6 Burst results for "Computer Science Club"

"computer science club" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

08:11 min | 3 months ago

"computer science club" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Is shipwrecked. They all wash up on a deserted island, along with their butler, named crichton. Okay, the nearest town of it is find some transport and bring it back with you. Very good, my lord. After the shipwreck, the butler crichton behaves at first as he always has. He bows and scrapes and speaks only when spoken to. But on the island, he's the only one who has any idea how to survive. The nobility are forced to admit it and defer to him, lest they starve. And by the end, he's king of the island. The British lord is crichton's slave. And his daughters of the butler's harem in waiting. And the lord is freaking out. With the deepest respect my lord, no. The reason I can't get the admirable crichton out of my head is because it's about the arbitrariness of social status. And the way that status can disguise people's value. Athena health is his own little island. Todd parkes washed up on it with Sue Henderson. But is at first a bit unclear about how to maximize her value. So, he called his brother. Ty called me up and said, can you? We need some help. Can you help me? And so I said, of course, because when your older brother calls you, you basically say yes. This is Ed park. He was just then a 22 year old graduate of Harvard. Where he'd run the computer science club. And so I packed up all my things and no drove in my ten year old daily camera in a three day sprint out west to join them in San Diego. It wouldn't have been a startup if there wasn't a story about an old Toyota Camry. Once Ed stopped driving, he took a long, hard look at the health insurance industry. We went through and we tried to figure out what are all these rules. And then we pretty quickly figured out that the rules weren't written down anywhere. The only people who knew the rules were people who had actually worked in the industry and had been incredibly observant for the last 5 years. People like Sue Henderson. Or perhaps no one but Sue Henderson. Anyway, Todd Ned figured out that what Ed needed to do was go into a room with Sue. To see if he could replicate her brain in computer code. And so Ed drove his Camry back to the Boston suburbs. I still remember the offices that we were working in. There were these tiny little offices. I think with the requisite three or four people to an office, she's sort of the next office over. And I was heads down coding, and that was like, what do I need to code to make this thing work? So her job was to basically help us get paid. And my job was to try and figure out how to write a bunch of code to make it so that we could start doing it in a way that was semi replicable. For her part, Sue was struck by just how much was in her head that was not in theirs. Yeah, I think and probably Eddie would and he's going to kill me because I call him Eddie all the time. I think that Eddie probably understood the fact that the hell is complexities, but I think that he thought with all of these brilliant programmers that they could figure it out. All by themselves that they could just figure it out. There was a few days into it when Sue realized that Ed and I really had no idea what we were doing. So she said, she's like, boys shut up. I'm going to give you a little lesson if she taught us about how the accounting works. Bob gatewood is remembering the day on the island when it became clear who was the admirable crichton. After she gave us that lesson, we were like, oh, yes, we will follow you. You're gonna stop us. And so, you know, she was basically the product manager at that point. So she, you know, she would tell us what the system needed to do. And we would go do it. And we bought her hazel, did she tell you about hazel, the big printer? So we got her a big claims printer, and she named it after her mother. So we have a GLaDOS, a hazel and a suit. That's right. So I was sitting in one room, Sue was sitting out over the next room, and every day, I would code something and put it out there, and then that evening she would yell at me. And so about something or other I did in terms of say, like, you can't, I don't understand what you're doing, you can't do that. And I'm like, what do you mean? Then she would basically explain to me that you need to make sure that the procedure code with the highest charge amount is put first on the claim because the insurance companies will sometimes pay the first line in the claim and not the second third and fourth lines in the claim. So I'm like, I didn't know that. Great, I'll do that. And so then that would change it and then it would be that way from then on. This went on and on. And on. Not for weeks or months. For years. The first three years, Ed park worked 18 hours a day. He had a sleeping bag and slept under his desk. By day, he had listened to sue. By night it turned what was ensues head into software. In the morning, I would kind of wake up at 6 or so, go to the bathroom. You know that. Do you remember that pink soap that the clear pink soap that you sometimes get? From those dispensers from a long time ago. I basically take that stuff, run through my hair. Shampoo in the sink. And go back to my desk and keep programming. So that was, that's the kind of life I've had. This weird new version of Athena health now totally depends on the value of one woman's expertise. Even though no one else had ever seen special value in Sue Henderson, or considered the stuff in her head and expertise. In a funny way, that's why there's money to be made here. Up until now, no one. Not even really Sue herself, has figured out how valuable Sue is. If I basically had asked her to go into the middle of a room and basically gave her a stack of paper and said, please write out everything you know about billing. She would not have produced the things that were necessary for us to be successful. Instead, she'd had a set of experiences such that when she got placed into a sort of a situation which I often did, I'd put her into a situation where something didn't make sense, right? Then she would basically say she would immediately recognize that something was wrong and she basically searcher database her head and said ask yourself, why is this wrong? The smart young Harvard graduates are trying to fix a big problem in the healthcare system. But what they're really doing is exploiting the world's inability to see the expert. It's expert blindness. See how the sense of moral indignation when something was wrong, right? And so there are some people who are essentially the unsung experts, but you get them into a room and you present them with something wrong and they won't tell you, right? Like they're trying to read the room, they're trying to figure out what you think the answer should be and they don't tell you that you're full of crap, right? Sue did not have that problem. If she thought it was wrong, she would say Eddie, I think you're wrong. And she would tell me and no uncertain terms. You get this sense that there are certain things in the world in particular for suit with medical billing. For which they have a sense of moral indignation that they can't hide. She cared a lot. Yes, we cared a lot. Did you at any point think our wonder if there was someone who was even better than Sue with this? Or did you think all on wow? We probably have the best. I couldn't conceive of anyone who knew more than her. I would say it was three or four years until we got to the point where it was clear that we had something that did justice to the knowledge in her head. The contents.

Sue Henderson crichton Sue Ed butler crichton Todd parkes Ed park Eddie Todd Ned Bob gatewood Camry Ty Harvard butler Toyota San Diego Boston hazel
"computer science club" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"computer science club" Discussed on Florida Matters

"Been many opportunities for that. There's been some casual sport clubs that have sprung up and have continued Before the pandemic like volleyball is pretty popular and also like swim. Club is still going so there are some extracurricular activities that are still meeting in person outside in distance and everything there are also quite a few clubs that have shifted to you. One hundred percent online operations like The computer science club also Anarchy fix our knitting and crocheting club also underperforming online. Now so it's it's mixed there. In general there have been a couple more events done on campus this semester. Like for example new college. Has this really big party. Formerly known as a pumpkin party anonima center of the universe party that was held in person in february and that was really nice because it was outside. Everybody wear masks and We got to dance for the first time in almost a year and see people that we hadn't seen for almost a year outside and that's another thing too. Is that at new college. Every i feel like most people understand that there are a part of greater community in so mask wearing. He's been really really good like it's very rare to campus and seasons outside. Not wearing a mask. I mean aside from the dining hall where at small tables three students are allowed to sit and eat together. Far and away like it's it's very reassuring to go on campus and see how many people are wearing masks and following guidelines. You mentioned at the beginning of this conversation that you're you're getting ready to graduate and i guess this this kind of final semester for you. It's kind of a surreal experience. How have you kind of dealt with that. Well it's interesting that you bring that up. Because i remember talking with my friend who's also graduating with me this spring and we're talking over the summer about how the class of twenty twenty got a lot of love because their last two months of the college experience where really disrupted but she was like you know why like it's gonna be it's going to be that plus a whole year for us and so. I've just tried to go with this year. Not feeling not feeling bummed out about all the things that could have been happening in instead. Being happy about the things that i do have an. I have a close group of a couple of friends. That i've been seeing like mask of course Outside but just just a small things that can make me happy versus feeling sad about the things that can't be because of the pandemic and i it me a while to process that i definitely cried a lot less realizing that my college experience is never going to be the same again. But i don't know. I'm i'm very hopeful for the future and i hope that new college students will be able to rebuild that community and we'll be able to do the things that i so savored so much over the nearly three years that were you know quote unquote normal right. So i really hope that the community will be able to come together in the future and rebuild from this terrible tragedy if you will have a traditional commencement ceremony in person or will it be more of a virtual type thing. The administration is still working that out. I know there's discussions of either having something at the bay Which has been the traditional venue of for. But with that like we wouldn't be able to invite friends and family there's also potentially discussion of graduating from a baseball field so that we would be able to have friends and family ticketed and like socially distanced out together and also still have all the students in faculty but everything is still up in the air. Nothing has been decided definitively. Well alan thanks so much for talking with us. Best of luck to you. Hopefully the remainder of twenty twenty one will be maybe a little bit more normal than the past. Twelve months have been i sir. Thank you so much. That was anna lynn winfrey. She's a senior at new college of florida and editor in chief of the catalyst campus newspaper. Devendra almond is a critical. Care doctor at baker's morton plant hospital in clearwater. We heard from him last fall when he shared his experience getting covid nineteen just as the pandemic start shutting down much of florida. I'm in described being a patient in his own. Icu and how his colleagues helped him recover with little knowledge of how the tackle the virus now he tells us about how life at the hospital has been sense. It's been a long hard several months with the waxing and waning of numbers. Just as you think things are getting better. Unfortunately people were very quick to relinquish their guard may maybe opened up economy too quickly sometimes causing the secondary and then the third waves that we had surges that we've had but we've learned how to cope with that and send me as a system. We've been able to cope with that very well. Dad's in managing the extra numbers. The difficulty has been that we've learned over the last year that a lot of the drugs we started with just have no significant benefit and may even be harmful so we're left with basically supportive care oxygen steroids and possibly the new antivirals that might be of benefit from visited. Data was leak commerce and plasma also unfortunate young man. Probably about three or four months ago was very sick. We moved very quickly to ecm. Oh itches extra corporeal long support you basically have an artificial lung working for you while his own lungs are not working Young healthy no other a significant medical history very sick very quickly unfortunately even after about two to three months. We're not able to help him. That was just just such a horrible thing to see a young patient through very vulnerable. We're all still very vulnerable and It's just luck of the draw. How things happen when you get through this illness. It's frustrating there has been a significant toll certainly internationally and nationally. The amount of out that we've seen is significant. And i think everybody has done a phenomenal job sacrificing themselves that but isn't spirit to taking care of people Which i think everybody does day in day out. But it's particularly taxing when you know you're dealing with a disease that can if not kill you suddenly debilitate sigma amount of time you know. It's truly is People who do this specifically. I'd say the nursing staff and the ancillary staff who respiratory therapy who in the rooms for far longer than we are It's just amazing. How selfless actually taking care of patients. Day in day out everybody's been overworked overstressed and they've just managed it beautifully. I mean i think a lot of its internalize and we have to do better at helping people cope with that. But on the whole. I think the support has been very good vaccinated Early february or january when we first had them available to us Had the pfizer. Vaccine at significant symptoms of fatigue and muscle aches and pains like energy the day after second vaccine. No trouble whatsoever fine. I think it's pretty much one day at a time right now. I think there's a level of optimism that we may be through as a numbers that specifically as a number going down. But i didn't think we're letting down our guard at this point. Ninety five percents ninety five percents hundred percent so even though the advocacy great. There's still a risk of getting an infection is does it would be and it's not so much your issue anymore. But you're transmitting it to somebody else. It's going to be tough getting back to normal. And hopefully as we get more and more vaccinated that might become easier.

Devendra almond Twelve months february january anna lynn winfrey last year hundred percent three students alan One hundred percent one day three months four months ago this year this spring first time last fall first Anarchy second vaccine
"computer science club" Discussed on CodeNewbie

CodeNewbie

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"computer science club" Discussed on CodeNewbie

"So I, want to switch gears and talk about live coding, which is something that you do. You are a youtube live coding streamer for free coat cab, which sounds terrifying. How did you get into voting? So when I was at this job, it was at a university I. decided that I wanted to collaborate more with the computer science department. I wanted to help the computer science students start to build a resume before they graduated and I thought it would be cool to get some of their ideas because I knew my own gaps in my learning, not having a computer science degree. So I thought we can kind of help each other out in the maybe they would have a lot of knowledge that I didn't, and I would have more practical not. That, they hadn't yet acquired about just like getting things done in making live in applications. So I decided to record myself doing some work and then put a link to it in the <hes>, the facebook group for the Computer Science Club. And My boss thought that was a good idea and you said, yeah, let's let's do that and I had always been developing everything I. Could Open source on get hope anyway. So that wasn't really an issue and I did some live streams and I didn't I'd never livestream anything before like I really didn't know what I was doing the first live streams were. You couldn't see the code even the the the video quality was terrible the phone I had two small. So it was, it was pretty bad <hes>. So I went on the Free Co Camp Forum and I a post saying. Just. Here's what I'm trying to do, and I don't know what I'm doing. If anyone has some time, please check out one of my live streams and at appreciate any advice that you have. And I ended up getting a bunch of people watching and giving advice. But probably, the most important view that I had was from Bo Corns who's in charge of the Youtube Channel for Free Code. camp. Alcohol. had asked if I would be interested in doing. Some live coating on the Free Co Camp Channel and I. You know, of course, 'cause my channel, add maybe three subscribers at the time in the Free Co. camp. Channel at the time had maybe somewhere between fifty thousand, one, hundred, thousand subscribers gone up significantly since then we're over a million. Maybe three years ago. So after I did that Quincy who's the head of recode camp also, ill, he watched the stream and he said I really like this and new said, you know you could do this? You know however many times a week you one. So I started live coding for at least an hour a day five days a week. Monday through Friday. How? Is a lot of time that is dedication yet in would really helped was I lies streamed my work. So it wasn't prepared beforehand or rehearse. It was whatever I had to work on that day. I would try to pick whatever I thought would be the most exciting in helpful for other people to see. And I would lie stream that portion of my work. And they were real projects that I was working on, and thankfully you know my boss was just super excited about it and saw this as a great opportunity for publicity for the university. which it really was for a tiny university in Ohio, the logo of the university was seen by people all over the world. So we definitely got some publicity and we also got a lot of people contributing code. So since it was open source. We had a nice community of developers from all over the world that would contribute code. Actually, add a developer. Believe was fourteen years old when he started watching the show from the Himalayas was one of the top contributors on most of the projects and he was so good. He's fine. The Best Coder I've ever worked with. He was so good. I would be in the middle of a livestream talking through a problem of. So here's what, I'm trying to do and I would look over the live chat and there would be five or six messages in all caps saying check my request. And I would look. In, he would have already solved the problem in submitted requests. Yeah It was so. He would often call me out on things. I was doing wrong and I tell you I. I kept in mind all the time. How young he was. I if it were an older person, I may not have taken it so well. A. Little Bit. Yeah. It it did. But I just imagined that he was young. US very excited about what he was doing us very skilled. With it and to be honest, I love what up so much during the live streaming so much more than I ever thought I mean, well. I never thought anybody would really watch it maybe a few computer science. So like. Like maybe one or two people watching to now having hundreds of people you're watching, live all typing and contributing code, and then my work day changed dramatically. It went from me coding most of the day on my own to me spending my mornings, reviewing pool requests in merging them, and then spending my afternoons live coding. And that was like my daily work, we would regularly have you know maybe. Somewhere between like five and a dozen contributors to each one of the projects that I was working on and I, I'd like to think that it was a pretty fair exchange that I would. I would give a shoutout to everybody that contributed in review their pool requests on on air just to let people know what they had done. So I kinda helped. These people who were volunteering their code, build up their portfolios and get some exposure on the Free Code Camp Channel, and then in turn they helped make my projects better. And and I learned so much because I couldn't merge

How live coding can level up your development (Jesse Weigel)

CodeNewbie

06:31 min | 2 years ago

How live coding can level up your development (Jesse Weigel)

"So I, want to switch gears and talk about live coding, which is something that you do. You are a youtube live coding streamer for free coat cab, which sounds terrifying. How did you get into voting? So when I was at this job, it was at a university I. decided that I wanted to collaborate more with the computer science department. I wanted to help the computer science students start to build a resume before they graduated and I thought it would be cool to get some of their ideas because I knew my own gaps in my learning, not having a computer science degree. So I thought we can kind of help each other out in the maybe they would have a lot of knowledge that I didn't, and I would have more practical not. That, they hadn't yet acquired about just like getting things done in making live in applications. So I decided to record myself doing some work and then put a link to it in the the facebook group for the Computer Science Club. And My boss thought that was a good idea and you said, yeah, let's let's do that and I had always been developing everything I. Could Open source on get hope anyway. So that wasn't really an issue and I did some live streams and I didn't I'd never livestream anything before like I really didn't know what I was doing the first live streams were. You couldn't see the code even the the the video quality was terrible the phone I had two small. So it was, it was pretty bad So I went on the Free Co Camp Forum and I a post saying. Just. Here's what I'm trying to do, and I don't know what I'm doing. If anyone has some time, please check out one of my live streams and at appreciate any advice that you have. And I ended up getting a bunch of people watching and giving advice. But probably, the most important view that I had was from Bo Corns who's in charge of the Youtube Channel for Free Code. camp. Alcohol. had asked if I would be interested in doing. Some live coating on the Free Co Camp Channel and I. You know, of course, 'cause my channel, add maybe three subscribers at the time in the Free Co. camp. Channel at the time had maybe somewhere between fifty thousand, one, hundred, thousand subscribers gone up significantly since then we're over a million. Maybe three years ago. So after I did that Quincy who's the head of recode camp also, ill, he watched the stream and he said I really like this and new said, you know you could do this? You know however many times a week you one. So I started live coding for at least an hour a day five days a week. Monday through Friday. How? Is a lot of time that is dedication yet in would really helped was I lies streamed my work. So it wasn't prepared beforehand or rehearse. It was whatever I had to work on that day. I would try to pick whatever I thought would be the most exciting in helpful for other people to see. And I would lie stream that portion of my work. And they were real projects that I was working on, and thankfully you know my boss was just super excited about it and saw this as a great opportunity for publicity for the university. which it really was for a tiny university in Ohio, the logo of the university was seen by people all over the world. So we definitely got some publicity and we also got a lot of people contributing code. So since it was open source. We had a nice community of developers from all over the world that would contribute code. Actually, add a developer. Believe was fourteen years old when he started watching the show from the Himalayas was one of the top contributors on most of the projects and he was so good. He's fine. The Best Coder I've ever worked with. He was so good. I would be in the middle of a livestream talking through a problem of. So here's what, I'm trying to do and I would look over the live chat and there would be five or six messages in all caps saying check my request. And I would look. In, he would have already solved the problem in submitted requests. Yeah It was so. He would often call me out on things. I was doing wrong and I tell you I. I kept in mind all the time. How young he was. I if it were an older person, I may not have taken it so well. A. Little Bit. Yeah. It it did. But I just imagined that he was young. US very excited about what he was doing us very skilled. With it and to be honest, I love what up so much during the live streaming so much more than I ever thought I mean, well. I never thought anybody would really watch it maybe a few computer science. So like. Like maybe one or two people watching to now having hundreds of people you're watching, live all typing and contributing code, and then my work day changed dramatically. It went from me coding most of the day on my own to me spending my mornings, reviewing pool requests in merging them, and then spending my afternoons live coding. And that was like my daily work, we would regularly have you know maybe. Somewhere between like five and a dozen contributors to each one of the projects that I was working on and I, I'd like to think that it was a pretty fair exchange that I would. I would give a shoutout to everybody that contributed in review their pool requests on on air just to let people know what they had done. So I kinda helped. These people who were volunteering their code, build up their portfolios and get some exposure on the Free Code Camp Channel, and then in turn they helped make my projects better. And and I learned so much because I couldn't merge

Computer Science Club Developer Facebook Himalayas Youtube Ohio Bo Corns Quincy
"computer science club" Discussed on Technically 200

Technically 200

08:05 min | 2 years ago

"computer science club" Discussed on Technically 200

"Depressing things that are happening so I to be honest. I was sick to my stomach fruits for weeks. I like I I just was just trying to practice all care, and like I was down for the count like I was very sick to my stomach. Like every time I thought about it I. was just like I'm so sick and about how? This is happening in the country I lived in and you know. And, I think a big part is it was a bail over it like we didn't expect all the stuff to happen. You know we knew the stuff was happening, but it's like now. It's like this is truly happening and we are seeing this with our own eyes. and. At the end of the day again I want to try to optimize and say like. If, there wasn't any other time like for this to happen. It would have been now because. You know we all are home. We can't ignore it. But I, think for Blackie with so much harder. 'cause like we've been dealing with this for so long in our we were born on the shoulders of our ancestors have dealt with it and like. It just. It's it's a crash, but in a different way and I think that's the hardest part, but. I don't even I can't even say that I've gotten through it yet. I think I'm just trying to figure out what is going on like what is happening like you know i. hear the stories. My parents tell me and I can tell the difference a man like you know, usually go to your parents for a lot of things, and it's like they're even sad and depressed about they don't have the answer, so it's like who does thing and I think this is. It's taking so much time. Really figure out like you know. These systems hadn't played for years aren't always on our side kind of thing. and. It's been wild time. It's been a wild time per share inning going where it's been. It's elephant in the room luckily like we've been in different diversity inclusion talks in like you know really talks about like what is all. Is the placards matter being in? You know how many people really have died at the hands of police brutality and it's it's. It's a wild time. Can you. Can you talk about how that? Impacts. How does taught to me how your employer treats. Equity and diversity inclusion. How important is that to you? How does that impact your decision to to remain an employee with them? Yeah? I definitely say this piece of advice for everybody listening. After all of this if your employer is not willing to tell you or talk to you, and like make changes on your behalf, take action. I would not work there, and and I think that's. Too because like all of the companies, but I thought I loved and like Oh I have to go big Ford Company. It's like they're not treating people who look like me correctly, and they haven't been for years, and it's like all of these people have these stories about how they can treated like. Am I going to be treated like that so? That's my biggest piece of advice like you know. Not. Every company's is perfect, you know. Like I said systems have been in place for years like it's just inevitable that things are going to happen that. Are you know? Disrespectful and downright terrible to you know people that look different or act different, different ability, different sexual orientation all of that. but I. think that's the biggest thing for me like. I struggled with I've been what Internet to companies and. One of them was more willing to call out. More willing to call out. Okay, this is obvious. We don't have enough women, or we don't have enough people of Color, or you know we don't have underrepresented minorities and it's like okay. You're saying this near aware of it, but are you doing actions? You know, take era bit. So I think that's the big thing for me and for companies willing to take action. Donate money you know. As as the kids say. Open their purses like I. It's not worth your time. It just I don't think it is, and I think a lot of social media platforms. Let's be honest or supported by people of color like there's so many things that you know America and against the world has gotten from people of Color in like technology. Whatever and it's like. They don't give them the credit, so it's like I shouldn't be supporting a company like that, too. If they're not willing to give credit, take action ending. Take up from at the end of the day. How so how do you? So how has all of this either changed or reinforced how you spend your dollars? I definitely like for me, I, definitely, doing my research on companies I, there has been a few companies I barely buy things from anymore. in some pretty big ones, but I'm looking the fact, that like I have a lot of friends who've been posted really good resources. They've been sharing them with me. I've only know I'm trying to purely by black owned businesses, or you know brands that I know are secreted by. You know black people. In general does looking at. Practices that the company does ethically like you know. I'm trying to think of an example of one I'm looking for new skincare and I didn't realize there were so many different GLAC brands out there. That are actually formulated for skin like mine. It's like riding I do this before kind of thing but I've been trying to do my research as much as possible it's it's deepen their, but like there's tons of. In, black owned restaurant. There's another thing I've been trying to do that to Let's be real. This goes off a little bit like. I've been sitting dollars there, too. It's just. It's more about awareness like, are you? What brands are you supporting kind of thing it's like. Every goes still support those brands. The least you could do buy from a black on restaurant wants. Acre wants to free two. Yeah and you know it's. It's when you talk about your advice to listeners. If you're not feeling supported or represented, or your employer is not speaking out for, you should not be working there I imagine that their employers who are listening as well. I imagined that there are folks you're gonNA. Listen to this podcast and say wait. She's in. She's a black female engineer and she's working at. How do we get? So this is this is not in invitation or solicitation for such offers. What you I mean in terms of candidate profile. What are some were some pieces of advice that you'd give to employers out there because I'll tell you right now where you answer. We Are A. we've got this initiative cold. Vision Twenty twenty four, and we are placing two hundred black and latte. Next women into stem rose by twenty twenty four. Now we're raising. We're or raising one point five million, and what would be amazing if these companies would help us close this race. I want you to. Also were. If, if I had advice I'd say like. Put your money where your mouth is. Why I know that they want they want you. And so, what could they get? An incredible candidate light yourself. I think the biggest thing for me the? You know to be perfectly honest. The only reason why I really was interested in G and I actually. Went to work. Mayor was purely purely will and I guess I. Guess I also Internet Disney so I think the other. Two of the re I guess one reason Internet both companies and then worked. One of these companies is. They were out of conference at a Club meeting that I was part of so specifically like I'm a part of I was of natural sidey black engineers briefly on, but it was more involved in limited computer science clubs so. We attended grace. Hopper. Grace Hopper conference is the world's largest conference dedicates women in technology also the one place that I've met some amazing black living in lot and Latino women amazing amazing women..

Grace Hopper Blackie Ford Company America twenty twenty solicitation engineer GLAC Vision Twenty Acre
"computer science club" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"computer science club" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Accident with a motorcycle rider down in the roadway offered and crews are on the scene there traffic on the tens every two ten minutes mornings and afternoons Ryan nobles news ninety three point one K. if the gay looking at temperatures this weekend warming up again in fact we should be about ten degrees above average for this time of year this weekend today we'll be seeing a mix of clouds and sun early on with more sunshine for the afternoon highs will be up around seventy degrees clear tonight down into the mid forties sunshine a little bit breezy tomorrow temperature around seventy three degrees and sunshine expected for Sunday with a high of seventy six again the average for this time of year about sixty three degrees right now in around Eldorado hills fifty five degrees Davis at fifty and fifty five degrees in Sacramento going to a high near seventy news ninety three point one K. F. C. K. sign up for news from a neighbor let's bring in Zack foster he's been taking a look at the headlines from all across northern California is one where you from yeah I have this is a good one comes out of the woodland daily Democrat this morning and that a UC Davis agricultural entomologists has created an app that he believes will help farmers and growers yield better crops and reduce waste and he starting with strawberries here and he's teamed up with the UC Davis computer science club to build an app that projects the variables route that go into spring pesticides mon crops and he says with a few simple inputs and projections that he can give you the optimal formula for our pesticide use to reduce waste so they don't use too much pesticide an appliance.

Eldorado hills Davis Sacramento Zack California Ryan nobles K. F. C. K. woodland daily Democrat UC Davis fifty five degrees one K seventy three degrees sixty three degrees seventy degrees two ten minutes ten degrees