35 Burst results for "Computer Science"

Even Cooperative Chess is Hard

Data Skeptic

04:07 min | 4 d ago

Even Cooperative Chess is Hard

"Hi i'm josh. Brunner master student at mit right now. Science so my research is primarily about the algorithm and complexity of puzzles and games for example. I think we're talking about here. Why proved the peace based harnessed of retro chests. A form chess puzzle and obviously we'll i think we'll spend most of our time talking about chess but just more broadly. Can you comment on games. In general everyone has a sense of what it is but maybe not. An appreciation for the mathematical definitions. What's a game to you. There's many forms of it like there's simple abstract games that are like them or like graph games like geography that well known studied in computer science. And there's also your traditional board games you might play settlers catanha's one law people know and chess of courses are so well known game go and there's also card games and all of these you actually think about the complexity of like how hard it is to determine whether you can win from a given position or like what moves her legal position and what about chess in particular makes it interesting. I in chess has chosen part. Because it's a canonical well-known game and i've been playing since i was little and enjoy the game a lot. The rules are nice and simple elegant. Which makes it easy to think about. And the peace movements. There's just enough kinds of peace movements to for pretty complicated puzzles positions. Like it's known that chess is exponential time complete. So you can't solve. Who wins a chess game in less than exponential time and that to my understanding we have that firm separation that is definitely worse than polynomial so knowing the chances. Xp time seems rather hopeless or my looking at the situation with two dire of ice. That means that yes. We probably won't ever be able to fully solve chess. This is different from those things like chess engines and such like. We're really doing here. Showing the absolute worst case is that you cannot make an algorithm that runs reasonably efficiently. Show for any chest position whether or not you could win but you can certainly give very good heuristic and that doesn't prevent you from solving like reasonable cases. It might only be the case that bad hard cases are actually that long so asking these broad questions about can. This player wind from this position have obvious value to the game of chess and a chess player might like to have oracle. It could answer a question like that but it's not the only interesting question a what are some of the other things one might wanna know about a game of chess or a particular board configuration so natural question that we ask the paper whether you can reach a position. Legally this is a common type of chess puzzle known as retro chess puzzle. Or you get some crazy position you say. Could this dish ever be legally reached and these puzzles will involve some nonsense with cast lying or entente or like. You'll have to do this. really deep. calculation figurative to king could legally not moved for the entire duration of the game so far or might be like a bishop that's in an impossible location and can only have got their via parotid pawn and these are quite interesting as to sort of hobby to solve them. But i think our papers the first time and looked at them from a academic standpoint. There are some things in there. I don't know if you've used the word annoyance but that ability to capture upon and converted to another piece certainly opens up a lot of passive exploration. Let's say a simpler game like i couldn't capture pawn and convert that to the bishop as you describe. It might be easier to say. Oh obviously it could never have arrived at this position. But for that one weird case that you were describing and that one weird case that we might not even seen a lot of chess games if you wanna have a complete algorithm it certainly has to capture it and that's one that is sort of like a point of discontinuity to me right. As soon as that piece has changed. The rules have changed but the experience of the game changes quite a bit. Are there any special things you need to do. To account for the dynamics of that game or you really just looking more at simulating broad sets of possible games for our paper we looked at. We didn't need any of those weird rules actually while they're interesting for creating puzzles did like humans like solve in of complexity all we need is the basic movement pieces. We never care about promoting on passat or casting. Actually don't even use kings in the entire proof that kings are just like left at home when we say we don't need the kings to prove us

Chess Catanha Brunner MIT Josh Oracle Kings
Data and AI in the state of North Dakota, Interview with Dorman Bazzell, CDO of North Dakota

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:27 min | 6 d ago

Data and AI in the state of North Dakota, Interview with Dorman Bazzell, CDO of North Dakota

"Today with us. Our guest is dorman basell. Who is the chief data officer for the state of north dakota so high doormen and thanks for joining us today. Kathleen ron thank you for the opportunity. Either to hang out with you guys for a little bit. Yeah we'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role as the chief data officer for the state of north dakota. Sure sure well. Good morning everyone So my my background is You know went to college. Got a degree in computer science mathematics and then when often like everyone else When i lived in saint louis you. It was kind of a requirement. You had to work for mcdonnell. Douglas which is now boeing corporation. So did that for it. But but then after a while Got got involved in consulting and worked my way up through the Consulting ranked says developer and they as a project manager is the data architect the solution architect and then finally got into a position of driving business intelligence and analytics for a couple of large international consulting firms where ran their north america. Big data and the i practice And the great ride. A thoroughly enjoyed all of the things we did. I think we added a lot of value to Our customers which was private industry And had great teams Had a strong onshore team strong offshore kimes and delivered a lot of value. But i think two years ago Over two years ago. When i applied for this position as the chief data officer At first i really didn't want position Didn't like the idea of state government state government has has a bad connotation Of kind of a nine to five job And a people people who just weren't really motivated to To move the world change the world and my boss who i interviewed my off. Now the cio. Sean reilly Who i interviewed with his his final comment to me was well. I can't pay what you make today. But are you wanna paycheck or do want to change the world. And i had never thought about life that way. Never tried to change the world and So i decided to take on this opportunity This was the first chief data officer position for the state of north dakota so there were a lot of unknowns Certainly certainly my presence Was a bit chaotic for the organization. Because i came in with a completely different agenda and completely different way of looking at the world through the eyes of the pillars that are assigned a line to me which application development and automation. And the second pillar is data analytics data science artificial intelligence and had some very different opinions about those things. And how we might move those forward So as i became involved with this role i became an. I had made an assumption that every state had a chief data officer come to find out there are only twenty seven of us out of fifty states So it's it's an interesting It's an interesting mix of of individuals who are chief data officers and getting to know them is. It has been a really amazing opportunity because they have such a very backgrounds and they bring such such different perspectives to cheap date officer role I like to joke and tell people that the last thing i focus on data which is obviously not true but but my real focus is really around cultural change within the city physician and what that means in the context of not not necessarily data. Because i have to executives are on my team who Are just are just brilliant at running the operations and managing the two pillars within my organization.

North Dakota Dorman Basell Kathleen Ron Boeing Corporation Kimes Sean Reilly Saint Louis Mcdonnell Douglas North America
Hackers have leaked the COVID-19 vaccine data they stole in a cyberattack

Cyber Security Headlines

03:05 min | Last week

Hackers have leaked the COVID-19 vaccine data they stole in a cyberattack

"Hackers leaked stolen pfizer covid nineteen vaccine data online the european medicines agency e. And a today revealed that some of the pfizer bio and tech covid nineteen vaccine data stolen from its service in december was leaked online. Ema is a decentralized agency responsible for reviewing and approving covid nineteen vaccines as well as for evaluating monitoring and supervising any new medicines introduced to the european union on december. Thirty first there were media reports of threat actors leaking. What they claimed was the stolen. Ema data on several hacker forums. Ema also said that the european medicines regulatory network is fully functional and covid covid nineteen evaluation and approval. Timelines are not affected by the incident. Social media's big terrible week. Facebook staff are being warned to avoid wearing company branded apparel for their safety house. Democrats are planning to look into the role of social media as a source of this information relating to events proceeding and including the january six riot german chancellor angela merkel as well as a minister for the government of france have publicly objected to the ban on president. Trump's accounts and alternative private chat apps such as signal telegram on our topping app store downloads. For the first time go fund me has banned trump. rally travel fundraisers although not appearing strictly cybersecurity issues. These stories all have a great deal to do with privacy and they also have to do with security as the media in question have been outed as a means to incite groups to do militias. it's parlor archived. Due to quote mind numbing mistake as we reported here yesterday. A hacker succeeded in archiving ninety nine point nine percent of partners contents before it went off. Line analysis of what made this possible shows. That partner lacked the most basic security measures to prevent scraping and even ordered its posts by number in the sites. You are else which helped in pro grammatically downloading. It's millions of posts. Kenneth white a security engineer for mungo. Db refers to this as an insecure direct object reference parlor also did not use any sort of rate limiting to cut off anyone accessing to many posts too quickly making it. Easy for the hacker to write a script download everything in the order that they were posted. White calls this quote mind-numbing like a computer science one bad homework assignment sunspot. Malware used to insert back door into solar winds supply chain attack. Crowd strike has shared details about another piece of the solar winds orion puzzle. A piece of malware named sunspot was used to inject the previously analyzed. Sun burst back door into the orion product without being detected crowd. Strike reveal that the hackers deployed sunspot on solar winds systems. Sunspot is designed to check every second for the presence of processes associated with the compilation of the orion product on the compromised system if such a process is detected sunspot replaces a single source code file to include the sunburst back door

EMA Pfizer European Medicines Regulatory Angela Merkel European Union Kenneth White Donald Trump App Store Social Media Facebook France White SUN
Interview With Joe Petro CTO and EVP of R&D at Nuance

The Voicebot Podcast

06:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Joe Petro CTO and EVP of R&D at Nuance

"Joe. Petro welcome to the voice podcast. Thanks to be here. Glad to have you really cited for me to get someone from nuance particularly. Who's been there as long as you have. a dominant name and the voice of the i industry over decades and things are a little different. Now because there's also other big names in this space i think there was a long time when nuance only big name. And the voice. Today i space but we we have some other household names that creep into the conversation from time to time. So i've been looking forward to this for a long time. Why don't you tell people just to get started a little bit about who you are what you do on a regular basis day-to-day basis in nuance. Sure so on the chief technology officer of nuance and i've been here for about twelve twelve years or so. When i came in joined the organization. I was coming criminal Medical record bender company. And and i joined a nuance to basically run research and development for healthcare and i think that division at that point in time with something like i want to say two hundred two hundred twenty million or something like that in revenue you know after the last twelve years on that now be close to a billion dollars in five hundred hundred dollar enterprise organization as as well which show. We'll talk about but see. Te'o i'm responsible for all of the products and all the technology and all the research you know that. That nuance does both amana prized healthcare side. And really over the course of the last two years i transitioned from healthcare. Are the svp to the cto a. We pulled it everything our company together and when we When we did that a lot of it's kind magic started to happen. You know we made a lot of progress. You know both Both in the market as well as you from an innovation point of view. So it's been a super exciting a couple years you know as a cto. I basically lead the entire organization. So we worry about you. know how. Innovate and wood products. Bring to market in you. Know how talking to the market our creating messages around the product. How the products connect with you know the value propositions we spend our money as well at the at the same time so this kind of operational responsibility as well. It's been a good ride less twelve years. Yeah i think about it as as looking at your background you are you as an iraqi i think originally and there's not a lot of people i mean in your role. Who have mechanical background. Usually it's doubly computer science something related to that occasionally linguists So so that was low surprising. So how did you get from a mechanical engineer earlier. In your career. What you're doing back into that like full software into eclipses. Emr like a graduated from chemical engineering in the early nineties and And i was graduating in boston. It's kinda distress market at that moment. A moment in time in i was really fascinated with computer aided engineering so the application of computers to really hard engineering problems time. A company called electron data systems was was hiring. It was ross perot company. They had they had a program called c. Four technologies and basically what they did is they. They lived with general motors a michigan in all over the world and they did all of their it but they also did all of the computer aided engineering finding element. Analysis computers factor. It was a it was very much like an inflection. Point because compute was just getting to the point where it's becoming super powerful. So cad system solid modeling So i immediately kind of went out of school in directly directly into that and i was using computers to solve really hard mechanical engineering problems. In really what happened was i got a. I finally got involved in software companies involved with the application engineering. Some leaders in those companies realized. I could talk to clients so i spent a lot of time to doing that. And then you know it's just it feels like it's been a twenty five year journey journey. is kind of really really quickly. I just kind of progressed and kinda migrated up through you know. Increasing levels of responsibility you know had the lucky app stance of running some really really big organizations which eventually position me for you know for roles like this kind of interested in your your time and eclipses to media bars evolved for certain since since you were there obviously was in it was a really dynamic time when you were there to fifteen years ago You know what are your thoughts about how that space has evolved electronic medical records for those who are listening or ernest space. How that's evolved over time because we've got a couple of big players spent some really big concentration of some players but then there's all these satellite systems of engagement and specialty assistance. Which what are your thoughts. On that general. I think in some ways things have come a long way in in some ways. They're very kind of the same I got to be honest with you that that role that i took there when they called me i was actually in a in a distress. Kinda startup company that we we were turning around. And you know when i got the call was an odd call because i didn't know anything about healthcare at the time and they convinced me co executives. They are in the board of directors. Convince me oh you don't need to know much about healthcare. We need some the deliver good product. And i didn't know this at the time but it was. The a lot of people were kind of recycling their way through like healthcare's small community and yes it basically convinced me like we've interviewed everybody. We know who's out there. We need some of outside the industry. We'll teach you healthcare.

Petro Electron Data Systems Amana JOE Ross Perot General Motors Boston Michigan
Joe Petro CTO and EVP of R&D at Nuance talks about his role at the company

The Voicebot Podcast

04:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Joe Petro CTO and EVP of R&D at Nuance talks about his role at the company

"Why don't you tell people just to get started a little bit about who you are what you do on a regular basis day-to-day basis in nuance. Sure so on the chief technology officer of nuance and i've been here for about twelve twelve years or so. When i came in joined the organization. I was coming criminal Medical record bender company. And and i joined a nuance to basically run research and development for healthcare and i think that division at that point in time with something like i want to say two hundred two hundred twenty million or something like that in revenue you know after the last twelve years on that now be close to a billion dollars in five hundred hundred dollar enterprise organization as as well which show. We'll talk about but see. Te'o i'm responsible for all of the products and all the technology and all the research you know that. That nuance does both amana prized healthcare side. And really over the course of the last two years i transitioned from healthcare. Are the svp to the cto a. We pulled it everything our company together and when we When we did that a lot of it's kind magic started to happen. You know we made a lot of progress. You know both Both in the market as well as you from an innovation point of view. So it's been a super exciting a couple years you know as a cto. I basically lead the entire organization. So we worry about you. know how. Innovate and wood products. Bring to market in you. Know how talking to the market our creating messages around the product. How the products connect with you know the value propositions we spend our money as well at the at the same time so this kind of operational responsibility as well. It's been a good ride less twelve years. Yeah i think about it as as looking at your background you are you as an iraqi i think originally and there's not a lot of people i mean in your role. Who have mechanical background. Usually it's doubly computer science something related to that occasionally linguists So so that was low surprising. So how did you get from a mechanical engineer earlier. In your career. What you're doing back into that like full software into eclipses. Emr like a graduated from chemical engineering in the early nineties and And i was graduating in boston. It's kinda distress market at that moment. A moment in time in i was really fascinated with computer aided engineering so the application of computers to really hard engineering problems time. A company called electron data systems was was hiring. It was ross perot company. They had they had a program called c. Four technologies and basically what they did is they. They lived with general motors a michigan in all over the world and they did all of their it but they also did all of the computer aided engineering finding element. Analysis computers factor. It was a it was very much like an inflection. Point because compute was just getting to the point where it's becoming super powerful. So cad system solid modeling So i immediately kind of went out of school in directly directly into that and i was using computers to solve really hard mechanical engineering problems. In really what happened was i got a. I finally got involved in software companies involved with the application engineering. Some leaders in those companies realized. I could talk to clients so i spent a lot of time to doing that. And then you know it's just it feels like it's been a twenty five year journey journey. is kind of really really quickly. I just kind of progressed and kinda migrated up through you know. Increasing levels of responsibility you know had the lucky app stance of running some really really big organizations which eventually position me for you know for roles like this

Amana Electron Data Systems Ross Perot General Motors Boston Michigan
Visual Illusions Deceiving Neural Networks

Data Skeptic

04:22 min | 2 weeks ago

Visual Illusions Deceiving Neural Networks

"I i'm. Martine was the researcher at the university in barcelona spain. Welcome this show. Tell us a little bit about what you studied there. As i say. I started some years ago so now undoing Study was mathematics and computer science with them led me to computer science. Masterson abused deal nimitz processing on. Now we were basically in image processing ongoing recent techniques with For models that comes round this study obesity in humans. Got just so. I know we always hear this analogy. That's deep neural. Networks are kinda like the layers of the brain and i think sometimes neurologist cringe a little bit when we make the comparison but i'm not sure how much they cringe. Maybe some of its fair. What's your perception there on. The comparison between a neural network and artificial neural network and a human neural network. I will definitely creamed celso like us. Now it's an of the networks of course inspired Network this we all know that this simplification and naturally i think more and more people are working on trying to go from that simplification. some Actually are margaret. And you'd mentioned part of your work includes looking at models that are used. The word inspired but something along those lines from the human visual system. What are some of the ways in which one might be inspired in that fashion will actually. It's it's interesting because the model of activism neural network is inspired beecham's so when people started to look at how actually sees you start to mobile A stack of layers where we have some with some filters When we envision us oriented field. There's that can see recent vertical different frequencies To obedience actually like a very simplified note. Landlord say i'm not really someone knows a lot about the brain but i'm vaguely aware that our eyes are somewhat imperfect in the brain does a lot of cleaning up yet. I don't know if that's true in the more computer vision. I think our cameras are maybe more accurate than the human eye in some cases. And there's not quite as much cleanup. Are these fundamentally different approaches. Or at the end of the day do both systems have basically the same day to set. Nah i think it's a analogy because there's a bar that is only the information that we receive from the exterior. Let's say the luminance of they're seeing on the This on bar. But of course we don just see that we processing formation on this is why we say that we actually we perceive information because there are some other things that are happening in our brain taking this information on combining with everything that we know from the beginning memories although stop so we actually is when we see at camera. recording is actually taking just some information soon so the analogy would be computer. Actually tried to do this analogy so when you put so not. What's behind those cameras. Tried to do something without information. Either retail They're like following someone. Then you're more or less doing this analogy how ac. Because when we see we are doing something with information is it not only just preceding the light which is the dot com era's i saw perceiving and processing. Then is that right. yes exactly. Yeah it makes sense. Well the main work. I invited you on to talk about with the paper titled convolution neural. Networks can be deceived by visual illusions. I thought maybe we should start with a definition of a visual illusion in my mind. I'm picturing like the image where it's either a candle or two faces or maybe some. Mc art is there a formal like mathematically satisfying definition of what a visual illusion is own. Think so. I think it's something that you see one but is not so easy to describe. I would say that the these right is something. By general it would be some images stimulus usually name it that actually cows illusion in your rain and illusion will women with any lewiston. Is that what you perceive is not consistent with reality. So we've got mr light actually with photo mentors for instance and we can measure a color. That is different from the one that we are proceeding. So that's obvious lucille. When actually the reality perception are not in the same face

Martine Masterson Celso Barcelona Beecham Obesity Spain Margaret Lewiston Lucille
Visual Illusions Deceiving Neural Networks

Data Skeptic

03:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Visual Illusions Deceiving Neural Networks

"I i'm. Martine was the researcher at the university in barcelona spain. Welcome this show. Tell us a little bit about what you studied there. As i say. I started some years ago so now undoing Study was mathematics and computer science with them led me to computer science. Masterson abused deal nimitz processing on. Now we were basically in image processing ongoing recent techniques with For models that comes round this study obesity in humans. Got just so. I know we always hear this analogy. That's deep neural. Networks are kinda like the layers of the brain and i think sometimes neurologist cringe a little bit when we make the comparison but i'm not sure how much they cringe. Maybe some of its fair. What's your perception there on. The comparison between a neural network and artificial neural network and a human neural network. I will definitely creamed celso like us. Now it's an of the networks of course inspired Network this we all know that this simplification and naturally i think more and more people are working on trying to go from that simplification. some Actually are margaret. And you'd mentioned part of your work includes looking at models that are used. The word inspired but something along those lines from the human visual system. What are some of the ways in which one might be inspired in that fashion will actually. It's it's interesting because the model of activism neural network is inspired beecham's so when people started to look at how actually sees you start to mobile A stack of layers where we have some with some filters When we envision us oriented field. There's that can see recent vertical different frequencies To obedience actually like a very simplified note. Landlord say i'm not really someone knows a lot about the brain but i'm vaguely aware that our eyes are somewhat imperfect in the brain does a lot of cleaning up yet. I don't know if that's true in the more computer vision. I think our cameras are maybe more accurate than the human eye in some cases. And there's not quite as much cleanup. Are these fundamentally different approaches. Or at the end of the day do both systems have basically the same day to set. Nah i think it's a analogy because there's a bar that is only the information that we receive from the exterior. Let's say the luminance of they're seeing on the This on bar. But of course we don just see that we processing formation on this is why we say that we actually we perceive information because there are some other things that are happening in our brain taking this information on combining with everything that we know from the beginning memories although stop so we actually is when we see at camera. recording is actually taking just some information soon so the analogy would be computer. Actually tried to do this analogy so when you put so not. What's behind those cameras. Tried to do something without information. Either retail They're like following someone. Then you're more or less doing this analogy how ac. Because when we see we are doing something with information is it not only just preceding the light which is the dot com era's

Martine Masterson Celso Barcelona Spain Obesity Beecham Margaret
Hacker Folklore

Advent of Computing

06:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Hacker Folklore

"When it comes to computers the actual hardware and software only account for part of the full story. Now don't get me wrong here. Hardware is a really interesting and important. Part of what i cover. The same thing goes for software. As i always say harbor is actually pretty useless without some kind of code to run on it. But you can't fully explain the history of computing with just blinking lights and stacks of code. That would turn to a pretty dry story pretty quickly. You need to also look the messy part. That's the human element and for me. This is problems usually crop up. You see there's a certain kind of person that's drawn to computers enthusiasts programmers engineers and researchers all seem to have at least somewhat similar motivations. Why do they work with computers. Well computers are just neat by us. Solve problems is fun and finding inventive solutions is rewarding in itself. And how this kind of drive is really great for the discipline at large. It can also make researching the development of technologies. A little bit annoying. Why did can thomas. And dennis ritchie developed a unix. Why did text based adventure game start to show up all over the place sure. They're really good technical reasons but partly it was just for the fun of the project. Once mass produced computers introduced more people into the fold these kinds of traits and motivations they kind of become omnipresent at least to appoint those working on large shared mainframes quickly turned from teams of researchers into groups of friends and once networking starts to link of computers. These groups of friends form into a larger community. So we start to see a large group of people with shared ideals practices beliefs and a common cause at their core. Now that sounds an awful lot like a culture. This is usually called hacker culture and like any other culture. It has its own folklore. Welcome back to advocate of computing. I'm your host sean. Hannity and this is episode forty-six hacker folklore now. This is a project that i've actually had in the works for a while. So i'm especially excited to get to share it with you. All today's episode is going to be a little bit different from my normal fair. I'm not going to be talking a specific computer technology or even really a series of events. Instead we're taking a detour through some fun. And i think pretty funny territory. We're going to be looking at a section of the jargon file in the print edition. It's appendix a hacker folklore. Hopefully you'll excuse me but you're in for a bit of a long preamble here. I put together a mini episode on the jargon file way back in the archive mainly talking about the files origins and its history in short. It's a dictionary of terms used by the more computer savvy folk. The file began in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy s at mit artificial intelligence lab and it spread pretty quickly from their versions moved from coast to coast over the arpanet and nine hundred eighty three. The first print edition was published as the hacker's dictionary. This isn't really a dry treaties. On terms and technical language jar file is a lot closer to really humor. The files mixture of some pretty low brow jokes jabs at corporate employees and actually useful definitions for its creators. The jargon file was fun pastime with an actual purpose it captures a slightly filtered view of the culture around computers in the seventies eighties and the latest version. V four point four point seven up on cat be dot. Org was last updated in two thousand and three. Well it makes the jargon file so important is that it preserves something normally hard to come by. There's been endless. Amounts of ink spilled over big events in the history of computing figures. Like bill gates. Steve jobs have multiple biographies covering their life. Stories to that all the actual hardware and software lying around and it's actually somewhat easy to chronicle all the big events all these things are essentially preserved. So you don't really have to go hunting for that. One scrap of a note. The bill gates wrote in the mid eighties. Instead you can just go grab both the focuses on microsoft in that era when we get below that high level of visibility. We can run into some serious issues sourcing. Computer science as a field wasn't developed by a handful of people it took masses but those masses aren't usually chronicled in the same way as high profile figures. Most researchers donate their notebooks to university. Archives user group minutes were usually just thrown in the recycling bin and online forums and messages. Don't really start being relevant until much more recently. This means that trying to put together less well known stories can get kind of difficult and a lotta. The culture around these stories is either lost or really really difficult to find information on. That's where the jargon file sweeps into saved the day well at least somewhat. It gives a picture of the hacker subculture during a pretty wide span of time. I guess this may be a good time to actually address the terminology here. Hacker didn't originally mean some malicious actor that broke into computers although breaking and entering was sometimes part of it. The jar file has a few different definitions for the term. I think the most relevant here is quote a person who enjoys exploring the details of programmable systems and how to stretch their capabilities as opposed to most users who prefer to learn only the minimum necessary r f c one three nine to the internet users. Glossary usefully amplifies this as a person who delights in having an intimate understanding of the internal workings of a system

Dennis Ritchie Mit Artificial Intelligence La Hannity Bill Gates Thomas Sean Steve Jobs Microsoft Hacker
Dmitri Dolgov: Waymo and the Future of Self-Driving Cars

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:24 min | Last month

Dmitri Dolgov: Waymo and the Future of Self-Driving Cars

"When did you first fall in love with robotics or even computer science more general computer science. I at a fairly young age. Robotics happened much later. I think my first interesting introduction to computers was in the late eighty s When we got our first computer. I think it was an an. Ibm i think ibm at. Remember those things that had like a turbo button in the frontier precedent. You'll make make the thing goes faster. Did they already have floppy disks. Yeah the the the five point four inch once. I think there's a bigger inch so good when something than five inches and three inches. I that was five. Maybe before that was the giant plates than it didn't get that but it was definitely not the not the three inch ones anyway so that you know we got that computer. I spent the first Few months just know playing video games as you would expect. I got bored of that So i started messing around and trying to figure out how to make the thing. Do other stuff got into Exploring programming and a couple of years later. It got to a point where i actually wrote a game. A lot of games and game developer japanese developer actually offered to buy it from me for a few hundred bucks. But you know for for a kid in russia. The big deal. It's a big deal. Yeah i do not think the deal well integrity. Yeah i instead Pity use those not the most acute financial move that i made my life looking back at it now. I i the reason i put it online. was what would you call. It was freeware. think right. it was not open source. But you could upload the binary that would put the game online idea was that people like it and then they you know contributing to send you a little donations rate so quick math of forcing them thousands and millions of people are gonna play my game couple of bucks a piece. You know definitely do that as i said not. Not the best way to raise about business models remember. What language was programming that was scale which what pascal pasco and had a graphical component did text based. It was like I think there are three hundred twenty by two hundred whatever it was. I think the early resume resume. And i actually think the reason why this company wanted to buy does not like the fancy graphics or the limitation. Those maybe the idea Of actual game but the idea the campaign one of the things i. It's so funny. I used to play this game. Called golden axe and the simplicity of the graphics and something about simplicity of music. Like it's still haunts me. I don't know if that's a childhood thing. I don't know if that's the same thing for call of duty these days for young kids but i still think that the games are simple. That simple purity makes four allows your imagination takeover and thereby creating a more magical experience like now with better graphics. It feels like your imagination doesn't get to Create worlds which is kind of interesting I it could be just an old man approach waving kids these days. That have no respect. But i still think that graphics almost get in the way of the experience i dunno flippered letter. I don't know the case closed. I don't yet but that that's more games at up like it's more like tetris. World where they optimally masterfully create a fun short term dopamine experience versus a more referring to like role playing games. Where there's like a story you can live in it for months or years. like There's an elder scrolls series which is probably my favorite settled games thousand magical experience that the graphics terrible the characters were all randomly generated It pulls you in. There's a story. It's like an interactive version of an elder scrolls. Tolkien world

IBM Pascal Pasco Russia Dunno Tolkien
Beeple on How He Raked In $3.5 Million

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

03:11 min | Last month

Beeple on How He Raked In $3.5 Million

"Today's guest is mike winkelmann a beagle. Welcome mike great nice to have you so you're a digital artist and you've worked with apple. Louis vitton nike justin bieber and katy perry even producing one digital artwork a day for over thirteen years. How did you get into crypto So a bunch of people just started telling me you should check out this. Nfc stuff and so really only like two months ago. I looked into the space a bit closer and saw a bunch of names that i recognize. You know in my certified design area. And so as i go there definitely seems like there's some here and so i like dole van and i have a computer science degree you know. I'm not a programmer. But you know that piece of it really started like interested me so it. Just the possibilities. I thought were just endless. There was just a bunch of things people by try and get it. I thought sounded really really finally. Try and you ended up having a big digital art sale last weekend that rakes in three point. Five million dollars. Congratulations thank you. Yeah it was crazy the to see. But i also think like it truly is like sort of the start of people really like collecting the I think you know the the the physical tolkien paired with the the annettee. I think email makes it something. People can really understand and sort of like speaks to their inner sort of like collecting voice. And i think it's just the system that you know will be a the future of sort of like you know collecting artwork sieve. Tell us more of the details about that sale. What did you offer. How did you offer it and what happened. Sure saw the biggest thing that i think is different from this sale than previous sales. Is that each of the pieces. Included a physical token you know a digital screen that was very closely tied to the like blockchain. Though it wasn't sort of like you know cries that could be separated easily from the nfl at something. That's very sort of meant to be looked at as one piece And so i. I made you know people ask collect dot com which sort of like houses the collection and then You know there was an open edition For those on sale for just five minutes and then you know which also includes physical token twenty one auction throat. The weekend Sold single edition You know sort of pieces to the highest bidder and so that was sort of like the components of the draft. So you know all weekend. We sold six hundred thousand dollars worth of the open edition five minutes and then you know the everyday's themselves the auction we're going over one hundred thousand dollars on average at last piece went for seven hundred seventy seven thousand dollars so i think it just shows that there's like a huge appetite for you know a tightly sort of connected digital and physical sort of like

Mike Winkelmann Louis Vitton Katy Perry Justin Bieber NFC Dole Mike Apple NFL
Andrew Song: Whisper.ai and a Novel Approach to Hearing Aids

Future Ear Radio

05:57 min | Last month

Andrew Song: Whisper.ai and a Novel Approach to Hearing Aids

"I wanna kind of get into you know so k- obviously you have this personal background story And i know you've worked in silicon valley. It sounds like you were working at facebook Can you just speak to you know whether it be facebook specifically or or any of the other ventures that you were doing. I'm just very very curious. To like what in your background ending your other fellow co-founders backed backgrounds Along with the personal side of things led you to the point where you decided. I wanna take totally novel approach to how a hearing aid might look and feel in your twenty twenty for sure. It's a really interesting story I would say that for myself. And my co founders. We all have our own unique story. About what our inspiration was to hearing a book for all three of us it it it involves different family members And that was kind of independently. You know it wasn't dinner table. Conversation are Let's go grab a beer. Conversation depend on. We all felt that. And i think the thing that you learn at any you see and really experience at any company in technology companies especially here in the san francisco bay area and silicon valley is what the opportunity for change really is and that You have everyone really has an opportunity to bring something new to the table If there's if there's value at the end of the day for for the for a customer and customer in this case could be either here in a professional or an end user and so we all sort of at a high level understood this problem especially Especially dwight curl who i met at facebook. And there's a lot of interest back. When this was all being thought of especially from dwight i would say a brown how artificial intelligence would really change everyday stinks and artificial intelligence itself. Sort of a kind of like magical incantations. I like to. I like to say that it's actually batches very much how we We as a society spoke about the internet in the nineties when we talked about the internet in the nineties you talked about modems and ip addresses and servers and that's sort of the language use the ai version of that language but when we talk about the internet today we talked about what we wanna to do. We talk about being able to meet remotely. We use a lot. We talked about listening to music or sending money or messaging our friends. That's we don't talk about ip addresses. Every day i was going to go through that that similar transformation dwight's background. He worked at facebook on a lot of on the lot of marketing and advertising products. But he got to facebook because i'm facebook acquired his last company which was using ai to accomplish a lot of these similar types of goals I took maybe a more traditional route out of school Studying software studying computer science studying mathematics and being really interested in working on a lot of products that had a lot of positive impact on people. You know working with facebook frigging on facebook messenger for a number of years and leading the core consumer product team and we met shlomo has a very similar background. His experience personally with hearing loss was through his family so he understood that he had started a number of companies before the very successful worked on a number of different hardware applications. Originally you know his his experience goes all the way back to To to israel where he was originally from working on a lot of the technology that ended up in the xbox is where you can move dance in front of them. Play those games that that's one of the first types of technologies you've worked on. Yeah the xbox connect and so we all had this idea and this understanding of how we could put something together to make a difference in this industry. But i think it's naive to think it starts there. It's naive to think. Well i have this technology. I have this idea. I'm going to change the a lot of the early days of the company and this may speak to why we work so closely with hearing care professionals hours passionate about that is really just understanding the the problems And the the challenges that people have with hearing. It's not just my grandfather but you know as an industry And and there's there's a a number of them Some are related to product performance. Some are related to image ones image when using hearing loss on the professional side Direct to consumer was a really big challenge. But you really start to understand that this idea that we have that we could make a hearing aid. That's going to get better over time that we could use artificial intelligence to Improve the sound processing on the hearing directly Not not not artificial intelligence so that you're my grandfather could use siri that. My grandfather doesn't really syria that much so it's wasn't wasn't super important. We didn't hear a lot of people who said i really wanted to syria like go us to do that. What they really said it. I want it to sound better care a lot about noise performance. People buy these things and they spend money on them because they really want to want to not just hear things but connect with the world. They want to have a conversation with people. They want to have in debt that independence and so that's the path that we that we set off on When we really felt like hey this is a this is a real thing. And we've been really fortunate. I would say to have great investor support to build this company. Because as i'm sure all of your listeners know building hearing it from the ground up is not necessarily the easiest thing. It takes a really talented team with a bunch of different diverse skills but it also takes great investor support and that's why we've been really happy at the partnerships we've had there not just to have the money in the funding to do this but also have the support and the vision that we can really make a difference in myspace.

Facebook Silicon Valley Dwight Curl Dwight San Francisco Bay Shlomo Syria Israel Myspace
Secrets from the Happiness Lab With Laurie Santos

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:40 min | Last month

Secrets from the Happiness Lab With Laurie Santos

"All right. Let's get to today's episode. Twenty twenty as we all know sucked extremely hard already but we may now be entering into even more difficult months ahead as winter sets in and the case loads appear to be rising so we asked professor. Laurie santos to come on the show. She is overflowing with science based strategies for navigating this difficult time this is the second episode and our two part series that we are semi facetiously calling. Winter is coming. If you missed last week's episode zindel segal a pioneer in mindful treatment for depression and anxiety. Go back and check that. One out laurie. Meanwhile as a tenured professor at yale where she teaches a blockbuster course unhappiness. she's also now. The host of a really popular podcast. A really great podcast called the happiness lab and in this conversation we talk about how to handle the holidays in a pandemic how to have hard conversations with your family combating pandemic fatigue in your own mind. The need to double down on self care these days. Why the things we think will make us happy. Probably won't and the cultivation of jomo the opposite of fomo and time effluence. Here we go. Laurie santos laurie santos. Thanks for coming on. thanks for having me. It's a pleasure. So let me just start with your course which there been a bunch of articles about your course in the new york times in new york magazine and so i've been following your work for a long time. But can you just describe how you became interested in teaching this students. And why you think it took off in such an incredible way. Yeah so it. All started when i took on a new role so i've been teaching for over a decade. Now which makes me feel very old but in just the last couple of years. I took on this new position. I became a head of college on campus. And so y'all's one of these weird places like hogwarts where they're like colleges within a college like connect griffin doris leather in sort of thing And so i'm head of silliman college no relation to slither and even though people get that confused but what that means that. I live with students on campus. Like my house is literally in the middle of their quad. I e with them in the dining hall. I kind of hang out with them in the courtyard as i was seeing student. Life up. Close and personal and honestly. I didn't like what i was seeing. I was kinda shocked at the level of mental health. Dysfunction that my students were dealing with it was something. I was kind of blind to while i was like up at the front of the classroom. Which sort of embarrassing. Now in retrospect. But i kind of just didn't see it but you know so many students reporting. They're depressed and anxious and this caused me to like look. Is there something weird about yale or something. We're doing wrong but conceptually to something. We're seeing nationally like right now. The national statistics are really scary over forty percent of college students today. Report being too depressed to function. I shouldn't say today. this is more two thousand. Nineteen sorta of pre kovic time right so in two thousand nineteen over forty percent of college. Students were too depressed to function over sixty percent report. They felt overwhelmingly anxious most days and more than one in ten said. They'd seriously considered suicide in the last year. And so these are national statistics but this bore out what. I was seeing on campus. It just felt like you know honestly. We weren't meeting our educational mission at yale right. We're bringing these students here but you know for students in my lecture and forty percent of the kids out there. Too depressed function most days like they're not learning computer science or chaucer trying to teach them at yale right there just kinda missing it and so i thought it was sort of part of my educational mission to sort of fix this and as a psychologist i thought you know. There's lots of work on the kinds of practices. You can engage with to improve your mental health. It doesn't have to be this way. And so i thought i know i'll develop this whole new class about living a good life and all these evidence based practices students could use. I no idea. I thought it was going to be thirty or so students. Because that's what's typical for a new class. And i remember yale. Students don't register ahead of time so it's like once the classes offered you kind of watch. This little graph of how many students are interested in your course and the i noticed something weird was happening. Was that the graph in most classes went from zero to one hundred students but mine had an order of magnitude difference. It went from zero to one thousand students and then it went over. That and i was like this is strange and that was because over. A quarter of the students at yale wanted to take the class the first time it was offered over a thousand students and so that created lots of logistical hurdles. Like finding a concert hall. That was big enough to fit everyone. You know joked about putting it in the football stadium but that would be a little cold. And yeah i mean when it showed me. Was that students you know. They don't like this culture of feeling stressed anxious. They're really like searching for solutions. And i was sort of proud of them because they were really looking for evidence based solutions. Like they didn't want platitudes or just kind of self help but they wanted to know what did the science say about how you could live healthier.

Laurie Santos Yale Zindel Segal Griffin Doris Silliman College Laurie Anxiety Depression New York Times New York Football
Face Mask Sentiment Analysis

Data Skeptic

04:59 min | Last month

Face Mask Sentiment Analysis

"My name is neil young. I'm affiliated with the department of computer science at the university of rochester and working towards a bs in computer science with a minor in and statistics. I m table professor of computer. Science at the university of rochester may research areas on in general a machine many data mining areas. I'm donna lie. I'm a junior at interested in rochester. L. majoring in computer science and economics will great to have all three of you here today to get started. Tell me a little bit about what brought the three of you together. Computational social science as one of my research areas and michael has been working on similar poppy extol. We've done a lot of election related research but this year because kobe nineteen it becomes clear to us that we should seize the sub -tunities though as i was teaching the data mining course. I encouraged students to take kobe. Nineteen as the topic for the project. So neon jonathan amount them though we investigate a number of issues from face masks ordine panic buying mental health issues contribues views of kobe. Nineteen terminology such as china but face mask is one of the most interesting issues. I'm glad neil and jonathan jumped on the opportunity right so as professor low mentioned our project originated as sort of final project for our game might in class then. We worked over the summer. Mer finding it so basically the impetus. I guess for the investigating masks as thick nineteen topic was the fact that it was so controversial. I think it's very interesting because we just sort of casually. I noticed that there seems to be cultural differences. In how americans sort of approach mask wearing and many countries in asia for example of french mass wearing. It's pretty ingrained in the culture. Just wearing a mask in asia means most of the time you don't necessarily sick like you want to prevent someone else from being sick seems to be the attitude but then these sort of attitudes towards pass was polarized in them skewed and then there's increasingly large amount of coverage about mask political issue right. You know we have articles about. Why will trump not wear masks or a certain demographics having difference us towards mass and so with these facts. We thought that it would be a good topic to investigate. Also i guess announced experiences kind of notice that like when it first broke out restoring General funny kind of just the wear masks you another. But we don't have to kind of shifted to everyone covering mass eventually and it being mandated for everywhere now. Well that's good to hear given that they definitely help in public health. But i get the sense that that's not a universal thing we can say about everybody everywhere. I guess to get started. Maybe you could tell me a little bit about how you collect data in this area. Obviously there's an interest in making some statements and doing some analysis around the usage and opinions about face masks. But how do you get started tapping into some data source that can give you a real place to start from so we choose social media as the source of data. This is different from other reports awaits rely on surveys and questionnaires and polls to study public opinion. Many issues including face masks so as some issues with traditional approach of using surveys to number why scale so typically us avail poll only involves assad. Noel fewer people though scaly issue ways. The small-scale came the buyer stole. We all know that post were not accurate in predicting the outcome of a presidential elections at least not the percentages and also pose surveys amount necessary. Real time 'cause you send them out. People may not respond immediately. They may not respond faithfully so only sort of weaknesses of a traditional approach so we decided to do social media where we can get lots of data are we can get a million users and we get these data on ongoing basis to perform real time analysis. We believe this approach overcome a number of weaknesses of the traditional approach. Yes so basically. There are some intrinsic issues with survey based approaches that social media data mining resolves. Now i've received the question before about why we choose twitter specifically and vesicles twitter in general the types of topics and the types of authorisation. That happened on the platform are technically more serious. Rights alike wouldn't necessarily go to instagram namely i because it's a picture based social media site while i'm twitter's mostly taste and then previously in the literature. Twitter has been verified as a valuable source of analyzing and predicting areas. Large-scale societal events. So festival mentions that his group has worked on sort of elections or example. The two thousand sixteen election sort of predicting. I believe the group did a better job when compared to the polls and the actual percentages just by using of social media. There's been previous works looking at h one n one pandemic Outbreak any sort of analyzing aspects of those pandemics so the twitter would be assessed

Kobe University Of Rochester Donna Lie Department Of Computer Science Neil Young Asia Rochester Neil Jonathan Michael China Assad Twitter Noel
Ransomware Stalls Online Learning In Baltimore School District

All Things Considered

02:03 min | Last month

Ransomware Stalls Online Learning In Baltimore School District

"All learning stopped in Baltimore County public schools this morning, teachers and students were locked out of their online courses when a ransomware attack halted all of the district's digital systems. Emily Sullivan and member Station W. Y P. R Reports Elena Lama Ke thought she'd seen all possible remote learning blunders. But then, as the kindergarten teacher was preparing for virtual parent teacher conference, she learned of the attacks, I think if it Have been any other year. My panic level probably would have been a lot higher. Honestly, I was like, Of course, there's a cyber attack. She and other teachers are shut out of their grating portals, email and even their phones. I don't know how we're going to navigate this. My hope is that we will be able to get back into our virtual world as soon as possible. Imagine if thieves snuck into school headquarters loaded up every single document and then put those files in a warehouse on Lee. They can enter. That's how ransomware works and encrypt systems and on Lee, the hackers have the key. Avi Rubin is a computer science professor at Johns Hopkins University, he says. While it's too early to say for certain the attacks look serious. I don't think it's completely out of the question that we may not be able to finish out this year if they can't get back in line and then that several weeks, schools are not traditional ransomware targets but as many remain online. Rubin says hackers have more opportunities to infiltrate them. Everybody is now using either zoom or Microsoft teams or some form of remote communication, and that includes students learning in school. There's been at least 30 ransomware attacks on schools this year. This one has left more than 115,000 Children who can't enter their classrooms due to the pandemic without a way to learn. Lama, Ke says she can't believe she's nostalgic for virtual learning. We get excited to see each other every day, and even though they're only seeing each other virtually when one student hasn't they asked, Why aren't they on the screen? Or they send virtual hugs to each other? Baltimore County School officials say they're working with the FBI, and they don't plan on paying ransom

Emily Sullivan Station W. Y P. R Elena Lama Ke Baltimore County Avi Rubin LEE Johns Hopkins University Rubin Microsoft KE Lama Baltimore County School FBI
Medtech Goes Virtual at Osso VR

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:49 min | 2 months ago

Medtech Goes Virtual at Osso VR

"Welcome to the tech talk pond caps. This is your host farro. And i'm very excited to have justin. Ceo of also be with us today. The role of virtual reality is pushing past traditional gaming into industrial applications. And also vr. Julie front of this forging a fascinating tap into the world of medical training and education. Jackson brings a particularly unique background as a gamer. A physician and now melting various interests as an entrepreneur justin. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much for having me well great. This is such a fascinating topic like probably many people listening you know. I've been a part of many training laps from cadavers to bone models and beyond and and you kind of feel delimitations when you've been in those settings it can be wildly inefficient and face serious limitations in terms of how scalable measurable of the training is so it just feels you know incredibly relevant and timely Particularly today is we Enter situations that are ever more remote That osa vr's really aiming to change a lot of that so so maybe to get started here you can give listeners an overview of really how you're bringing virtual reality into surgical training and assessment and we'll jump into it from their great. It really starts with my personal career journey and the problems that i experienced firsthand so like you said i originally started out in the world of gaming i was studying computer science and had the opportunity to work at activision and i got interested in healthcare because of a sick family member and i started to wonder if there was way to software and technology to help people instead of just entertainment So pivoted to medical engineering with the golden ben healthcare technology. But i didn't really know how to get started with invention and i was discussing this with a mentor when he told me. If you wanna invent something you need to understand the problem you're trying to i. And he felt that the best way to understand. Medical problems was to be a doctor and be on the front lines taking care of patients and seeing what works. And what doesn't so. I took his advice very literally. He helped me get into medical school. Ucla and then i stayed there to do my surgery training which is really where i started noticing a big problem which is how we train and assess our healthcare professionals with their technical skills like surgery and i would be in procedure after procedure at these top hospitals. Where sometimes people would say. Hey just scrub out. And google what to do or stock. We need to find an instruction manual or youtube video and to me. It kind of raised an eyebrow or two and what i noticed that was going on was really three core three dynamics. The first is that there's too much to learn so we're victims of our own success in a way. Accelerating science and technology the work that you and i do massively expanding. The library of procedures that healthcare professionals are expected to know how to do in a moment's notice as sort of an extreme example. I always tell the story how one day i was called to the zoo to operate on a guerilla not knowing anything about girl anatomy or girl as and that was a really interesting experience but just highlights how on any given day. You really don't know what you're going to deal with as a doctor or healthcare professional for that matter. The second part of the problem is that surgery is getting more complicated. Newer devices like robotics navigation minimally invasive techniques have longer learning curve so instead of ten to twenty cases. You're looking more like fifty to a hundred so of magnitude and then the final thing and most people don't know this outside of healthcare but there's little to no assessment of technical skills that takes place for surgeons and in health care. This is starting to change. But in general there's minimal also in my career as a surgeon. I still practice on weekends. I've only been assessed. One time i was interviewing for residency spot. Now's asked to play the board game. Operation and to remove a plastic piece without buzzing so it was basically seeing all of this firsthand and also having background and game development that i got introduced a virtual reality very early in its development and immediately recognized its ability to solve this problem. You can use it anytime and anywhere. You can train on any procedure. You can use your hands in a realistic way. You can train remotely train as a team and then you can get objective assessment. And so that's really how the concept for vr was born and win. Oh severe got started. Which october two thousand sixteen. We were really in a state where the practices that we were doing. In terms of training and assessment were unsustainable so the american association of medical colleges estimated. We're going to be over. One hundred thousand. Healthcare providers short within a decade thirty one percent of graduating residents after fourteen years of education could not operate without supervision and required additional years of training and lower skilled surgeons had five times higher mortality rates than higher skilled counterparts as reported by the new england journal of medicine and so we are already were on sort of a pretty bad path and then you throw covert in the mix as you mentioned and everything just got accelerated and so the main way especially after. We're done with our formal training and residency and fellowship as surgeons that we practice are as you mentioned at in-person events courses and conferences often sometimes with hundreds of thousands of people. So that's something that is very difficult to impossible to do right now. And we don't really know what the future is gonna look like the so called new normal. So that's where we've seen. Interest really skyrocket in the ability to train remotely without needing to be physically present with others on these new emerging medical technologies and procedures

Justin Golden Ben Healthcare Farro Julie Jackson Ucla American Association Of Medica Youtube Google New England Journal Of Medicin
The Foundation: Closing the Technical Skills Gap

Work In Progress

03:23 min | 2 months ago

The Foundation: Closing the Technical Skills Gap

"That there are so many people who don't have the access to these programs they don't have the mentorship it's been there. It's not that it didn't exist before people knew it. People 'specially felted in we're experiencing it but now it's out there and there is a stronger effort to kind of eliminate that gap. What kind of programs do you see out there. What kind are you funding. That might help make them. More diverse workforce such an important area of investment and really hard problem to tackle. Can you two examples sensitive other end of the spectrum on the workforce in the spectrum. You as we've suggested especially in a time of kobe. Social capital matters when you need to get a job when you need to connect To someone in house to submit your resume to ask for an interview social capital's one of the top indicators of whether you will in fact get that job and for many of the populations that we serve. This just doesn't exist and we're seeing a lot of interesting pilots again. Around building that social capital building. Networks to siltation mentorship at that allows for individuals to really build their social capital that will enable them to both get in the door and move up once there and having networks to support them along the way. It's absolutely critical on an thrilled to see so many funders now starting real investments in this space on the other end of the spectrum. Something i'm deeply passionate about k. Twelve computer science education. We know that the majority of these technology roles today had access to computer science education and high school. We know that if you work at all chances are you had computer. Science education at high school in what we now know is that computer. Science is offered only in those districts that can afford it and if you look at the maps of reporting we're seeing even in the last year despite huge advances in k. twelve cs education. What we now knows. The majority of schools in the united states the majority in twenty twenty still do not offer one computer science course. The number one predictor of whether an individual go into technology career or not and we simply have to fix that but we have to reframe the conversation around diversity equity technology around early interventions early education and leveling the playing field k twelve level. We the foundation have done this investment in teach for america working in the hardest to reach the codes in the country training in place in computer science teachers in those markets in bringing computer science coursework and rigor to schools that otherwise. Have it but we have a lot of work to do here in. And i you know we talk about diversity intact for the last ten years now. This is felt like the issue is your and i just hope that we can move to a place where we understand that early. Interventions are absolutely critical. If we are ever to see the needle move on this what do you think the problem is. I mean as as you said we've been talking about this for a decade. Is

Kobe America
The Foundation: Closing the Technical Skills Gap

Work In Progress

03:20 min | 2 months ago

The Foundation: Closing the Technical Skills Gap

"That comes out of that as well covid. Nineteen has really shown a light on the diversity gap that we have that there are so many people who don't have the access to these programs they don't have the mentorship it's been there. It's not that it didn't exist before people knew it. People 'specially felted in we're experiencing it but now it's out there and there is a stronger effort to kind of eliminate that gap. What kind of programs do you see out there. What kind are you funding. That might help make them. More diverse workforce such an important area of investment and really hard problem to tackle. Can you two examples sensitive other end of the spectrum on the workforce in the spectrum. You as we've suggested especially in a time of kobe. Social capital matters when you need to get a job when you need to connect To someone in house to submit your resume to ask for an interview social capital's one of the top indicators of whether you will in fact get that job and for many of the populations that we serve. This just doesn't exist and we're seeing a lot of interesting pilots again. Around building that social capital building. Networks to siltation mentorship at that allows for individuals to really build their social capital that will enable them to both get in the door and move up once there and having networks to support them along the way. It's absolutely critical on an thrilled to see so many funders now starting real investments in this space on the other end of the spectrum. Something i'm deeply passionate about k. Twelve computer science education. We know that the majority of these technology roles today had access to computer science education and high school. We know that if you work at all chances are you had computer. Science education at high school in what we now know is that computer. Science is offered only in those districts that can afford it and if you look at the maps of reporting we're seeing even in the last year despite huge advances in k. twelve cs education. What we now knows. The majority of schools in the united states the majority in twenty twenty still do not offer one computer science course. The number one predictor of whether an individual go into technology career or not and we simply have to fix that but we have to reframe the conversation around diversity equity technology around early interventions early education and leveling the playing field k twelve level. We the foundation have done this investment in teach for america working in the hardest to reach the codes in the country training in place in computer science teachers in those markets in bringing computer science coursework and rigor to schools that otherwise. Have it but we have a lot of work to do here in. And i you know we talk about diversity intact for the last ten years now. This is felt like the issue is your and i just hope that we can move to a place where we understand

Kobe America
Sybil Attacks on Federated Learning

Data Skeptic

05:22 min | 2 months ago

Sybil Attacks on Federated Learning

"Hi. My name is clement. phone. I'm a phd student at carnegie mellon university. Welcome to the show thanks. I'm here so tell me a little bit about your specific areas of study. Yeah so at carnegie mellon. I'm a phd student in the school of computer science. And more specifically. I do research in. Let's say the broad category of computer security and if you wanna drill down even further i mostly work in security when applied to machine learning systems and the security of machine learning systems. I would guess the audience has at least some familiarity with security is being like denial of service attacks and very like rule based kind of system looking at traffic. Maybe not as much machine learning. How does security play into machine learning operations. Yeah absolutely there are many different levels. I think that you can approach the problem. There's the initial idea of just taking traditional security problems. Such as denial service intrusion detection and applying machine learning to those domains just gathering insights from data and learning about them. and then there's the more meta area of making the actual process of machine. Learning more secure has so there's been a wide array of work in the community that has shown how at test time you can perform different tastes of attacks during training time you can perform a tax on the model and pretty much anything in between. I'm sure you're familiar with this phrase that if you're not paying for the product you are the product and i guess. There's some wisdom in that i don't know if it's universally true but people are certainly becoming more aware of that and maybe the off the cuff reaction is. I don't want people having my data because its privacy. But in some sense i would like people to have some of my data. I don't mind having good recommendations on amazon for example. Because i can just ignore them. Where do you yourself. Draw the lines about data sharing yet. So i agree with you that this is a pretty personal choice when it comes to just the type of experience you wanna have with the products. I think i would be similar to you in that respect where nothing comes for free. As you've said you've got to give some data to system to use it and to use it effectively. I think it's a really big area of research in general about ways in which maybe you could provide assistance but do things in a more privacy preserving way so that's a very big area research these days i guess i am a user of most day things. So that's where i would slide. Hundred spectrum makes sense. yeah. I think that's most of us. Perhaps we'll the specific paper. I invade you on to discuss. Today is titled delimitations of federated learning in civil settings so some definitions questions to kick us off. What is federated learning. This is great because it kind of plays into the idea of privacy. A little more federated learning is this new idea in distributing machine. Learning came out in around twenty seventeen developed by google. And it's the idea that you can train machine. Learning models across distributed data sets over the network without actually transferring data into google domain. So previously you'd have the idea that i'm using a service and some server. Let's say that's owned by. Google would be collecting all the information in storing it somewhere on a database and then writing machine learning on that collected data federated. Learning is a different idea. Where instead of storing data on a database owned by google. They actually just do the model training kind of live as it's occurring and there's no transfer of data is just machine learning occurs over the network and that might sound like it's kind of the same thing but when it comes to the problem of data ownership and privacy there's a bit of nuance there in terms of both the privacy and security implications federated learning which is one of the big topics of our paper and when the models being trained. Where does that training actually take place in the situation of federated learning. I guess you could think of the machine. Learning process is kind of just an iterative summation of values. So the training still takes place at work in the sense that you're taking updates to a model like you're learning it by adding values but the values are passed over the network directly so it's still lives in the service domain. Just the data used to supply those updates does not it still stays on the client devices. Gotcha so maybe we take a simple case of something like the logistic regression which can be nicely summarized as just it's beta values just the parameters that were calculated machine learning. Would it be corrected to saying like my phone or my local or whatever looks at my private data calculates that model and instead of sending my data just sends those parameters off to google. Yeah that's exactly right. That's like a really good way. Just gotcha okay. So we're seeing that then. Don't i still have some sort of privacy risks though because someone could kind of invert that and say well. If you're sending us these parameters what's the data that would have arrived at this answer exactly. So there's a whole field of research on privacy attacks on federated learning. We discussed this a little bit in our paper. But it's not really. The focus of our paper ends the idea behind. All these attacks is very much what you just said which is maybe. I can't observe the data used to train the model directly and that provides some sort of privacy but if i can observe the model updates or the beta values as you're saying and observed multiple instances of them i get a pretty good idea of what your data looks like there's some you know mathematical theoretical bounds on how much you can do but in practice. That might already be too much for certain context.

Federated Carnegie Mellon University Google Clement Amazon
"computer science" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:54 min | 5 months ago

"computer science" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is emphasis George Murkowski who is a professor and former chair of computer science at the Minnesota University of Science and Technology Becky cyber. Society. Lab. He was jailed and professor of Computer Science University of Maine if visiting scholar at the. Technology visiting professor at RPI and demanded those special projects in the computer science department of five BM's Watson Research Center. He switch interest theoretical methods and computer science and the impact of computers on society though Kim George. Thank you. Thank you for having me. Absolutely. So I want to start with one of your order papers and. It was relevant dentists increasingly irrelevant. Now everything's so it's entitled crowdsourcing big data and cold land security. adding bet people, you discuss ways that cub scouts could help homeland security. And You know you review some some successes and possibly some failures in the you want to talk a bit about that. Sure, happy to. Do just want me to talk. Yeah. Yeah. Yes. So what's the paper per about? How how good Cocoa. You know big data and cloud sourcing specifically help in the Homeland Security arena well. One of the things that. Some way I was picturing Mississippi extension of of the neighborhood watch you know a lot of us kind of rely on our neighbors like for example, if you have good neighbors in, you're going away for vacation trips or something you might just mentioned to your neighbor. You know where we're going to be out of town for a week. Could you just keep an eye? You know that way or you know if you're gonNA be away but you're GonNa have some people come work on the house you you tell your neighbor. Okay. Throwing burgers that sort of thing. So. in particular. The one of got me thinking a lot about this was the Boston. Marathon bombing. and. Within relatively short time. Up People. Were able to identify the culprits and track down and a lot of that happened because you know this store had a video camera and there was some other of footage that was put together from various places. Okay. So they were able to identify where the blast came they were able to track. Some of these people and and then other people recognized some of the shots. So Sylla's a lot of information that came from the community to identify the perpetrators. There was a case of they didn't that. happened. In the subway station in New York City. where? You know a a song attack, the woman. installer purse, but he had a very distinctive. Sweatshirt. And The police have no no leads totally unable to find when they posted the picture within like half a day people said Oh that so-and-so. And they. Lead so so the idea. Is. And again, I think would I always worry about is building a big brother kind of society where you know people are just trying to suppress other people. And so the idea is, how do you find that balance between up people helping each other especially in terms of thwarting Ariza them or crime?.

Computer Science University of professor visiting professor George Murkowski Kim George Homeland Security arena Minnesota University of Scienc Sylla visiting scholar RPI Watson Research Center Ariza Boston Mississippi New York City.
"computer science" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"computer science" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"I think is sometimes taken for granted because Seattle is so much bigger what kind of relationship does the computer science and engineering program have with the broader tech community and Seattle? I, I want to say and you might bring me back to the Christian, but that's fine. You know, if you look at all the high tech centers in the country, it's pretty clear that they are close to, and they surround top universities, and in our case top computer science departments, it's not an axe. That's looking valley is next to Stanford and Berkeley. It's not accident that the high tech region in the Boston area is near MIT and Harvard and many other schools. Even in North Carolina. There there's, you know, Duke UNC which had a very early programming computer sites. NC state. So people purposely locate around universities, because their source of ideas, there are source of workforce in terms of the students that we graduate, their source of consulting and collaboration with faculty. So all of these things are there and people in industry want to be close, if they're going to grow to a university for the technology, that's coming out of it. And for the people that are coming out of it. People are the secret if you're doing a startup those people that you hire those first people that you hire are everything, and the quality of those people it's harder to get to hire those people in the middle of a cornfield than it is in a place like Seattle. I don't know if you know, but somebody did Lincoln study, number of years ago, people who identified themselves, suffer engineers and looked at where they went to school, and where they ended up working, and we had the highest percentage of software engineers, who were educated in Seattle university of Washington state, Seattle compared anywhere else. Interesting. I'm so it's part of the it's such a great place to live and great place to work. We benefited enormously from the tech community around us in many ways. But the most obvious was, you know, we have been growing incredibly in the program. We've kind of tripled the undergraduate program, we've almost doubled the faculty, we've doubled the PHD program we were out of space and we needed to build another building, that's challenging proposition. And we were able to do that, in part from support from the state, of course in the university, but the majority of the funds were raised privately and that was because people like Brad Smith at Microsoft and my. Microsoft Corporation, and Amazon Zillow and Google were able to support us other people in the community. Charleena's Simoni step forward and really helped us. And just many, many people in the end, there were something like two to three hundred donors but to have those local companies come forward and say, we really value what we do what you do. And we want to support your growth was just an amazing thing to me, the beauty of that is the long term decades long, virtuous cycle that you can point to where Bill Gates and Paul Allen. Now granted the university didn't explicitly in support this but they would sneak in to, to the university buildings late at night and learn how to program on on punch cards. Right. I, I there when I think you were there when Paul Allen, when, when we had the fiftieth anniversary announced the creation of the ounce school, and Paul Allen, actually brought with him the letter that had been written to him. However, many, you know in the in the eighties from the helmet Goldie, who was then the head of computer science, telling them that they had been illegally using resources in the computer science department, and that they committed the sin, which is they borrowed an acoustic coupler, which was a device. We use fifty years ago to communicate from a home computer, too big computer somewhere over phone line. It was the internet. They had borrowed right? It was a point to point internet that they had barred this accused the cuff ler quote, without permission from the professor and that they were to cease to return, the, the coupler and to cease using department resources and it was just so funny. And one of the things I did after that was I went to EBay and I found the forty year old acoustic coupler we package, it up with a letter from on America, Kosei, our president saying, dear Paul..

Paul Allen Seattle Charleena Stanford Seattle university of Washingt Brad Smith Microsoft Corporation North Carolina Boston Berkeley NC MIT Harvard professor Bill Gates Lincoln
"computer science" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Network today, I'm delighted to have Andrew more on the podcast. He's the dean of Carnegie Mellon's school of computer science, which was ranked number one in the world by US news and World Report, and he was previously vice president of engineering Google, where he was in charge of Google shopping. Andrew, welcome to Rico, decode. Thanks for. Thank you. So let's talk. I wanna I wanna get your background. I have had various computer scientists on the show, and we're teaching and just like that. And I love to get sort of the academic perspective, but you've been in the in the fray also. So let's give your background where you came from and how you got to Carnegie Mellon, and then we'll talk about what's going on there. I grew up in the seaside town called boom in the south of England, and there in the late eighty s I really got into creating video games like kids at the time right? When studied computer science at Cambridge University and then did a PHD on this big question of it's so hard to program robots to do stuff. Even we make them learn to do it instead, which has been the biggest challenge obviously. So that's why I really fell in love with this question of, to what extent can we help machines improve their performance and performance? I, we'll talk about that later a little bit more. So you did that, but you did you go right to robotics? Where'd you go from there? Subsequently, I, I spent some time at the MIT a up which is super fun working for professor Chris Atkinson there, and I'm totally a math statistics guy, where's he builds real robots. So it was a trial. Fan actually build the physical robots, and frankly, I still suck at that mechanical engineer, exactly, huge respect for that the it's the stuff to do with making things decide what they're going to do next. I'm really interested in anyway. Subsequently I joined Connie Email and really enjoyed sort of helping develop the AI classes that got super into using machine learning, not only for robots, but for manufacturing because there's so much I'm do to improve that. I really enjoyed my time that started to get interested in other big questions around computer science to do with things like, can you detect near-earth objects which potentially dangerous using so fancy algorithms or Nathan Myhrvold thing, but go ahead. Can you get an early warning that this being an ABC borne diseases, heck on a city by noticing that the perhaps the uptick in sales of of medications, following stripe along the city in the direction of the f. low for example, that's that was the cool stuff. Right? Helpful is all around this key thing that if you compress a lot of data machines may be able to see stuff that no individual human could see because we can only sort of ingest a certain amount of beta exactly which is the whole idea behind all this. So you were there Carnegie Mellon, and then you went to Google. Is that the only job you've had like that's not academic, or was it? Yes, yes, I did. Do a spectacularly unsuccessful startup for a while. What was it? That was all his spectacularly unsuccessful startup. They're my favorites machine learning consulting services early. Yeah, we in the one thousand nine thousand nine hundred. We had a flashing neon sign on Craig street near CMU which said, data mining mining, fleshing all the time. Right? Which he never got any will can customers, unfortunately. Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Today wouldn't go over well, go ahead what we loved doing that, but we just didn't figure out how to make money at it, consulting engagements on a playing machine learning and all kinds of places really do. Do that was now the thing. So you went over to Google. How did you get to Google? I was really impressed by the way that things were scaling so much and I, I made the move relatively late. It was in the mid two, thousands, and the fact is I was very, very interested in this question of what can you do with a billions or in some cases, more than billions of obsessions. That's what I entice me..

Google Carnegie Mellon Andrew US vice president of engineering Nathan Myhrvold MIT England Cambridge University Connie Email Rico ABC Chris Atkinson professor
"computer science" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on The Changelog

"Be good at telescopes you know that's really really important but it's probably not whether it's tournaments they might be the telescope geek because i have to do these statutes just so i get to use a telescope but we suspect that most of them are not because they want to explore the universe and it's the same with computer science you know of course we do programming all the time we in programming is had we put wheels on the great ideas that people have and you know in those couple of decades since we started doing this to being useful to great ideas that have happened search engines such billions of pages in a fraction of the secundo sites that stole the you know any video that anyone wants so and social weeks that lead people communicate in any way around the world and podcasts you know just so many things that people have come up with and but but the things that make them look she'll you need a program that's that's actually making it happen but if you do it the wrong way the it it won't be a thing and and you know good example is the most popular weep site in the world which is google it's just takes box in a button so from a programming point of view it's very hard to implement but we know that what's behind it the computer science right how do you search billions of things in a fraction of a second you need to start thinking about different algorithms and processes you need to think about communication protocols security had he stopped people trying to bring your site down trying to make their website the most popular one on the engine and things like that and and so suddenly there's a huge amount of stuff that you need to know that you're gonna program yeah so the the telescope and they'll gio from the general public helps quite a bit and it's not to say that you know it's anti programming or anything like that but it's simply i think traditionally for computer science with used programming is the gateway to computer science so you know enroll for computer science and you'll loon a whole year of programming and they will start showing you some cool stuff you can do with it and it would be a little bit like single distinct this thing could astronomy you probably don't know what it's about trust me it's really cool but i'm fiscal luna bent telescopes for year or two and then we'll tell you what is actually about and so what i have come to realize that i'm like does is it kinda skips it sees let's have a look at some stars civil look at what's really going on is that cool ak now you're gonna have to suck it in and lynn how to use a telescope balloon had to program to really make stuff happen and and i think one of them putin social things there is that with the traditional view of will loon coding loon programming fist and then we'll show you some cool stuff is that it it looks at a lot of people who can't see the point of programming will coding and whereas if you can show them the point then they okay i will i this is with learning it makes the journey worth it because you can you could kinda like do with the pink as you have some sort of motivator yeah yeah and also i think what are the things that of course we get a lot of that the gene difference in cultural differences and who gets involved in this and we tend to filter out the people who at so interested in the machine in that switch didn't programming and one of the main says that i tried to push particularly teachers as that we don't write programs for computers we wipe programs for people on computers and and so the people who write good pre games are the people who understand people and then suddenly that changes some of the stereotypes a wee bit and because you know the assumption is that if you love computers and you really good at programming than you you're right great programs but initial phase they might be terrible for people to use because you haven't thought about the person you need need people who good at both yes a big story coming out of the telescopes but it is very useful analogy relevant i mean it makes sense 'cause you you remove one a huge cost burden especially if you're targeting like primary like you said k through twelve or you know bringing it.

"computer science" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on The Changelog

"So tim i think the way to start this might be one day we were in what i would consider an after show we were recording a podcast it was over we were all chatting afterwards and the conversation came to be essentially how do we share software development programming computer science with kids and i was like i don't know where to send people and someone linked to cs unplugged dot org and i was like wow and so i immediately we've gotta talk to whoever's involved in this and we emailed and you respond to back now here we are so that's essentially how have found out about this this awesome thing you're doing your story goes kind of far back so maybe kind of tee up what this program is and you know kind of who you are okay cool so basically it started because i had exactly the same question but for me it was when my son was five years old which was making ninety two which can if your listeners might remember but it in nineteen ninetytwo he was five they were having appearance along to the classes and just to talk about what we did for a living and i the time and i still am a computer science researcher and lecturer and but the week before me that hit a cop along who'd pulled along a cop cat which the kids got to play off the sirens and you know that kind of stuff and before that had a news to for my son and she'd pull along fake blood and bandages and the kids got raped up nice it was yeah and the kids were raving about it and it was really fun and then the next week the parent to come along was me a computer scientist and at the time and through longtime after it my my main research area was data compression and you know how to make data smaller and that sort of thing and how do you explain this to kids who don't even know what data is baked bean didn't own a computer nothing like a data projector in the room or anything to demonstrate things and so i didn't know why but i just had this idea will let's not worry about the computer all it's try get to the heart of what i think about what i care about i'm solving problems when i'm trying to develop a new program for something and so i sort of things bacon are what are the key ideas he that we're looking at and just looked at a whole lot of topics that exercise my mind is a researcher in computer science and trying to think well how could that be transferred into a game or an activity or something like that and came up with three or four eight titties wind along to the class and it was just so it was using nothing but cads and paper and string unsual continues like that end we had a great time the class in it went so well they've vitamin bake which was a very pleasant surprise because i thought it might have been one of the least interesting talks that the kids might have had and so i ended up going back crinkly and developed a whole series of these things and then beckley i came across a colleague on the internet who had been doing the same thing in canada mike fellows and mike and i.

tim five years one day
"computer science" Discussed on The Atlantic Interview

The Atlantic Interview

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on The Atlantic Interview

"Studying computer science and technical fields much earlier and some approaches sit at our for example making computer science mandatory so everybody has to take some computer science into then there's no longer any sort of skew in the classroom because everyone is present i think there's tied to that some of the a stereotypes and social consciousness and awareness around software and technology and the idea that girls can do technical things and if you're looking at from the cultural side movies like hidden figures are really big deal and just showing people these stories is really powerful in these narratives that also ties into the idea of having role models that people can identify with no matter what their background is another big part of solving this problem around diversity is actually in the field once people get to industry making it possible in welcoming to everyone an such that anyone who wants to work in technology can succeed there one thing we are seeing is that even the women and minorities that do make it into industry then encounter very hostile or unwelcoming work environment that makes it difficult to continue and to succeed well let's go to that question of what happened when you went into industry i mean you obviously succeeded at stanford you obviously uncovered the lie that many of your male colleagues were living which is to say the oh yeah this is easy when it actually was hard and they wound up coming to you so you go in with unity of the wind at your back and you go to some very big companies gould pinterest i'm wondering if you could frame out a little bit of of what you've experienced when you went into the actual field.

computer science stanford
"computer science" Discussed on Analog(ue)

Analog(ue)

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on Analog(ue)

"Crash course early computer science crash calls computer science early computing is the episode that we're talking about today i watched it today so be fresh in my mind and i'll say right off the bat that i am super on board with us progressing this as a thing to go into the future because i really enjoyed it and i learned some super interesting things today i wasn't expecting to learn as much as i was going to learn but i should have because crashcourse is built to teach you stuff i did what i thought we could do as a structure for these i tell you the things that loan today that sounds good because that's what this is all about this is really to teach mic about computers at a more base level and that's what i'm getting out of this they even near up to like okay the host kerryanne is amazing and she's british so it helps me because i hear a british accent which every time of alone something in my life i school it was told to me by a british libel aisha there are a lot of australian teachers in my scoville mostly british accents so after it was normal to me feels like i'm back of school again and there's a couple of things that they said that i really liked as she said the we're not going to teach you how to program so well this is is about the basics of computing is to teach you about all of the layers of abstraction of computers which is of really beautiful tom because as will computers all right like it's just layers upon layers of things that help make a thing work and she was even saying that like certain types of people that do things are.

computer science tom
"computer science" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"You're on the can cullman show a plan thank you for taking my call sure man how can help today so i am in a career that i don't have a lot of passion for tech sales position great great position i feel very fortunate to have got into and i accepted it kinda following your proximity principle so i've i have a tech background uh engineering degree in pursuing a masters computer science and programming is what i love to do um and software engineering so my question is firstly i'm a very logic minded person and so it will win i think through uh trying to figure out you know is this really the path i wanna go especially begin sales for awhile money is good at don't dislike the job how can i be certain that uh software as where i want to joe and uh how can i make that transition without making too many waves with my my current a team that i work with uh as i have developed a pretty close relationship with with my team and i have some members of the team who recommended needs with the position as well so how to make that transition smoothly when it does happen and be sure i'm on the right path smoker well we'll get to the how to make the transition smooths later because that's the easiest and simplest one to to give you uh some advice on that's not a big deal at all appreciate your hard on that but that's that's not a big deal uh how to how to know that software is really where you want to be i mean you listed two things that you absolutely love programming and software engineering is there a difference between those two i sorry for the silly question.

computer science cullman joe
"computer science" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Yes yes a false dichotomy it's clearly so look each of yeah it would be nice if we could make it a science so that or we could guarantee that our code good work run reliably are well in all of those kinds of things but to get to that stage were not able to do that really that's where the yard said dis dis computer science belong in the school of engineering or liberal arts does it even matter i don't think it matters it's interesting to see in universities that no all it tends to be in engineering although sometimes that seems historical accident princeton use weird because although computer science is in the engineering school hit actually has students who are not engineers as well in that his major's who are not changing years as well as ngos but lots of schools is engineering department but sometimes this is probably going back for your time often were computer science started was whatever department had the first computer in so it might have been engineering bite of in mathematics at west point use geology not geography on 2s weird things like at home in then eventually these things could normalize could this for your science is a much more mature discipline right okay so i i wanna close off with one question it it's us of some people don't like the question but other other other people its spurred really interesting responses do you think that were living in a simulation.

computer science school of engineering
"computer science" Discussed on College Info Geek

College Info Geek

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on College Info Geek

"There is a bunch of ways you can do it stuff's easier scan later to that is that's kind of mines with the voice recording is that i have to listen through it and sometimes it's long if i was unsure of what i was gonna say yeah now i don't know about you but when i working through a really difficult problem like when i was on the plane trying to figure out how to create super puzzles or when i am yesterday i was like trying to figure out how certain sort works in computer science i talked to myself fulltime like i don't sit there silently trying to visualize how things work actually talk them out yeah and the might do them under my breath so knowing can hear me but i'm still talking at the very least i'm saying them all very deliberately in my head if not allowed yeah yeah so i don't know bottom line voice recording apps skype friends and imaginer friends time yep all right like a duck question number four why not just put everything into onchiri why not put your dog in donkey put your dinner and on key i don't remember my dad any on with that inaki air yohanam eat that everyone's going to knock he was barbecue brisket here's the thing and i do wanna define every time we mentioned ongky i feel the need average define it and also say how it's spelled ongky a n k y k i almost loud you can't even a n k i expert is a it's a flash card out the uses spaced repetition if yo notes based her petition is i wrote an article i made a video that will link to on the show notes as a very very effective study technique uh the thing about ongky is.

computer science
"computer science" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Kind of a root problems at to know that you've got your arm shot it or at least if you don't have your arms fully around it no what you need to discover but buffet at ago yeah um and go from there sure yeah and it is so important to you kenneth strip things back and i think i think a lot of developers have their preconceived notion coming out of a cs degree for example a lot of computer science degrees you're going to teach you java and that's kind of the thing you're going to rely on you can build a long and successful career using just java there are a lot of tools out there there's a lot available to learn and a new capabilities are going to increase your name you know the the number of things you can work on in the ways the you can work on them but getting two two hung up on it is certainly one of the killers of progress for developers and as especially when it causes indecision and when you you know you're not moving forward because you're so concerned about taking the right thing to learn or to implement for that matter i've had it always enjoyed just kind of embracing at issue as a whole so uh yeah i think it really the light turnover i was classical you drop a guy myself you not way back when uh and before it was cool so i guess that makes me hitler i was looking at us an early stuff you know like like trip this way preelectoral all that stuff and you know i got i went through their bills a few things just kind of personally on the side with a as like.

cs computer science
"computer science" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on Developer Tea

"These kinda computer science concepts really as early as eight we got i mean before that he was kinda dabbling in in playful programming kind of things but by a kind of got more serious about it and made programming part of his everyday routine made tied tied his math curriculum to that and it worked out fantastically and he became really expert at the stuff really early as you might imagine and by the time he turned sixteen he realized he had the skills to go out and get a professional software engineering job and so that's what he did my daughter um i did a lot of the same things with her from a very young age and she also was really good at it in in in in enjoyed it but not quite in the same way it wasn't the kind of thing she wanted to be doing every day and and that's okay too she's she's going a different direction she is going off to college this year going to be studying stagemanagement she loves theater that's her passion but what i have seen over the years is that those early years that i spent working on these foundational math in computer science concepts have really just made her a significantly better problemsolver a really strong thinker and it's really helped her in every other thing she's done so i'm really glad she has that experience in her background and i can see that it's it's going to help her even though that's not the kinda career she wants to go into in that is perfectly ok too.

computer science
"computer science" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Receive on their end and so i'm the sender and had to encode that information to the other person and i think a lot of a lot of computer science students they don't get this step a taught to them very well of encoding something uh that that you understand in such a way that the computer will understand it right so a can of empathizing in a way a that's not really the right word for it but putting yourself in the position of the computer said that you can understand how you can best communicate that concept through code to the computer yeah that is exactly exactly right and when when we right as or speeches or anything like that in in english class at school you're always told to think about your audience and how the audience is going to read and interpret that you have to put yourself in the mindset of the person is eventually gonna be reading this or or listening to your speech or whatever that that's how you construct good writing in co when you're writing a program the audience is the computer the computer is the thing that's going to have to execute this program so the the driving skill the fundamental thing that makes a students have a huge edge in computer science is if they have that skill of being able to roleplay the computer in their head in mentally stepped through the codes step by step and execute the statements the way the computer would executed and to those of us who are already working programmers maybe that seems like such an obvious thing that.

computer science
"computer science" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on Developer Tea

"And a lot of people even if they go for a degree in computer science they never really have the chance to do you know effectively what is happening in these games these fundamental ways of thinking about information and how information moves around and how you operate on that information and how you can pass it from you know one place to another in how that passing of that information you know interesting ways that you can pass things there's there's so much that you can teach earlier that unite in we discussed this in our in our first round and you mentioned something that i think is really interesting i love for you to expound on this day when someone arrives at uh basically what amounts to trade school to learn computer science in order to practice as a trade dateline at missing out on a lot of ways of thinking that could bank them significantly better ran out of the gate yeah and and i mentioned to this to you last time but the way i kinda have been thinking about this is developing the games comes back to how i got into the education side of this so i was a book for for several years i was a virtual reality programmer nasa and then i got into developing computer games but then when my kids were born i decided i wanted to be the stay at home dad and i saw i resigned from my job a became a stay at home doubt and i started homeschooling my kids as they got older and this is around when i also started doing some puzzle development on the side because that was something i could easily fit into my life while i was mostly playing the role of stay at home doubt.

computer science virtual reality programmer
"computer science" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The object oriented stuff that you learn in a computer science education you really get that stuff drilled into you in may that uh yeah it doesn't happen so much it the hacker scores a look just get this game working or get dislikes gaydos ems tool that we're trying to build working which is fantastic and that's a philosophy i love and probably if you do that a little bit baby you can start to understand that the penalties of moving fast and having an untype to code base and you may understand more easily after those trials and tribulations okay here are some values in interfaces or abstract classes if somebody explains them to use it so does it does it take significant on boarding when you're talking to these new or developers that are coming to slacken you have to explain okay here's what word of type script and this is an interface and this is why were defining inns this is how it's going to help us i think it really depends on are you to find significant i think this real value and growing those people any way in that direction right because i think it makes them also bet after avas cup developers types could for a moment but a thing that makes people village i'll skip developers i think if this igf 1 magic wand make with fixed one of the bounce that's the type scripted will be that it will be this notion that type script is wonderful to any person who is maybe coming from see sharpen his saying allow if only if only jobs could will be as smart as he sharp frightening he comes type script in this exactly that but the right lip side of the coin does of course you mentioned extract costs ride like that's that's an excellent example of something that is not immediately where to get typical jobs cup developer it's certainly something that you need to spend some time on what we do or the philosophy that i follow is that you can sort of defying i'm gonna say like multiple levels ride you can say okay maybe this file we don't use every single future of type script.

developer object oriented computer science
"computer science" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"What do you think are what are the types of problems in computer science or software engineering that are a good fit for this crowd sourced competition model does my question make sense uh so i'm not truth wound the question suit so rooms by so my question is so like if i were so like if i if i may an engineer at google for example and i've got a minor bug to fix in g male that would not be a good problem to crowd source to the entire company and do a competition for because the probably is probably not that many different approaches you could take to solving of bug and then on the opposite extreme end you've got something like densely annotated video segmentation where you've got a giant data set you've got a million different approaches you could take and then in the middle between those two different types of problems you've got a huge array of different types of problem sets where there's varying there's varying degrees of subjectivity so what i'm wondering is like what classifies a problem in computer science or software engineering as being something that is approachable from the wisdom of the croats 'cause that's essentially we doing with davis is it's a wisdom of the crowds approach to let's try to find the best way to approach this video segmentation problem that is super important look let's be clear this is a super important problem for computer vision specifically i mean the selfdriving car thing i think is is the most important thing that comes to mind obviously it's important for drones and like a whole host of other problems and.

computer science engineer google davis data set
"computer science" Discussed on CodeNewbie

CodeNewbie

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"computer science" Discussed on CodeNewbie

"And i made the undefeatable took tacked up and i had so much fun because it was it was something i could point at and any that i like the idea i can point it something in and because i made it i think that really helped me get into computer science because i i could play with it yeah i imagine you know what i'm talking about his around and give being clear with this puzzle aspect and and the play part of it i didn't know that those were options yup no i totally agree and actually to data was also my first real cutting besides doing like coat academy exercise that was the first product that i really felt something on my own and i opened it up recently because few months ago because i excel the files at all i wonder when her sister works and i and i played it and it has made me so happy all over gals like all my little grid in my little instructions in the first question was like before before the game starts equipped surname how you doing on it was so cute is so cute but yeah like being able to to i'm i'm totally not a game or at all but there's something about building products that feels that feels like a game you know you get stock and then you have little win you unlock a thing that you move forward and then you have conquered it because you've you've made something you can point at it and the and the kinds of being a little trophy at the end so yeah i totally totally relate to those feelings.

computer science