they say these territories can become states part of the United States. But there are some requirements have to have self government. They have to have freedom of speech freedom of the press freedom of religion. They're not allowed to have slavery. Okay. Stop. This ordinance says slavery is not legal in new states. We're three documents in and we have finally arrived at our first national limitation on the expansion of slavery. But states that practice it already are allowed to continue to practice it and therefore become even more rich and powerful. Yes. So this can be viewed as a pro slavery and anti-slavery ordinance. But that aside if a new territory abides by these rules, it can apply to become a state. They have to have a constitution, and they had to be approved by the congress. But once they went through that process. They were able to have equal rights and equal representation in the government as the original thirteen states, and that was really a revolutionary idea of us, adding more states to our union that really didn't happen in the past. So there's a little good. But it seems like a lot of problems in this week system of government. How does it all come crashing down in the end? Crashes like this. You got this government that can't tax can't collect money and therefore can't pay soldiers, and Linda among puts it unpaid soldiers after war's over are not a good idea. And it leads to something called Shays rebellion. We can think of that term harshly today. Call it rebellion instead of say revolution. But really Daniel Shays had been a captain. He was a revolutionary war veteran. These were farmers from western Massachusetts who had gone up to defend their country. While the bankers from Boston were foreclosing on their debts and taking away their homes that didn't sound fair to the people of western Massachusetts, Shays and other unpaid veterans, so he and these farmers decided to March on the armory in Springfield, Massachusetts. And sees the guns and weaponry in. And they will go then marched down to where the confederation. Congress was meeting, and they will go to absolutely. Fire a month that we'll go to take over the government. So Massachusetts says we need help and the federal government requests that the state's chip in with money and soldiers and cannon, but all those states say they've got their own problems. So what happens what happens is wealthy? Private citizens who are losing money due to this uprising pool their resources together, and they hire a private military to quell Shays and the four thousand plus rebels, but look at the implication of this. You've got private citizens. Hiring private citizens to go to war with private citizens. Is that what you want is that what America is is that what this new nation is going to be like, and if it happens in Massachusetts who's to say, it's not going to happen in your state Shays rebellion is a cautionary tale. So we're at the beginning of the end as is so often the case it comes down to money. All this time. The states have been doing what? Ever they could with their own constitutions and every state had their own constitution, by the way, just to make things work when it came to interstate commerce, dealing with those Rhode Island's shillings in those Connecticut dollars. So what they had to do was create treaties just to trade with each other like four nations, and there's a call for a political convention at man's tavern in Annapolis Maryland to talk about how we should handle trade between the states James Madison was there. Only five states sent representatives the host state Maryland sent nobody. They have been given directives from their states to discuss interstate commerce and to create trade agreements, but on New Jersey's directive from their state. It says in anything else pertinent to the success of our country. Anything else pertinent to the success of our country anything else? New Jersey's like anything any of us. You want to chat about why? All we're all here. Some sort of big elephant in the room. Maybe we could talk about fixing this disaster of government system, but they can't do much just five states. So they decide to meet up again next year, but not in this bar in Maryland. Let's do a proper. Let's do it and Philadelphia and they get nowhere. This is going. Yeah. The point of this episode is not to say the articles confederation were an abject failure. And oh, how foolish where we they taught us a great deal about ourselves. So I want to end with a final thought from Lindsey Stevens some people call the articles of confederation a learning to crawl before you walk document, taking the first steps of creating a national government, some people consider it to be a total mistake. I think those people are looking at it with with the insight of what we know today. If you think about it, though, the articles was is really a good first step towards a national government. What we learn from the articles is that absence of power doesn't create a limited government. It actually creates an ineffective government. You know, government has a purpose. And that is to protect the unalienable rights of its citizens in order for that to happen. We do have to give the government some power. We just have to be careful about how we do that. And so we developed a system of checks and balances. Separation of powers in order to make sure that that system stays in place. And that the government's power is limited. So did we learn from our mistakes? Can we keep this Republican ah? Find out next time on civics. Wanna one today's episode produced by mean, it kept EJ with Hannah McCarthy our staff includes Jackie Hilbert, Danielle Vidal, I'll Lee and Ben Henry Erica Janik is our executive producer? Maureen McMurray as Justice fighter in the firm league of friendship. If you want to check out some photos or read more about Paul bogus lesson plan on teaching the articles confederation with blocks head on over to our website civics wanna one podcast dot org music. In this episode by Jews are blue dot sessions. Kevin McCloud, a Jura and Scott Gratton civics. One. One is production of NHPRC New Hampshire public radio.

Daniel Shays Massachusetts congress Maryland federal government United States Paris New Jersey Lindsay England Kevin McCloud Britain Ohio NHPRC New Hampshire Rhode Island Maureen McMurray Wisconsin Philadelphia Linda Annapolis Maryland