35 Burst results for "Conde Nast"

PodLP: a new podcast app for the next billion listeners

podnews

03:04 min | Last month

PodLP: a new podcast app for the next billion listeners

"Well, it's next stop to S. an ANDROID Kawhi s is the third most popular mobile operating system in the world, aiming to help the three and a half billion people along US connected in India. Seventy million kaiwas s phones have been cells. They cost seven dollars each. Pain, is the first podcast. APP for the platform Thomas Barosso pod that Nigeria Uganda and Tanzania are among the top countries using the APP so far. Free podcast hosts sounder has launched these sounder discovery suites, which they call the first-ever Keyword based analytics tool along with audio seo and sound bite sharing all free for creators. Be, W scripts is apparently looking at setting stitcher poppies told by someone familiar with the matter that the company has been looking for buyers for some time, audio craft and Australian Broadcasting Conference has announced its first set of speakers. We linked to those today. The event normally held in Sydney in New South. Wales will be virtual this year. IHEARTMEDIA and vice news it's produce a new show called Vice News reports a weekly investigative series, covering critical new subjects from around the world at launch, next quarter Conde nast as also announced a podcast network. The Independent Filmmaker Project has extended its twenty two thousand submissions process to on July the first. They're looking for innovative audio. Audio creators in any stage of development is a link in our show notes and newsletter today. Fox is planning a podcast. Advertising Industry summitted free to virtually attend, and on June the thirtieth for one eastern time whereas I in your podcast stats, probably nowhere, I'm guessing there's good news I've vokes -application currently used an anonymous user identifier and don't have their own user agents, but they plan to implement one soon. Hariri megaphone is now hosting podcasts from noisier, a Bristol based production company. My lover that I show real narcos has topped the charts in many different countries zoom offers end to end encryption to all of its users after work by the F.. F.! Paula Rogo is to write a regular column on medium about the African podcasting scene. In focused news marketplace minutes is a new show from Westwood One and marketplace. It's a sixty seconds reports updated three times a day for smart speakers and podcast also air on commercial radio in the US from Gimblett, the latest episode of science versus has a return guests Dr Anthony. FAO CI the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, giving an update on the spread of the pandemic in the US. Bloomberg has a new serialized podcast called foundering out. It'll bring. It's listeners inside one big story from Silicon Valley each season the first season we work and launching today all hands talks with CEO's and other sea level leaders about how being people I. Company is a strategic advantage.

United States Vice News National Institute Of Allergy Pain Bloomberg Paula Rogo Australian Broadcasting Confer Wales Conde Nast Thomas Barosso Westwood One Silicon Valley Hariri India Nigeria Bristol FOX
Editor of Bon Appétit steps down after brownface photo surfaces

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

Editor of Bon Appétit steps down after brownface photo surfaces

"Government and the editor in chief at bona petite resigning after a photo taken sixteen years ago surfaced on social media showing him dressed in a racially insensitive costume Adam Rapoport has been at the helm of the Conde Nast publication for nearly a decade he posted on Instagram and stepping down as editor in chief of Bon appetite to reflect on the work I need to do as a human being and to a level on it to get to a better

Adam Rapoport Editor In Chief Conde Nast
Alexis Ohanian Says He Stepped Down from Reddit Board to Help 'Make a Better World' for Daughter Olympia

Equity

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Alexis Ohanian Says He Stepped Down from Reddit Board to Help 'Make a Better World' for Daughter Olympia

"About what you can do to help make a difference and make the world a little bit better. Please check out equity from last Friday. Okay now to the headlines over the weekend well known investor and entrepreneur and former Equity Guest Alexis. Haney announced that he will step down from the board of read it and according to Tech Ranch is quote calling on the company. He founded to fill his position with a block board member. Now a little bit of history to ground you. 'cause I know you know it read. It is but did you recall the read. It was initially acquired by Conde. Nast back in two thousand and six before be made an independent subsidiary. A little bit later and the company has since then raise hundreds of millions of dollars

Haney Nast Tech Ranch
A Chat with Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

Skimm'd from The Couch

10:57 min | 3 months ago

A Chat with Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

"We are very excited to have Lindsey People's Wagner. Lindsay is the editor in chief of Teen Vogue magazine and is the youngest editor in chief of Conde NAST publication. She's also the only black female editor in chief of A. Us Fashion magazine as a career journalist. Her work focuses on the intersecting world of style identity culture and politics. Lindsey thank you so much for coming on today. We're really excited for the conversation. Thank you so much for having me. So let's start out with our basic question. Skim your resume Flores. I started religious interning into. That's really how I figured out that I even want to publications and teen. Vogue was my first actual internship and my first big internship in general so after doing that in college. It became the first job that I actually got out of college and I worked in the closet basically schlepping and doing running errands. And all the not fun things that wasn't on the hills of for a couple of years and then from there. I went to style DOT COM which merged into vogue dot com eventually. And that's when I really wanted to get into more writing and more of the storytelling and more of the behind the scenes of like how all of these pieces come together to really make a feature. And then I went to New York magazine in the cut for awhile and I mean that was an incredible experience for me because I was able to be at a place where I think you learn so much about your own story and how that plays into everything that you write or edit or that you wanna cover and I think there I was able to really flex love the muscles of things that I wanted to do from styling and producing shoots to working on you know really long. Form pieces like black and fashion. It's been over a year and a half. I would say of being editor-in-chief Teen Vogue so it's been a fun full circle moment to be back now as editor in chief and I think we've really leaned into a lot of the core things what I loved about Teen Vogue but in a modern in fresh and inclusive way that I always wanted to make it. I always love talking to people in fashion when they talk about like. Oh I started off in the closet and it's this thing and for people that aren't in fashion. It's like way that it's an actual real job that requires a lot of organization. And it's how a lot of people start off but I always think that's such a funny face when people see you working in fashion in TV or films. It looks very glamorous and it looks like you're just around town shopping and everything's breezy and their champagne and it's not that at all for those of us who've actually had to work our way out so I think that's an interesting point because you actually have to do a lot to figure out even what it takes to make a magazine come together. What something that people can't find on your linked in or that is in Google about you that you want people to know the only thing you can't really do but it's not like a secret and it's something that I have on my social media how much I love to cook. I grew up in a family. We always had to be at the dinner table. There was no fast food allowed. I find it really just calming and reminds me of home and so that's something that I really enjoy and I think it's interesting because in fashion people tend to not want to talk about food or not food to be the center of any conversation. Because there's always these very stupid pressures and anxieties around body image and how much you consume and even in this time. I think it's been really disappointing for me to see so. Many people in the industry say really insensitive things about you know not wanting to gain weight during this time and it's incredibly insensitive but also just ignorant and I want the industry to move to this place of inclusivity in a real way. I'm so grateful for this body that I have and I'm grateful to be able to make food and to be able to. You know to live this life. And that's really all that I think. Cooking food conversation should be about. Yeah and it's it's especially a very relevant conversation right now as you said thinking about so. Many people that are experiencing unexpected turns poor health that thinking about food and how we think about our bodies and being thankful for it in this moment his very different on that note about covert. You are leading a team a team that is part of Conde nast which is like any major media company has had its its ups and downs. How are you leading through this with the balance of trying to keep people calm? I know from leading our own team that it's not like we have a magic eight ball of being able to see when this ends. How have you handled this environment from a leadership perspective to be honest? I think it's been really tough because it is so open ended. We don't really know what is going to happen in the future and you can make all these plans for life and then you know life happens and I think for me. It's been a lot of just having those conversations with people you know. Do you need a mental health? Day Do you not. Do you feel like you can't do this today. And that's fine and now take on that you know today if I can and I'll figure out a way that we can move forward. That feels good for everyone. I've been having so many conversations of bandwidth and what people can just emotionally and mentally handle right now as journalists in like someone who's always overly ambitious. There's so many ideas and things that I always WANNA do. But I've been very transparent with my staff of like this is a great idea and I think this would be cool but I'm not trying to pressure anyone in ad anyone's workload of this is a cool idea but like I can't emotionally handle anymore worker. I can't spend any more time on this right now and I think we all have to be understanding of that and you know so many people have had family issues and I had a family member pass away from Kovin so I'm so sorry I'm very sorry for your family. No it's okay. It's just it's emotional roller coaster for everyone. I think just trying to be understanding in that. Is You know an empathy is everything. Yeah speaking about empathy is studies and more information is coming out that shows Cova nineteen infecting and killing people of color at a disproportionately higher rates. I think that there's been a lot of conversation about how this can reveal inequalities and disparities in our society that sometimes people don't spend time or don't WanNa think about as someone that has written about the overlap between culture and politics. I'm just curious to talk about how you're thinking through this moment and the type of data that we're seeing it just sucks to see that people of color going to be affected even more in the situation because you know people have covered just disproportionately don't have access to healthcare. And I mean really what this. Kobe situation is put so much light on his problems with class. And how we treat certain people in how we give you know other people privileges and I think it's it's been really upsetting to see a lot of popular influencers. You know be able to get tested really quickly and be able to have access to be able to get any medical advice and to be able to just hop in their RV and go to some house and be able to just escape and this is a reality for a lot of people have colored. They can't get the help that they need and I think for us. It's a constant conversation that we're having of. How do we amplify the voices of people of Color this because it just spans to so many things like even in my hometown from Wisconsin and the Wisconsin primary was like Sony? My family members were saying people of color are going to be directly affected by this election. And they're not being you know comforted in this at all. The polling stations are actually safe. And there's no hand sanitizer. They're they're not able to wash their hands in the bathroom. But they're told you know you need to just wait in line here for three hours. It affects so many different things and I think the economics of it and you know this class war is just. It's crazy and I think the it makes me really upset because it's going to have such a lasting effects on people colors communities that won't even have the resources to make it better and I mean we're going to continue to figure out ways that we can help in ways that we can make those communities feel like we're at least here for them because there are a lot of people in situations that won't be able to get out of this speaking of how you grow up. You grew up in Wisconsin. Tell us a little bit about what your family was like. Oh I have a really loving family. it's weird interview. My family is the best people planet. And it's just been really hard for us but I think that I grew up in a family just has really strong faith and I think that that has been a big point in my life. My Dad is a pastor. My husband's status pastor. And I think in these times you really kind of on your faith to help you through this and so I'm regardless of you know nervous being sick and this just being a really crazy time. I think that's really stuck with me and I think that the older I've gotten the more that I'm grateful of the ways that my parents have grounded me. I'm not any of these things that people may think in fashion. That isn't really my identity and my identity is really who I am in the integrity that I have as a human being. I think that you know we are trying to just walk through this with as much grace in humility that. They've instilled in me that I can. Do you think your family than like looking back on who? You are would be surprised at what you've become today. Yes no I mean. I was always very opinionated on a lot of artistic things like my mom always jokes you know they like allowed my sister and I to pick out colors for our bedroom and my sisters chose really you know. Pale floral wallpaper very basic in my opinion and I was like this. None of this will work for me. I need a custom color and my mom was like. Who Do you think you are? Yeah I can see that being such a pain in the ass for a mob like just pick a fucking color. Your that was me. She saved like all of my art projects and she was. She's that mom and so she always has like we were really upset when the glitter spill and we. We always had to have talks with you about things. Aren't going to go your way and I mean I was always definitely into creative. Things of his incenting Lessons Piano Violin. I like to dry like those. Are I love to do all of those things but I think it? The fashion stuff didn't come 'til lot later for sure just because the nature of growing out in the Midwest. You don't know anybody really who works at a publication and so it took a while for me to figure out really how. I wanted to use all those creative

Editor In Chief Teen Vogue Lindsey People Wisconsin Conde Nast A. Us Fashion Magazine Midwest Lindsay Google Kovin New York Cova Kobe Sony
From PepsiCo to GM, Big Advertisers Set to Cancel Commitments to TV Networks

Midday News

00:20 sec | 3 months ago

From PepsiCo to GM, Big Advertisers Set to Cancel Commitments to TV Networks

"Both Conde Nast and Viacom CBS have seen a drop in advertising spending General Motors Pepsi and other major cable and broadcast TV advertisers want to cut even more but they are bound by contracts that well in advance the Wall Street journal says this month is our first opportunity to cancel up to fifty percent of their summer ad spending and they're expected to

Conde Nast Viacom CBS Wall Street Journal General Motors
Cruise lines face lawsuit and investigation over virus response

WBBM Evening News

02:45 min | 3 months ago

Cruise lines face lawsuit and investigation over virus response

"Congress has launched an investigation into how carnival cruise line responded to the outbreak and royal Caribbean is facing a lawsuit over the wrongful death of a crew member due to the coronavirus Kris van cleave reports the wrongful death lawsuit was filed on behalf of twenty seven year old geo co a housekeeping employee from Indonesia the suit claims he contracted covert nineteen on royal Caribbean's symphony of the seas getting sick only after passengers left the ship how prepared with the cruise lines for dealing with code ninety it's very clear that the entire cruise industry dramatically mishandled the entire this operates not only as it relates to passengers but also as a crew member's maritime attorney Michael Winkelman represents the man's family I think had they taken the steps that pretty much every single person around the world seeking I don't think you would be dead today how they implemented proper social distancing quarantines given proper master everybody I think that joke would still be alive today the roughly fifty three billion dollar cruise industry has been in dry dock since mid March after a number of highly publicized corona virus outbreaks polls show more than one in five Americans say it'll be a year or longer before they set foot on a cruise ship but carnival is hoping to restart service on eight vessels from ports in Florida and Texas by late summer saying it submitted a plan to the centers for disease control are there people who actually want to get on a cruise ship right now the short answer is yes absolutely Erin Florio from Conde Nast traveler says bookings for cruises in twenty twenty one appear strong but there will be changes on board when they first get on board there's going to be a lot of temperature checks people might be denied boarding they don't have proper medical notes but before those ships take on passengers Congress has some questions the chairman of the house transportation committee sent this letter to carnival demanding information about its response to corona virus and there's another issue more than a hundred U. S. citizens working on cruise ships that cannot come home the CDC won't allow them to disembark until cruise lines agreed to a plan to get them home in quarantine murshid performer Ryan Driscoll has been essentially stranded at sea for sixty days his ship hasn't seen passengers since mid March and bottom line he'd like to go home yeah I'd like to go home yes of course royal Caribbean declined comment on the lawsuit but says it has reached an agreement with the CDC to start bringing home its American crewmembers carnival says it will cooperate with the congressional investigation and is still working with the CDC to bring Americans like Ryan back home the CDC says it does not have enough information yet to determine if the plans to resume cruise service are safe

Congress Indonesia Royal Caribbean Michael Winkelman Florida Erin Florio Chairman CDC Ryan Driscoll Kris Van Cleave Attorney Texas Conde Nast
How Jessi Hempel Went from Poet to Podcast Host

Inside Podcasting

16:28 min | 3 months ago

How Jessi Hempel Went from Poet to Podcast Host

"Let's start at the beginning. I as I said you've had an extraordinary career as a journalist but I'd love to know how you ought the writing bog were you. You know. Extremely curious a child yeah. It was extremely curious as a child but I also just was always a writer just from the beginning of time I was a writer I wanted to grow up and write poetry and science fiction and I went to college and I got a degree in poetry and remember coming out of college in going into the Barnes and noble which was Believe it or not the big corporate media of bookstores back then. Because that's how old I am and I looked in the big book of First Year. Salary is and I looked up poet. Remember 'cause I was with a friend and that friend was a nurse and she looked up nursing. It said fifty thousand dollars a year and she thought sweet. I'm set and I looked. Poyton said twelve dollars a year. Yeah and I knew I could not survive on twelve dollars a year and I was going to have to take the writing and do something with it. That was going to help me pay the rent. And that's really how I got turned in the direction of journalism. My mother is going to enjoy this because she is a poet and she can vouch. that You can't really make a living which is a shame. Do you still write poetry You know I don't. I still read a lot of poetry. I feel like my work is colored by the early work. I did around the construction of language but no I don't like a lot of poetry. I hope your mom's still. She does your mom she does. She doesn't she's she's published books and she was actually a poem. I was in a textbook at my arrival. High School so She's once in prizes and things like that. That's the only time you really make any money. So so when you made this move did you. What was your first job? Not Business Week somewhere else. No so I did a lot of different things in my early twenty S I. I ended up going to graduate school at Berkeley for Journalism. Had A great program and I came out when I was about twenty eight and at first I wanted to be a foreign correspondent and I went to Hong Kong and I did some writing for time time Asia and then I discovered business and I discovered business journalism and I got extremely passionate about it because I quickly I learned that if you want to understand how the world is working and you understand how business works he will. You will do a lot better at understanding how everything else worked. And so I went to Business Week and while I was at business. Week I met a very young mark Zuckerberg. Wow and that is really the start of how I started. Writing about technology I started writing about social networking in two thousand four and two thousand five. So we're you just assigned to detail you gotta go talk to the sky or like. How did that all happen? And what was he like Well so I'm embarrassed to tell you this because it's not gonNa make me out to sound like the smartest lady in the room by. I was a huge user of friendster and Earl Ya Ya Ya Ma and mice space and I thought that my space was really innovative. Was just something that I hadn't seen before in two thousand five at that time. Most of my colleagues were much older than me and none of them were actually using services like this and so I asked well. Can I write a little story about my space? And my editors honestly probably at the time just to give me something that was a passion project so I would keep doing the sort of grunt work that I was doing as an intern. Then said sure you can write a story about my space and I did. And then Rupert Murdoch did me a solid and paid five hundred and eighty million dollars for it and everybody looked up and it was my goodness. That must be a business. Didn't Jesse wouldn't you going to write something on that? And we quickly pulled out that story and made a bigger that became my first sort of big story and it was called the mice base generation. And why that slightly embarrassing is because as part of the big story on my space. I made a phone call to this other website that no one was paying attention to call facebook And of course my bet at that point that facebook was just you know the boring version of my space. Did you say something like that in the story? I don't think that of course many many more stories later I did. I chronicled really the rise of facebook in the rise of all of those Social software companies that served to connect to each other so that we could talk to each other on the web. The way that we didn't have you continued to talk to mark Zuckerberg over the years about how things have progressed willow. In a reporting capacity I continued to report on facebook during my time in the profession up until I guess the last big story I did on. Facebook was in probably twenty sixteen and a haven't spoken to him at all in the last couple of years so then of course we know that you go to Fortune I fortune. I and Ben Wired to have that right. Yeah so yep that's right. So as a writer I went from BusinessWeek to Fortune. I spent a lot of years at fortune. Had A great time there on really learned the craft and then I went to wired and I was at wired for the five years really until I came here to Lincoln. How fulfilled were you by that work? Oh Gosh that's a doesn't the truth. Is that the thing that mattered to me. Most was to become a better writer and better storyteller and become better at telling other people story so K. Sky I feel like it is almost more than a job is calling for me. I love the the whole process of figuring out how to tell a story and I love the trust that someone else puts in you when they invite you to tell them their story and really most of the time that I was a writer writing for magazines. I have been able to do that But you know sky as well as I know that that industry has changed so much over the last decade. It's so much So I definitely got to a point where I was looking to grow and I was looking around me and I had written a lot of magazines. Stories are a lot more magazines stories to be written but I was like well. What can I add to this like when I look forward ten years at this company that I'm at which at that point was Conde Nast? Is there a job for me that I can see that? I can't do today but I could grow into and I did stop being able to see things in my own industry. That excited me. Does that mean that you would have been eventually doing less writing and more managing or would it have taken it away from the core of what? You're enjoying yes. There were managing the you know as a as somebody working as a sort of early to mid stage writer and reporter in the sort of more traditional media industry. Often you get to a place in your career where there are two doors. There is the editor door in there as the writer door. And if you choose the editor door then you may go into a series of roles that involves Making other people's work beautiful and also managing people on and I chose the writers door I wanted to remain an independent contributor telling stories in doing that kind of work I guess when I say like ways that I could grow I meant sort of exactly what I'm doing now. Opportunities to try storytelling and other mediums on an opportunity to have bigger and better stages to do that.

Writer Facebook Mark Zuckerberg Fortune High School Friendster Hong Kong Editor Asia Poyton Ben Wired Rupert Murdoch Berkeley Intern Conde Nast Jesse Lincoln
One small change for America's small airports: One big difference for breastfeeding families

Business Wars Daily

00:58 sec | 5 months ago

One small change for America's small airports: One big difference for breastfeeding families

"It new moms know how hard it is to breastfeed or pump at workplaces and while traveling laws have required companies with fifty more workers to provide safe secure lactation spaces for moms since two thousand ten and in two thousand seventeen a new federal law required all medium and large airports to do the same according to Conde Nast Traveler magazine. Airports have until two thousand twenty one to meet those requirements while some

Conde Nast Traveler
It's Sharapover: A Complicated Affair

The Body Serve

10:09 min | 5 months ago

It's Sharapover: A Complicated Affair

"Thought we had the weekend off. I thought we had bought ourselves a little bit of time doing that. Mailbox episode but Maria Sharapova decided to upend our brief break and announced her retirement from tennis. Let's not do a whole lung. Preamble about this. We're here because Maria Sharapova has retired and we're here to talk about that to situate her career talk about the the ups and downs of her career and put her career and her into some context. She announced this week via an essay that she wrote for Vanity Fair and Vogue which were released at the same time both conde nast publications. It's the sort of flex that only a player of her magnitude can do. It's been interesting to me to watch her over. I would say probably the past year or a little more and an observed how little attention and how little fanfare has followed her around considering that she was once the highest paid female athlete in the world. She was tennis's biggest superstar for for many years and this latter stage of her career has been quiet. When you say only a player like her obviously Serena can do that too. I Know Naomi can do that too. I think those are the three players in women's tennis who have that kind of stature status to be able to call up an A. Winter. And be like. Hey can I can let y'all know in your publication regardless of who can do it. The point is that Maria is bigger than tennis. In the same way that Serena or Roger or Rafa are Novak are bigger than tennis. They don't have to go through the traditional tennis media to do these things they can call on their sponsors their friends mainstream press. They have that freedom does afford them because they are successful and they make a lot of money. Of course I knew what you meant but I think dealing with a complicated figure like Maria Sharapova comment on us to be as precise as we can with our words so as to not open up ourselves controlled. But we're not doing this. The whole episode. Every every statement about Maria is not an equal statement about serene. We're just not. I agree I'm just saying we can easily cost nothing to be more precise okay. You see what you did there. You put me in a position to be the bad person. Well maybe you shouldn't shouldn't do it anyway. Maria wrote this essay. I think there were probably a few journalists and people within the sport who was coming and we can't release it as a massive surprise considering that her body has been betraying her over the past few years. It's been extremely difficult for her. To stay healthy at this point for even a match or two in a row. Her events have been sparse. It seemed that the writing had been on the wall for a little while. What's interesting to me is that there is no retirement tour. There's no final triumphant moment at a Grand Slam. That meant a lot to her. There's no on-court Farewell. It almost seems I know. Use The word quiet before but it. It just seems a little anti-climactic for somebody who has meant so much to the game for the past fifteen years. Sure but to me. It makes sense because to embark on some kind of farewell tour. You'd have to be able to count on your body to a low to show up for right and I think that's what the bottom line is here for Maria. She told this story in her Vanity Fair Vogue Essay. That just getting on court for her match at the. Us Open last year. Felt like a victory getting the shot in her shoulder Infos cortisone or whatever but just being able to play to numb the shoulder and play in the first round was a big achievement and so she was past the point of being able to plan anything tennis related because their body just wouldn't let her right and I don't think she's the type to be like well. Let me just show up for this first. Rhone have a cute little moment and lose six two six two like. That's not the kind of scripting that she would one. No and she's had an interesting career injury wise because after that big shoulder surgery that she went through with that had really compromised her play. She had to rewrite the way that she served. Her game. Looked quite a bit different than when she was seventeen. Eighteen nineteen years old but she learns how to move on Clay. She wins two French Open. She becomes a dominant player. Again will maybe not a dominant player. But she reaches number one again. She's part of this triumvirate for a little while with Serena and as Aranka all the while dealing with this shoulder issue. That is still very much a problem. It's not just that she won the French Open. She was winning tournaments on clay. Yeah her up until two thousand ten. I believe she had one or made. Just one final unclean. It was green clad. Amelia Island But from two thousand ten words you see Maria making a ton of clay finals in fact the majority of her finals that she makes I believe in the second half of her career come on clay winnings took three times and winning Rome three times. So that's like you said a complete change of course from what we conceive of her to start her. So where do you WANNA start here? Do you WanNa talk about her career on the court and just kind of give a little background where she started where we are now and then I mean the extracurricular things are huge story with Maria as always I wanNA talk about first about her influence one of the things that I've seen since the the announcement that she's retired is some folks. Scoffing at just how much her actual influence was and how much she inspired people and I don't think you can underestimate. Just how much influence Maria Sharapova had in bringing people into tenants. They might not be the reasons that you would want people to come to tennis. But Maria Sharapova is Bar. None globally the most well-known women's tennis player. And we know this. Because Jamaicans don't know what Serena Williams looks like. We know this from schools John's quits. I can't tell you how many times I've interacted with people and they're like what would you like? Well I have a tennis podcast and like Oh Maria sharp over. I'm like do you follow tennis. No but they know who? Marie sharp over yes. Her Persona has cut through so many different facets of life to the point where random people know who she is on top of that. There are a lot of people who the very first match they saw was Maria Sharapova match. And that's the kind of thing that can't control. I was a Cheetah van because the very first match I watched was a continue to match the very first men's match. I watch was an Agassi match. Those are the things that that people hang onto. Because it's their first introduction right so there is that there is the fact that she occupied this place of prominence being the top paid female athletes in the world. For so long we can have a totally different discussion about whether that was warranted or deserved that separate and apart. If you're able to separate those two things then I think you can see clearly that Sharipova mental out to a lot of people and had great influence within the tennis world the sporting world and in society at large globally as well within tennis. She is a polarizing figure. We are not going to pretend like we have always been kind to her on the show. We've had our fun roasting Maria over the years. You've had your fun today with the title for this episode and You know. I'm going to be totally straightforward. Maria is not not a player that I loved to watch play tennis. I can appreciate her place. I respect a lot of things about her. She's not somebody who's matches I- flocked to watch and we've been critical about the way that she wrote about Serena and her bulk about how she handled the IT F. and then water ban and there's a lot going on but she is not an a boring character by any stretch. If you were to look back now and Marie his career what is the one word or the one thing that comes to mind what well? Unfortunately right now. It's Mel Donen. That's the first thing that comes to my e. Yeah like if we're doing plane Word Association. I'm not saying that's fair. Okay but I think when we have some distance when I've been thinking about her career. I'm thinking about winning Wimbledon at seventeen thinking about having a career slam on Sugar Povoa. Her tennis achievements are huge. Because very few women have won a career. Grand Slam. Her off-court achievements are also big and they're also painted by the fact that her blindness and her whiteness made her the perfect foil and the perfect heroin. As opposed to this dominant black champion Serena Williams you know she was the great white hope right again. Another consideration of the great white hope for me. The word is complicated when we covered the muldoon thing. We came down right in the middle of the fence. We come down on either side of the. I think I'm still there actually. It was kind of interesting to go back and look through some of the research done for that episode. What like what three years ago? At this point I'm early. Two Thousand Sixteen when it when it came out so almost four years ago we would have covered this on the show and to now be going through it again are thinking about it again and and feeling the same way like not much has changed for

Maria Sharapova Maria Tennis Serena Williams Maria Sharp Grand Slam Clay Marie Sharp Vanity Fair Conde Nast Publications Vanity Fair Vogue Essay Naomi Amelia Island Heroin Rhone Muldoon Word Association Mel Donen Agassi John
Chicago lands on top travel lists for hotels, bars and experiences

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:28 sec | 8 months ago

Chicago lands on top travel lists for hotels, bars and experiences

"Twenty nineteen was a very good year for Chicago hotels Conde Nast traveler right the Lang of Chicago the best in the Midwest one of the best in the world US news and World Report named the peninsula Chicago with the four seasons in the number two and five all tells in the nation the potential had one of the best hotel bars readers choice awards called Chicago the best big city in the country for the third straight year Tribune says other high marks for Chicago as a party city the Willis tower sky deck architecture river cruise and for steak

Chicago Midwest Conde Nast United States Willis Tower
"No matter what you do, whether you're in media or other things, learn business."

Skimm'd from The Couch

09:14 min | 10 months ago

"No matter what you do, whether you're in media or other things, learn business."

"Today we are talking to Michelle Lee the editor in Chief of Allure magazine Michelle started her career and magazines working in publications such as parenting Glamour and paper fast forward to becoming one of the youngest editor in chiefs ever humble Brag Michelle was an early adopter of digital strategy within more traditional all print publications nearly tripling visits to Lord Dot Com since taking the lead there she's a champion for diversity and says she wants to change the world I brought the definition of beauty we're GONNA get into that Michelle we are so excited to have you on the couch ladies high so let's jump in there's just skim your resume for us yes I actually thought about this in advance because I know you asked this question what I always half jokingly say to people's how much time do you have a lot of time you look at my resume it looks a little bit crazy so I'll give you the super cliff notes version of it so in the first like seven years I would say I was a major job hopper so that's why my resume is so long that if you go on my linked or something if I went into detail it would probably go on for like four or five pages so someone very early on in my career had said to me in order to move up in the media world you have to move out and I think I took it too literally and I stayed in every job for like I said the first seven years for only a year and in some cases less so it did help me move very quickly up but the problem is with that is that it starts to look very very bad and starts to be a red flag to people so I don't recommend doing that but we're GONNA come back to the first half of my career was very much spent imprint I worked like you said at a lot of different places I didn't necessarily have specific it be at the time I worked at parenting I was on the launch team of COSMO girls or worked in like parents teens also on the launch team of US weekly and really had a very vibrant freelance career at the time too so I always talk to my bosses at the time wherever I was about one to freelance other places that were not competitive with at that was so when I was at parenting wrote a lot for men's health for G. Q. At the time the women's voice was very different this is like more than twenty years ago the men's voice in women's publishing was very earnest and so- men's was very like snarky and fun and clever as I liked being able to stretch that muscle a bit and then flash words second-half may career I got much more into women's publishing but then also into digital and into the business side so most recently before Laura I was the editor in chief and she from marketing officer at Nylon and then about four and a half years ago I got just a random email from conde nast and then I came over to allure about four years ago and that's where we are eh why is something people should know about you that they can't find on linked in or googling you I think that looking at my list dinner looking at my resume doesn't actually reflect how much of a generalist I was I don't include all of it because again looks kind of crazy the types of things I used to write about arose about everything from cars to extreme sports to finance technology and now I think when people think about me think oh she's like a beauty and fashion person it is not at all how it was at first my first job was actually at a weekly newspaper so doing hard news and a look back and I think at the time I thought God I seem really unfocused and I should probably pick a topic I know plenty of other people who started out in beauty and they stayed in that for me looking back though I think it was actually a really positive the thing that I see myself as a generalist now because in everything that I do even though a lawyer is core beauty it's also about so many other things right as women we can have so many different multilayered interests anything that's really great and that everything does sort of intersect in a really interesting way and then not something that people need to know yeah I have done I don't know very weird things when I was younger I was an extra in I was watching something about Jim Carey recently and it made me think about when I was in college I was an ex in that movie Ace Ventura KS Mishra I don't think you can even see me so at the very end he's in like a State Liam I think it was like Dolphin Stadium because I lived in Florida it's time in Dolphin Stadium Lay said one of my friends was like do you want to go be an extra on this movie I was like okay so it was great I saw the behind the scenes of how a movie is made and the only other thing I really remember is having crispy cream donuts later and it's like had a lot of like odd jobs when I was a kid I worked concessions at a stadium also I worked at a bookstore and swept floors and think about now like those were some of the greatest time james because you get to see all these different industries even though like I can't say I worked in movie production I got to see what it was like to actually put together a movie and to see like some of the creative process well I wasn't expecting that as an answer on this thinking and of course I'm not GonNa put you touched on a lot of things just now about career path and about being generalist and moving around and I think it's a lot of stuff that we've thought about for our solves a lot of our employees have we've talked to them about and certainly I know a lot of our listeners I think about which is is it okay to be a generalist do I need to really become an expert at something and what are your thoughts on that yeah I mean for me obviously it worked out really how being a generalist certainly understand that if somebody feels so passionately about something I know plenty of people who when they were kids like elementary school level they just felt this passionate for working in the fashion industry they stood there unclothed say just devoured every single fashion magazine and to me that makes sense then that if you feel that way about something that you're GonNa go and you're going to live that passion for me I think that it's been really great for me being a generalist but then also once I decided when I was a sophomore go into journalism I felt like that was my path and then within journalism you can make that so many different things but it also play within the past ten years or so realized that the Hatha Journalists Ron and editors was not going to be the path forever right like when I was starting out being an editor reaching two full you know that for sure when I started out in media being an editor in chief was completely one eighty degrees different from what is today so had I stayed on the path and just thought these are the only things that I need to do becoming editor in chief to be successful for the rest of my life I would have been setting myself up for failure so I knew at some point within the past ten years that I needed to learn digital I needed to learn radio social but then also to learn business so I feel like I'm constantly preaching to people no matter what you do whether you're media or other things learn business if I go back to school I think I would either get my mba or if I could literally get on a time machine I would probably have a major in journalism and a minor in business or I how do you learn business were you in your previous jobs going to your bosses and saying can you teach me social can you teach me how to look at a p Anelle or redoing this in your own time partly so part of it was born out of frustration like I said I started out mostly in print and I was frustrated because the job that I was in my see Oh had no interest in digital whatsoever actually I remember I took like an eleven by seventeen sheet of paper and I was like this is what our website should look like and he was like well we shouldn't do it because it's cannibalize what we're doing in print so no interest in it whatsoever so after he left that job a very kind of famously took a pay cut in half and they went to a digital only place and I was faking it till I make it because I didn't really know what I was doing I mean right now it's awesome because you can learn so much online so I taught myself. Seo so once they left that job I taught myself how to fully design a responsive website I taught myself CSS. I taught myself video editing and production I taught myself like sales basically I taught myself so many different things at the same time you can only get so far with that too so when I was at nylon I remember had a really great discussion with my ceo where he wanted me to grow there and he said what can we do to kind of get you to that next level you're already an editor in chief like typically where do you go from there in like the old school media world that was like the pinnacle and you get put out to pasture after that so for me I was the thing I'm really frustrated with is that I sit and now these advertising sales meetings and marketing meetings and there are terms that people are using the I don't actually understand and I'll kind of nod my head and be like oh yeah yeah yeah and so my husband used to work in finance so occasionally I would come home and say to him what does this mean can you explain this to me it's awkward sometimes with your spouse to of like asking them too many questions and stuff so I was very open with my CEO and I said I feel really self conscious sometimes about not fully understanding the business side so he was great and he has been an amazing mentor for me where he said Okay I'm going to include you in some more of these meetings you can come along with me and he understood that I was creative and away the of the business people were not so it was sort of mutually beneficial that he saw me as somebody who could be great on the marketing side and building the brand and away on a business side that wasn't really being

Michelle Editor Chief Of Allure Michelle Lee CEO Editor In Chief Advertising Sales Seven Years Ten Years One Eighty Degrees Twenty Years Four Years
"conde nast" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

02:00 min | 11 months ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Oh Up to my I love the I love the Tim Robbins podcast. It's one of my favorites. I not Tim Czarist Tim Robbins has a podcast is crazy or at least in my mind the captain class by Sam Walker which I thought was just a fantastic book on leadership and not a lot of great thoughts in air on building winning cultures fantastic book. What do you do for fun? My big thing is my big thing is exercise. It's my daily meditation. It's not something that brings me. The most joy in clears my head and allows me to kind of deals. Is Everything else so that's my that's my passion. What thing or technology are you most excited about going forward? I think you have to be paying attention today. I I think the artificial intelligence the implications for everything from media to transportation to healthcare I I think it's just starting to rear its head now but it's something that I'm keeping a close eye on how revolves and I think that's where opportunity in the market is really going to be over the next couple of years. What is your best advice for first time? CDO FOR FIRST TIME CEO defy quickly. If I see that accompanies hired make sure that she said a very clear an audacious northstar for for the entire company not just the parts that you manage to aspire to what question do you never get asked that I did not ask you today today that you wish I don't know I'm drawing a blank. I'm I'm drawing a blank. I'm drawing a blank on that one fred. It's been awesome. You've been super generous with your time. Thanks so much for hanging out today. We're just really excited.

Tim Czarist Tim Robbins Tim Robbins Sam Walker CDO CEO
"conde nast" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

12:01 min | 11 months ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Mission Daily

"We tried to always lead with thoughtfulness on whether or not we felt voice the brand you know really fit us and the portfolio and often have many the other editors in the building. You know really spend time with the really spent time with the content and make sure that it wasn't just say Oh we think this is a good fit but really kind of getting that blessing of the folks who are living and breathing it every day before we put sugar and then once you had the infrastructure infrastructure to help make those y'all properties achieve economies of scale that you don't have I mean I think that that's one of the things things when these smaller organism as somebody's speaking from experience here of us more meteoric that they're certain economies of scale that once you hit like having that you know that braintrust that you were talking about having you and the CTO and the business development team the technology stack that you can lay on you know decreasing time you know post time all that stuff that's where you look at those type of opportunities and say hey if they just had a little bit more professionalism and a a little bit better insights into business models and a little bit more you know just general help we could probably elevate this brand to a level that ah they couldn't do on their own or would take much longer and I think that that's the thing whether it's pro in on this is just general acquisition strategy rather than just it doesn't have have to be media but specifically with media. You're looking at people who are probably really good you know content curator's and creators but don't have the rest of that stuff stuff that you could bring that you could say hey as fred weaken bring a digital presence that has massive economies of scale yeah yeah I mean that's that's that's definitely true. It certainly factors into your analysis. When you're when you're kind of you're thinking through these types of transactions I would also just say that you now these companies find success for reason and on their own and they're usually very scrappy and they know how to get things done? You know you you don't WANNA lose. WHO's that element of it? When you integrate into a major organization that that scrappy way of doing things is the critical component and I actually like you know looking at the other way to where you're injecting a little bit different type of energy into the culture sure to help the behavioral transformation if you will? How did you view social channels during your time I know this is something that that from like a governance standpoint people and you know CTO's and CIO's you know mostly just falls under marketing? You know it's not something that is traditionally only something that technology handles but for you know content. Obviously it is one of the true accelerators but it comes with a massive downside you don't own the access to the audience and you know earlier days specifically facebook being the case that having pages back in the day meant a totally different from thing and you know whether it's Google Algorithm or whether it's you know facebook changing her instagram or twitter whatever you whatever it is not owning your own audience. The ants on those platforms is potentially extremely problematic. How did you view social during your time yet another great question you know so so number one I would just say I very much believe that you know you can't force audience to come to you? You have to go with the audiences so acknowledging that you must have strategy for these platforms is critical in that wasn't no. It certainly hasn't always been the case in companies that I've works for you know in in some cases. It was very much a a walled garden approach for a very long time but you do need is you need to acknowledge these platforms build no competency competency and expertise in activating natively on them. I would say it gets dangerous. If you start to older rely on any one third party platform for YouTube or facebook or the more your business relies on those platforms to succeed they can still be great partners to you but that doesn't mean that they can't have significant impacts on business when they decide to to pivot or change direction for for any reason so you know one of the first things that we did you know at Conde it was billed had not existed prior. We built a very very significant audience development discipline and you know that wasn't didn't necessarily just about you know building audience but it was about getting a lot smarter and a lot more diversified on your audiences were and in had activate against them in the beginning. My approach to social platforms was to participate in not all but most host of the new Beta programs in products that they release saying you know we would have you know pretty much one foot in one foot out we test with a couple of brands in the portfolio Oh but hold back the other is waiting to see what the what the response would be. I would say over time you know my philosophy change to be more about you know really leaving much more methodical about ensuring that there's a real return there because you know you can spend a lot of resources time and effort testing and activating all these different platforms without really having much to show for it so you really understanding where you can drive your greatest business value first and foremost I think is I I think the first decision out of the gate and if it's not generating revenue then secondarily. Is it generating audience that can you monetize in other ways elsewhere it is great. You're still investing time and resources but if you're not really generating either of those two things in mass it's really hard to keep a significant presence alive on some of those platforms you also find or found in is that you know those those things cub in coming ebbs and flows right near moments in time where you really have on one platform and your light on another and then vice versa based on you know where the market demand is and platforms have invested in Business Infrastructures I support third party partners and their business concerns so critical part of the business companies absolutely absolutely need to be there but they I need to be mindful that they're not. They're not betting store anyone platform. Yeah I think one of the biggest problems is just that social channels at their purest based utility or a communication platform with your audience in a way that's like public and so when you're content creator I think a lot of times we just like like see the hammer or you know. Every every problem is a nail when yeah the hammer is like Oh. This is a great place to push our content right. 'cause you're like we have all this great stuff. We want to push it out there but in actuality it's more about creating the dialogue and I think that if you look at the companies that are the best on social they're the ones who who have the most like transparent conversations in public with their fans. You know it's not the ones that are just constantly pushing their stuff over over the course of X. amount of post today and all that sort of stuff right right it's also it's also about about social activity to what business the set right and are you. Are you monetize relationship through one means or another and I think you see in plenty of companies build significant significant email strategies Q. manage their direct traffic and building audiences to their own operated so they're less reliant on social partners as a as a terms of the overall pie where their audience comes from and you know trying to build a more engaged connection through the email channel which also can be monetize you know lots of different ways often. You'll find that could be the most engaged audience at all because the commitment to sign up as indifferent barrier to Entry Korea than just kind of following on facebook or instagram page. Yeah I mean we have we have seven podcasts and and then like our core channel but we we have segments and all sorts of different lists I mean each type of each segment or lists like once communication to happen in a totally different way and it allows them to get you know episode updates or company updates or just general newsletter. You know kind of like essentially you know the mornings article all of the day newsletter the day sort of stuff but I think that what's so interesting is that those are all different use cases for one type of technology and that's what's so exciting citing right is like I think for so long people were using all of these different things and kind of like one way and the complexity of how many different options we have allows different sort of things to be at play and that's I just think it's super exciting for technologists and for immediate it's bionic setting but for anyone because you can now figure out why people are using stuff like what is the utility that you're providing rather than kind of like you know older the days when it was a lot more reactive than proactive right and I think I think right and that's where the data part of the businesses really interesting right because you know if if if you invested the effort to really get your regain restructuring your data capabilities down you can start to slice and dice you know your audience all sorts of specific cohorts and and create all different types of use cases to create revenue value for your business right and and so making sure that you're putting data in the hands of the people who are actually running the day to day operations. It's not just sitting in reporting functions if you will is critical nickel to get maximum value out of that and and making sure that your own channels are driving significant party your business that you're you are less reliant on third parties to to manage business okay so not to save the the best for last year but I'm a huge fan in Vivo little back on me from probably the time that you were the GM was when those three years I was in the army me and I was deployed to Afghanistan for a period of that so I watched a lot of Vivo Youtube videos during that time because that's how we would play music it was being able to do that and so I have. There's a special place in my heart for that. You know you were instrumental. Aw in consistently being having Vivo be the number one video property in all of Youtube with billions of of views each month you created certified which videos that surpassed one hundred million views you created a lift and a bunch of other stuff you know we. We can't do thirty minutes on lead but I I I wish we could hear I'll just love to learn like from the fact that you led the product and technology team. What were some of the the kinds of challenges challenges that you saw early days with building this like you know massive digital property yeah? I mean look since two thousand nine now now right so it's a very different world. It wasn't a wasn't a business onto itself so challenge we had was to go to the market and say look we've. We've got a fantastic you know short form video assets that were made for the Internet and they are premium. They are highly produced I they you know they are done by world class directors and they feature the most socially relevant celebrities on the planet. You know we have this pipeline of content that is going to generate hundreds and hundreds.

facebook YouTube CTO instagram content curator fred content creator Google development team twitter Korea CIO GM army Afghanistan one foot thirty minutes three years
How to Figure Out Anything as a Multi-Passionate Entrepreneur

The Goal Digger Podcast

10:06 min | 1 year ago

How to Figure Out Anything as a Multi-Passionate Entrepreneur

"Dive on now. I feel like you need no introduction but i feel like let's do it like give me marie forleo at a glimpse yes well. You know we'll take it back for anyone listening. If we've never met before i like going back to the old days of when i popped out of college and was super excited about doing something i was hoping is going to be meaningful in the world and that would allow me freedom and to build financial oh freedom and all those things i think many of a stream of and i found myself on the floor of the new york stock exchange wall street and i was super excited john because i'm a person who has a lot of energy and and there is literally no physical seats on the floor. They have these things that pop out from the wall. They're like fold up seats but there's no real seats and i was pumped to be there. I was grateful to be there. I grew up in a working class family on the first person in my family to ever go to college. That was a really big deal and to have this job on wall street was like a._m. Proud i. I have a steady paycheck. I have health benefits like this is good and i'm not gonna lie. I was always someone who is very ambitious. I experienced a lot of pain heenan my childhood specifically around money and i saw how much pain the lack of it caused and i saw my mom go through so much feeling so powerless us around money and you know quite frankly i saw that many moms and adult women when i was growing up and so i had made a pact to myself that when i became an adult i wanted to do ever ever was possible to earn a lot of money not because i care about nice shoes or a lot of materialism. That's really that's not my life. I love experiences and i also left taking care of. If people like it's part of my nature and i wanted to be able to take care of others so at this wall street job guys around me were earning like a jillion dollars a year more money then i could have ever conceived ub growing up yet there is a big problem most of them while they seemed rich and successful and powerful on the outside seemed spiritually bankrupt one way i could see that was used to pine for these like two weeks of vacation that they had every year that that was the only thing they we had to look forward to and then of course the lifestyle of wall street was very typical of what we see you know back in the ninety s. Which was you know. The bell rings at four p._m. You hit a strip strip club. You do lines of coke and i'm like oh my god. This is so not me plus. It was ninety nine point nine percent men gender inequality and gender balance was insane. I was trying so hard to be taken seriously. I've always had very long hair but on wall street. I actually had a pixie cut. I cut off all my hair in an effort to be taken seriously. I just wind fine my spot in this world so cut to six months into that job. I started hearing this little still small voice inside that was like marie. This isn't worse must obey. This isn't what you're meant to do. You need to get out of here and that was hard to hear because that little voice was not telling me what else i was supposed supposed to do and i tried to ignore it because again. It felt wildly irresponsible. I i don't again comparable wealthy family. I didn't have a trust fund. I was tens of thousands of dollars in debt after college. Delay quitting steady job without having a backup plan seemed insane right not what i was going to do but got to the point where i could no longer ignore that voice in one day on the floor. I had what i can only describe to be some what of a mild panic annika tack. You know. I'm walking around. I started getting dizzy. I had trouble breathing. I felt like really nauseated like i was going to throw up and told my bosses like had to get out and go grab a cup of coffee thirty instead of getting the caffeine i made a beeline to the nearest church i had grown up in a catholic household and i went to a catholic university so i was kind of trained to new crisis. Ask god for help some kind of guidance. I'm sitting on the steps trinity church bawling my eyes out in my little kind of you know they give be these like dark blue blazers that you are in the floor exchange miscarriage running down my face and the first one i got was to call my dad which made sense because i was so just i. I felt so guilty to be honest with you because i knew how much he busted his ass to put me through school that i didn't want to be a disappointment so i opened my flip phone. If anyone remembers those call my pops and was just bawling my face out. I finally took a breath to catch my breath. He interrupted. He said ray com now. Now you're fine. He's like you've worked since you were nine years old. I am not worried about you keeping a roof over your head or paying your bills look. You're gonna work for the next forty forty or fifty years of your life. You have got to find something you love and if this isn't it and you're getting yourself this second this upset then you gotta adequate and you've got to do whatever it takes to find something you love and don't stop looking until you find it and so that was kind of my first permission slip you you get the f out of there but you know. I honestly had no clue how to find something. I loved and there's even a skeptical part of my brain. That was like what does that mean somewhere deep in my soul. I knew it was right so i went on a bit of an odyssey to try and find out who i was and my only clues were that i loved creativity. I was highly the creative. I thought i was going to be either an animator for disney or a painter or fashion designer and i loved business and marketing. My dad was an entrepreneur in a small business owner and i got to see him operate his small printing business growing up so i thought magazine publishing might be the place for me right. There's like the the editorial side and there's the ad side commerce business art all of it and so. I got a job at gourmet magazine in their ad sales department. I was like okay. This is going. It'll be and it's gonna be awesome right now. In terms of the landscape there was many more women. My boss was a woman. The publisher of the magazine was a woman. They were all amazing. I'm like like this is wonderful. I love to eat it was gourmet by my little cubicle was next to the test kitchen so the chefs would be like hey. We're trying out this new recipe. Do you want to chase yeah. That's right. I was like who has to like this on your police. Bring the snacks but the same thing happened about six months. I started hearing that voice jonah voice right. This isn't who you're supposed to be and then i started to really feel a sense sense of panic because i watched my peer group around me. They were all starting to get promotions. They were all kind of getting this foothold in their life and here i was wanting to quit. Quit my job yen so i thought to myself okay. Wall street was very numbers focused. The ad sales side of a magazine is very numbers focused. Maybe i have gone too far on that nightside. Maybe i need to really strengthen my creativity. What if i'm supposed to be on the editorial side so hustled my buns off. I got a position as a fashion assistant at mademoiselle and i was like okay. This is gotta be at gona photo shoots fashion shows in the new product lines you know working with layouts like all these highly creative things and when she now at six months in same thing started happening at and i have to be honest here because i started started to feel really broken you know i had graduated the valedictorian of my class and i'm a very hard worker and couldn't square. How can i be this committed to doing really good work and this freaking clueless about who i am in this world like why does nothing fit and so when i was at that the job i was on the internet one day probably when i shouldn't have been and i stumbled upon what was a new profession at the time now you gotta get guys. This is nineteen ninety nine like nine hundred ninety nine. It was talking about this new profession called coaching which at that point no one had ever heard of before jenna when i read this article all about people that had these coaching businesses about how it was so focused on co creating strategies with people it was very positive. It was very forward moving. It sounded really exciting. It was as though something inside of my heart broke open. It was like the clouds parted and little cherubs. We're we're seeing like little sunbeam's. Shooting out of there is right into my heart and something about it just felt so right. However my very critical mind signed immediately stepped in. Who do you think you are who the hell is gonna hire a twenty-three-year-old life coach. You haven't even lift life yet. You can't even keep a job for more than six months your ten thousand dollars in debt. You have nothing to offer anyone. This is nuts. This is crazy by the way how cheesy is a term life coach which so that's where i was but i couldn't deny that this was the right thing i had ever felt in terms of calling and so i signed up for three year coach training program with coach university and i continue to work at the magazine during the day can i was my paycheck. That's how things went fast forward a few months. I got a call all from the h._r. Department at conde nast publications. They had a promotion for me. It was an opportunity at folk more money a lot more prestige staying on that steady paycheck health benefits train and that jenna was my work on the road a on the safe path or do i do this weird thing called life life coaching which no one has ever heard of i think as cheesy as hell but sounds amusing and so i quit my job and i went back to bartending in waiting tables else and decided to start my business at twenty three so what has happened since twenty three because has happened and i'm juiced just giggling as you're talking because i feel like every listener can relate to these voices the one that is like who do you think you are in the one that is like you you were made for this and like it's just this constant conversation in our heads in if if the world saw the conversations that you're having in our heads we would look like geico

Marie Forleo Jenna Gourmet Magazine New York Conde Nast Publications Heenan Disney Caffeine John Jonah Geico Ray Com Business Owner Publisher Sales Department Six Months One Day Ten Thousand Dollars Twenty-Three-Year
Discovery Expands Golf Coverage with $30m Purchase of Golf Digest

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Discovery Expands Golf Coverage with $30m Purchase of Golf Digest

"It already owns the international streaming service golf TV. And now discovery is buying golf digest from Conde nast for an estimated thirty million dollars discovery will continue to publish golf digest as a regular monthly magazine, but will bolster coverage, including course, rankings instructional, videos and travel destinations the magazine brand joining discoveries golf content partnership with Tiger Woods as well. As golf TV

Golf Digest Conde Nast Tiger Woods Monthly Magazine Thirty Million Dollars
Cruise Lines Set Sights On Solo Travelers

Business Wars Daily

04:19 min | 1 year ago

Cruise Lines Set Sights On Solo Travelers

"This episode of business words daily is brought to you by central online from Pitney Bowes simple online makes it easy to save time and money. No matter what you ship or male. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale when you visit PBA dot com slash BW w daily. From wonder I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Thursday night once upon a time time not that long ago. It was a weird thing to take vacation alone. So though, travelers often felt stigmatized and even if they didn't it typically costs more to travel alone than as part of a couple. Well, the travel world is finally catching up to a trend. That's changed pretty quickly more and more of us are deciding to get away from everything and that means everyone to a full twenty five percent of millennials planned to take a solo trip in the next twelve to twenty four months, according to a recent study and data from Pinterest shows that searches on solo traveled shot up six hundred percent in twenty eighteen alone. According to British newspaper, the telegraph, clearly there are more and more solo travelers everywhere, including in places, you'd think would be the last welcome solitary adventures. Cruise ships cruising has been particularly difficult for single travellers like hotel, rooms cabins are price for double occupancy until recently a single traveller would have to pay what's called a single supplement. That's an additional charge of ten to one hundred percent intended to make up for the losses. Cruise lines incur when you travel so those single supplements can make taking a cruise prohibitively expensive. But in two thousand ten Norwegian cruise lines noticed an uptick of single travelers and decided to try catering to their smaller budgets. The company added studio sized cabins to its Norwegian epic ship that move made history reports Conde nast traveler magazine now at least five Norwegian cruise ships offer studios and not in paltry numbers either. There are eighty two rooms for one on the Norwegian escape and Norwegian bliss ships not to be outdone Royal Caribbean now offers studio state rooms on at least three of its ships. Quantum of the seas ovation of the season anthem of the seas. And they're priced without the dreaded single supplement other luxury. Cruise lines have followed from Canard which operates the Queen Mary two the river cruise specialist American cruise lines, but the trend is still young solo travelers will still spend as much as double for a cabin on many cruise ships so booking that relaxing, ocean-going vacation should be done very very carefully. But once you've secured that budget state room, there may be few things more lovely than several days at sea. Good book and Margarita in hand alone. From one this business wars daily. Hey, crews on over to wondering dot com slash survey palace. A little bit about yourself, would you? We'd love knowing who you are. We promise we'll give you some amount. Thanks for listening. I'm David Brown. Will see you tomorrow. This episode of business daily is brought to you by central online from Pitney Bowes with sin pro online from Pitney Bowes, you can send everything from packages two overnights letters without leaving your office right from your desk for his low as four dollars ninety nine cents per month, French shipping, labels and stamps from your own printer easily compare rates using send pros online software, get special USPS savings for letters and priority, mail shipping. Plus, you can track all of your shipments and get Email notifications when they've arrived. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit PBA dot com slash BWI. Ellie?

Pitney Bowes PBA David Brown Margarita Conde Nast Traveler Royal Caribbean Pinterest Ellie Canard Thirty Days One Hundred Percent Six Hundred Percent Twenty Five Percent Twenty Four Months Four Dollars Ten Pounds Ten Pound
LiveIntent - The Fight Against Facebook Starts With Email

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

09:43 min | 1 year ago

LiveIntent - The Fight Against Facebook Starts With Email

"I've learned since earning a name for myself on linked tandem, picking up that linked Tim top voice award. He's never have all your eggs in one basket. And don't rely on a game where you're playing by somebody else's rules on their playground because they control that pay to play model, and they can turn that type of any moment and start charging you to make your voice heard amongst following that you've created now when Lincoln and the algorithms changed like could have been finished, but creating by own platform, the I ruin was possibly the best decision. I ever made. And of course, you build up your own Email list. An over the is obscene this grow more and more because publishes did give away there. Inventory over to Facebook, and many of them paid a very heavy price for doing that. Because ultimately Facebook gets revenue from user engagement, and the publisher they don't own or control that distribution method, and in response to realizing that they've been taken advantage of over the years by these walled gardens with now beginning to witness to Rene sons of Email for publishes publishers have realized that they have locked in channel that they own. That's right Email and now Email newsletter is all acting as a bulwark against Facebook and their ilk. So buckle up and hold on tight. So I can be meal is all the way to New York. So we can speak wave corral Cooper, s three P global marketing at live in ten who's going to talk about how publishers are fighting against those wall gardens with Email. Sequel welcome to the show corral. Kenny tell that listeners about who you are. And what you do. Yes. Thanks for for having me on the on the podcast by names. Caro- cooper. I am currently the senior vice president of global marketing and a Martin company called live in tent with the company now for little four and a half years and various roles from account management proc marketing. And now a heading up all of marketing prior to live and ten is. I pretty much grew up. I would say on the publisher side of our industry. That's where I had, you know, most of my professional development growth, if you will and more specifically at a local news publisher of call advanced digital where I was there for almost eight years running at operations and platform, strategies and. I guess as a as a side note, a co a partner of mine in the space is name is Eric Rickett in he worked for a company called inner markets, a good friend of mine in space. He and I started a podcast about a year ago called the minority report podcast. And essentially what that podcast is is. It's a way for us to sort of create a platform to allow people of color women. People have diverse backgrounds within the marketing advertising space to tell their story. Right. So the podcast is less about sort of the day to day of advertising marketing, but more about getting to know people on a personal level. So, you know, talking about their background their upbringing, their culture, their views on diversity and inclusion in space so on and so forth and we've been doing that for about a year, which has been a really cool experience for me. Filo putt cast him. I'm gonna have to gang bail. My best behavior. Now. Despite being a full of IT guy. I wanted to read techies that puts people before technology, and that is one of the reasons that put you guys Amar radio is because you describe yourself as a people base marketing tech company, so keep telling listeners a little bit more about live in ten and how you're changing the way brands and publishes actually think about Email now. Yes, sure. So the company lying Ted we've been around for a little over ten years. Actually last month was our our tenure bursary, and essentially we started out as helping publishers solve the ability to deliver ads within Email, newsletters, because there really wasn't an efficient way to dynamically deliver and Prussian campaigns within with an Email, newsletters. And so over the course of I would say ten years here, we built up this massive ecosystem within easy. L, newsletters, where now we work with over twenty five hundred of polishes of brands to help them to help them acquire retain monetize their audience within Email newsletters in. It's it's everyone from companies like New York Times Meredith in Conde nast to you know, other brands like WalMart, Wayfair overstock, all of those types of companies of work with us to to to get help acquire retain, a monetize their audience of within Email, newsletters, you know, with that said, I think one of the unique while not not that I think I know one of the unique things about us is that everything that we do in terms of delivering advertising marketing messages, and helping our customers really understand more about their audience is connected to the Email address. Right ORs, we refer to the Email. Hash which is a privacy compliant way of looking at Email addresses. Right. So when you think about targeting today on the web, everything revolves around the cookie, riot weather, first party or third party, cook everything revolves around a cookie, but for us, it's it's the Email address in when you think about that. Right. When you think about a user in their Email address, and the value that provides in terms of helping to identify people, right? It's your Email addresses pretty much, your your gateway your passport to the internet. There isn't much you can do on the internet without it. Ryan you use it to log in the social you use it to buy something you use it to sign up for for something. Right. You ended at it's yours too personal. You don't share it with anyone else in your Email address is what you really have had a, you know, or maintain I guess she should say for everything that you do on the internet. And so we think about. What's tied to that? And how personal is. And when you think about sort of Email environment, you have to be one hundred percent law in because the Email address is tied to us in individual. It's it's fraud free and people that sign up for Email, newsletters, usually a publisher our brands most engaged audience. Right. And so we really feel like we sit at that sort of intersection between advertising and marketing technology in really cool space where you know, the Email address we think is the sort of a future of digital advertising. Now for the as of coast, publishers have given much of that inventory over to companies such as Facebook as a result of paint, a pretty heavy price for not because of course, Facebook six revenue from us engagement and publishes don't actually own or control the distribution in those pay to play kind of muddles. So in response to realizing that might be taken. On H all bodies will go it just say that we're witnessing the renaissance of Email for publishers. But can you set the scene and tell me about the scale of the problem in an what you're saying that? Yeah. The the problem is a is a is a massive one from the standpoint of you know, if if for for publishers for brands to survive moving forward, they have to understand more and more about their audience. Right. And you're right. Unfortunately, a publisher's given away that information to Facebook to Google to other wall gardens of for a number of years. It was interesting that we are seeing here. Live in tent is more volunteers. Now coming back to us sort of waking up to the fact that you know, they need to figure out a first party audience strategy in a, you know, let's just call it a cookie less world, right? Because I think you know, with everything from IT p a two point oh to all the privacy rules and regulations to some of what a Google just recently announced that the cookie is going to slowly, but surely sort of diminish over time. And if you are a major publisher, right? You have to think about our ability to continue to grow audience, right? Not necessarily traffic traffic is important. But when I look at traffic, you know, you can come and go, that's traffic. But in audience is court, your business, your audience are most engaged users your audiences who you know, the most about so that you can make the best decisions for how you want to have conversations with them in in order to grill audience. Right Email still sits at the core of it for for all things that I just mentioned in in the in the last response to you. And so more more of a loser. Now trying to figure out how can they a leverage the power of Email, Email, newsletters, and and the Email address to grow their audience. So

Email Publisher Facebook Caro- Cooper Google Senior Vice President Of Globa TIM Lincoln New York Rene New York Times Kenny Filo Partner TED Walmart Eric Rickett Martin
"conde nast" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"conde nast" Discussed on The Vergecast

"You can see how that that proposition might work for you, the casual magazine reader, you know, it's interesting is I think most of those people their discovery happens on Twitter. This is why I think it's it's a very low bar it works, okay? In the sense that you can pay apple the money in. This will be signed in in some things will happen on it. But most people who are hitting those pay walls for like, I just wish I could pay some money and see all these pay all articles that I can't read. There's no connection to their primary discuss you would have to go. Oh, I wanted to read that New Yorker dinosaur ical. Yep. That I've heard it's great. So if you get a Twitter linked to it that won't work you have to remember that it's available in the app than bad. So there's there's extra steps to get there. If you can just say like I have this link. Apple news have habit. If your phone, for example, which is wholly controlled laughable now, maybe they'll get to it. Or maybe they want it to be kind of a crippled product. That's a good question to ask. Yeah. And then the other piece of it that just kills me is we work for very digital media company up. I think most were audience isn't realized that most of our print competitor's printing colleagues actually still have newsrooms divided between print and online or they have publishing methodologies divided between print right and periodical say we're getting rid of the silos we still silos twenty nineteen. Yeah. But you do but employees at Conde nast all over the place are tweeting. If you want all of the New Yorker, you got up you still gotta pay us because nothing that we published online is gonna hit this app. That's right in that issues like mind blowing legacy magazine stuff, but I don't understand it. But this cuts to the core thing, right? Do do. The does the New Yorker does Conde nast does Hearst as Meredith would they prefer that you get a subscription directly through. Them. They keep all the money instead of cutting that money in half, and then cutting it up multiple times. That's what happens right now. Obviously, they'd prefer that you sell directly that you buy something from them directly. What they are saying is we don't think we're selling a whole lot more subscriptions. Yeah. And we think apple can sell millions and millions and millions of subscriptions. And we would have a small piece of very big pie than that big small, then have that Piedra ourself into tidy pipe. This is kind of the economics debate about it. I just got an Email from a publishing executive. I don't understand why people haven't done the math on this. It's great for bags, and it may be. I mean, you can do some very rough back of the envelope stuff. Apple music has sold fifty million subscriptions. It's an okay product. It's mostly apple was pushed it out. Let's say they say twenty five million of these subscriptions over. I don't know. How many years they get to that? It's worldwide. It's English language. I don't know. Maybe it's less than that. But if you get the twenty five million if I have done my math correctly, that's one point five billion dollars to be divided by the public participation publishers. Yeah, sounds like a lot. But then you gotta divide that by hundreds of publishers would they be better off selling individuals ascriptions. Absolutely. And the bigger question is are they going to prevent are. They going to entice me to not subscribe to the New Yorker directly and get the apple news product directly you can get the apple news product instead. And I think they might not seems very dangerous. So I think this cuts to kind of the big debate around the the newspaper sides, and I think this is also for most mainstream consumers, the idea that newspapers and magazines are different beasts right there in a modern thing you click on it's crazy. But yet they consider themselves difference. All magazine publishers are in there. They they're doing the math..

apple Conde nast Twitter casual magazine executive Hearst Meredith five billion dollars
"conde nast" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"That is I n t r o. I hope you give it a try. Like, many publishers Conde nast had a rough and tumble two thousand eighteen but Pam Drucker, man, Conde CRO says it is not all doom and gloom at the home of oh Vanity Fair, the New Yorker and other titles. In fact, the admitted challenges on the print side of the business can overshadow successful growth areas in particular, those around video and subscriptions. Brian marcy. And this is the digital podcast on today's episode. Pam, and I discussed y video will continue to be a focus Akande how the subscription plan across all Conde nast titles in the United States will roll out. And also, why Conde is putting its Snapchat efforts quote on pause. Hope you enjoy the episode. Podcasts. Thanks for having me two thousand eighteen year of change. She who a year change at Conde talk about that a little bit. I mean, a lot is going on on the in the overall media landscape, but a lot specifically at conduct. Yeah. We had a big year. You know, we I think that, you know, one of the big statements I made at our national sales summit, which was in third quarter of two thousand eighteen was you know, we are transitioning from publishing company to a media company. And so for us that transition had many different factors one part. You know, what we were making and where we were making it. So we were saying like, you know, the world is our own, oh or making content on all platforms and starting to really think differently about whether or not being the distributor is something. We need to be doing. So that's one to how we are prototyping our content on multiple platforms. So we really, you know, just came through our first upfront season and digital video. Oh, so that was a big change for us. In terms of not only, you know productized are constant in that space, but actually being a real player and just navigating those waters, and then third I would say, you know, how we executed against that. So creating a structure that was I think very different than what our structure was in the past reorders are always fun. But that was it was a few. We've had a few. I feel like this one. Was this one felt a little different though? This was this this this one was important because you know, like the comes out Conde's having to reorganize like, no. Yeah. That's everyone's favorite topic. Yeah. No. I mean, I think for us. It was about progress. So, you know, being a media company means that, you know, you're you are trying to streamline your efforts, and you know, focus in a new way. And that means one really taking a look at our talent. To like understanding that we wanna move a lot faster and three if we have a strategic plan that we want to execute against we need to be set up to succeed. Right. So, you know, one of the things just as one example since you ask, you know, if I think about a client like L'Oreal as an example, they don't need ten people selling them the same thing, they need ten people potentially selling them different things. Right. So just really changing the way that in reorienting our way around what it meant to you know, kind of a new company in this space. And if you think about videos, an example in some ways, it's more of an audience based sell than it is like a brand basil. Right. So if you have if you have an org setup as individual brands with individual brands sellers doesn't really allow you to sell audience at scale, so just making shifts like that. And it was really fun actually like putting together this plan that was, you know, meant to I would say modernize a business that we hadn't modernize a really long time. What what specifically needed outside of the organizational structure, what specifically needed to be organ?.

Conde Conde nast Conde CRO Pam Drucker Brian marcy United States L'Oreal two thousand eighteen year
"conde nast" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Now back to the episode. So let's briefly about, you know, expanding the brand and and brain into news places, whether it's faux cafes or whether it's the fashion colleges because there's a lot of opportunity there, the vote brand means a lot. But the same time you clearly do not wanna go down the route of like other publishers that sort of taken what were once stored brands and are putting it on like Manila shopping centers that. Jonathan knew how is our jamming. And see who has really built this this disclosable miracle of Conan international has been extremely conservative when it came to experiments with the brand. So he he was really careful about vote branded restaurants or cafes, or as you can imagine there, so many textile companies that want to vote t shirts, and she Q hoodies where we always said and often these are very very compelling offers. And we said now because we you lose that brand authority so quickly. So yes, we're very very careful, but we have built a team though, and have also indicated the American team and the international team because most of these partnerships, if you speak with automotive companies hotel chains or whatever it is these days, I'll noble conversation. You're seeing that because a lot of times. There's not as many global deals people think there are and stuff still takes place on on the national level. But we had for instance of beverage company, we work with in the past and was very successful. And when in that country we wanted to continue that conversation. The answer was fantastic, but we really need to speak globally at this point. So the interesting deal jock logo. Also. Because of how cars are the products are being sold globally. It's just too complicated for them to produce something only for one continent. One market. So one thing in the US the conversation has shifted to shift from thing thing. It's like a children's soccer game or football game. Everyone just follows the ball around. But the conversation shifted quite a bit to getting people to pay for digital content and Conde nast is is doing that don't have very fair with the New Yorker to wired might be missing one or two doesn't seem as. Much of a priority with CNI not yet we have run experiments with walls in India. And that's that's the beauty of having so many marketing, so many titles that you can can experiment and learn from each other. But I think pay walls need scale. You know, you need you need a unit huge amount of high quality content, and you need a potentially huge audience because as soon as you have a pay. Well, you need to frustrate mostly your loyalists before they hopefully sign up to the payable. So this is where I put in a plug for digital plus membership program will annoy you. You describe? But had this is where. Once we have Mike waited all our sights on the same platform. We are in a place where we can run these experiments centrally. And of course, we'll test various forms of hybrid pay walls. But we. Ah very optimistic about the businesses we build around these publications, whether it's college is whether it's more and more conferences, we already have huge conference business in many markets, different types to see and B to be where we don't really want to impede on our audience that way, how much of your business is what you consider to be versus beat ac- for CNN because I mean, it's different like in scale markets like the United States, it's different than than in markets. I wouldn't know how to answer that. It's really difficult because the borders really blurry between B to B and B two C. Yeah. I'd say most if I were conferences finance B to B. Most. If I were current thinking more goes towards be to be most of editorial product, if not all are B to C, or at least being sold as be to see while we know.

United States Manila Jonathan Conde nast Conan international CNN CNI football India Mike
"conde nast" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Now back to the episode. So let's briefly about, you know, expanding the brand and and brain into news places, whether it's faux cafes or whether it's the fashion colleges because there's a lot of opportunity there, the vote brand means a lot. But the same time you clearly do not wanna go down the route of like other publishers that sort of taken what were once stored brands and are putting it on like Manila shopping centers that. Jonathan knew how is our jamming. And see who has really built this this disclosable miracle of Conan international has been extremely conservative when it came to experiments with the brand. So he he was really careful about vote branded restaurants or cafes, or as you can imagine there, so many textile companies that want to vote t shirts, and she Q hoodies where we always said and often these are very very compelling offers. And we said now because we you lose that brand authority so quickly. So yes, we're very very careful, but we have built a team though, and have also indicated the American team and the international team because most of these partnerships, if you speak with automotive companies hotel chains or whatever it is these days, I'll noble conversation. You're seeing that because a lot of times. There's not as many global deals people think there are and stuff still takes place on on the national level. But we had for instance of beverage company, we work with in the past and was very successful. And when in that country we wanted to continue that conversation. The answer was fantastic, but we really need to speak globally at this point. So the interesting deal jock logo. Also. Because of how cars are the products are being sold globally. It's just too complicated for them to produce something only for one continent. One market. So one thing in the US the conversation has shifted to shift from thing thing. It's like a children's soccer game or football game. Everyone just follows the ball around. But the conversation shifted quite a bit to getting people to pay for digital content and Conde nast is is doing that don't have very fair with the New Yorker to wired might be missing one or two doesn't seem as. Much of a priority with CNI not yet we have run experiments with walls in India. And that's that's the beauty of having so many marketing, so many titles that you can can experiment and learn from each other. But I think pay walls need scale. You know, you need you need a unit huge amount of high quality content, and you need a potentially huge audience because as soon as you have a pay. Well, you need to frustrate mostly your loyalists before they hopefully sign up to the payable. So this is where I put in a plug for digital plus membership program will annoy you. You describe? But had this is where. Once we have Mike waited all our sights on the same platform. We are in a place where we can run these experiments centrally. And of course, we'll test various forms of hybrid pay walls. But we. Ah very optimistic about the businesses we build around these publications, whether it's college is whether it's more and more conferences, we already have huge conference business in many markets, different types to see and B to be where we don't really want to impede on our audience that way, how much of your business is what you consider to be versus beat ac- for CNN because I mean, it's different like in scale markets like the United States, it's different than than in markets. I wouldn't know how to answer that. It's really difficult because the borders really blurry between B to B and B two C. Yeah. I'd say most if I were conferences finance B to B. Most. If I were current thinking more goes towards be to be most of editorial product, if not all are B to C, or at least being sold as be.

United States Manila Jonathan Conde nast Conan international CNN CNI football India Mike
"conde nast" Discussed on Travelogue

Travelogue

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Travelogue

"Hey, everyone. It's Meredith carry a producer here travelogue. We are taking one week off one hiatus between Brad's leaving and us restarting travelogue with Laura Redman Mark Elliott and myself swapping off at the lead Mike next week. We have a really great episode. But this week we're going to replay one of our favorite episodes, which is all the joys and did not so great joys of living abroad. So definitely tune in. Ooh. Oh, come and happy Friday. This travelogue the podcast of Conde nast traveler and here in the podcast studios at Conde nast with lolly Ourika glue, Sebastian mode act, Mark Ellwood and law Redmond all podcast, regulars with whom you are no-doubt familiar having listened to the entire back catalogue, and we have a special guest today Elliott Stein, who's not here by our usual Skype. But by phone remember that remember those say, hi, Elliot. Hey, thanks for having me. Does Elliott is a writer for us. And he is currently a resident of Berlin. Which is I always forget, my name is Brad Rickman? Branston case, you're wondering and Elliott is currently a resident of Berlin which is relevant because our topic of the week is going to be ex Pat life, and so everybody at this table. I think everybody on this podcast is either currently an ex Pat or has been an ex Pat or is Mary his married to. I'm still heavy. I can't claim. And so we're gonna talk about with that life is like and some of the good things some of the bad things. And hopefully, some advice if we can get around to that. So first question I wanted to pose to the panel is how do we define this like what is the difference between an immigrant and an ex Pat a traveler, like even along tribe because we talk about people who are on the road for a year, or whatever more what are the differences between these types of people Lally, I feel like you have opinions on this. All right ex-, very problematic. Because only certain types of people get the privilege of being an ex pot. I you have to be from Sutton, countries and set nationalities. Certain socio economic status perceived it that's a really interesting. And that it's I laze Alie use that tone, and you absolutely right. I'm baking in a lot of some show. Yeah. It's like so loaded, and for example, my dad is talking moved to the UK as an architecture student, and then ended up staying I'd say that sounds pretty much like an ex Pat. But he, you know, people describe Turkish people in the UK is immigrants. Oh, I think a good example of this is there's a list let's put out every year by HSBC called the ex Pat. When we were talking about. So it's very thorough. It's surveys tens of thousands of people who consider themselves experts overseas, and that it ranks the best countries for experts based on quality of life. You know access to education health, whatever reported reported by those people. Okay this year, which was interesting, which I don't think was the case last year was that the UA made the top ten only eleven percent of the people in UAE are Maradas. So that means the vast majority of people from overseas. But if you ask an Murad, either, not all experts, the experts are the ones who are working at banks and other financial institutions, maybe they're diplomats whatever else. The vast majority of them are migrant labourers from South Asia and southeast Asia were coming in who I guarantee you were not called by HSBC for their opinions on life in do by. So it shows that there is a delineation that happens. And I've heard it described as something about like a temporal aspect to it. So. Experts are people who are going somewhere. But know that they're gonna come home at some point move back home, or that they're gonna move somewhere else that there's just like a temporary posting which is why a lot of them fall into, you know, diplomats or working for multinational corporations or whatnot while immigrant or migrant has more permanence to it that you're moving up and setting up shop elsewhere, but even then it still runs into issues..

Laura Redman Mark Elliott Brad Rickman HSBC Conde nast Elliott Stein Meredith Elliot UK Berlin producer South Asia Mike Lally UAE Branston Mary southeast Asia writer Sebastian
"conde nast" Discussed on Travelogue

Travelogue

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Travelogue

"Four. Welcome and happy Friday. This is travelogue podcast and cutting traveler, and we are here in the Conde nast podcast studios. I've got Katherine the grave. Hello, I got Sebastian mode act. Lou Bridget Jalan. Hello. All of those people are editors for Conde nast traveler, and they also right and they know things and they know people. My name is bregman. I'm hermit. And this is our show about well, okay, publicly, we're calling this late night eats. That's our polite public facing name for this thing that we have done internally. I think we can confess to podcast listeners that we've been calling this from the very beginning drunk food, douse, the idea, we loved the idea and we have remained faithful to that idea. Even though the hour trappings have attempted to paper that over with Jin -til discussions of late night that don't involve alcohol, but why do you think that is? I want to ask you guys that what is it about the experience of the middle of the night arriving? You're usually not out in the middle of the night unless you are doing something social and fun if you are. It's probably sad. And we don't want to write that roaming the streets. Yeah, I Austin this thing. Stephen. I lady, I liked it because I feel like that's when you really see a place right is this is the place that you don't find in the guidebooks, but it's where you find the people that really live in the city on a lot of these places, this package are not the best restaurants in the city, right? They're not even places that have foods that are emblematic place, but it's kind of like the place that we all know that everybody goes to after a few drinks or before a few drinks or inbetween and hangs out. And to me, that's where you find a true spirit of the place. So that's what I really liked about this. I think it's, I mean, maybe there are exceptions to the rule, but for the most part, we're talking like unhealthy greasy cheese, eat a little indulgent. Bridget did try and pitch something about kale salad as as I remember that everybody laugh..

Lou Bridget Jalan Conde nast traveler Conde nast Katherine Sebastian Jin Stephen
"conde nast" Discussed on Travelogue

Travelogue

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Travelogue

"We are also at Conde nast traveler on Facebook and YouTube, seeing traveler on Instagram and Twitter subscribe to the women who travel. Cast. If you haven't already shame on you. I'm sure you all already have and do tweet at us. We've just given you a lot of homework here. We need you to come back answer some of these questions because people here at travelogue wanna know, send us feedback review us on itunes. Don't forget as you do those things. Another great reason to tweet wish Lally a happy forty. Fifth birthday. He's always happy to get those to get those wishes Mark. How can people get in touch with you if they wanna reach you directly about this stuff? As they as they do on Twitter at mock jail with a k. and two, we love hearing feedback asks questions if you missed and please, I'm particularly interested in anyone from Kansas City. Tell us as out. So maters Alwi right wrong about that new energy because I think it saw it sounds so exciting. You know what's funny Mark. I've gotten a couple of tweets in the last week alone where people said, hey, I want you guys to do an episode about this particular thing or this particular destination. And we've been doing this for long enough now that sometimes we have and I'm able to go back and find it and send it out to them. And I love the efficiency of that instead of going like, okay, we'll put it in the hopper. We'll see when it comes up. I've got it right there. I can answer the question and it's great and it is. We want people, please remember we love the new episodes, but remember there three years ago now. Dental back and hopefully you'll find some interesting come, I come. I want to also thank Alex Hoenig who gave us the five five-storey view on the what you should never ever do in a hotel. Remembrance owed who said, I love through mine, Todd will commute those five star reviews really help us because it gets helps other people find us thinking. Yeah, thank you for the five star reviews more first reviews, nobody's can argue that Laura. How can people get in touch with you? I'm on Instagram at Laura, underscore Redman and Twitter at Dannon eight to five and Bridget. Where can everybody find you? You can find me on Instagram at b. r. and I am at broddrick have a great weekend. Everybody..

Twitter Laura Alex Hoenig Conde nast Lally YouTube Mark Facebook Kansas City Bridget Redman Todd three years
"conde nast" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Recode Decode

"No, right. They couldn't afford me. They can afford you. So they with the concept is that they, they have some issues kinda ask, because fact, checking is, is a lot of this stuff is is not something Conde nast wanted to be well. Yeah. I mean, I think Conde nast is indefinitely in there. You know into their credit, there's enough of a cut on your face there, but I don't mind that stuff. Right. Okay. Yeah. But that's, you know, that's not you. I mean, some of the claims in the. Medical claims on goop are really quite outrageous. And you know, like I said, they pony up with anti vaccine. Conspiracy theorists, you know, people who write for them, believe that the mercury in your fillings or you know, causing whatever the, you know, I mean, all name your conspiracy theory. So you know, you say. Today? It's, yeah, I try not to get read too many conspiracy theories because you start thinking about the way how how, how gray, but you know it does happen. So what do you hope to do? What do you do? And then I want to get into wellness the wellness industry in general online. I just hope people. I want people to learn how to look up good information. I want people to know that they can question their doctors. I'm, you know to say, hey, why do I need to do this? What's the information? I mean the the thing that makes me most proud is I'll get an Email from patient. So you know, my doctor told me I couldn't get an IUD because I'd never been pregnant before and I printed off your blog post and I took it in. I showed it to my doctor and then my doctor said, oh yeah, you're right. So you know, I, I'm hoping to empower women, right? It's your body and your choice. And if you if you want to do raw goat's milk for parasites, you don't have, obviously that is your choice, but it would be correct for you to know that you don't have those parasites and that you could get really ill from. Right. And then you make the decision with the right info. Formation. Right, right, right. And so when are you going to end this with goober just gonna keep like fact checking them? Well, you know, I just write about things that I think are that women want to know about, right, you know. So I think that if they're going to keep promoting, vaginal misinformation, you know, I'll probably keep calling them out on it, but you know, I like right about a lot of other things too. So you know? Yeah. I mean, I think that they should know that there's other people out there looking as well as being very you. 'cause a lot of attention towards it, which is great, which is important. You know again, it's one thing to do. Silly things. It's another thing to do medical things when we get back on and talk about that because I think wellness online has really taken off. It's become the biggest, whether it's meditation, whether it's vitamin, there's all these internet companies that are now doing pill different pills wine in them and things like that. I do you. Are you aware of some of these? Yeah, you don't eat any of them. But yeah, I know that I got to talk about that when we get back here, Dr Jen Guenter she is the. She's a doctor. She lives in Marin county where there's a lot of wa. Wa, wa. Wa going up there. Right? Oh, yeah. I know it's always interesting to to. Yeah, yes, yes, there is. She's an OB GYN and a pain medicine physician, and she's been taking the wellness industry to task, which I think is really important because a lot of it is online. And in fact, most of the growth of it is online. Today's show is brought to you by transfer wise. Do you ever need to send money internationally? Sure. Your Bank or pay pal can get your money from a to b, but the transfer will cost you more than it should a lot more. That's the old way of doing things. Let me tell you about the new smarter and cheaper way to send money. Internationally. Transfer wise transfer wise was founded by two friends, Todd and Christo who were frustrated by their banks, bad exchange rates and high fees. They wondered what if we could bypass the banks entirely. So they built transfer wise that was seven years ago today more than two million people use. Transfer wise people sending money home businesses, paying suppliers, freelancers getting.

Dr Jen Guenter Conde nast wa Marin county Todd Christo seven years milk
Europe sizzles as heatwave intensifies across continent

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:43 min | 2 years ago

Europe sizzles as heatwave intensifies across continent

"To ten years, Conde nast is owned by a parent company called advance publications which similarly, similarly split off its cable assets in two thousand sixteen. So we're seeing in, you know, in many ways, sort of unbundling of these large conglomerates that cobbled together dispirit businesses. So we might see some special specialization in the publishing industry in that sense. You've mentioned that why change in the industry and the dating with the the she's around on for tising moving online and the dominance companies like Google, I is he down to that or do we also have to factor in specific missteps that we can say that estimate? I mean, there's certainly been missteps along the way as true with every media company. One of the ways a lot of publishers are trying to ramp up revenue is through commerce, essentially, creating content that audiences can come to and then buy products through. So you see the New York Times. For example, recently bought a startup called wire cutter, which is a great commerce business Conde nast tried to build an inhouse commerce business to the tune of one hundred million dollars that failed miserably over the last year or two. So that alone would make up a large proportion of their losses last year. So whether you know legacy publishers, which would like to get into the commerce game. Game and take back some of the advertising revenue they lost. They're able to do that is really unclear, but you do see a lot of missteps lot a big and potentially bad bets, David. Thank you very much. David about that from a splinter in just a moment, we'll learn about new career for Hillary Clinton. I, here's some more of the day's top stories. Apple has formally become the first public company to be worth. One trillion dollars had passed that landmark after the value of Chas and trading, Neil apple stock has been rising since it reported better than expected results. He this week Chaz have increased by moving in Levin hundred percent. Since the first iphone was introduced eleven years ago. US national security chief. So if United to warn that America's democracy is in the crosshairs of foreign adversaries, Dan Coats, director of national intelligence has will Russia continues to try to weaken and divide the US ahead of November's midterm elections Kremlin continues to deny the claims full Costa's a warning, Europe's all time. Temperature record could be broken in the coming days as a heatwave continues the record of forty eight degrees celsius set in Athens in nineteen seventy. Seven looks likely to be toppled with a warnings are in place in Portugal and Spain. With the young and the elderly said to be a particular consent. This is the multiple..

Conde Nast David Apple United States New York Times Hillary Clinton Google Tising Portugal Athens Dan Coats Chas Neil Apple Spain Russia Levin Europe
Rihanna Ditches Her Eyebrows for the September Issue of British Vogue

Lori and Julia

03:02 min | 2 years ago

Rihanna Ditches Her Eyebrows for the September Issue of British Vogue

"July e Thanks for reminding sending me into a panic spiral my, gosh all right well, let's, clear up a little something from yesterday's dirt alert yesterday in the dirt alert. We talked about beyond say, having control over the September issue cover of vogue magazine in an unprecedented move this has never happened before. And there were rumors that maybe this was signaling Anna Wintour, departure as editor in chief of vogue magazine while I'm here to tell you. That is not the case it's not know the CEO of Conde NAS has issued a statement this. Afternoon saying the following and went tour is an incredibly talented and creative leader whose influence is beyond. Measure she is integral to the future of our company's transformation and has agreed to work with? Me, indefinitely. Has her role as vogue. Editor in chief and artistic director, of Conde nast center last year yes yes she's on her last year she's doing the wind down well and what that says to me is that they're going to allow her to say Publicly when she's. Going to let her have the, power move in that decision so even though there's probably behind the scenes talks leaving Last September issue and they didn't know. That people would notice it so much I think it's, good that they put, out this notice so that, vogue, doesn't dry the. Attention the fact that Anna has been there at the helm what twenty five years at least at least beyond say hired Tyler Mitchell the first black photographer. Ever to shoot a VO cover is a blemish on Tenure at vote Hundred twenty. Six years old, but I mean I was like. Shocked, about that yeah I really wasn't I think, in the fashion photography. World but, you, know I mean. They'd sounds like beyond saying everything she control she'd like with help of course, yes dick your direction so she's controlling the cover image, all, the. Images, of herself inside the magazine all the copy with, all without doing an. Interview about oh yeah well it's going to be Lauren comments on. The photographs which means no interview also the fact that Tyler Mitchell is only twenty three years. Old so young up and, coming really giving him an opportunity to be the photographer for the cover now, in other vogue fashion magazine news over on British vogue is on the cover of the, September issue sees the first. Black woman ever, to be on the cover of. British, vogue September issue Catching up Now. This, image okay I want you guys. As opinions. It's Riano she looks gorgeous and pencil. Thin eyebrows I'm talking Jean Harlow. Skinny eyebrows do we think that the big eyebrow trend is going to be over after we see this image of riana There's going to be a good percentage of people who will do that though yeah Julia.

Vogue Magazine Tyler Mitchell Anna Wintour Editor In Chief Conde Nas Fashion Magazine Conde Nast Center Jean Harlow CEO Julia Lauren Director Twenty Three Years Twenty Five Years Six Years
The Goop-iest Revelations from Gwyneth Paltrow's New York Times Profile

Lori and Julia

02:52 min | 2 years ago

The Goop-iest Revelations from Gwyneth Paltrow's New York Times Profile

"Thank you for joining us Laurie is promising us really UC vintage scandal at the bottom of. Our that she had to really clean up I. Did have to redact a lot of words I did have to redact a lot of words and about a movie, about, a book that we, had member Scotty Bowers the gas station guy That he's from, way, back when doesn't matter That's ever, been written about Hollywood and it really bestseller and it's a movie when it's out and I've got an. Exclusive conversation with filmmaker and just a rehash that's what you were doing earlier today All the sexual, stories that we learned from Scotty Bauer because virtually every story he told about on everyone had passed on. He's like ninety five great so anyway This, is a story. From the New York, Times they did, the New York Times magazine they did a profile of. Gwyneth Paltrow yes and it is not a stent standard celebrity profile it's all, about, goof the wellness wellness the pseudoscience and how Gwen it has monetize, her elitism, if you. Will. Be has Expressive yeah inherent, elitism and it, is a long and well ridden and Greenwich continues to. Be absolutely full of, crap Okay Okay here's few. Highlights she's no interest in making any group proud acts mass market to broad. Audiences she, says it's crucial to me that we remain, aspirational, quote, unquote outrageously, expensive. Yes And she said but the price. Point because content is always. Free ourself. Is. Beautiful our ingredients. Are beautiful you can't get a lower price point you can't make these things. Mass market, that's Bs some of her stuff you certainly, can, her, candles that's. Right Why her goop magazine didn't work out with Conde nast she. Only had one. Episode and it was she. Was. On the cover with Brad feld Chuck she to, the one she was covered in mud in the, second one with. Brad feld truck about. Yeah so she only had two quarterlies. She would make it through I know. It so here's what she said. Okay a company that's really. In transition And they do things in a very old school way? But. It was amazing to work with Anna I love her she's. A total idol. Of mine we realized we. Could. Do a better job in house Okay which means what She wanted to boss around Conde, nast to writer.

Scotty Bauer Brad Feld Scotty Bowers Conde Nast Gwyneth Paltrow Conde Laurie New York Anna The New York Times Hollywood Goop Magazine Greenwich Nast Gwen Writer Chuck
"conde nast" Discussed on Travelogue

Travelogue

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Travelogue

"Four travelogue podcast conde nast traveler we are here in the podcast i've got meredith kerry sebastian and bridget hallinan all of whom are podcast veterans at this point say hello people hello hi my name's roderick mun and we have a couple of housekeeping things to take care of before we get into this week's topic i one of these is a correction so inner aplastic spot cast on june eighth we lumped espresso in with other single use plastic products and vendors that was not accurate i did not know that i'm actually in this presser user did not realize that was true this bresso's pods it turns out are made from aluminum even touching them it's a little hard to tell because of the way that the aluminum is machine but aluminum is quite recyclable of course and espresso does in fact have recycling program that's relatively robust at least in terms of the consumer facing piece of it so here's what you can do if you are an espresso user and want to recycle your pods this is something you should do something i'm going do you can get recycling bags directly from espresso so they will ship them to you if you order from espresso if you order your coffee from this so they'll give them to you for free but you also pick them up from espresso boutiques these are things that exist typically inside existing retailers like macy's bloomingdale's just in case you're wondering what an espresso boutique is i did not know yeah you can order them online which is you know among the easier ways to do that if you're an internet person you can call them and they have a customer relations department recycling program and you can ask for their i'm not a phone person myself so i would not be opting for that but you you can if you are a phone person and they will give you a prepaid return package and then you can take that return package and again did not know this but it's kind of cool they have a program at ups you can drop them off at ups drop locations like the ups store or other dropoffs ubs drop boxes also office depot staples did not know that ups was connected with those but in any case you can so that's actually fairly convenient and then the other thing you can do is take them to cerlo todd williams cinema they have a partnership with those retailer so it is good to know that and it does make me feel a lot better about drinking coffee other housekeeping things just to get them out of the way women who travel is in season three right now what's on tap mair so we've got a lot coming up we are still working out our schedule for the rest of summer so if you've been listening you have ideas for us please let lally or glue and i know coming up we have secrets from ex pats which i think will be really fun we have a bunch office and then maybe a few people surprise guests coming on as well and we just recorded a really fun episode about the curse of the beach read and why love the title by the way when i saw that you know it's something that when we were talking in previous episode about all the books that we loved and would read again before a trip to europe we were talking we just kinda got carried away on honestly we realize that we love talking about books and then we also realize that so many betrayed cz are considered fluff and they're almost always written by women so we wanted to kind of turn that on its head talking about all the books we love reading at the beach exclusively written by women of course and it was a really great episode okay subscribe to that there's more stuff coming and then the final final final housekeeping thing here the reader's choice awards so your chance to review travel which not everybody gets to do and that is ending voting ends at midnight on saturday june thirtieth which is tomorrow if you're listening to this on the release date you should go vote now if you haven't already against your chance to have the voice but also prizes so you can win our grand prize is a two week viking ocean cruise which is actually pretty spectacular and here's the thing if you have already voted you can still vote again every time that you vote every time.

bridget hallinan conde nast meredith kerry sebastian two week
"conde nast" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"conde nast" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"And women ever really work together you know i mean i grew up when i came of age when there was a lot of gender discrimination the world has changed and we're now at a time when so many men i know say veteran even a how to deal with women at all they're afraid that everything they do is going to be inappropriate there is a lot going on and no one knows better than joanne lipman who has written that's what she said what men need to know and women need to tell them about working together and joanna todd and it's having a great career editor in chief of usa today part of the gannett giant publishing company started at the wall street journal became deputy managing editor no woman had ever been in that post before and then founding editor in chief of conde nast portfolio magazine and portfolio dot com so your timing is perfect tell me we're hoskin and this is something that you have been aware of since you were in college and out of college you and your friends all smart talented and all how to deal with a lot of the same issues you're so right about that give back in the workforce.

joanne lipman usa wall street journal managing editor joanna todd editor in chief founding editor conde nast portfolio
"conde nast" Discussed on Travelogue

Travelogue

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Travelogue

"Four conde nast traveler i'm here in the podcast studios with andrea whittle and errand florio who are editors for conde nast traveler and we have becca meisner who is our west coast editor and she's here by facetime obviously we can never know whether it's based on skype and we have behind us the mother of all storms that just broke out we record on tuesday so i hope new york is still here on friday when we released but just in case it's not the podcast will be stored in off site facility and we'll make sure that the people can get it so today we're gonna talk about what makes a great hotel we just released our hot list which is our annual list of the best new hotels in the world and it doesn't need cover the world so i thought it would be a great time for us to talk about what are really great hotel is how that definition has evolved and also talk about this list that we put together that takes an entire year to make it's one of the longest lasting things that we do the most effort full things that we do so i'm curious starting kind of at the very beginning which is where we are now for next year's list in a way how many hotels do we consider for the hot list starting from the very beginning there's not a definite number that we consider we always really do is pay attention to all of the opening all of the world that we think may be of interest i think in this year's list we had almost five hundred hotels that we started out with we landed on a roundabout hundred but in the years in the past we've had any range of like three hundred or becky you've been working on this longer than i have how many do you think been the highest number of started with this year was pretty high around five hundred that is not every single hotel has opened in the past year it's every hotel that we think might have a chance for making the hot list so you're ready cutting down probably two thirds of the actual hotels have opened around the world so i don't know huge.

editor skype new york nast andrea whittle florio conde nast becca meisner facetime becky
"conde nast" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"conde nast" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Just south of six ninety four and highway sixty one in maplewood he's a mytalk dirt alert hello miss elizabeth girls happy monday thank you story thinks girls i want to ask you if you think is this a real story or is this just something we hear about every so often anna wintour being out at vogue this is what page six is asking today is anna wintour out at vogue and chatter coming out of conde nast and the publishing industry is that anna could be on her way out of conde nast and out of vogue as artistic director sources they say a host of stunned sources have been saying that her plan is to exit her all powerful role at the publishing house this summer after the july wedding of her daughter be to francesco karazin who is the son of former italian vogue editor franco susani are we buying this well i fashioned mind is exploding i can't even believe that they wouldn't do it before the met gala which is you know the first monday in may wow okay so conde nast a spokesperson says we emphatically denied these rumors but declined to comment more specifically on ana win tours plans now remember page six says they have a whole bunch of sources she's sixty eight years old and this would allow her to step aside on a high after closing vogues all important september issue okay so they would close it it would go to print and then she would be leaving after july the likely replacement is a guy named edward nfl who is vogues uk editor and they don't know if anyone would replace anna wintour as the artistic director of conde nast she ascended to that title in two thousand thirteen because she has oversight over all of the kinda nast magazine titles the reality here is that the magazine business is changing they'd been closing magazines for example teen vogue self and details they're fighting to try to compete online sources are telling the post that the company is in about one hundred million dollars a year in the red while i know i mean you know look at other conde nast people bringing carter just had his last issue advantage vanity fair he was there for twentyfive years the woman lure she was there for a long time that women add glamour cindy leave or was there for sixteen years he's out and well this was two days yeah i don't know.

maplewood anna wintour conde nast franco susani edward nfl editor director carter elizabeth francesco karazin nast magazine teen vogue nast one hundred million dollars sixty eight years twentyfive years sixteen years two days
"conde nast" Discussed on Travelogue

Travelogue

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Travelogue

"And happy friday this is travelogue the podcast conde nast traveler and i'm here in the conde nast podcast studios with laura redman and rachel peach mun laura's of course our deputy digital director and she edits our website rachel's a writer for us and on the skype we've got tyler moss who's also a writer both rachel and tyler have covered our subject today for us recently and in the past couple of years months brad rickman and our topic for the week is both a complicated one slightly sad one and one that we hope we can help people get a little bit more pleasure joy and satisfaction out of if we can get to an end point with that but it's flying with pets which has been in the news a lot legally and which we have been covering there was an explosive story last week which will get into but the first thing that i was curious about from you guys rachel and tyler is i'm not clear on what the actual policies are the official policies for the may carriers particularly domestic do you guys have a handle on that sure in general the pet can come in the cabin with you if there is space and the pet is small enough to fit in its carrier underneath the seat in front of you the pet also needs to be able to stand up and turn around within the carrier on each airline has specifics on the size of the carrier but i believe it's generally like seventeen by ten inches and each airline i feel like has variations on that right it's so important to check airline website at the very beginning to make sure that you can put your pet in a carrier on their plane because united only recently and again we'll get into this united had a big program call it's pet safe programme which allowed you to ship your pet by cargo and they just put it on hold because they've been having a lot of problems but like typically it's either carrier in the cabin right or in car.

conde nast traveler laura redman director writer tyler moss conde nast rachel peach brad rickman official ten inches
"conde nast" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

"Perry i am in los angeles on wilshire boulevard at the conde nast offices here the very swank and i'm in chris the smith's office high christa highnet um so i usually do these elaborate in droves we have music and is probably music playing right now actually but but i figured lend let's lay you tell the wounded on you before we dive into two where we're gonna talk about today lena don't worry i don't raise leg because some som lead in music uh look what do you want to now well to how long have you been a vanity fair been very for a long time as you can see there's lots of pictures on my walls of hollywood covers a i think starting from nineteen ninety six at leonardo dicaprio uh and last year's behind me but i've been in la now twenty years so so long time and just to paint the room for people uh there are lots and lots of vanity fair covers all of the wall as christopher said and there are also is a giant share sign which is apparently pretty famous in your office can give us a little more adds that i like to say is a little famous well we when we photographed share for the cover of the magazine december two thousand ten i wrote that coverstory uh but i also my duel my many jobs here's the west coast editor i attended that shoot and we had this share signed built for her of which she laid across said in its the opening spread in the magazine and we thought i'll be great we should have her sign it and then we can eventually auction it off and it it lights up and than you stole it you snuck it out i didn't actually still and so she she she signed it and then when the shoot wrapped in the next it we were clear and everything out the guys that we can't move this can can't really transported we can only move at one time and i was like all right just moving into the office and so here at sat.

Perry los angeles smith hollywood editor conde nast chris christa highnet leonardo dicaprio christopher twenty years
"conde nast" Discussed on Women Worldwide

Women Worldwide

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"conde nast" Discussed on Women Worldwide

"We just made so much video like at one point where making three hundred videos a month so that's a law it's a law it was just really the time of like what is happening in this landscape is it make a lot of video it doesn't matter if quality make a little bit and focus on quality like the the way to do it kept changing was before they were influencers in the youtube space it was really like a new frontier and then i moved to new york and started at cardenas to entertainment at the very beginning when john awestruck to solve that so kind of how that was built which is actually pretty interesting is that movies like argo were uh from articles of conde nast magazines so that was like started nova yes started as like a gq article or something and conde announced itself was retaining was making no money off of these movies being made basically so don osheroff came in and she was like we have all this ip we should be owning it um and made a film division tv division at a digital division so i started in the digital division right at the beginning and we made videos across all the different uh magazine brands glamour vogue selves um but apetite even it was it was really fun and yeah that was kind of like that the beginning of that one and now i met awesomeness but digital is like in full force now so it's it's a nice it's nice to be in a place where like people are recognising now that this is the way people consume konta.

new york cardenas john conde don osheroff youtube conde nast