8 Burst results for "Concerto Grosso"

"concerto grosso" Discussed on SF Ballet Blog

SF Ballet Blog

03:17 min | Last month

"concerto grosso" Discussed on SF Ballet Blog

"It was to to be in a huge huge stage with a beautiful story with. The Costume Beautiful Gusts Yuma Mason. SAD ON A. I Don. I don't know how to say this is too much is too much. The audience was. Sold will defend theater was beautiful to. Everyone expecting so much about the. Each each one of us. And Yeah, and then the actor went up. I felt. The freedom. Freedom than than. Any such, a my soul than E, you. Makes me Express on. This what I'm what I'm saying is it doesn't it doesn't luckily doesn't stop me up. You makes me feel they. This is what you. What you how you know. You know how to do this and And I just couldn't. Say. Thank you to the rectory goes I was crying. Behind it. Back station I couldn't believe the Everyone was. Saying. Relations because. It's a big thing for. About a dancer of big thing and and. Get reading. Today's is a really big challenge. You could have when. Ron Too but he buddy went. It went right. Didn't. So you was happy to. An. Vice. Important. But. Yeah. So it was a It was an experience that you will will stay my my my heart forever. And then after that, I wanted to keep an eye on the time. But after that you did you sort of led off the gala with Stars and Stripes yes? Yes it's true. Dental office season. You do Concerto Grosso which is know a piece that many many many young. have, done over the. Bigger so. Yeah and you're learning puck as well. Right? The book. You kind of looking at all that together. Did you think? You know. Maybe this might be my ear maybe get a promotion. Maybe I'm going to be a celeste or were you just really in the work and focused not thinking about it? I guess I wasn't about in a moment but a an maybe. By the end of the season will will be. The fence how it was the. Yeah, they might the results. Opportunity you. Accept taking one by one every fourteen. Bella was incredible. beleza gallows..

Bella Concerto Grosso Ron celeste
"concerto grosso" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:36 min | 7 months ago

"concerto grosso" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Concerto comes from two Italian words with sort of meanings first concerto means in agreement or together like the word concert. You go to a concert to hear people playing together but the Italian word contract. Tari has to do with struggling. And a concerto also has to do with one or more solo instruments doing friendly battle in concert with a larger group. Italian COMPOSER GIUSEPPE. Torelli gets most of the credit for developing the instrumental concerto. In the late sixteen hundreds an Italian who lived a bit later on Tonio Vivaldi wrote Zillions of Concerto will actually only five hundred or so. But it seems like Zillions Vivaldi's most famous set of concertos named for the four seasons the earliest concertos were written for violins. But you can have a concerto for any instrument. Here's one that you'll have nipple Makoma road for trumpet. One for cello by front-seat high one for Tuba by Refund Williams who in the late twentieth century Scottish composer James Macmillan wrote a concerto called vinnie Emmanuel for percussionist. Evelyn Glenn you can also have a concerto with more than one Solo Instrument Wolfgang Gone Medina's Mozart wrote this one for flute and Harp Dmitri Shostakovich wrote a wonderful concerto for piano and trumpet the end of the peace sense just like music for a silent movie. Let's because when he was young Shostakovich had a job playing piano for silent movies in box day composers also wrote something called the Concerto Grosso which does not mean. A concerto with slimy stuff. Losing out of it grow is Italian for great. Instead of just one or two soloists. A Concerto Grosso has a whole group of soloists. A smaller group pitted against a larger group. George Frederic Handel. Who lived at the same time as Bach wrote quite a few Concerto Grossi? That's the official plural of Concerto Grosso. a lot of Bach's Brandenburg concertos fall into the Concerto Grosso category in the Brandenburg Concerto. Number two the small group consists of Trumpet Flute Oboe Violin and the big group is made up of string instruments. You've heard music from Johann Sebastian faulks Brandenburg Concerto number. Two so by now you might be wondering how many Brandenburg concertos there are and how they got a name like Brandenburg. I'll tell you that next week. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for Kids and produce it with Pimm Lander at wgn Cincinnati. Please join me next. Time for the story of the Brandon. Birds on classics for kids..

Concerto Grosso Brandenburg Concerto Dmitri Shostakovich Johann Sebastian faulks Brande Zillions Vivaldi Brandenburg Pimm Lander Tonio Vivaldi George Frederic Handel Bach Tari Torelli Evelyn Glenn James Macmillan Naomi Lewin vinnie Emmanuel Cincinnati Refund Williams
Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

Classics for Kids

05:25 min | 7 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

"Kids. Concerto comes from two Italian words with sort of meanings first concerto means in agreement or together like the word concert. You go to a concert to hear people playing together but the Italian word contract. Tari has to do with struggling. And a concerto also has to do with one or more solo instruments doing friendly battle in concert with a larger group. Italian COMPOSER GIUSEPPE. Torelli gets most of the credit for developing the instrumental concerto. In the late sixteen hundreds an Italian who lived a bit later on Tonio Vivaldi wrote Zillions of Concerto will actually only five hundred or so. But it seems like Zillions Vivaldi's most famous set of concertos named for the four seasons the earliest concertos were written for violins. But you can have a concerto for any instrument. Here's one that you'll have nipple Makoma road for trumpet. One for cello by front-seat high one for Tuba by Refund Williams who in the late twentieth century Scottish composer James Macmillan wrote a concerto called vinnie Emmanuel for percussionist. Evelyn Glenn you can also have a concerto with more than one Solo Instrument Wolfgang Gone Medina's Mozart wrote this one for flute and Harp Dmitri Shostakovich wrote a wonderful concerto for piano and trumpet the end of the peace sense just like music for a silent movie. Let's because when he was young Shostakovich had a job playing piano for silent movies in box day composers also wrote something called the Concerto Grosso which does not mean. A concerto with slimy stuff. Losing out of it grow is Italian for great. Instead of just one or two soloists. A Concerto Grosso has a whole group of soloists. A smaller group pitted against a larger group. George Frederic Handel. Who lived at the same time as Bach wrote quite a few Concerto Grossi? That's the official plural of Concerto Grosso. a lot of Bach's Brandenburg concertos fall into the Concerto Grosso category in the Brandenburg Concerto. Number two the small group consists of Trumpet Flute Oboe Violin and the big group is made up of string instruments.

Concerto Grosso Brandenburg Concerto Dmitri Shostakovich Zillions Vivaldi Tonio Vivaldi George Frederic Handel Bach Tari Torelli Evelyn Glenn James Macmillan Vinnie Emmanuel Refund Williams Tuba Wolfgang Official
"concerto grosso" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:12 min | 8 months ago

"concerto grosso" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A Thor vaults mattress daughter more at Charles the P. music Rogers from Christopherson dot com roan based right here in New York both Mar of night them have on new sounds experience it's a Saturday with electronic night Saturdays music that only were seems heard to midnight inflect their writing later for string instruments and even that we when will it's take completely you on a acoustic tour of that and will begin a with couple some music of different from Pinterest's musical Voss languages all boxes mashed Latvian together composer for example probably the leading this Latvian is actually composer two different of our time bands playing together in the pretty background well known for his choral Constantinople music and so this and piece tell them is both for and chorus and with strings a name like Constantinople and factors from an album in the sound of all by these the traditional choir of Clare near college eastern instruments Cambridge university you might expect directed based by in Graham Ross someplace like Istanbul and it's but essentially in fact from Canada nocturnal will also hear peaceful of the group mano sonic Swayze landscape which includes it's called musicians from Mozambique plain scapes Norway and Sweden what you'll hear and Zimbabwe are these kind of and evocations lots of other of night unexpected on the planes collisions and of bird cultures song and appears musical styles and things like tomorrow that what you night won't hear our at words midnight on new so sound this is basically a long vocal leaves with the chorus alternating if with you'd like the to string hear this ensemble program again it's in our and new it it's sounds just audio it really archives sets they are the online mood and at keeps new sounds you there dot for org a good playlists fifteen are minutes there with spellings here of it all is the various by peta names Rhys mosques and the easiest called way to plain find scapes both the playlist and the audio archive for any show is to have that programs number this is new silence number forty three thirty seven and you'll find us at new sounds dot org up next is a piece by New York composer Christopher Cerrone and let me be more specific this is a Brooklyn composer and he lets you know it the piece that we're going to hear is called high windows and it's called that because it was inspired by the windows of St Anne's church in Brooklyn heights which is where the piece was premiered it's written for the somewhat unusual combination of string quartet and string orchestra so it's almost like one of those baroque concerto Grosso is where you have a group of soloists or maybe a single composite soloist and then the larger ensemble playing behind them and so hi windows referring to the church of St Anne's that is not the first time that Brooklyn has inserted itself into Chris surrounds music and in fact halfway through this piece he starts to quote from one of his earlier works a piano piece called lights camera horn named after the subway station in Brooklyn let's hear this performance by the Argus string quartet and the string orchestra of Brooklyn both conducted by ifly spindale and transmissibility English.

"concerto grosso" Discussed on SF Ballet Blog

SF Ballet Blog

12:46 min | 9 months ago

"concerto grosso" Discussed on SF Ballet Blog

"Everyone and welcome in Francisco. bally's to the point podcast. I'm running Charlotte. The Associate Director of Audience Development here at San Francisco Ballet and I am your host this week and every week for to the point the podcast tells you all about San Francisco Ballet's season performances. This time we are talking about program to classical local revision you have to imagine the parenthetical there so it's re vision so revision classical revision or classical vision this program as a tasting flight of Contemporary Ballet From Stanton Welch's updated classicism hence the classical revision to mark Morris's quirky cool with a rotating in group of directors choice valleys in between all the ballets on this evening highlight different elements of the company's style and really serve as showpieces for the company's dancers. Today we're GonNa talk a little bit about that. What I mean by the company style and how these three choreographers work within it? As well of course about the converse about the choreographers themselves these ballets and what to look for ready for that. All right. Then let's get to the point. San Francisco Ballet Company known for its first Attila. Eighty performing valets in a variety righty of styles whereas some companies devote a lot of time in training to one type of ballet even if they perform multiple kinds are companies. Style is a kind of anti style and ability to shift quickly from one way of performing to another with a characteristic cleanliness and speed in the course of classical revision. You'll see this ability ready to transform as the program features just about every style of ballet imaginable. But you'll also see a kind of consistency and approach to music. And physicality that stays is true across the different ballets the evening opens with the most recent ballet on the program. bespoke choreographed Stanton Welsh in two thousand eighteen for the unbound festival stanton has a longstanding relationship San Francisco Ballet He. I came here as a student and then returned as part of the Australian ballet's delegation united. We Dance Festival in Nineteen Ninety Ninety five where his work was first seen in the United States after his time as a dancer he turned fulltime choreography and artistic leadership and he's now the artistic director of Houston ballet he's made several ballets for San Francisco Valley over the years and has gotten to know our dancers really well in this case he was really thinking about them as individuals paying attention to how they move given class and what kinds of feelings and attributes they bring to their movement. I'll let him elaborate a bit. This ballet is really an example of neo classicism in Bali a style popularized by George Balanchine in the middle of the twentieth century. And one of the many styles of ballet performed by San Francisco Ballet Neoclassical bally's look a lot like classical ballets. They're usually performed in point shoes. And the shapes dancers make are fundamentally classical or fundamentally based on the basic positions of ballet. But there's something new about them to hence the neo. Sometimes it's in the costumes as bespoke where the dancers are in Leotards. Rather than Tutu's sometimes it's in the choreography geography which incorporates. Just enough modern dance jazz to seem not completely purely classical. And sometimes it's in the theme or the plot or rather in the lack thereof as most neo. Classical ballets are fundamentally abstract about music and movement but not about a story but just because a neoclassical classical ballet made a story that doesn't mean it lacks in meaning rather these valleys can be deeply meaningful in much. The way that abstract art is deeply meaningful and moving bespoke spoke in particular is about the brevity dancers career and the way a dancer. Mourns the loss of this art form to which they've devoted so much time devotion. This is expressed in the Bali through one key motif the way the dancers arms move the hands of a clock to suggest the passage of time and in the valleys final moments stanton seems to reference the Martha Graham quotation. It quote a dancer dies twice once when they stopped dancing. And it's this first. Death is more painful. The seems to come back to this idea about the dancer. Dying twice as the dancers one by one lay themselves down to rest at the end of the Palais but classical revision only show the company's neoclassical capacity but also their classical contemporary and dramatic abilities in the middle of this program is what we're calling director's choice a rotating set of three ballets that feature for our dancers really showing off each individually do best. Depending on the night of the week you might see our dancers in circles and Sierras showing off their classical technique and Helgi Thomason Soiree musicale or victor softies GRANDPA classique or they might be in leotards and bare legs. In Christopher Wilkins after the rain potted a mile Thatchers brand new five forty nine or David Dawson's Swan Lake pod which is not the classical pep version but his own contemporary take on that music each of these ballets as an example of contemporary Bali or the dancers might be in a more of a dance theater mode as in Volcano Parolees recent world premiere foreshadow or Daniel Rose for Pixie or they might be right back into neo classicism and virtuosic display like Thomson's Concerto Grosso. In any given night you'll see three you'll get an a a wide array these short gala style pizza ballet terminology for a series of short ballets or excerpts it showcase individual dancers provide a real sense of the range of the company's artists. Depending on the night you come you'll see a selection of three of these work that the Gary said that but it bears repeating repeating. And that means if you'd like prices to show up see what's in store it'll change every night if you come more than once and if you like to plan ahead details about which bally's you'll see see which night are available now on the San Francisco Ballet website and as I said no harm in coming more than once so that you can catch all of these works the the final piece on the evening or afternoon. If you're a matinee goer shifts shifts gears entirely the overture alone will let you know that. You're in for something really the different with Mark Morris as Nineteen eighty-nine sandpaper ballet. And No. If you don't already know you have already seen it. I'm not going to spoil the joke. The point of this podcast. Pardon the PUN is to give you a sense of what to look for not to ruin any surprises. Morris is known for being something of a marvelously musical iconoclast working mainly in the modern dance world world but frequently commissioned by ballet companies and especially by San Francisco Ballet. He's made more works for us than for any other ballet company in the world so the question would might be why well a big part of it is the orchestra. San Francisco Ballet's orchestras known for being particularly excellent. And as more says in his recent memoir titled Out Loud He did finally come around to trusting them with the music he gave them to perform he called sandpaper ballet his. This is a quote apology and joke. For that original misapprehension he had about the orchestra because the music by Leroy Anderson is hardly a master of the classical repertory but rather a collection of novelty numbers written as encores. The Boston pops and we will have a special edition. podcast in this feed about the music itself so stay tuned for back this ballet features eleven anderson songs including the typewriter featuring typewriter played by the workers percussionist fiddle-faddle little fat oil and the syncopated clock. And the costumes are equally fun. Isaac Mizrahi unitards and a brilliant green across the dancers chests are painted blue Sky With white clouds and if the dancers lineup and height order the horizon line runs straight across meaning that on a short dancer. The blue segment of the costume was only gonNA GONNA come to our shoulders while on a tall one. It may go all the way down to his waist. They also wear green gloves and for the women green point shoes. I was actually recently listening to an old dance in Steph. podcast which is a podcast. Well worth lesson. And the host of that show. Were interviewing Isaac Nick Mizrahi about his new memoir and he said that the gloves were a bit of a battle dancers. Don't necessarily like wearing things on their hands. Especially if they have to do partnering and things but in the end he won that and he was right. Those gloves really hope make the costume. We've been talking a lot about style today. So it's worth returning to that idea for a minute minute. This ballet rather defies categorization. But that's really how it shows off our dancers versatility. They need to be clear that they need to be clever without about being cheesy witty without mugging for the audience and casual without being sloppy. More choreography here has a jazzy edge to it at moments almonds but it also has a kind of softness through the rest of the shoulders away in which they seemed trail a bit behind the body and the legs and feet as often taper hyper classical as they are turned in and contemporary the ballet changes mode and mood as frequently as it changes music and it is is really the musicality of this ballet. It's a big part of what makes it so charming to watch. Morris is intensely musical. He even has begun to conduct a bit when his company performs and this ballet is the epitome of the George Balanchine Dictum hear the music. See The dance. Morris uses the dancers to highlight certain details. The music moments. It's of syncopated specific instruments. So that watching the dance really makes you take this. Sometimes chilly seeming music seriously. It makes you literally see its complexity and it. Also I'll add that there are few at George Balanchine quotations embedded within the ballet. So see if if anyone who's been seeing a lot of balancing work can pick out some of those moments but for all its complexity there's a satisfying simplicity to this bally's organization. If you watch any Bali enough times you'll often start to notice some kind of pattern or at least that's something I tell people all the time in this podcast. Maybe it's a step that comes back over and over again or a gesture that repeat heat like the clock arm gesture bespoke which I talked about a few minutes ago. But the main pattern in sandpaper ballet doesn't need multiple viewings to notice it's a grid that starts and ends many sections of the piece several times throughout the twenty five dancers. And yes. It's a twenty five member cast assemble themselves into a five by five grid. The repeated motifs signals both kind of choreographic ending at a new beginning. Almost like shaking an extra sketch to start design. But it's not quite the same every time mm-hmm each time the grid is formed dancers in different locations and they even keep teach sometimes backstage during the studio to make sure they know where they're going. These kinds kinds of repeated ideas often suggests something important about the dance and the grid is no different as the dancers scramble and then unscramble themselves. They show how they're part of a group and yet still jill individuals several solo pop out of the crowd. And of course the ballet for Solos and potted as they blend back in creating a kind of seamless whole and AH classical revision from the classical to the very much revised. Thanks for tuning into the season of to the point and meet me right back here for previews of the rest of the seasons since performances as well as that special bonus episode. I mentioned.

San Francisco Ballet Mark Morris San Francisco Ballet Company San Francisco Ballet Neoclassi bally George Balanchine stanton Stanton Welch director Bali San Francisco Associate Director of Audience Charlotte San Francisco Valley United States Stanton Welsh Leroy Anderson Isaac Mizrahi unitards Boston
"concerto grosso" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:11 min | 11 months ago

"concerto grosso" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Called music for ensemble and orchestra David Robertson leading the Sydney symphony orchestra Steve let me ask you about the role of the piano for pianos floral here because they start the peace and once they start they never seem to stop mean they're basically that pulse is just throughout this piece right exactly we discuss the the the the sixteen days quarters and head back to the base is sixteen and and whose planet who's playing that much obviously the canister absolutely have it right the pianos are basically keeping everybody together and the vibes sometimes help them and there are two PS because what you describe would be for twenty five minutes hi I have a very unhappy pianist and I'm keenly aware of musicians he interested reason all those things that you're not you really can't write very good music US so but there are two pianos and the the change that function between them and have other things to do and not doing the calls and not just playing the time there that did the cord to their player giving a kind of harmonic bad for what's going on the whole orchestra now there are a couple of sudden swerves in the harmonies in in the piece which you know and and with that kind of bedrock that harmonic bedrock provided by the pianos and occasionally the vibes it's all the more startling when when those sudden left turns happen well again I I I have gotten into the habit of sort of Prague changing key by moving up of a minor third as if you were going from CD he flatly he flattered she fled into a and back to C. but as time has passed when I'm in a particular key I will have much more liberty with in that key to move around and I have been exercising at liberty and that's the part of I think what has kept me very alive and well in my in my eighties you're actually right to noted and it's actually right for me to do it well and and the other thing is it is basically concerto Grosso exactly exactly exactly exactly one of my all time favorite pieces of music is the box printer number five it's not a creature of a violin concerto FOR piano which is the most standard consider instruments it's for a harpsichord flute and violin so and then you have the same instruments in the repair of the rest of the park is right so the so it is literally music for an ensemble and an orchestra yeah ship of yours is much more yeah it is saying let's take the concerto Grosso idea and and large it so that you have eighteen or nineteen or twenty soloists and then the strings who are the orders are basically a string section and four trumpets and so the the majority of the music is written for the ensemble which is the kind of ensemble live dealing with for years so in a sense for me for my purse that part music from solid works his **** having my cake and eat it I'm the ensemble composer who has this additional lift in harmony and texture from the strings in the shop let's hear another excerpt from this piece called music for ensemble and orchestra we'll hear some of these ideas put in practice.

David Robertson Sydney Steve twenty five minutes sixteen days
"concerto grosso" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"concerto grosso" Discussed on Here & Now

"That's one of the great mysteries of history but amazingly masan georgia's seventeen he challenges alexandre picard to a duel card is one of the rival fencing masters in all of france and he's a student at that time and picard as a master and all of paris gets involved in this dual because of course you have a black person who's the student fighting a white french master and sanchez wins amazingly winds and king louis makes him a night it just who says you know. This was so fascinating an amazing. I want you as part of my royal protection <hes> so he becomes the only black knight in the kings private <hes> army private guard really and that sort of makes his fame and suddenly everyone in paris and everyone in france knows of the chevalier so that's how he becomes uh-huh famous but then seven or eight years later this famous fencer has debut with a concert material the the one of the great orchestras in paris as as a violinist and suddenly he's a solo violinist playing his own compositions and no one knew that this man men had been studying the violin for twenty years so you could just imagine how his fame skyrocketed and then the french revolution happens and basically cuts off all of these his artistic progressions and french music in opera and because of that i think his story is just just lost lost but also during during his time as you say he was celebrated in in many many circles kind of renaissance man <hes> after the renaissance just a different period of time but he also faced racism massively so <hes> he was put up to be the artistic leader of the paris opera which at that point was the greatest stage in europe and this is in the late seventeen seventies right about the time that he's he's with with mozart and petitions but for by three aging divas obviously they're white <hes> that said they couldn't possibly sing for a mulatto which of course is very insensitive term but that's that's the term that they used at the time for someone of mixed race and he has to withdraw his name in great embarrassment and part of the play that i'm writing thing is included marie-antoinette in this because he was over in versailles playing music with her privately they would read together perform together and they became very close and i believe i believe that out of respect for marie antoinette. It's so not to embarrass her. He withdraws his name from consideration and these rare but painful awful slights <hes> because of his race did hold him back from some great places of privilege in parisian society barclay. I want to take us out on apiece by the chevalier his opus posthumous. We can hear it now and as we do. I wonder if you can tell us what you think is. Legacy is to music and what you would like to see become the story while i think as you start to play listen to the contrast between the orchestra which is still dylan the baroque concerto grosso style but when the violin comes and this piece is actually not posthumous but very early in his career so he is still demonstrating himself self to the public as a violinist composer but you can hear the violin almost take on a pre romantic style. He has the audience in the palm of his hand and and just listened to the contrast between the violin playing and the orchestra <music>. What do you hope nor production. His music will mean to an audience today. Song george is the first major classical composer of african descent and there are many many others. I think we're in a cultural moment where we need to hear from minority artists. We need to hear the voices we need to understand their stories of and we need to celebrate their unique contributions to historical and musical culture the history of which seems to be unfairly predominantly white thank you for telling his story bill barklay director of music at shakespeare's globe doc theater in london his production the black mozart will have its world premiere tonight at the tanglewood learning institute in western massachusetts featuring.

paris alexandre picard france marie antoinette georgia sanchez george louis europe tanglewood learning institute mozart dylan director massachusetts versailles london twenty years eight years
"concerto grosso" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

12:47 min | 1 year ago

"concerto grosso" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"I am not the conductor that our next guest is frontier vote i pointed at the court appointed the court and they just stand there finally brandenburg johann sebastian during his now usually in studio but they're both a little bit under the weather are linda mary nello and franz vote the conductor franz what did i do wrong i'm pointing at these guys and pointing and they just stand there with their mouths agape what do i need to do stamp my foot or what richard it must be something about your personality what can i say i have an electrifying personality but it didn't work on these guys both on i wish you both feeling better yeah we wish that too yeah thanks so much well we're just happy to be with you always enjoy visiting all right tell us about this upcoming shoe because it is this sunday and saturday saturday in albuquerque and sunday in that's the one we're worried that's the one we're focused on the one on sunday at immaculate heart of mary chapel wonderful facility up near santa fe prep tell us about that one well that's going to be with orchestra and we're going to start off with box brandenburg concerto number five and then do a series of selections my absolute pick heaven over this because there's so much glorious music to choose from but selections from the saint john passion the saint matthew from the mass in d minor and then we'll take a limiter mission and finish up with a cantata number seventy eight by baa and it should be feast for anybody who likes this kind of music for those that are educated what is the proper way to say bach good and by the way i wanted to share some information that one of our singers esther moses berg she was a featured soloist on this program posted on our facebook page because one of the things that's exciting about bah is that he is his music is timeless he's the most popular composer to this very day some three hundred years after his life ended where i should say began because actually he died in seventeen fifty so we're not quite to twenty-fifty yet but in any case she posted this really fun quote that i wanted to share by a guy named james roads and it's just about how we can all relate to who this man was here's a man who was orphaned by the age of ten who lost eleven of his twenty kids in infancy or childbirth whose first wife and love of his life died suddenly so there's spa drenched in grief sleeping with groupies in the oregon law a duly fighting hard-drinking rockstar with a work ethic that makes obama look like a bum and producing music that's still three hundred years later inspire stuns and rockets us into a fourth dimension of existence it's quite a statement twenty children he produced as well in his spare time yes exactly frans worry operating director you directed an opera houses is anywhere near as popular in this country as he is in europe yes equally popular it's an amazing story of all of the composers of all time he has he takes place no matter where he occurs on the globe being the most sought after and the most appreciated of all composers of all time why what is it well genius and inspiration he was a channel directly from whatever your view of the cosmos and the spirit is and every single piece that he wrote to varying degrees is a source of inspiration and fascination for for audiences and for musicians for performers of the were just thinking last night we were doing one of the rest achieves from the cantata and everybody kind of looked at one another after the arrest was finished because it sounded like like schurenberg burglar or some modern composer indeed buck did everything that all of the composer's who followed him century as later did and did it better so when you when we hear the brandenburg's we were listening to concerto number five coming in it's so popular sounds like masterpiece theatre merchant ivory movie beginning of know of the costume drama some kind the brandenburg's are his most popular work most accessible work certainly orchestral of all of the orchestral music that he wrote it rank day rank right up there at the very top and they're performed very often makes a great box set it does indeed and they remain as challenging today as they were when they were first performed they are technically not easy whatsoever and they require a great deal of musicianship and technical ability and musicality so it really stretches the entire musical sphere now i know you you required you being the new mexico performing arts society did acquire a harpsichord correct well we have an electronic instrument that mimics the harpsichord with real sound samples so in your in your instance up at the immaculate heart of mary chapel on mount carmel road on sunday at six pm get your tickets now because they always sell out it will be a group made up of what kind of instruments strings flutes hobos and keyboard piano in this case because we don't have a concert style harpsichord okay so our pianists jacquelyn helene graciously has accepted the challenge of performing this music on the piano and she's doing an absolutely fabulous job of it because the day was written for harpsichord correct well that's what was this was pre piano do you have to transcribe it when you have to change what's the challenge the challenges with the harpsichord no matter what sort of pressure you use on the keyboard it doesn't get louder or excuse one dynamic and so bought compensated by writing more notes and quicker notes in order to make more sound you don't have that challenge on the data in fact you have the opposite challenge to not make too much sound because of the enormous number of notes and the quickness of some can sometimes be overwhelming to the year so that's the challenge for the piano player right sounds like one our guests are frond vote and linda marina new mexico performing arts society and linda franz said flute your flouted you're going to be performing yes i am the brandenburg five is for what's called it's a concerto grosso which means that there's a group or a a general orchestral group and then there are three soloists violin flute and keyboard in this case piano we're joined by david felber are violin soloist and i'll be our flute soloist for that first piece is flutist or flout is correct well i'll answer to both but i personally prefer fluted oh you do okay yes i do this loudest is more tied at the british term of floss death it's pronounced all hoity toity yeah and we're pretty you know we've talked about this a little on your show before we're pretty low brow in the sense that we like to try to lower all barriers between the performers and the audience so that there's a real collaborative experience there for people who were listening and people who are performing i like the way you equate lowbrow with my show thank you glad you got that i picked up on the run i'm not the one that's a little bit under the weather here i got a loud and clear thank you very much people can acquire tickets how yes well now i have to say that as of today wednesday april third of we're getting very close to being sold out for the santa fe performance we're not completely sold out but we're really on the border here i'm so we recommend that people go to the website the tickets page of our website immediately that's an m. p. a. s. dot org or they call hold my ticket right away at eight seven seven four six six three four zero four it is possible that the program will be sold out in that there may not be tickets available at the door for particular performance so underlay get on the stick go to the website yes hold my ticket your tickets now usually have some rosa tickets in the front of people want to spend a little bit more for reserved seating yeah that's sold out completely all right if they would like or they're going to be in albuquerque if they're listening online the show on saturday win where same same same program it's almost the same program except that the very first piece is going to be two preludes and fuchs from box well tempered clavier book one also featuring jacqueline helene as piano soloist and then the rest of the program will be identical to the sunday evening program the only difference really is that we're not we're not having the orchestra for the saturday evening performance it is at st michael and all angels episcopal church on montano at seven p._m. on saturday april six and we do have tickets available for that performance we think it's going to be equally beautiful and we encourage people to come to the albuquerque performance if they find that the santa fe performances sold out this is spring show are you going to be doing anything special for the for around easter well this is pretty much our program yeah we usually do it a bit on the early side to avoid conflicting of their major on sombo center performing around then for example you know pro musica hester series and the loretto chapel always at easter time and so forth so what the groups try to do is schedule around each other so that people don't have to choose which programme they want to experience this is some of the some of the best most beautiful historic appreciated music and rural of this especially for me the brandenburg's i mean really stand out because they're just gorgeous.

johann sebastian franz linda mary nello three hundred years