35 Burst results for "Complications Complications Complications Complications"

Judith Durham, Australia's folk music icon, dies at 79

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last week

Judith Durham, Australia's folk music icon, dies at 79

"Singer Judith Durham of the seekers has died of complications from lung disease in Melbourne Australia according to her music label she was 79 I'm Margie sarla with the latest Judith Durham and the seekers were the first Australian band to make it big in the U.S. their hits include I'll never find another you Georgie girl and a world of our own Durham joined the seekers in 1963 She left in 1968 to go solo but returned in the 1990s The rest of the seekers say their lives have been changed forever by losing their lifelong friend and shining star

Judith Durham Margie Sarla Lung Disease Melbourne Australia Georgie Durham U.S.
James Lovelock, creator of Gaia ecology theory, dies at 103

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 3 weeks ago

James Lovelock, creator of Gaia ecology theory, dies at 103

"James lovelock the creator of the Gaia ecology theory has died at 103 Lovelock's family says he died at the previous evening surrounded by his family from complications related to a fall the family adds that until 6 months ago lovelock was still able to walk along the coast near his home in Dorset and take part in interviews but his health deteriorated after the fall born in 1919 lovelock studied chemistry medicine and biophysics in the UK and the U.S. his contribution to environmental science as well as the Gaia theory included developing a device to measure ozone depleting chlorofluorocarbons in the atmosphere and pollutants in the air soil and water Charles De Ledesma London

Lovelock James Lovelock Dorset UK U.S. Charles De Ledesma London
White House Confirms Biden Has Taken Paxlovid for COVID Recovery

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:52 sec | Last month

White House Confirms Biden Has Taken Paxlovid for COVID Recovery

"President Joe Biden has tested positive for COVID. The White House moments ago released a statement. Saying that he's fully vaccinated twice boosted experiencing very mild symptoms. He has begun taking paxlovid, pax Levi is a drug that I think Doctor Fauci, Tony Fauci took it as well. And of course, Fauci experienced rebound COVID, which is said to be one of the complications of pax livid, in fact, I've got a good friend who I've shared with you has had rebound COVID. From not mistaken Joey took paxil levit as well. But that supposed to be a pretty powerful and effective medication, especially for the elderly and vulnerable people who have COVID-19.

President Joe Biden Pax Levi Doctor Fauci Tony Fauci White House Fauci Paxil Levit Joey
Delfonics lead singer William 'Poogie' Hart dead at 77

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Delfonics lead singer William 'Poogie' Hart dead at 77

"The cofounder and lead singer of the delfonics has died Thanks to William pugi heart and the Delph sonics a lot of us back in the day were able to say the kind of mushy things that we wanted to to the girls of our dreams But in an episode of unsung Hart said he got the concept of la la means I love you from his infant son who would cool la la over and over again and that interpreted that as an expression of affection Didn't I blow your mind this time and other hits kept the delfonics at or near the top of the charts in both the pop and R&B realm his son has told The New York Times his dad has died He was 77 and that he died last week of complications during surgery I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

William Pugi Delph Sonics Unsung Hart La La The New York Times Oscar Wells Gabriel
The Delfonics' William "Poogie" Hart Has Died

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

00:49 sec | Last month

The Delfonics' William "Poogie" Hart Has Died

"One of the great singers I wanted to talk to you about from the delfonics died the other day. Very sad. William poogie Hart. Great singer founding member of the Philadelphia soul group that delphox, he died taking the temple university hospital in Philadelphia, he had difficulty breathing and died of complications. The guy was 77 years old, lived a hell of a life. Some of the songs you know him for, come on. La la la la la la la la, I love you big hit when I was a kid back on a.m. radio in the 70s. The delfonics music was featured a lot by Quentin Tarantino, especially in the movie Jackie Brown.

William Poogie Hart Philadelphia Soul Group Delphox Temple University Hospital Philadelphia La La La La La La La Quentin Tarantino Jackie Brown
Biden admin: Docs must offer abortion if mom's life at risk

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last month

Biden admin: Docs must offer abortion if mom's life at risk

"The Biden administration is telling hospitals that they must provide abortion services if the life of the mothers at risk the administration says federal law on emergency treatment guidelines for state laws in jurisdictions that now ban the procedure without any exceptions following the Supreme Court's decision to end the constitutional right to abortion last month The Department of Health and Human Services cites the emergency medical treatment and labor act which requires medical facilities to determine whether a person seeking treatment may be in labor or whether they face an emergency health situation or one that could develop into an emergency and to provide treatment that barbette said emergency conditions include ectopic pregnancy complications of pregnancy loss are emergent hypertensive disorders such as preeclampsia with severe features Norman hall Washington

Biden Administration Emergency Medical Treatment An Department Of Health And Human Supreme Court Barbette Preeclampsia Washington
Using the Word 'Evil' to Describe Others

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Using the Word 'Evil' to Describe Others

"To know this that I mean this. I choose my words carefully because I don't want to throw around a word like evil. Loosely or lightly. I know there are people who are convinced that many Democrats are demon rats or demon crats their satanic, their evil, I know there are and listen, it's hard for me as a pro life Republican to understand justifying a late term abortion. That's really hard for me. I've always been able to understand at least the debate behind. When life begins. That's a debate that is, you know, that has merit. I believe life begins at conception, but that creates all kinds of shades of gray and complications. If you believe that abortion is the taking of a human life as I do, well, you could spend a lot of time then dealing with or should doctors be charged with murder, should women who have their babies aborted. You know what I mean? It gets very, it's not an easy conversation. But it is easy for me to say that if you're an elected legislator and you want to put your political opponents literally in harm's way, that's

"complications  " Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

04:37 min | 3 months ago

"complications " Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"And saying that this happens at a time when segregation laws are not being upheld and they're being set back and so the right turns itself towards abortion as another way of shoring up white supremacy. I don't know all of that kind of history, but that makes sense to me, right? As we were talking about the Gerber babies on the pro life signs or who they're worried about. But the rest of us are going to get caught up in this. So these are things I'm just thinking about. I don't really study them and have any great insight. January? Yeah, I don't know that the topic of abortion is without its stigmas within indigenous communities. I think there's still a lot of nervousness around even broaching the subject of abortion if you bring it into community. And therein lies one of the issues that prevents women from even believing they have the right to abortions. You know what I mean? Culturally speaking. So I would like to see that addressed first and foremost and you know what I agree with this. It's not only women who have abortions, right? Oh, absolutely. But I can't disagree that this is these are laws that are targeting women. People who identify as, right? And so anyway, but yeah, I do want to acknowledge that. I mean, I know people who are not women who had babies. So I don't know that I don't, I can't speak to forced sterilization. Of course, I believe it exists. And I believe that that is very, of course, damaging. And the imbalance racial imbalance of that practice. Even though I'm kind of thinking to about if colonial white governing bodies are concerned about being the populations, the numbers of people of color and say the United States or even within Canada. Then, but we're still we still can't have autonomy over ourselves unless we are in a financial position to have that autonomy. Do you know what I mean? How do you call yourself a minority, even though we are populations brown people are greater in numbers, but we don't have the financial power to break out of the title of minority. Do you know what I mean? So you're talking about just our capacity to fulfill a full array of health services, including reproductive related. Yeah, that. Yeah. Yeah, yes. Yes, there's that. And just the idea of trying to control the population through forced sterilization. Our populations. You know, something I've not seen brought up is just making an explicit link to this emergent discussion around genocide and how this is another means by which that's being achieved. Absolutely. And I think, you know, I mean, it's a little more challenging because for some, any way to make the case because, you know, these are just healthcare folk doing this. In these individual cases and people are like, well, how does that constitute a state campaign at the state level kind of thing? Well, that's what we mean by systemic. You can have these disparate actors all working in the aggregate to achieve this outcome. We've run out of time. So any final thoughts in this regard? Well, I was just thinking it's all eugenics, right? I think forced sterilization of indigenous women black women of disabled people since eugenics, right? This has happened to many populations around the world. And then the promotion of the birth of a certain kind of baby of particularly white women in middle class women supposing, you know, there's these memes going around showing up. A professional woman writes college debt drinking wine and eating a piece of pizza versus a self actualized woman with four kids and a husband. So there's that a promotion of those kinds of views of womanhood and family while the promotion of that kind of family results in the idea that indigenous people should be sterilized. You know, that they should have their children taken away. I mean, it is largely eugenicist project. The question for me is, what is the kind of convoluted thinking around criminalizing.

Gerber Canada United States
"complications  " Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

05:13 min | 3 months ago

"complications " Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"That's the piece I'm interested in. And so I wanted to talk about this idea really quickly because I remember what she also talks about back in 2006 when South Dakota wanted to ban abortion, which is where I'm from. A fighter thunder who was chairperson of Oklahoma nation at that time, I think, or she was maybe running. I can't remember anyway. She's Lakota. She said, and she's a healthcare worker in nurse. She said, we will build a clinic because tribes do not go by state law. They go by federal law. In the United States. So they were permissible for them to have a reproductive clinic, right? And they had proposed not only abortion services, but education. And parenting classes and birth control and things like that. So anyway. So it was built. Like it's in operation? I don't know. So I just wanted to, I'm just going to go to the concept that Jack and keeler's bringing up this time. She's talking about a relative who told her that when he was a boy on the standing rock Sioux reservation, there was an elder who would freely admit she was a, quote, unquote, killed child. It was such a shame that most would never admit it. And the idea of the killed child as a child that was born too closely to a child before it. And so she talked about the ceremony of the beloved child of not having children too close together because if you're a people on the move, you can't adequately take adequately take care of children that you have too close together. And if you have, say, you know, if you have a second child, the year after you have a first child, the first child could become the killed child. The idea being that maybe you weren't happy with them. You had another one to try to do better or replace them. And so she brings up this idea in here, which I thought was really interesting. I've never heard that idea. But I have heard of the beloved child ceremony that people would have to recognize how beloved a child was. And as far as I can tell, in my experience growing up as a Dakota person in South Dakota, we don't really do that ceremony anymore. So anyway, I thought that was really interesting. The killed child concept. That's what I wanted to talk about. And I've probably taken up all my time just explaining it. January, your media thoughts? Yeah, right away I'm remembering a time when I was doing a residency in Santa Fe, New Mexico at the institute of art there. And as such, being friends with people over at native America calling, I said, hey, I'm going to be in town. Do you want to do something? And I got invited to be a guest producer. So the idea for the show that I proposed to them was the idea of Planned Parenthood, practices within indigenous cultures. And trust, it was a struggle getting indigenous people from the southwest to talk about such a thing. And but we did have some people call in, but it was a struggle of a show. And referencing Kim's statements about ceremony around reproduction. This is exactly what we kind of came back to within that program where people who did were brave enough to call in. They did start to talk about ceremony around dating, ceremony, around conception, and ceremony, of course, around child rearing, which are these practices aren't necessarily followed so much anymore. And so the idea around ceremony and this couldn't even get us talking about sexuality and sex practices and sex positivity and ceremony and spirituality. I see to be the missing key ingredient in how we're going about these things today. Well, I mean, speaking to the concept raised by keeler, too, right? I mean, it does raise a question about what do you do with protocols that were based in a different material reality as I understand it? People were on the move a lot more. You're seeing Kim in this rendition of the concept. So there was there was a practical aspect. If I don't know if I'm being reductive or not, but now that people are staying in one place permanently, quote unquote, it changes the game. And so may arguably have implications for all of that. Well, let me read you another quote that she ended the article with her own words, which kind of brings the idea of killed child into the present. We should do everything in our power to ensure the well-being of the children who already exist to not only survive but thrive. How is the Oklahoma nation doing this today if they do not value the lives and potentially of their women. This is in response to these men saying, no abortion and women were not acting honorably, et cetera, like putting it all on women, right? So she's asking these kind of men. Why are you willing to create a generation of quote unquote killed women, even have killed children as many of these young women are a little more than children themselves. I'm a mother. I'm raising two children. The effort in daily investment is great. She said, I would be devaluing my daughter if I were to force her to bear a child of rape or incest. It would be killing her because I am forcing into life another life before the present is able.

South Dakota keeler institute of art Oklahoma America Sioux Jack Kim Dakota Santa Fe New Mexico
"complications  " Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

01:35 min | 3 months ago

"complications " Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"I'm Rick harp, welcome to mini indigene, the quick and casual version of media indigenous, joining me this Friday May 6th via the call in app are Kim tall bear professor in the faculty of native studies at the university of Alberta and our special guest this week January Rogers. A Mohawk tuscarora poet, author and media producer from 6 nations of the grand river, greetings you two. All right, let's get into it a quick reminder many indigenous follows a three four 5 format three people four things roughly 5 minutes each. No one knows what the others want to talk about, including that fourth item submitted by one of our monthly patrons on Patreon. All right, Kim, how about you kick us off? What's on your mind? Well, I wasn't going to talk about this topic, but there's a good article that I decided I would put it forward. So Jacqueline keeler published in Sierra magazine yesterday. Okay. Striking down roe V wade leaves native women and girls even more vulnerable. Oh, wow. She talks about the courts and the legislation. But what I'm really interested in in this is because I've been, you know, this has been going on much of my life, this conversation. What I'm really interested in is her Lakota cultural orientation that she kind of grounds. And in addition to dealing with the federal legislation in the history of that, she really arrives at a Lakota kind of standing point. And that's the piece I'm interested in. And so I wanted to talk about this idea really quickly because I remember what she also talks about back in 2006 when.

Rick harp Kim tall faculty of native studies university of Alberta Jacqueline keeler Sierra magazine grand river Rogers Kim
Next battle over access to abortion will focus on pills

AP News Radio

01:05 min | 3 months ago

Next battle over access to abortion will focus on pills

"If if if if abortion abortion abortion abortion rights rights rights rights are are are are drastically drastically drastically drastically curtailed curtailed curtailed curtailed by by by by the the the the U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. Supreme Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court Court there there there there could could could could be be be be more more more more hurdles hurdles hurdles hurdles as as as as well well well well for for for for those those those those seeking seeking seeking seeking pill pill pill pill induced induced induced induced abortions abortions abortions abortions more more more more than than than than half half half half the the the the abortions abortions abortions abortions in in in in the the the the U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. now now now now are are are are done done done done with with with with pills pills pills pills rather rather rather rather than than than than surgery surgery surgery surgery and and and and there's there's there's there's an an an an ongoing ongoing ongoing ongoing battle battle battle battle over over over over these these these these medication medication medication medication abortions abortions abortions abortions with with with with at at at at least least least least six six six six GOP GOP GOP GOP led led led led states states states states in in in in recent recent recent recent months months months months taking taking taking taking steps steps steps steps to to to to restrict restrict restrict restrict access access access access to to to to abortion abortion abortion abortion pills pills pills pills which which which which often often often often come come come come in in in in the the the the mail mail mail mail last last last last fall fall fall fall we we we we spoke spoke spoke spoke with with with with Dr Dr Dr Dr me me me me champagne champagne champagne champagne gas gas gas gas at at at at an an an an OBGYN OBGYN OBGYN OBGYN at at at at the the the the university university university university of of of of Utah Utah Utah Utah health health health health system system system system there's there's there's there's sort sort sort sort of of of of a a a a patchwork patchwork patchwork patchwork of of of of laws laws laws laws around around around around the the the the United United United United States States States States right right right right now now now now in in in in terms terms terms terms of of of of you you you you know know know know who who who who is is is is able able able able to to to to provide provide provide provide abortion abortion abortion abortion care care care care and and and and how how how how that that that that affects affects affects affects self self self self managed managed managed managed abortion abortion abortion abortion and and and and how how how how that that that that affects affects affects affects telemedicine telemedicine telemedicine telemedicine abortion abortion abortion abortion right right right right now now now now nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen states states states states require require require require a a a a medical medical medical medical clinician clinician clinician clinician be be be be physically physically physically physically there there there there when when when when abortion abortion abortion abortion pills pills pills pills are are are are administered administered administered administered even even even even though though though though the the the the FDA FDA FDA FDA says says says says complications complications complications complications are are are are rare rare rare rare and and and and it it it it allows allows allows allows the the the the pills pills pills pills to to to to be be be be mailed mailed mailed mailed directly directly directly directly to to to to customers customers customers customers hi hi hi hi Jackie Jackie Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn Quinn Quinn

GOP U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. Suprem U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. Dr Dr Dr Dr University University Universi United United United United St FDA Jackie Jackie Jackie Jackie Qu
Second Booster or Natural Antibodies?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:18 min | 4 months ago

Second Booster or Natural Antibodies?

"There is a study out of Israel just released yesterday that shows that people who got a second booster had less complications from COVID, less severe symptoms, less illness, less hospitalization, less death. Who knows? I mean, at this point, I think they're flipping a coin. I decided, after I heard all this booster talk, well, you know, I'm vaccinated. I've got a booster. I had COVID over Christmas. Mild symptoms, I've got this big musical coming up next month in Dallas. I'm going to play suitless in a funny thing happened on the way to the forum, which is going to be a lot of fun at the majestic theater. Thanks to lyric stage, lyric stage dot org for tickets. It's going to it's going to be mounted the first weekend or the middle of the weekend in May. May, I think, 12 through the 15th or something like that. And you know, heaven forbid, I get COVID in the middle of that. Like I did when I played daddy warbucks in Annie, three weeks into the run, and I wound up getting COVID. And I had to miss the final weekend of performances. So that was, that was tricky. They had a understudy who came in and finished the run, which was great, but you know, with the antibodies test, 2500, my doctor says, Mike, you got plenty of antibodies.

Majestic Theater Israel Dallas Annie Mike
Tim Tebow Shares His Miraculous Story

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:40 min | 5 months ago

Tim Tebow Shares His Miraculous Story

"I heard you speak to him recently. I mean, I've met you a number of times and I know your story. But recently I was at the march for life in D.C., and the night before there was an event. And you were the speaker because they couldn't afford me. So they had to go down a tear. And you were the speaker. And I've never heard you do your thing before. And you're famous for all kinds of things for being a sophomore winning the Heisman Trophy and for athletics, but it really was wonderful to hear you speak. But I thought to myself, before we get into the subject of your book, I know there are folks in my audience that do not know your story. So could you tell us the nutshell version of how you came into this world? Yeah, absolutely. So my dad in 1986 was getting ready to preach in a remote village in the Philippines and just started to a week for all the babies that were being aborted around the world. And he asked Scott, he already had four kids and asked Scott if you would give them another kid and started actually praying for me by name for a boy named Timothy and went back home and told my mom, hey, gotta put it on my heart to have tried to have another child and she was like, well, it got inputted on my heart and she started praying about it and then a few days later she felt convicted and so they started trying not long after my mom was pregnant and actually at first they didn't even think I was the baby that thought it was a tumor and so truly my first nickname was Timmy the tumor. So I had that going for me. Is that your siblings? They crushed me. But it's a tough one. Yeah, but then. You know, they found out what's the baby, the doctors told my parents, you need to have an abortion or will cost you your life and your baby's life and my mom said, you know, we're going to trust God. Let me just so people are clear. This is in the mid 80s. Your parents are missionaries in the Philippines. They have four kids and you said, God put it on your father's heart. You know, because a lot of people don't believe God speaks today. God put it on your father's heart in prayer. That they were to have another kid, and he felt that this is going to be a boy, and he's going to be named Timothy. So God impresses this on your father. And your mother gets pregnant. What happened during the pregnancy? Because you shared this when I heard you speak in D.C. the other day. But what happened that made the doctors in the Philippines say that she absolutely must abort this child? Well, there were so many different kinds of. Me not being able to get nutrients of the placenta not being attached and they didn't even know actually how bad it was until she was giving birth, but there were so many other amoeba dysentery and so many other things that were going on with my mom and me and the womb at the time. And a lot of complications, but actually a doctor had been doing it for 35 years when my mom gave birth, he said to my mom, this is the greatest miracle I've ever seen because I have no idea how your baby survived. I don't understand it, and your baby is a miracle. And you know, I think, you know, I still get so emotional when I think about it to this day because the only reason I'm here is because my mom gave me a

Philippines D.C. Scott Timothy Athletics Timmy
A highlight from In The Way The Lord Led Me !

Live Behind The Veil

08:39 min | 5 months ago

A highlight from In The Way The Lord Led Me !

"Welcome to live in behind the veil and atmosphere where men and women of God speak his word to this age and bring his kingdom to this earth. Do you have ears to hear and eyes to see what God is doing in this hour? Let us join our host and the family's conversation as the Holy Spirit is unfolding. The word behind the veil. How are we led by God's spirit? I'm Ron your host, and I believe that is a question on the heart of every true disciple of the lord. We don't want to be wasting our time spinning our wheels and doing our own thing. If you're like me, you've really wrestled with this principle of being led each day by the Holy Spirit. I believe that through the family, he is revealing to us that walking with him and being led by his spirit is just not that hard. Let's tune into the family, and drink in with the Holy Spirit, is imparting to us today. God can't lead you if you're not willing to go and start doing something. Don't pray for rain and leave your umbrella at home. Right. What do you believe in for? Take a step of faith showing that I believe this is going to happen. And then things start to happen. Because he sees what you're doing. What are you doing today, lord? Well, I'm just going to find out if you look at your schedule, the things that you wrote to get done today, and you start out. And God presents things to you. What are you going to do? Do I go left or I go right? That's where as Alan was saying, you can't steer a parked car. What do you do after you're in motion? And I think that's where the leading of the lord comes in. That your lead in motion, well, how did you get in motion? I was at old saying I got in the way. All right. God's doing something in the earth, so I got in the way. Because I wanted to be a part of what he was doing. And you had out many times in the morning, not knowing what is it, whether or not that you know you're going and that's what's important. I think we're hitting a principle of being led by the spirit, but it is by the spirit, and is requirement in that, and it's called faith and trust. And so you move out in faith, you trust the lord, and then like they'll sang, then things begin to happen. Things begin to be presented to you, but it's not, you know, I'm going to sit and wait on the lord and he's going to show me my day, and then I'm going to go do what he told me to do. Maybe someday we'll come to that. I don't know. I don't know if God's even that interested in our minds, I think, is more interested in our hearts, you know, trusting and expressing faith in him than our minds, and so again, we're taking the complication that the carnal mind quote calls spiritual, or taking that away, and we're saying, no, walking with God does not have to be this complicated, hard thing to walk in the spirit. It's simply a thing of faith, and trust. You have faith in the, you ask the father, father, leave my day. Okay, now you just heard you, and then off you go. And you trusting him to lead your day, and he does. You know, and I think the awareness of that, as you do that, as a lifestyle, I think there will be a growing awareness in you how much God's leading you, and a lot of it, I think, is a surprise. A man after God's own heart will go after God's heart. I've got a day today. I am going after God's heart. What does he want? What's his thing for today? You start asking questions, God is one who loves to give answers. You know, another practical aspect of what we're talking about. You're going to go on a trip. And let's just say it's only an hour and a half. And you've driven this hundreds of times, right? You know the roads inside and out. But you set your GPS and then it says turn left here, and you go, no, we're supposed to go straight here. Well, you have a choice to either turn left or follow your own instincts. But you don't realize there might be an accident up ahead. That you can't see. You can't perceive it because it's not on your radar. But GPS knows about it. Someone reported it, it's there. So if you were to go left, it's going to take you an extra ten minutes. But you'll get there. If you don't turn left and you go, you're going to wait in traffic and extra hour waiting for the accident to clear up. That is the simplicity of listening and moving by the Holy Spirit. Sometimes he's going to take you a route you may not know of, and it may not be what you believe is the quickest way. But he's trying to get you where he wants you at the point in time he wants you there. In like the GPS, he's going to say, okay, you need to go this way. Because what are you going to be averting? What are you not going to run into by going the way he asked you to go? Or conversely, what are you going to run into if you don't listen to what he's saying? God knows what he's doing. If we understand that scripture that says all things work together for good to those who love the lord, so everything is directed of the lord already, we just have to sharpen our awareness and say, okay, father, this is what you're doing, okay. It's not my will, but thine be done. So that the fullness of the sun, that dwells in this life that I have offered. That song that goes on and so song about a person crying out to be pleasing unto the father. The way we're pleasing unto the father and the way we fulfill the fathers, desire, dreams, hope, word, all kinds of stuff you can throw out there. Is that we do his will. And I would say this is a level of maturity. Jesus 12. Knew what to do, and that comes out of a heart. Comes out of a spirit soul and body set to do the will of God, the earth. And that sounds like something that is a very lofty thing to obtain. No, it's not lofty, but it is attainable. Because you ask God to help you. You say lord show me the way. Experiencing the impartation of God's word through his family is life. As this time in his presence blessed you, then please subscribe to our podcast at live behind the veil dot com. If you would like to contact the family with questions or topics that you would like to discuss, you can email them to living epistles at live behind the veil dot com. Stay connected, tuned in and grow with the family as the lord unveils his word to us live. Behind the video.

Scripture Word Family Christian Love GOD RON Alan
Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick Speaks to Ukranian Corruption

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:55 min | 5 months ago

Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick Speaks to Ukranian Corruption

"Congressman, you've served this country for years with honor and distinction, both as an FBI special agent, a federal prosecutor. You have battled domestic and international corruption. I have to ask you about corruption. You know what's going on in some of the many of the alternative media outlets, lots of talk about Ukrainian corruption. I met a Ukrainian the other day in Florida who told me, Mike, you know, it's awful what's happening to my people, but he had really not a lot of good things to say about zelensky. He said that there is a lot of corruption in Ukraine. That's what helps make this adds to the complication and the confusion for the American people. There's a lot of gray areas here. Can you speak to the corruption in Ukraine, the level of corruption in Ukraine and how that plays into what we're witnessing? Sure. So my last international assignment is an FBI agent was in Ukraine. I lived in Kyiv. Signed out of there. And I can just tell you what my observations were sure. I mean, historically, the former Soviet bloc countries, Eastern European countries, have a high corruption index because Russia is corrupt. So they're still generational lag over effect of that. But I will tell you, Mike, one of my responsibilities there, one of my many responsibilities was to help Ukraine meet their NATO metrics. And there were falling short on two fronts. Number one, economic and two anti corruption in what we knew at the time, and I have no reason to think that that changed since I left, was much of their corruption problems were not because of the Ukrainians, but because of Russian saboteurs that were sent in by Vladimir Putin to corrode and infiltrate their institutions, their judicial system, their law enforcement system, their RADA, their financial networks, to make sure that that corruption metric was never met so that Ukraine could not become part of NATO.

Ukraine FBI Mike Kyiv Confusion Florida Russia Nato Vladimir Putin Rada
Dr. Peter McCullough Explains Latest Study on Pfizer Vaccine

The Dan Bongino Show

01:29 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Peter McCullough Explains Latest Study on Pfizer Vaccine

"So doctor I read this study I saw it on your social media feed about the intracellular reverse transcription of the Pfizer COVID-19 mRNA vaccine Can you explain to us in layman's terms what this means it sounds to me like our bodies could be incentivized to produce this spike protein a lot longer than anticipated and if true that could cause a lot of complications And am I wrong That's true I mean the concerning new news on this is that lab in Sweden now has found the cell line that indeed a lot of this has to do with laboratory technique The cell line that has demonstrated the fact that the vaccines now in the cytoplasm in basically in the area where the messenger RNA should be transcribed in order to produce the spike protein that in fact it's there long enough for DNA to be laid down against the RNA and that DNA moves into the nucleus of the cell And with that it's found in the nucleus and it's coding for the spike protein Now we don't know if it's actually physically changing the chromosomes permanently but many believe that that is circumstantial evidence that that's happening Now there's going to be a really hot and heavy investigation to see whether or not these vaccines in fact permanently change chromosomes And if this is the case is spike protein going to be produced

Pfizer Sweden
Dr. Sam Pappas: We've Learned Natural Immunity & New Treatments Work

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:48 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Sam Pappas: We've Learned Natural Immunity & New Treatments Work

"So now we have multiple vaccines. Now we have France's Collins and others saying, yes, there are issues of heart inflammation, myocarditis. We have gone much further than what you helped me with originally, which is hydroxychloroquine, the Z pack, then Ivermectin came along now. We have the new nova, the new vaccine that's still under testing. Novavax. So tell us about what we have learned in just the last few months about COVID and the way to treat it. Well, we've learned that natural immunity is fantastic. We kind of knew that already, but it's been proven now multiple multiple times, but still not acknowledged, so we know natural immunity is a great place to be in a safety net. We know that many, many more treatments are out there and as the variants have gotten weaker and the new variant omicron and I want to listeners to know that's how you pronounce it. It's omicron. Yeah, not Omni cron. So you know, I had a trachea. I actually found that the British, I went and I checked with the 83 year old Professor of anatomy at Stanford from the UK and it is tricky and not in America. But in the original, real English, it's tricky. That's an intro from the last excellent. You do your homework. So we've learned that with the new variants that the treatments are much more effective that less people are getting hospitalized and having serious complications. It's a milder version. And attacking mostly the upper, which is less dangerous. Once it goes into the lower into the alveoli, that's really dangerous, especially for the elderly. Exactly. But I'm a little different than a lot of my peers who are for early treatment. Many of them say, well, only if you're 50 or above, and my take is, this can have a chronic component to it,

Heart Inflammation Novavax Myocarditis Omni Cron Collins France Stanford UK America
Scotland, Wales to offer COVID vaccine to all children 5-11

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 6 months ago

Scotland, Wales to offer COVID vaccine to all children 5-11

"Scotland and Wales all too often the vaccine to young children Scotland's government has confirmed it will roll out a coronavirus vaccine to all children aged five to eleven and wills is doing the same after accepting drafted by some scientists the countries so far the only two parts of the UK this it said they will offer vaccines to the end top five to eleven age group England and Northern Ireland currently officials to children under eleven who have medical conditions the mean that COS risk of complications from the coronavirus Charles Taylor this month London

Scotland Wales Wills Northern Ireland UK England Charles Taylor London
"complications  " Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:47 min | 6 months ago

"complications " Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"Models <Speech_Female> and we have to be <Speech_Female> able to have conversations <Speech_Female> with each other about <Speech_Female> what it means to <Speech_Female> tinker with the <Speech_Female> source code of life. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> what that means <Speech_Female> is if somebody <Speech_Female> seems skeptical about <Speech_Female> that, which of course <Speech_Female> they would, <Speech_Female> not to shut them up right <Speech_Female> away, but to <Speech_Female> listen to them <Speech_Female> and hear out their <Speech_Female> concerns, <Speech_Female> we have to give each <Speech_Female> other the respect <Speech_Female> that it's <Speech_Female> going to take <SpeakerChange> to <Silence> have these conversations. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> You talk <Speech_Female> about <Speech_Female> some deeply <Speech_Male> personal <Speech_Female> loss in this <Speech_Female> book. <Speech_Female> Would you mind sharing <Speech_Female> some of that story <Speech_Female> and how <Speech_Female> it affected <Speech_Female> your decision <SpeakerChange> to <Silence> focus on this topic <Speech_Female> right now? <Speech_Female> You know, <Speech_Female> when my husband and I <Speech_Female> decided to start <Speech_Female> a family, <Silence> we thought it would <Speech_Female> be <Speech_Female> easy. And <Speech_Female> that was <Speech_Female> just not the case <Speech_Female> for us. <Speech_Female> I was pregnant 9 <Speech_Female> times, and we <Speech_Female> have one child. <Speech_Female> We were <Speech_Female> seeing <Speech_Female> every doctor we could. <Speech_Female> We were at fertility <Speech_Female> centers, and we just <Speech_Female> kept being told <Speech_Female> over and over again that there <Speech_Female> was nothing wrong <Speech_Female> with either one of us. <Speech_Female> And I <Speech_Female> can't tell you <Speech_Female> how soul crushing <Speech_Female> it is <Speech_Female> to hear the words, <Speech_Female> there's nothing <Speech_Female> wrong with <Speech_Female> you. <Speech_Female> And yet <Speech_Female> knowing that <Speech_Female> there's clearly <Speech_Female> something wrong <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Female> we <Speech_Female> couldn't seem to <Speech_Female> carry <Speech_Female> a pregnancy all the way <Speech_Female> through to term. <Speech_Female> Now, <Speech_Female> in hindsight, <Speech_Female> what's likely is <Speech_Female> that there was some type <Speech_Female> of chromosomal <Speech_Female> abnormality. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> if <Silence> there was <Speech_Female> a <Speech_Female> chance <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> extract embryos <Speech_Female> or to create embryos <Silence> before implantation, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> screen them, <Speech_Female> figure <Speech_Female> out which were <Speech_Female> the ones that were most <Speech_Female> optimized for success. So again, <Speech_Female> I'm not talking about <Speech_Female> enhancement. I'm just <Speech_Female> saying like, let's just <Speech_Female> pick the one that's <Speech_Female> most likely going to <Speech_Female> be carried through to <Speech_Female> term. <Speech_Female> That would have saved <Speech_Female> us <Speech_Female> years of heartache. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And it would <Speech_Female> have saved <Speech_Female> the incredible <Speech_Female> strain on our <Speech_Female> marriage. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> I guess going through <Speech_Female> that experience, <Speech_Female> what I hope for my own <Speech_Female> daughter <Speech_Female> is that <Speech_Female> when she's ready <Speech_Female> to get pregnant, <Speech_Female> she <Speech_Female> has the means <Speech_Female> and the choice <Speech_Female> to choose <Speech_Female> IVF <Speech_Female> with screening <Speech_Female> and with <Speech_Female> selection. <Speech_Female> I actually hope that that's <Speech_Female> the case someday <Silence> for everybody, because <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> miscarriage is really <Speech_Female> hard. And <Speech_Female> we don't talk about <Speech_Female> it in this country. <Speech_Female> We don't talk about it <Speech_Female> at all. And <Speech_Female> <Silence> the first time it happened <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Female> it <SpeakerChange> was <Speech_Female> awful, <Speech_Female> I also didn't realize <Speech_Female> that it's pretty common. <Speech_Female> We just don't talk about <Speech_Female> it. And so <Speech_Female> this is <Speech_Female> not about <Speech_Female> creating <Speech_Female> designer babies. <Speech_Female> This is <Speech_Female> about giving people <Speech_Female> like me, <Speech_Female> optionality. <Speech_Female> And I think <Speech_Female> that's probably <Speech_Female> a good thing <Speech_Female> going forward if <Silence> we can make it equitable. <Speech_Female> Amy <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Webb is co <Speech_Female> author <SpeakerChange> of the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> genesis machine. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> And now <Speech_Female> for some related links, <Speech_Female> in the book, <Speech_Female> Amy and her co <Speech_Female> author lay out <Speech_Female> multiple scenarios <Speech_Female> of what a <Speech_Female> future with <Speech_Female> advanced synthetic <Speech_Female> biology <Speech_Music_Female> might look like. <Speech_Female> Underground <Speech_Female> communities doing trial <Speech_Music_Female> runs for Mars <Speech_Music_Female> colonies. <Speech_Female> Pop up restaurants <Speech_Female> that are effectively <Speech_Female> on <Speech_Female> demand bioreactors <Speech_Music_Female> putting <Speech_Female> out custom meals. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> a brochure <Speech_Female> for an <Speech_Music_Female> imagined future <Speech_Female> fertility clinic, <Speech_Female> laying out <Speech_Female> just how much you <Speech_Music_Female> can <Speech_Music_Female> engineer <Speech_Music_Female> a child. <Speech_Female> And the costs <Speech_Female> associated <Speech_Female> with various <Speech_Female> upgrades. <Speech_Female> We'll have an <Speech_Female> excerpt of that section <Speech_Female> of the book on our <Speech_Music_Female> website, marketplace <Speech_Female> tech dot org, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> along with <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a link to the last <Speech_Female> time Amy was on the <Speech_Music_Female> show, previewing <Speech_Female> some of her other <Speech_Music_Female> predictions for <Speech_Music_Female> 2022. <Speech_Music_Female> I'm Kimberly <Speech_Music_Female> Adams, and that's <Speech_Music_Female> marketplace tech. <Music> <Music> <Music>

Amy Kimberly
"complications  " Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:29 min | 6 months ago

"complications " Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"People <Speech_Female> who can afford <Speech_Female> these treatments <Speech_Female> can also <Speech_Female> afford to optimize <Speech_Female> their <Speech_Female> children in <Speech_Female> advance. <Speech_Female> Either through selection <Speech_Female> or genetic surgery, <Speech_Female> which is going in <Speech_Female> and making some tweaks <Speech_Female> to an embryo <Speech_Female> before it's implanted <Speech_Female> or in <Speech_Female> the much farther future, <Speech_Female> perhaps <Speech_Female> some <Speech_Female> type of genetic enhancement. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> we have to make sure <Speech_Female> that everybody's in a <Speech_Female> position <Speech_Female> to offer <Speech_Male> the very best for their <Speech_Male> children. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> That's going to require <Speech_Female> us thinking <Speech_Female> through <Speech_Female> how <Speech_Female> these techniques can <Speech_Female> be made <Speech_Female> much more affordable <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> and <Silence> available to everybody. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> So much of the conversation <Speech_Female> around <Speech_Female> synthetic <Speech_Female> biology <Speech_Female> does have <Speech_Female> a lot of fear <Speech_Female> and concern <Speech_Female> layered <Speech_Female> over it, <Speech_Female> but it sounds like <Speech_Female> what you have is hope. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I <SpeakerChange> do have hope <Silence> because <Silence> <Speech_Female> even <Speech_Female> when we are <Speech_Female> at our most <Speech_Female> polarized, <Speech_Female> we all still <Speech_Female> want to <Speech_Female> survive <Speech_Female> and to thrive. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> the heart of the <Speech_Female> matter is that there are <Speech_Female> some external <Speech_Female> issues facing <Speech_Female> us <Speech_Female> that we are not going <Speech_Female> to be able to <Speech_Female> work through <Speech_Female> without <Speech_Female> some type of <Speech_Female> intervention. <Speech_Female> Sunday, <Speech_Female> during the <Speech_Female> Super Bowl, Americans <Speech_Female> consumed <Speech_Female> somewhere around 1.5 billion <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> chicken <Speech_Female> wings. <Speech_Female> The amount <Speech_Female> of resources that <Speech_Female> it took to <Speech_Female> create the <Speech_Female> number of chickens <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> in order to <Speech_Female> produce that <Speech_Female> many wings is <Speech_Female> absolutely <Speech_Female> staggering. <Speech_Female> And a lot of times <Speech_Female> those chickens are not grown <Speech_Female> in the most humane <Speech_Female> conditions. So <Speech_Female> what if, <Speech_Female> instead, <Speech_Female> we were <Speech_Female> able to produce <Speech_Female> something that looked <Speech_Female> like a chicken wing, <Speech_Female> tasted like a chicken <Speech_Female> wing, <Speech_Female> but was made in a bio <Speech_Female> reactor <Speech_Female> rather than a <Speech_Female> commercial poultry <Speech_Female> farm. And <Speech_Female> we were able to produce <Speech_Female> those at scale. <Speech_Female> Then <Speech_Female> we <Speech_Male> don't need to consume as many <Speech_Female> resources. <Speech_Female> Those <Speech_Female> synthetically produced <Speech_Female> chicken wings <Speech_Female> don't have <Speech_Female> hormones in antibiotics. <Speech_Female> So they're <Speech_Female> better for us. <Speech_Female> They're better for the environment. <Speech_Female> I mean, for goodness sake, <Speech_Female> they're better for the chickens. <Speech_Female> But <Speech_Female> it's going to require <Speech_Female> us to confront <Speech_Female> our cherished beliefs <Speech_Female> about where our food <Speech_Female> comes from. <Speech_Female> I know that there <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Female> lots of <Speech_Female> applications of this <Speech_Female> technology that <Speech_Male> are going to give us the <Speech_Female> solutions we <Speech_Female> need. We're <Speech_Female> going to need soon. <Speech_Female> But in <Speech_Female> order for <Speech_Female> those solutions <Speech_Female> to find <Speech_Female> a place in our <Speech_Female> homes <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> in our schools and our <Speech_Female> hospitals, <Speech_Female> we have <Speech_Female> to change our mental

"complications  " Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:05 min | 6 months ago

"complications " Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"Show up in parts of your life, you might not expect. From American public media, this is marketplace tech. I'm Kimberly Adams. Futurist Amy Webb is known for her predictions about the next big thing in technology. And for early warnings, about some of the economic and ethical considerations that go along with those advancements. Her latest book co authored with geneticist Andrew hessel is called the genesis machine. Our quest to rewrite life in the age of synthetic biology. In it, she explores the role synthetic biology will play in shaping our world. It already has in some ways bringing us the mRNA vaccines we're using to fight COVID, but Webb says in a not so distant future, it will play an even bigger role in our health, what we eat, even how we have kids. We need to start preparing for a future in which we are no longer held to what nature desires. And by that I mean, we're going to have a little bit more control over how we procreate how we farm our produce. And even how we develop our meat. I know it sounds a little scary. The prospect of tinkering with biology, but in actuality what this does is give us options we're going to need going forward. One of the ways you talk about how we're likely to experience this is through upgrades, upgrading our agriculture, but also upgrading humans. What does that look like? In the near future, we might choose to procreate using IVF in vitro fertilization instead of sex. Now, I think we're still going to have plenty of sex. But we may choose to procreate in different ways. And there's some examples already. One includes genetic surgery. We'll start making genetic edits to embryos in order to correct major errors that might otherwise prevent a baby from being born. There's an emerging technology that's going to soon allow people to create a baby using their own genetic material without necessarily requiring donor eggs or sperm. And even further down the road, we're going to be in a position where we can both create and screen more embryos and at some point, it might theoretically also allow us to select for certain traits, including things like resistance to certain viruses. This gives us greater control to some degree over how life propagates. Who controls this technology right now?.

Kimberly Adams Amy Webb Andrew hessel Webb
 Howard Hesseman, star of 'WKRP in Cincinnati,' dies at 81

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 7 months ago

Howard Hesseman, star of 'WKRP in Cincinnati,' dies at 81

"Actor actor actor actor Howard Howard Howard Howard Hesseman Hesseman Hesseman Hesseman has has has has died died died died from from from from complications complications complications complications from from from from colon colon colon colon surgery surgery surgery surgery according according according according to to to to his his his his manager manager manager manager has has has has been been been been was was was was eighty eighty eighty eighty one one one one marches marches marches marches are are are are a a a a letter letter letter letter with with with with a a a a look look look look at at at at his his his his life life life life hi hi hi hi this this this this is is is is Dr Dr Dr Dr Johnny Johnny Johnny Johnny fever fever fever fever just just just just doing doing doing doing my my my my job job job job Howard Howard Howard Howard has has has has been been been been had had had had been been been been a a a a radio radio radio radio DJ DJ DJ DJ which which which which made made made made him him him him all all all all the the the the more more more more believable believable believable believable in in in in his his his his most most most most famous famous famous famous role role role role as as as as Dr Dr Dr Dr Johnny Johnny Johnny Johnny fever fever fever fever on on on on WKRP WKRP WKRP WKRP in in in in Cincinnati Cincinnati Cincinnati Cincinnati he he he he earned earned earned earned two two two two Emmy Emmy Emmy Emmy nominations nominations nominations nominations for for for for that that that that role role role role we're we're we're we're too too too too smart smart smart smart to to to to go go go go to to to to dances dances dances dances still still still still has has has has been been been been also also also also found found found found success success success success playing playing playing playing history history history history teacher teacher teacher teacher Charlie Charlie Charlie Charlie Moore Moore Moore Moore on on on on the the the the sitcom sitcom sitcom sitcom head head head head of of of of the the the the class class class class and and and and does does does does and and and and Romano's Romano's Romano's Romano's husband husband husband husband on on on on one one one one day day day day at at at at a a a a time time time time he he he he had had had had roles roles roles roles in in in in this this this this is is is is spinal spinal spinal spinal tap tap tap tap Billy Billy Billy Billy Jack Jack Jack Jack and and and and doctor doctor doctor doctor Detroit's Detroit's Detroit's Detroit's actor actor actor actor Howard Howard Howard Howard Hesseman Hesseman Hesseman Hesseman has has has has died died died died from from from from complications complications complications complications from from from from colon colon colon colon surgery surgery surgery surgery according according according according to to to to his his his his manager manager manager manager has has has has been been been been was was was was eighty eighty eighty eighty one one one one marches marches marches marches are are are are a a a a letter letter letter letter with with with with a a a a look look look look at at at at his his his his life life life life hi hi hi hi this this this this is is is is Dr Dr Dr Dr Johnny Johnny Johnny Johnny fever fever fever fever just just just just doing doing doing doing my my my my job job job job Howard Howard Howard Howard has has has has been been been been had had had had been been been been a a a a radio radio radio radio DJ DJ DJ DJ which which which which made made made made him him him him all all all all the the the the more more more more believable believable believable believable in in in in his his his his most most most most famous famous famous famous role role role role as as as as Dr Dr Dr Dr Johnny Johnny Johnny Johnny fever fever fever fever on on on on WKRP WKRP WKRP WKRP in in in in Cincinnati Cincinnati Cincinnati Cincinnati he he he he earned earned earned earned two two two two Emmy Emmy Emmy Emmy nominations nominations nominations nominations for for for for that that that that role role role role we're we're we're we're too too too too smart smart smart smart to to to to go go go go to to to to dances dances dances dances still still still still has has has has

Howard Howard Dr Dr Dr Dr Johnny Johnny John Fever Fever Fever Hesseman Hesseman Complications Complications Co Colon Colon Colon Colon Cincinnati Howard Howard Howard Howard Romano Wkrp Emmy Emmy Emmy Emmy Nomination Detroit Charlie Charlie Charlie Charlie Moore Moore Moore Moore Billy Billy Billy Billy Jack Jack Jack Jac Howard Howard Howard Howard Hesseman Emmy Emmy Emmy Emmy Nomination
Louie Anderson, Emmy-winning comedian, dies at 68

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 7 months ago

Louie Anderson, Emmy-winning comedian, dies at 68

"A a a a popular popular popular popular comedy comedy comedy comedy performer performer performer performer has has has has passed passed passed passed away away away away Louis Louis Louis Louis Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson has has has has died died died died word word word word of of of of his his his his death death death death comes comes comes comes from from from from his his his his longtime longtime longtime longtime publicist publicist publicist publicist could could could could just just just just announced announced announced announced days days days days ago ago ago ago that that that that the the the the comedian comedian comedian comedian and and and and actor actor actor actor was was was was hospitalized hospitalized hospitalized hospitalized in in in in Las Las Las Las Vegas Vegas Vegas Vegas for for for for cancer cancer cancer cancer treatment treatment treatment treatment his his his his rep rep rep rep says says says says Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson died died died died from from from from complications complications complications complications from from from from a a a a type type type type of of of of non non non non Hodgkin Hodgkin Hodgkin Hodgkin lymphoma lymphoma lymphoma lymphoma he he he he was was was was sixty sixty sixty sixty eight eight eight eight years years years years old old old old Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson had had had had been been been been a a a a presence presence presence presence in in in in comedy comedy comedy comedy on on on on TV TV TV TV and and and and in in in in the the the the movies movies movies movies for for for for four four four four decades decades decades decades he he he he won won won won an an an an Emmy Emmy Emmy Emmy in in in in twenty twenty twenty twenty sixteen sixteen sixteen sixteen playing playing playing playing the the the the mother mother mother mother of of of of two two two two twin twin twin twin adult adult adult adult sons sons sons sons in in in in the the the the TV TV TV TV series series series series baskets baskets baskets baskets he he he he was was was was in in in in the the the the original original original original Eddie Eddie Eddie Eddie Murphy Murphy Murphy Murphy movie movie movie movie coming coming coming coming to to to to America America America America and and and and in in in in last last last last year's year's year's year's sequel sequel sequel sequel to to to to the the the the nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen eighty eighty eighty eighty eight eight eight eight comedy comedy comedy comedy and and and and four four four four time time time time Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson hosted hosted hosted hosted a a a a revival revival revival revival of of of of the the the the game game game game show show show show family family family family feud feud feud feud I'm I'm I'm I'm Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar wells wells wells wells Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel

Anderson Anderson Anderson And Louis Louis Louis Louis Anders Anderson Anderson Las Las Las Las Vegas Vegas Vegas Cancer Cancer Cancer Cancer Complications Complications Co Hodgkin Hodgkin Hodgkin Hodgki Emmy Emmy Emmy Emmy Anderson Eddie Eddie Eddie Eddie Murphy Vegas America Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabrie
After a Year in Office, Biden Failed to Fix Inflation

The Larry Elder Show

00:53 sec | 7 months ago

After a Year in Office, Biden Failed to Fix Inflation

"Let's finish the three part plan that Biden has to deal with inflation. We're not there yet. But we will get there. Now the second challenge we're facing are prices. The prices. COVID-19 has created a lot of economic complications. Include best thing to tackle high prices is the more productive economy with greater capacity to deliver goods and services to the American people. And a growing economy where folks have more choices and more small businesses compete, and we're more goods can get to market faster and change. Yeah, yeah. All right. I've laid out a three part plan. Just that. First, first, fix the supply chain. Fix the supply chain. COVID-19 has had a global impact on the economy. When a factory shuts down, I thought you appointed mayor Pete Buttigieg to fix a supply chain. But

Biden Pete Buttigieg
"complications  " Discussed on GovExec Daily

GovExec Daily

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"complications " Discussed on GovExec Daily

"Rake because you have some outward pressure not a lot but some outward pressure but it also means that that you're stuck with a certain rate in albuquerque. 'cause it's the highest and you can't really do much more than that. Similarly in an area where the government is the is the major mission and there are plenty of communities around the country. The government activity might be the largest employer or certainly in certain functionaries. There are places where the government is operating finance centers or their governments offering nba pay centers. Have you count call centers or other kinds of activities where the government whatever the government contractors wages are dominate the marketplace and therefore it is setting the wage that way and when that happens it it creates a downward pressure makes it almost impossible to increase wages. Because you don't have a market force you have. The government is the determine if you follow me. It's not as affected by what's going on general economy. It's the it's the prevailing wages. Whatever the government's paying because it's the largest employer of that kind of work in the area so one of the things that needs to be thought about in this whole process. How do you address. Staten i think one of the things you do. Is you start to have to start allowing some sort of cost of living adjustments which do not exist under the service contract today and some sort of more open process for negotiating wages. Where you're in a situation where the government is driving the market through its contractor driving. The wage market therefore prevents the contractor from giving its employees in wage increases Because there's no other pressure to drive up the prevailing rate if that makes sense and so you need to be negotiate those circumstances and say look i'm in such and such a city my employees making eighteen dollars or fourteen dollars an hour. But i can't raise it until the prevailing wage rate goes up the prevailing. Wage isn't going to because we're the largest employer in the area gets all government work. We need to have some sort of negotiated process to give them cost of living and or other adjustments on. This needs to be sittard if our goal is to create a more equitable prevailing wage process and one that provides for more not less upward mobility for the workforce. Yeah there does seem to be a lot of complications in their particularly from place to place. A you know the the differences As you know if if it is if a contractor.

government albuquerque nba Staten
"complications  " Discussed on GovExec Daily

GovExec Daily

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"complications " Discussed on GovExec Daily

"The lowest minimum today which is ten something the fifteen and everybody else underneath fifteen raises proportionally. So if it's twenty five percent increase for some people it might be a forty percent increase for others. It's ten dollars and thirty cents or whatever. The today to fifteen is is almost fifty percent increase. So how do you deal with those things we end up with. With which impression you follow me where folks are pushed into the same category. Then what happens above fifty. So what about. Those are making fifteen eighty hour seventeen in our twenty five an hour thirty hour. Do they also get proportional increases in salary or wages. Because you've now raised the bar in terms of what. The minimum isn't theoretically. You've been raising everybody else now. You could make the argument that they shouldn't because the prevailing wage might be twenty dollars an hour where they are what they're doing when if everybody below fifteen is getting a forty or fifty percent or ten percent or twenty percent whatever it amounts to raise. What about those twenty today. They also get my guess is. They're not going to try to get really complicated. And the implications cost-wise enormous but that becomes an interesting tension in the system. There as well. So you have this. This challenge of of of disparities and wage increases on that that has to be dealt with and again. I don't think they're going to give everybody proportional in the same race This is not possible. The second piece as i said earlier. It's timing and in the last time it was done it was done it was phased in. There's not good data. But i believe the work we've looked at. Its suggests that there's a whole lot more people making between the current federal minimum wage contract wage of ten something and fifteen dollars. Then there were people who were making between seven and a quarter and the current wage when they raised it last time at twenty fourteen. That means is a much larger universe.

"complications  " Discussed on GovExec Daily

GovExec Daily

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"complications " Discussed on GovExec Daily

"Want to hear more from gov exotic next gov defense one and route fifty tune into our virtual events to your interviews with government leaders about the most important topics today including the federal workforce health. It artificial intelligence five g. and more visit got exac dot com slash events to learn more on earlier.

"complications  " Discussed on GovExec Daily

GovExec Daily

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"complications " Discussed on GovExec Daily

"Exact date bring the federal stories. That really matter is july nineteenth. twenty twenty. one. I'm ross. John for to net one of president. Joe biden's first actions. Following his january inauguration was to issue an executive order requiring that the minimum wage paid by government contractors. Be at least fifteen dollars per hour. The order was met with applause from progressives in congress who have been behind national fifteen dollars minimum wage for years on first blush. It seems as though the order is a no brainer to satisfy these political pressures from his party in a way to buttress his administration's agenda of which weighed security equity are foundational elements however as with many things involving government contracting. It's far more complicated than it. First appears for the most part. It's the government not the contractors that determine the wage employees are paid under government services contracts. The federal government does this through a series of laws guidances and formulas. the labor department's wage in our division has not yet issued guidance for example about the ways terminations covering the federal prevailing wage laws. Which are the davis. Bacon act for construction and the service contract act for services stand. Solloway is president and ceo of salero strategies llc and gun exact contributor. He formerly served as director of the defense reform initiative during bill clinton's administration. He has opposed on our site. Right now headlined raising the contractor minimum wage. It's not as simple as it looks after a short break stand and i will discuss the complications around implementing biden's executive order and the lessons learned from the last time. The federal minimum contractor wage was raised in twenty fourteen..

Joe biden ross Solloway salero strategies llc congress John labor department federal government Bacon davis bill clinton biden
"complications  " Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"complications " Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Complications with covered 19 will be the next preexisting condition, allowing insurers a jack up your premiums or deny your coverage. Biden's next stop Milwaukee. The US has now surpassed nine million cases of covert 19, according to Johns Hopkins University. As infections rise in 47 states, a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds the virus can spread. Mohr extensively in households in previous research suggests And find kids, Khun transmitted and leave about the same rate as adults. Researchers say that it shows how important it is for people to isolate themselves. Americans listening to you. Decision. 2020 is coming is Donald Trump or Joe Biden and talk Radio? 77 WNBC has you covered? We're gonna have to vote like we've never voted before. Keep listening for the information you need. This is the single most important election and the opinions you trust Joe Biden is taking the American voters for granted. It's all Trump, Trump says busy the right guy for the job election central from New York's news and talk station 77 anyway, VC Perlmutter Cancer Center at GNU Langone Health is aware that many anxious cancer patients have been postponing appointments and procedures due to fear of going to the doctor's office. Your cancer testing, screening and treatment should not be put on hold at Perlmutter Cancer Center. All of our facilities have instituted strict guidelines to keep you safe, including personal protective ointment for anyone on sight. Temperature screening frequent cleanings. Less crowded spaces and testing of all our staff. Patients can also access there. Perlmutter Cancer Center Physicians through video visits and anyone with concerning symptoms can speak by phone or video with a member of our suspicion of cancer Virtual clinic. Cancer hasn't stopped during this pandemic and Perlmutter Cancer Center. Neither will we. To schedule an appointment. This gnu langen dot org's slash cancer. Now the ladies from 77 W, A. B C and a BBC radio dot com I'm Bob Brown, an.

"complications  " Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"complications " Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"She died from complications from pancreatic cancer surrounded by her family at her home in Washington. Ensberg. 27 years in the high court were marked by notoriety, challenges and sometimes controversy. In October of last year, she sat down for an extended interview with David Rubenstein on his show, peer to peer conversations, and they look back at her body of work. And the mark she made on US law. We bring you some of the conversation. Now. Here's David Rubenstein, speaking with Ruth Bader Ginsburg, just last year in their Harvard Law School class, we did extremely well and you've got onto the Harvard Law Review. And you were near the top of your class. Maybe first they're tied for first class. But then, when your husband needed to move to New York, you want to transfer to Columbia Law school. And the dean of the Harvard Law School. Didn't think that was such a great idea. If you wanted to be a Harvard graduate, is that correct? Said I had to spend my third year and Harvard. The reason I didn't Was Marty was diagnosed with testicular tumor. In his third year of law school. Those were early days. For cancer cure. There was no such thing as chemotherapy. I was only massive radiation. We didn't know. Whether he wouldn't survive. And I didn't want to be a single mom. This chain. My daughter was 14 months when I started law school. So we wanted to stay together as a family. Money had a good job. With a firm Ania. And so I asked the Dean thought being easy answer. If I successfully complete my legal education at Columbia, May I have a Harvard degree? Absolutely not. You must spend a year here. I had to perfect the bomb..

Harvard Law School Harvard Harvard Law Review David Rubenstein Columbia Law school Dean US Marty Ruth Bader Ginsburg cancer Washington Ania Columbia Ensberg. New York
"complications  " Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"complications " Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"But the complications of this illness are far greater there much longer lasting and they're far more serious complications include breathing disorders, heart issues, neurological disorder, stroke, kidney, liver issues, blood system, blood clots, memory issues, difficulty and thinking, weakness and a long recovery. We know that smoking Increases the chances that if you do Contract Cove in 19 and if you developed pulmonary complications that those complications maybe more severe, there's good evidence that that is also true for Vaping. Not to mention the fact that we would have a hard time distinguishing what type of lung problem you have, because Vaping can cause its own lung disease as well. And we've seen a number of cases of that as well. Of the nearly 21,500 Cove it cases in the county. San Diegans, between 20 and 39 years old, represent nearly 44% of all cases for Maura Goto coco dot com Keyword virus. Local news time, 6 26 according to a new survey, close to 40% of respondents said they're work and wellbeing have been affected by the pandemic and women are twice as likely as Mento leave their jobs these days. The poll conducted by the mom project found that the pandemic has left many working women frustrated and burned out somewhere ready to say goodbye to their employers. Business strategist Tricia Ben says working women are painfully aware of the challenges presented by the pandemic, whether they've lost hours or wages at at home schooling and childcare duties to their plates or work jobs on the front lines that carry greater cove in 19 exposure risks. We'll still have women doing more work in the household and certainly will travel care than the men in their household. Another question in the survey are women's working hours being interrupted more than men's anecdotally. We can say they are. I was just on a call. Earlier this week, a woman executive was pitching me and she had a two and a four year old who wanted her attention. I gave her the grace and said, Listen, you've made my day. Your Children are beautiful. Do what you need to do. I've got an extra few minutes. You know there. There certainly are those moments, but I think At the end of the day. We need to be looking at this much more generally. What are great employers doing to create flexibility for men? Women Millennials are seniors that are in the workforce. In the poll. Women also raided their expected productivity over the next year, 29% lower than men raided their own anticipated productivity. Ted Garcia Kogo News Coming up with the admiral on the USS Bonham Rashard says about the firefight and the ship. That's next and we'll check your traffic in three minutes on San Diego's evening news KOGO News Times, 6 27 not all tests of the same when it comes to testing for the Corona virus. Michael Doherty of any lab tests now in Stirling says consumers need to do their homework. There's two categories right there's the swab, which is do I have active? These? That's not an antibody test. Okay, so you don't have symptoms by and large You know the way having this swab is relevant to see if you were just recently contaminate, which is highly unlikely. That's different than antibodies. So any bodies are like you get the flu shot. You build up a defence developed antibodies that shows you've been exposed and our bodies will fight things off. And you never know exactly how affected anybody. Is there going to be because every human beings different Now there's a ton of different antibody testing. You're gonna have to do a little more homework. Basically, you should ask your lab what antibodies test for because there's more than one and you should ask them what they used. For more information, Visit Cove in test Virginia dot com. Or call any lab tests now at 7034446633 It's a great time to.

Tricia Ben Contract Cove Vaping 21,500 Cove neurological disorder Visit Cove Maura Goto Mento San Diegans Virginia flu executive Ted Garcia San Diego Michael Doherty Bonham Rashard Stirling
"complications  " Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"complications " Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"The medical complications they frequently can't play sports or go to Boy Scouts or girl scouts or do a lot of those extra curricular activities that most people are involved in whether it's because they're on isolation or there they have to go to treatment were there you know tired whatever the case may be I give them the opportunity to to feel that that sense of team the other thing that's equally important they give the family something to focus on that's not the medical problems great you hear all these stories about siblings who feel left out there selling his sick is getting all this attention and mom and dad are at the hospital with them and not home so there's this is giving them an opportunity to be a family all together and do something fun and amazing that has nothing to do with their medical diagnosis meeting at the mount here Kevin Walker out after heart just walked into the room lights of the bases are loaded with one out here the top the fourth inning game tied at one each team with the solo home run in the first inning nothing on the board in terms of rock since that point the best opportunity for it comes here in the fourth row on third with the single and listed Romijn each on a walk and it brings up she even Robinson the center fielder for Lehigh Valley respeto por part is pop fell back to the right side and apply it to sing to see Shane Robinson go after that first pitch after hearted issued back to back walks eight of his last nine pages that come outside the strike zone but therefore hard to jump ahead early I would agree with that argument eight of nine out of the strike zone and then after the first pics nothing in one of the pitch jumps when a line drive into right field Casteel coming on and he makes the catch in print third Florida played by Casio is up the line Perella challenge standing and the challenge paid off as Lehigh Valley takes the lead to to wind up on a sacrifice fly by gene.

Kevin Walker Shane Robinson Florida Casio Lehigh Valley Casteel
"complications  " Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"complications " Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Experienced complications you may be entitled to significant cash compensation colder hernia mesh helpline now at eight hundred five one four six four seven six our experienced attorneys will fight to get to the compensation you deserve you pay nothing unless we get a recovery in your favor time is limited to file a claim so called a hernia mesh helpline now eight hundred five one four six four seven six operators are standing by twenty four seven call eight hundred five one four six four seven six that's eight hundred five one four six four seven six individuals and businesses with tax problems listen carefully do you feel like you're losing control of your finances if you over ten thousand dollars in back taxes or have on file tax returns we can help you take back control the IRS is the largest and most aggressive collection agency in the world and they can seize your bank accounts garnish your paycheck close your business and file criminal charges take control of your tax problem now by calling the experts at U. S. tax shield and take advantage of the fresh start programs and new laws that may allow us to negotiate a settlement for the lowest amount possible our team of tax attorneys and enrolled agents can stop collections and get you protected so you can take control of your financial future U. S. tax shield offers a price protection guaranteed quote to get you protected today U. S. tax shield is a plus rated with the better business bureau so call now eight hundred seven three five eighty three sixty that's eight hundred seven three five eighty three sixty U. S. tax shield eight hundred seven three five eighty three sixty are you looking for senior care for your mom or dad but don't know where to start hi I'm Joan.

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"complications  " Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"complications " Discussed on 710 WOR

"Complications of open surgery robotic surgery and they want better results better sexual life in your inner life this is why we have such an active prostate cancer program we have a new book the DVD you can call our office even now to pick it up at two one two choices we'll send it out in the mail at no charge two one two two four six forty two thirty seven two one two two four six four two three seven this is the work that we do every day Bynum sector leader men we'll be right back when doctor Lee the man came to New York from Harvard ninety seven percent of women in New York we're losing their breasts as breast cancer treatment but ninety percent of Dr Liam is patients with breast cancer were keeping their breasts doctor Lieberman an outspoken advocate of breast saving therapy educated women about choices to arm every woman about breast cancer choices breast saving whenever possible and desired when every hospital thought standard radiation was okay doctor leave them and had a better idea innovative doctor leading men first bought brain radiosurgery to New York and body radiosurgery to America meet doctor Lieberman breast conserving therapy over the decades thirteen eighty four Broadway at thirty eighth call two one two choices two one two choices about breast cancer treatment most insurances Medicare Medicaid accepted for fresh second opinion call doctor Lieberman breast cancer treatment call two one two choices two one two choices called out to lead him into day two one two choices doctor Gillian admin people saying that leaving guide you think you could do something for me I say yeah you goal for him we seem many people with cancer in home standard radiation chemo or surgery just doesn't work back to get a house radiosurgery different radio surgery is highly precise non invasive treatment that usually works even of standard radiation came or surgery didn't work or isn't tolerated radio show tree I'm not going to be crashing like after chemotherapy usually register is very well tolerated and the alternatives to going under the knife yes there's often non invasive options like radiosurgery this is Curtis Lee what Dr Gil leading man is the go to guy when ever it is an issue involving cancer I know so because have gone for my father other family members so put yourself in the hands of Dr Gil leader man for your.

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"complications  " Discussed on Outside the Lines

Outside the Lines

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"complications " Discussed on Outside the Lines

"And no one seems to know when you when you think about, you know, things that can happen in the workplace where you have cancer cluster. And things like that. And you don't know the underlying factors. Well, that's what's happening here, and everyone is pointing toward the surface because that's what they all run across. But there's also the idea that we've had twelve inches of rain in the last couple of months and how that's affecting it. So it is at this point a big mystery. They hired a top guy from Kentucky. He said the track was was ready. They brought in the former superintendent who's down yesterday, and they'll be down today and for the remainder to try to figure out what's causing this John. I think the other thing is a lot of people who might not know racing might not understand why these horses are dying just because they're injured. Why are horses euthanized? If they end up having an injury. Well, you know, if you or I if we have, you know, bang-up are knee or break, our leg, you know, we could go and sit in a recliner, we can do a lot of different things. And we the other leg is going to take a lot of the pressure. So we're like one hundred and fifty two hundred two hundred and fifty pounds these horses are thousand twelve. Hundred pounds. So you can't keep him immobile. And if one leg of the four is not working there's going to be pressure on the other three. And that's and that's like twelve hundred pounds of pressure going onto a hoof. And then sometimes the the it's called lamb and Itis what happens is, you know, the the bone in the leg will go into the hoof, and it's very painful, I've remember in two thousand six they try these spent nine months trying to save Barbara who won the Kentucky Derby would but broke down the Preakness, and they couldn't do it. And that's just the fragile nature of of thousand twelve hundred pound animal trying to support itself on four and then suddenly three legs such a tragic situation. And also as I understand it. There's a racing aspect of this too. Top derby contenders were expected to race this weekend. Now that the track is shut down indefinitely as I understand it. It might affect their chances to get into Kentucky Derby very much. So because you have spacing, you know, you'd go the derby. And then you go back a month. And you have you know, the same needed Herbie? The Wood Memorial the blue grass stakes the Arkansas derby is like three weeks, and then you back it up again. And that's what you were going to have this weekend is the San Felipe stakes which is for three year olds and game winner and improbable are two or Bob Baffert best horses. They're number one and two in the early rankings free derby rankings, and they need to they need. They're supposed to run on Saturday. Okay. Well, let's say they do get the track ready, and they run it on Thursday that would be twenty three days to the same needed Kirby. They could probably make that work. But if it goes beyond that, then we're, you know, we're do they run their training is all disrupted, and it could seriously compromise their chances of of of running in the Kentucky Derby, challenging situation all around John. Thank you very much right back. Sportscenter six eastern after PTI sage and Kevin on on tap. Stephen as take on when the Lakers season was laws plus eight rod joins the show to breakdown. Bryce, Harper's moved to the Phillies, and what's the trade market for Josh Rosen. If that's a big if the cardinals decided draft Kyle Murray at number one sportscenter six eastern on ESPN and.

Kentucky Derby Kentucky cancer superintendent Bob Baffert Stephen cardinals ESPN Lakers San Felipe Phillies Herbie Wood Memorial Kevin Kyle Murray Josh Rosen Barbara Kirby John