18 Burst results for "Comparative Analysis"

"comparative analysis" Discussed on Crypto Voices

Crypto Voices

06:50 min | 6 months ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on Crypto Voices

"But I'm going to have to have to skip that at least for this one time. But anyway, man, I don't know. What do you think? It's been a great discussion. As we close it here, you have any other final thoughts to our listeners regarding some privacy, some base money, Bitcoin, all the rest. Yeah, I mean, again, my base money is just so important. This is the thing to look at in any comparative analysis of Bitcoin versus other shit coins. And yeah, the work you do is so valuable, man. I'm still baffled that you're the only one doing this. Like what the fuck, it's just too important of a dataset that you only want. Massive bus factor, you know? I hope you don't get taken out. And. You might actually be most wanted because you spread very dangerous information that ought to be hidden. Well, apparently, according to you, I have some shadow bands as well, and I need to tweet more about it and become more popular from that side. We'll see. We'll see how important it really is. But I do appreciate the good words at least. You know, and then just because you show how important base money is. And then just the fact that you were full node is defining verifying and enforcing the actual quantity of global based money in the Bitcoin network is just factually like it's insane. It's uncomprehensible of what that actually means. You know, to know exactly how many gold atoms there are. It's like, what? You know that it's just a loan of how that might affect economic calculation. And pricing is a massive evolution in monetary economics, I would say. But and this is where we tied to the earlier part of the conversation. How can you actually verify the total base money supply in Bitcoin? Well, every user has to broadcast every transaction so that every other user can verify every transaction of every other user and that makes it not just extremely inefficient as a database where everyone has to read everything from everyone else. But it also comes with massive privacy downsides. Because now you have to tell someone else about the transaction that you're making so that he can verify it, but that means you're revealing some information about yourself or at least that transaction to the other person. And so yeah. And this is why the economic argument of why base money analysis is so important is why I'm a Bitcoin or not a monero guy. Because monero does make privacy improvements there, but at the massive, massive, like un explanatory, hugely cost of having ambiguity in the money supply. Like cryptographic ambiguity. And that is just that's such a downgrade. Like massive downgrade economically speaking. And that's why I think we ought to stick with Bitcoin, where it's trivial to verify based money supply. And where anyone can do it. But that means that we just have to be a little bit smarter about how we construct our transactions. Because again, these transactions are publicly verified and forever recorded. So you got to be a bit smart of how you present yourself to that network. And this is where wasabi and conjoint come in. Because this is a genius way to get such a substantial amount of privacy. In a sense, like if you pay someone else, he doesn't know where you got the money, or if someone pays you, he doesn't know what you're doing with that money in the future. These broadly speaking privacy guarantees that a coin join can offer you, while still not reducing the verifiability of Bitcoin's network. It's really great. This is kind of the best of both worlds. Now with Bitcoin, we have a system where every transaction is public and can be verified so that we have this incredibly important base money statistic, but then also we can make anonymous transactions within the system if we just get our act together and be a bit smarter. And that's incredibly promising because now we have the best of both worlds perfectly private money that is still publicly auditable and it's total based money supply. And wow. I mean, these two things together, on top of that, private keys and strong encryption or strong signature cryptography rather just work, make Bitcoin unconfident and inflatable and perfectly private. And I mean, this is the Holy Grail. Seriously. I think we figured out how to do the money. So maybe we can move on to some other problems now. I love your views on that max. Very optimistic. Very forward thinking and long-term and I totally agree. I mean, when you can just in a keystroke verify, verify the UTXO set, verify the amount of base money in the Bitcoin system and take steps as well to increase your privacy, you know, obfuscating some of those UTXOs there are. There are major major implications there for money for society for wealth and everything. So that's really in sovereignty, most importantly. So it's really great stuff, really love your views, man. So listen, we're going to have to leave it there. So as we close it, should any links, any places are listeners can work on our listeners go to find out more about what you're doing. Yeah, sure, go to towards liberty dot com for all my contact info and just reach out if you have any questions or want to chat. Twitter at Hildebrand max. And that wasabi wasabi wallet dot IO. Not the other phishing sites. Make sure you're verify your signatures. Absolutely. We'll try to link to the correct ones there. Great, max. Listen, man, thank you very much for coming on so much to talk about. We're going to have to do it again soon. And if not, at least in the meantime, see you very soon in Riga. Yeah, thanks very much, Matthew. And I'm so stoked for Riga. Being back in your backyard is going to be fun, looking forward to the hour long endless conversations to late night. So also for the listeners, get over there, say hi, and we'll talk base money. It'll be fun. Thanks for the invite Matthew. Thanks for coming on, buddy. Talk soon, have a great weekend, max. Take care. Bye bye.

Bitcoin un max Riga Twitter Matthew buddy
"comparative analysis" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"And you could just spend even more in other areas. I mean, you could go load up on free agents, but it's almost like you have fewer raster spots to improve. I mean, if you do a good enough job at player development, then it's almost hard to spend as much as you quote unquote should because the returns will be. So diminishing beyond a certain point, if you're the Dodgers, of course, there aren't that many teams that do that as well as the Dodgers do. But that's one reason why teams are so interested in player development these days is because if you're good at that, then you can win without actually spending which is worth all the one or two, I think. So this is a good start at measuring this, I think, as well as we can from the public perspective and you have the full results in a spreadsheet linked from the piece and I will link to the piece itself as well as that spreadsheet on our show page. So before we let you go, you have said the MLB a couple times during this segment and I don't think there were any the MLPs in the article. So I suppose I can thank your picture list editor for that maybe. But I saw, after I had invited you on to talk about this piece that your Twitter bio says that you are a historian of late antique religion who loves numbers and defends saying the MLB. And when I saw that, I had second thoughts about this whole segment. I'm giving a platform to someone with dangerous ideas. Do you have an actual defense as this based on some theory here because this has been a pet peeve of our people who say the MLB instead of MLB? So I will say as a caveat, I don't trouble my editors. So I do think I do believe in editorial practice and standardization and so I'm not saying I wouldn't write this way necessarily. But I do find that there's often times these tweets where people are dunking on people for using the phrase the MLB. And the reason that I defend it might be more or less interesting depending on what you're expecting. But for me, it's really based off of a familiarity with a lot of languages that I have to use in my day job. And just the sort of orientation that I have toward language in general, which is that linguistic rules are really just attempts to standardize a non standard system of communication that develops organically. And those rules are more logical than the actual phenomenon that they're trying to evaluate. And so you're talking about something like saying the MLB. Well, in general, when it comes to initialisms, in many instances anyway, we do use the before. Regardless, necessarily of whether or not it makes sense if we were to spell out the initial. The initials. And so, you know, there are exceptions to this. Certainly. And Major League Baseball does not speak this way about itself. But I do think that it's something you can expect that kind of usage would develop, given the fact that you have, for example, other leagues, other major sports leagues that use the and for good reason. So yeah, it's really just based on general orientation towards language, which is that I take usage first rather than rules or logic. And then I ask myself why they developed the way that they did. And from a personal place, like this is how I talked. And there was reason that I talked that way. So I might as well continue. I think in general, when it comes to grammatical things like this, yeah, I guess I just tend toward defending how people speak in general. And yeah. Yeah. That's a very reasonable argument. It is. Well, I do not. I will not use the MLB. I am in favor of people not being overly fussy about language just to be overly fussy. So yeah. It's still nails on a chalkboard for me personally, but I don't want to be too much of a linguistic prescriptivist when it comes to these things. I do understand why it happens and everyone knows what you mean when you say it. But still just don't say it. But all right, so read the first part of your bio there that you're a historian of late antique religion and I'm always interested in the day jobs that baseball analysts have and we talked to an astrophysicist earlier this week, who does baseball analysis sometimes and you're a historian of late anti religion who does baseball analysis sometimes in your Twitter header is an image of what looks like a late religious text with a fan graphs player page, superimposed over it, which I'm sure is not what it is actually like to be a historian of waiting take religion, maybe that's what you wish it were like. But what does that actually entail? Yeah, so yeah, I study second and third century, largely Christian text as the primary objects of my historical work. But a lot of what I do is kind of in relation to adjacent to the field of comparative religion. So what that means is basically just the kind of comparative analysis of how different religious thought practice worship, et cetera, how they're related to each other or how we can put them in relation to each other. And what I do is I look at these kind of second and third century texts and I try to ask how these texts are trying to orient themselves in relation to other cultural practices. And differentiate find commonality find differentiation. And all sorts of things like that. What it looks like on the day to today is trying to reconstruct a bunch of things that don't exist anymore. So I spend a lot of time reading texts in Latin that are translations of text that originally were written in Greek. And then just kind of cross referencing what we have and what we don't have and looking at old largely medieval copy to manuscripts of all of these texts and trying to see whether or not the decisions of scholars in the 18th or 19th century about how they print those manuscripts on paper, whether or not they hold up to scrutiny. So in many ways, I guess I do identify with my banner on my Twitter page, which is throughout the day I'm looking at either digitized manuscripts or fan graphs pages and in either case my sacred text. So we appreciate that. And we're glad we can give you a little distraction during your day. So thank you very much for coming on and you can find grant on Twitter at throwing gas underscore GA SSE and we will link to this study as well. Thank you very much, grant. Thank you. Really appreciate it being on. All right, by the way, one thing that I didn't mention in the first segment about player development and I'm interested in trying to quantify the improvement in player development in recent years. That was sort of outside the scope of Patrick study, which was about comparing teams. I'm interested in comparing eras, and I did ask Patrick to take a look at that and he did. And he couldn't find anything that seemed super significant to him in terms of recent improvement in the 2007 to 2021 dataset. He was using, it should be there, I think it's just tough to detect because of course sports is sort of a zero 7 game. If you're improving pitcher development and improving hitter development, it might not be obvious that both are developing better than they used to because they're playing each other, so he looked at ra mean and 90th percentile outcomes and standard deviations and rate of over performers and nothing really jumped out..

MLB Dodgers Twitter Major League Patrick
"comparative analysis" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"The methods before you apply those methods to the data. And we're kind of reversing that process in that you don't look at your data, you apply all the methods to the data before thinking about whether those assumptions apply to your data or not. And then at the end you pull out the methods that actually worked well. And so the kind of burden is on the scientist at the end to go every feature that worked well, then you have to go and use your domain expertise, read up on the literature, doesn't make sense. How is it working? Why is it working? So yeah, you don't get out of as a scientist. You don't get out of doing all of that hard work. You just do it at the end of this process where hopefully by doing this highly comparative analysis, it's pointed you in the directions that you ought to look rather than you having to guide that process manually. Do you find that that's at all controversial in philosophy of science departments? Is this looked at as a backwards way of doing science at all? Or there are trends in this direction. Well, I was shouted at some number of times during my PhD for this not being how people train the scientists to do their work where there really is that tradition of following through the steps doing things one at a time being very careful. And that makes sense, right? Because there's a potential to misuse this type of work. And if you don't know what you're doing and you throw something through, what is and ought to be a very subjective careful thoughtful process just through an automatic method and just simply pull out the top ones and over interpret them or don't do that kind of proper care. There is potential to misuse approaches that try to automate something that ought to be careful and thoughtful. And so I guess my job is really just to encourage people to at the end of the process put in that care and thought. I mean, it's not to say that if something has a potential to be misused, it shouldn't be used. It's just to encourage people to use it.

"comparative analysis" Discussed on Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

"I don't know if it's that i mean it's the only the only one that appears in four gospels thing that gives it a little bit more And maybe i don't know about that. A recovering alcoholic would say the miracles actually turned the wind into water not a minor point so anyway so part of what i started to say was part of the fun of having four versions of the stories. You can do a deep dive on the distinctions in those details. So the way mark tells the story we won't get into a comparative analysis thing here but march starts with this connection to the old testament by being very specific that jesus and the disciples are going into the wilderness even though they end up on the shore And that the crowd fouls them there. So they all end up presumably in the wilderness and then he feeds them which is just like the feeding of the israelites in the desert with god. That's what you're alluding to. And then he ends with a very clear connection to comedian. He takes bread breaks. The bread gives the bread gives it to his disciples. Literally is what it says which is literally the liturgy that we use for communion So the connection. That i made in a sermon was if if the miracle of the feeding in the wilderness like the old testament story from exodus is that god like met the physical needs for food of the people. Then the miracle of the of this later one i mean. There's there's obviously the feeding the meeting physical need. But because it's got such clear connections to hold communion you can kind of make a spiritual metaphor for it as well and which certainly applies them work means because all around the world. Jesus is president every single table meeting the spiritual needs of the people who come through this tangible means of grace. Yeah record okay. So let's talk about this miracle. Have you rustled with this story. Struggle to believe that it happened or are you like yeah for sure. I have no problem believing this miracle talk about that. Yeah so it's a really good question. Because i think modern postmodern people change that in modernity where everything has to be proven there was a p people who supply our time believing more fantastic details in the new testament. Post moderns are more comfortable with ambiguity. I think this in terms of total software analysis. I think that's true. I'm pretty orthodox though when i read the new testament and so Like i i. I'd like doing the deep dive on the bible study and trying to tease out what..

"comparative analysis" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"8 40 number. Uhh was that Gus Johnson? It was but nominal problem. That's gonna be a lot of fun willing. Now we're just contemplating in the break. If we jump on one of those cheap airlines that have a direct flight out to l A and head to that thing and see if we can't check that out that be something cool to be a part of that would be fun. Gus Johnson. He's so awesome. Yes, he is a couple of minutes away from Willie and the news. Joining us right afterwards, Dr Charles Hampton on your child's social media and more, we'll discuss that. Coming up time now for news about our money. It's head over to Karen Chase from Bloomberg. On Wall Street. Stocks are higher as traders await today's release of the August retail sales figures. Asian stocks fell overnight amid concerns about a slower recovery from the pandemic. Top auto safety regulators sent letters to 12 automakers as part of its probe into Tesla's autopilot system. And a dozen collisions that may be related to it. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration sent letters to Ford, Honda, Toyota, BMW and others seeking documents for a comparative analysis among vehicles with similar automated systems. Apple unveiled a new line of iPhones at a wide ranging product event called California Streaming, hoping to entice consumers to upgrade with improvements to the camera and processor. In lieu of major design changes. The new models the iPhone, 13 13 Mini, and the pro looks similar to the iPhone 12 but include a smaller display cut out at the top of the screen, faster chips and upgraded camera systems. With the news radio 8 40 w eight s Bloomberg money report. I'm Karen Chase. Do you have back pain? Oh, that's the worst. Only 8 to 10% of people who should get physical therapy for their back pain actually do pro rehab and anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kentucky or changing that. Anthem. Kentucky commercial members can get five physical therapy visits for the price of one copay only with pro rehabs back now, program text back now to 51005 and see if you're eligible. Heading out this morning. We have a tree down across the roadway in J Town. This is a Chenowith run road near Essen Road. Watch for trash. We blocked in that area. 64 eastbound slowing at us 1 50 in.

Ford Karen Chase Honda BMW Toyota Gus Johnson Apple iPhone 12 Tesla Essen Road 51005 iPhones August National Highway Transportatio 12 automakers iPhone Willie J Town Charles Hampton today
"comparative analysis" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Sorry. You lost the Cardinals. The Phillies by the I'm sorry. The Mets lost the Cardinals. The Phillies lost to the Cubs, 6 to 3. Both are back at it tonight that is look at your sports and news radio. 8 40 W H s couple minutes out from Will Clark and the news also the NBA, not mandating vaccinations. Is that going to go against Biden's protocols and mandates we'll discuss coming up here in just a little bit. It's a couple minutes away from what Clarkson said. Bloomberg Money update Now here's Karen Chase on Wall Street stocks are higher as traders await today's release of the August retail sales figures. Asian stocks fell overnight amid concerns about a slower recovery from the pandemic. Top auto safety regulators sent letters to 12 automakers as part of its probe into Tesla's autopilot system and a dozen collisions that may be related to it. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration sent letters to Ford, Honda, Toyota, BMW and others seeking documents for a comparative analysis among vehicles with similar automated systems. Apple unveiled a new line of iPhones at a wide ranging product event called California Streaming, hoping to entice consumers to upgrade with improvements to the camera and processor. In lieu of major design changes. The new models, the iPhone, 13 13, many and the pro looks similar to the iPhone 12 but include a smaller display cut out at the top of the screen, faster chips and upgraded camera systems. With the news radio 8 40 W H S Bloomberg money report. I'm Karen Chase. Yes. As you make it out this morning. It's a couple of issues. We have an injury accident. Somebody on a bicycle instructor, Valley station at Dixie Highway and Flower Veiled and 64 West Bank near the Georgia Power's Expressway before the Snyder Freeway have a disabled garbage truck there. For sending in a record to clear that out. Traffic on 65 south. You're looking good across the Kennedy. No problems right now. Added Jeffersonville. If you're hitting the second Street Bridge our next report in 10 minutes I'm Bobby Ellis NewsRadio 8 40 w H A s I'm Wook. Why Meteorologist a mammal. Oh, ceviche and or Wednesday forecast Get ready to dodge them. Scattered showers and storms today with highs near 83 will dry out tonight.

Will Clark Toyota BMW Karen Chase Apple Honda Ford Wednesday Cardinals Clarkson Dixie Highway Cubs iPhone 12 Tesla 12 automakers iPhones Bobby Ellis iPhone 6 Biden
"comparative analysis" Discussed on Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

"On our here and today i'll be sharing some of my initial thoughts on the first few days with fasd beta ten before that we will go through the news so again. Update from nitsa on the investigation of tesla. We've got news on giga texas. Maybe some news on the cyber truck ribian redwood materials. Really interesting update there and then after that we'll talk about the beta so first things. First tesla stock on the dates day again up and down but finishing up gaining two tenths of a percent on the day closing at seven hundred forty four dollars. Forty nine cents. The nasdaq on the day was down about a half a percent. All right. we'll start off with the update on the national highway. Traffic safety administration. Investigation of autopilot. Remember they're looking at collisions specifically with first responding vehicles. Also most of your familiar since we've talked about this a couple of times now but the update today is that nitsa has actually reached out to twelve other automakers to request data on this investigation as well so at the end of august remember nitsa requested a whole bunch of information from tesla while today. We've got letters here to bmw honda all the big players toyota volkswagen gm ford et cetera. We can look at the letter to afford as an example. They're all basically the same so they say quote. This information request is being sent to ford motor company to gather information and support of odi's comparative analysis amongst production vehicles equipped with the ability to control both steering and braking slash accelerating simultaneously under some circumstances and quote so remember nitsa had asked tesla for a pretty thorough set of data on their vehicles including basically every vehicle. They've sold software version firmware version et cetera. Along with any incidents like crashes or complaints from customers on each of those vehicles so nitsa here asking for the exact same information from these other automakers all those same eleven major categories each with their own sub category of data request nets as asking all these automakers to return this data by november third. And if they don't they also would face the same penalty that tesla would face if they don't hit their deadline which is a couple of weeks earlier of one hundred fifty million dollars so for me. Similar thoughts your to what we discussed win nitsa had requested all of this information from tesla. I wasn't bothered by that..

nitsa tesla First tesla Traffic safety administration ford texas volkswagen odi bmw honda toyota gm
"comparative analysis" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"The staff with we have dozens of award-winning training videos. That are three to seven minutes long. Really entertaining really effective and we spent hundreds of thousands of dollars making them. Yeah those kinds of things. Make a big difference. You know for practice. This is not big numbers. You don't get massive results on direct mail but you do get massive are alive. You do it properly. Our average our ally currently is about six hundred twenty seven percent which we track meticulously for your practice. He can see that on your dashboard that you can see twenty four seven whereas i don't know of any other competitors that actually track to the point that they provide their clients with what are why they're actually getting who actually is scheduled. When are they coming in. You know what happened with the staff members. What kind of closing ratio's to the staff avenue. All those kinds of things our clients go all that. I don't know of any other of our competitors that actually do if you look on comparative analysis. They don't don't traffic data. Gotcha gotcha okay. So then what one last question. I'm going to ask you like remember. This has to be something that our listeners can take with and like utilize it. So how can you start seeing a negative impact. Know you mentioned that that at the beginning like oh we'll start seeing a negative too much. So how does that happen. How can you start seeking negative impact on miller's so sometimes you'll have a situation where people just mail to their market area and their mailing that on a monthly basis. If you do that it doesn't take very long until you over saturate your market and then you start to get diminishing return. Gotcha so that takes you. How would you know that in the first place..

miller
"comparative analysis" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"Want wanna tell you what price against. We're not only completely transparent on our pricing and everything being on there but we actually go a step further and we put everyone else's information on also so we actually have by far away. The most comprehensive comparative analysis of all the top companies out there that are mailing dental postcards dentistry choosing and so you can see exactly you know why you know more practices. Choose us than anyone else to do. Marketing for using direct mail We just been perfecting our system for over a decade and so it works very very well and heart of the reason for that is one of many reasons. You'll see in that comparative analysis. You can look at that. Information is because we do target very seriously who is gonna get you the best results whereas most places will typically just show you a radius around your practice. They'll ask you just how far they drive. Or what not. And they'll look at a radius tarantula practice they'll pick up all those neighborhoods momentum. There's nothing wrong with that The only thing is it's not particularly precise they might even say. Hey we can put an income floor in. We can eliminate some of the lower incomes. If you have a problem with getting too much medicaid or whatever that socio-economic group or other different types of constraints of course do that also based on your target market but beyond just that once we've gathered data on your first cycle. You've mailed your marketer you once and will typically do it deep dive market analysis so we'll typically go in and have you output the addresses from your practice management system. So we're not actually using the names or anything. There's hit the issues in whatnot. But then we pin-drop all those addresses on a map. And so you know. Frankly just like if you're gonna go and look for the best mexican restaurant around and you'll see all the pin-drop so what you see the density of those drops in such gives an extremely clear picture what the actual reach of the practice is you know what the demographic profile truly is what the market really looks like for your practice what neighborhoods you have good brand presence and make sense to focus on what neighborhoods for whatever reason whether it be competition because of demographics because of you know natural barriers. There's a lot of different reasons. But there's many times there's gonna be neighborhoods that just don't really make sense fee to focus on you've already proven over time that you're not drawing from those areas so typically unless that's a very growing area that you want to build more you know brand awareness. Such we would typically eliminate those neighborhoods not include them so that you're not wasting money sending cards to a place that has already proven that. It's not optimal practice. Does that make sense. It makes a lotta sense. Yeah so like what. I kind of want to know. Let's just say for example. Somebody's listening in like this. Sounds great sean. That recall if i can roll with you but first and foremost how can i do this on my own in the sense of like. Give me like something. Like a almost like a checklist or something. Where i'm like. This is the best strategy or.

sean
"comparative analysis" Discussed on GovExec Daily

GovExec Daily

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on GovExec Daily

"I guess you know for decades really but really ramped up on the last few years. live scientists spoke out including a to us during the trump ears about political interference with science scientific work and career employees. At scientific agencies the biden administration came in promising to turn a new leaf on that front. They try the president. Signed an executive order within a few days of taking office to reinstate and revamped scientific integrity policies across government To sort of make sure that they're starting standards at every agency that would prevent interference in science that scientists have the ability to conduct their work without any sort of pressure that they can talk to the people. They need to talk to that. They can talk to the press. If if you know in the right circumstances and this issue and others that we've seen come up sort of call into question the commitment to that Epa in response to this These allegations reiterated that. They're they're committed to transparency and open dialogue and and providing the right environment for scientists to be able to do their work But you know we're seeing some groups And employees call that into question to some extent You know. I think that there was a little bit more of an extreme situation. Under the trump years because there was employees that were literally seeing their reports Being fudged after they turn manner. They were being excluded from important meetings Or they were being told directly like you know. You have to have this outcome. The sharpie gate situation you know is is one famous example of that although that it was one of many So you know. We haven't yet seen things rice that level But you know the the there's communities out there that wanna see biden really. Walk the walk here and there. They're you know starting to raise some questions as to whether that's happening i think to sort of build on. What what you just said like these organizations like the union of concerned scientists and public employees for environmental responsibility. they're not Some kind of trump aligned set of organizations so when when there's comparative analysis analysis done between the biden and trump administration's yes. There's not a sharpie gate incident. There's not a question about numbers about science science numbers and and measurements but in the individual agencies. The seems to be more. You know still coming out so at some point how do the two administrations compare in that sense. And is it just that the by administration isn't up to snuff even if it's better than the trump administration yeah..

biden administration Epa union of concerned scientists biden trump administration
"comparative analysis" Discussed on GovExec Daily

GovExec Daily

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on GovExec Daily

"If not the worst this year they were the worst in terms of morale particularly in terms of pay satisfaction The turnover rate. There is high there. There are currently two thousand vacancies that they're trying to fill And you know constantly having to recruit and train employees because people keep leaving cost a lot of money so You know this bill that you mentioned Advance out of the homeland security committee in the house Just last week would basically just apply title five to everyone at tsa and that would put people who work there. On the general schedule pay scale it would give them full collective bargaining rights like the rest of their federal counterparts and it would give them these whistleblower protections in these abilities to appeal adverse personnel accidents to the mspb and things like that so it essentially would bring them back up to or not back up but they would bring it up to where you know. Most other feds are correct. Correct it. Oh and also they mended the bill At the committee level to also include a. I believe it's a three thousand dollar bonus In lieu of providing them out you know hazard pay for the for the duration of the pandemic. It's it's sort of a one time. We know that you've been exposed travelers and that hundreds of you have gotten sick as a result of it. bonus that endemic obviously is affected. Everything let's move to the Federal labor relations stuff biden has yet to nominate a second democrats to the federal labor relations. Authority and The federal service impasses panel is vacant. biden talks about his relationship with with labor and and i'm not to on a comparative analysis front compared to the previous administration. He is certainly much more friendly to the federal workforce. But where does this leave. The administration's labor relations. Well you know it's it's as is always the case that these sorts of things it's it's kinda complicated You know In some instances you know agencies and unions are getting together and settling The you know the Disputes that they have had ongoing The va and ahe recently announced that they are just sort of wiping the slate clean And sort of going back to pre trump agreements to sort of start to get the process of renegotiating everything But you know in some ways. It really Stunts the administration's ability to undo a lot of the things that happened under the trump administration. You know The president has undone on undone A series of executive orders. But they're you know as i've covered over the past several years. There are a lot of changes to landscape of federal collective bargaining that took place at the flra level. Where these you know. These are decisions in disputes. That have a precedent over few minutes. So in order to undo those things you d to nominate someone to make it so the democrats have a majority on this panel and they haven't done that and you know as a result we've seen several decisions come through over the past few months. That sort of continue to erode Unions writes in the federal sector so know unions are starting to really put pressure on the administration now to nominate someone to replace the lone republican. Who is on unexpired term There are currently two republicans one person whose term runs through next year and the law requires that there always be a at least one member from the minority party on that panel Additionally the federal services impasses panel like you mentioned is vacant right now You know those Those folks come in to resolve a negotiation passes..

homeland security committee biden ahe tsa federal service flra va minority party
"comparative analysis" Discussed on #WhoWouldWin

#WhoWouldWin

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on #WhoWouldWin

"Silver samurai as a superpower being with a almost like a laser type of lightsaber ish type of samurai sword. Sometimes he wears power armor. When have you. This is someone who takes goes after wolverine as 'cause we'll ring lots lots of problems and electra. Took care of him no problem. Let's see she also again. She beat wolverine not once but twice. Thank you very much. Let's see a really fun battle. She took on this character named shanxi. No shame g with a great movie coming out. Shanxi is actually stated to be marvel's greatest fighter beats iron fist. Beats everyone shanxi. We even talked about shane. She is actually we. we understand. Best fighter marvel universe. She actually fought to a draw. Now you have to make a comparative analysis between great fighter there's real fighters shanxi electrified shanxi to a draw again. When she's resurrected with a new death powers she can do a whole lot of cool stuff. Uh she's facing off against what was stated in invulnerable cyborg and so she looked at mr powers. He was trying to throw everyone around. She said how am i going to be got it. Choose that kind of assassins way to see it down that one tiny weak spot chopped off his head and is a fun. After fact ahead was to live. And the heads cabbie defeat another. Do you just grabbed the head recently society places and starts squishing the brains around a little bit until yes but that's where she goes she's electron. She's awesome remember that. Be steam and i told you about the demon beast well. In one issue of electric was a limited series. She actually had to confront the beast. She wasn't cool with the control. The beast was trying to have over her. She said no more. You're not controlling me at all. And she actually thought the beast. Here's a fun part. Remember the beast. Is this immortal being who controls. I believe some type of hell liked dimension. Yea and she fought him and actually started hurting him with like makeshift weapons. She found she found like this long metal. Things are stabbing with it. Bertram and listen. Of course he eventually got the better of it but she was taking on a beast demon over its own dimension. That's pretty powerful..

shanxi Shanxi shane Bertram
"comparative analysis" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Sustains white democracy christina beltran christina. Thanks for joining us. I'm here with them. Viglant hi thanks for having me sam so okay. let's start with. I guess concept of of of a project of whiteness and how it is what is that me. Let's start with that right right well. I started this book. Because i was trying to make sense of why immigration particularly from latin america mexico was such a sight of such visceral hostility on the right right and why the fact it was emotionally galvanizing issue in widened migrants in particular seem to cribbage passionate opposition for conservatives and thinking about that i also wanted about like what are the pleasures of a virus as well like the fact that people seem to be not only doing violence but also kind of enjoying talking about antique of pleasure in talking about the fact that they were you know putting up barbed wire fence saying children in cages. And so in trying to figure out like what. Is this one of center of this sort of hostility. I realized i had to think about whiteness as a political project in the book being trying to talk about is. I'm talking about whiteness. not simply a race. I'm not talking about just white people i'm talking about. People who are invested in politics of whiteness is a political color which means politics that is embedded in politics of domination but not just the politics of domination but a politics of domination in which one feels more free when creating inequality for others ride. That one's own sense of sovereignty or freedom or quality is is centered on the idea that some people don't have access to that and so for me when you think about the united states Brief period of reconstruction As this effort to undo what scholars is sometimes referred to as white democracy when we look sort of passed that moment. That was really failed moment in this country. And then we we don't really until nineteen sixty four and sixty i do. We have a country where we really have legal equality for people across racial difference right so so it's a really embedded part of our history that segregation turn chinese exposure joe crow. You know these things are really embedded in our politics. And so i was trying to make sense of how it isn't just like a bad prejudice thing but really think about it is how has it affected. Our democracy are sensitive freedom And so that's would prompted the bullock. Talk this concept of cruelty tie to civic identity. Because i think that that was such a you know well Articulated phrase that fits into this concept of white democracy historically and in present day. Yeah yeah thanks. It's one of those interesting issues. I was reading different scholars. One scholar who really struck me was peer. Vanderberg had written a book where he used the term 'herrenvolk democracy. And what struck me about. The term 'herrenvolk refers to the idea of the master race. And we know that from nazi germany and that sort of that logic but what he says is it. He describes the term as democratic for the master race but tyrannical subordinate groups. And that really struck me is that is one thing i think. Is that when when you have these reforms of racial violence. They don't just feel like you're just be lawless. They actually feel like the rule of law right. They feel like people feel like what they're doing is a practicing the rule of law for themselves so so it took me as interesting Tyranny and liberalism could might be joined in this particular way but but in thinking about what really struck me was and i think we don't talk about this enough in our in our in this in our country and our history. Is that when we think about things like jim crow. We tend to think of that as i was. We think of those segregated water fountains right once his color. One says white. Right but the reality of jim crow and the reality of segregation was. It was deeply participatory act. Segregating people took a lot of effort and it took a lot of work and so a lot of people were participants in creating segregated spaces right. I mean it was all the way from you know bus drivers waitresses real estate of your real estate person in working real estate. If you were a usher at a movie theater. So one thing. I really wanted to think about was how white supremacy and segregation create a lot of participation for a lot of people and that that actually made them feel like they had a certain kind of power to tell people where they could move where they could sit what spaces and public can occupy which swimming pools which parks. And so when you think about it as participatory in some sense democratic project for certain way citizens then you realize that it also offered their power. It made them feel like they had something that somebody didn't have. And so when you start thinking about that kind of pleasure you start realizing that. That's a pleasure that not only does it go to extralegal violence lynchings or the tulsa riots those sorts of moments of lawless engagement. But on the very small ways. They're not even they're not small but in these very daily ways. He's very quotidian ways. There was a pleasure in some for some way citizens in creating segregated space and it made them feel powerful. It made them feel like they had something and so i wanted to think about the kind of regime of domination. That could go. From serving. all white jury all the way lynching participating in a lynching to reading about the lynching in the newspaper that it really was something that was unfortunately we can characterize it as civic. It was a civic element of american. Life would a fascinating because it's basically just sort of like. Hey we're all invested in this civic project of just making sure that we suppress a specific population or a couple of specific populations. I mean you start to really begin to understand this. Like bizarre fetish is ation of the wall on some level that that donald trump was. You know it's a big beautiful wall. It's almost like it's a it's a monument who were all brawl in this together except for the people that we have specifically said are not in this with us so that we have this ability to sort of join in the in group. What is there. And and i guess you know and we can talk about like you. Begin to understand why it's so important to hang onto the notion of illegals as a term right because what we're doing is illegal civic structure and the reason why we can do this because they're illegals and therefore the that they're playing a role in this too. It's just that they're playing the illegals role. But we're like is. This isn't a nate to americans right. Like i mean we're and and this is. I mean this is you're you're talking about a human dynamic not necessarily with all human beings but with with certain types of folks who wanna feel like they're in a project and part of their project is the subjugation of other people. Like where else. I guess maybe as i'm saying it. I'm thinking of a couple of examples. But where else do we see something like this. Play out right now. And i think that's really i think so important because one of them is that yes certainly when i cited vanderberg him. He talks about brazil. Mexico south africa so i think i wish we did have a better. A comparative analysis of racial difference. Racism functions colonialism..

christina beltran christina joe crow Vanderberg jim crow latin america sam bullock mexico united states germany tulsa swimming donald trump brazil south africa Mexico
"comparative analysis" Discussed on Cloud Security Podcast by Google

Cloud Security Podcast by Google

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on Cloud Security Podcast by Google

"Ability to the needs in the demands of traffic. I think that's where you star. And i think that's where your foundation has just on. Here's where we want to get and cloud can take us there. Give them some basic examples of how you can go there and then silverman from there by building examples so put an application out there put a simple application out there security and show them how it works and then do a comparative analysis to the way things used to be done guinea buddy who came from the old world when internal cloud became thing it was. I going to solve all of our problems. Developers are no longer going to be sitting around waiting for servers to develop on right. No wrong didn't happen now. We're solving that problem. And so we have these pictures. We can look back to like a grandma breaking out her photo album. You can live back. See where you came from and where you are now and show them nominally. Redoing it more securely. But here's how we're doing it you know. The controls are more automated. Were looking at things. As code from code to production and it's a controlled process xyz. So you have to really give them some sort of value statement to go along with why cloud is and then explain the security controls from there and we had a clients they are mandated by their executive. Cio's to heaven. approach club. I but sometimes in the middle of the cloud journey they might add understand why they even decided to support that whole concept. I think ad you know what i'm talking about here. You can't say the world is moving toward the cloud so you must've here to that direction is really that. What was your expected outcome. That's business agility and flexibility to get to the market. You do have a competition. Who's taking even more aggressive approach to it right now. Transformation requires innovation innovated. Fab leaders are willing to help us to get to the next steps so then reminder is probably very important because it is very painful for a lot of our enterprise customers will be from on premises to the cloud because everything that they control are at the all the knots different visibility might be not there so we had the continue this whole process of training and enablement awareness for our executives and our developers as well syncing cloud changes so fast. I agree with all of the challenge of getting people to think with cloud is one a face every day. It's like thinking with portals if you remember the game portal but it's different in the world really is quite different clouds so i wanna wrap up with two questions and youtube can divide them how you will. The first question. Is that traditional question for us and the second one is also traditional question for us. The first question is. Do you have a practical single tipped to improve people's cloud migrations and the second question is jeff further reading. We hate to leave our listeners. Empty-handed at the end of the show. I would say learn from others. Read the trials and errors that other organizations have had and look to your third party vendors. They really are out there. Solving real world problems. The book that.

youtube second question two questions first question second one jeff single Cio
"comparative analysis" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on WTVN

"Ready slice form. Slice slice of sauce Now it was a shark tank thing, I guess. Yep. Alex Rodriguez is an investor 200 grand. He put up 200 k baby that I don't And that's not that big of an investment for somebody like him. No, he got he owns a damn baseball team, right? Well, yeah, yeah, 200 grand. And this is gonna end up being a seven figure, maybe eight figure probably it's going to take off nature and it's not just Ranks. It's like any other kind of sauce could do this. So Frank's red hot original cayenne and secret art bark habanero hot sauce those of the two products. Their collaborations made with the actual sauce brands and they're gonna be available in eight slice packs there. 5 99, and they're showing up a slice is also catch up in Suraj to And no, I don't understand. For me. It feels like it would be too much like it would take over. Whatever you put a slice of this. I'm Yeah, and that see, I'm glad you brought that point of. That's where my brain immediately went with this right? Because I like it just a little bit. I don't pour, you know, Douse it it unless my buddy my buddy Matt query who will dump half a bottle of Tabasco on everything, but that's his prerogative. But for me If I'm going to dump us, say on a sandwich, or like a panini type, fingering a slice of pizza. I don't want the whole thing smothered in the song, right? I wanted there to accent and give a little heat in little flavor. I don't want it to taste like I'm eating Tabasco burger, like the meat is made of Tabasco sauce and oh, yeah, there's a little bit of burger in there or whatever, Um, I like to have it there a hint of it or maybe a little more. Whatever this feels to me like it's going to just overpower and take over. If you now here's the question I want to have and I will try these. I will go out if I was soon as I find one. Off bringing in. Heck, we could make a foodie Friday out of it and put it on something. All right, all right. Now. Do they dial back the heat and dial back the overwhelming flavor somehow, and if they did? What's the What else is it made this? The filler? There is its water, is it I mean, I'm very interested to see how this is going to come out. Because when you say a slice, I'm thinking like a single right now. Yep. That's the first thing I thought of two And if you combine that with a slice of cheese, I think we could be onto something depending on how the ratio works, But I would be willing to give it a world It's sold online on Lee right now. Slice of sauce dot com. And the Frank's red hot sauce is going to be in a sandwich. Ready, sliced form coming very, very soon again. Eight pack slices for 5 99, and I think this is going to be around a while. You know, Josh, there were there had to be a lot of people who had the same concerns us when they were designing it. And so, as a result, I can't imagine just you know, the northerly. The larger part of the population are like, Oh, yeah, Douse whatever I'm going to be eating and all of this, and I'm also let's do a cost comparative analysis real quick. Break this down. You go buy a normal bottle of Frank's red hot for 5 99 You get a lot more than eight servings Out of that. Well, that's a good point, too. Okay, So now how are they going to justify you get eight servings. But it's gonna cost you the same as a bottle That would give you like 30 some, right, right? That's interesting. Yeah. Comes.

Frank Alex Rodriguez baseball Matt Josh Lee
"comparative analysis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

09:01 min | 2 years ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Hey, friends. Welcome back to the ask Dr Wilson show. Today. We're going to talk about the 12 statistics that the mainstream media is hiding from you regarding covert 19. This is important because with big tech censorship and really the pharmaceutical influence on media, it's very difficult to find natural health information anymore. And it's really difficult. I believe for the average person to sort through the research sort through the bias within the research and then come to their own conclusion. So I'm going to go through the 12 statistics that the mainstream media is hiding from you intentionally, I would say regarding covert 19. So let's start right from the top. The number one statistic that the mainstream media is hiding from you regarding covert 19 is that 90% of covert 19 positive patients are asymptomatic. This is the most significant statistic that I'm gonna share with you because If you think historically About how we've tested individuals for any disease, Whether it be a bacteria infection, a viral infection. It's always symptoms first. Symptoms Dr the clinical testing within within the medical model. So you get a symptom. Let's say runny nose fever. Whatever it is, you're lethargic. You are having difficulty breathing. You are vomiting, whatever that might be for your individual symptoms Well, You go into the doctor. Most people do And what do they do? They get a diagnosis based off of a test so that the symptoms actually drive the test. That's not the case with Over 19 in this pandemic. We're broadly testing. Everyone. Asymptomatic carriers than exist because of the testing, so doing a comparative analysis across the board from year over year. From previous years. Is not necessarily something that's gonna end up being something that you can do A comparative analysis from this year versus previous years, you can't compare something. Historically, that's never been done before. So you're comparing apples to oranges? It's different. You wouldn't even apples to apples comparison. When is the last time we ever did a Just broad spectrum. Test across the board of People who are not symptomatic to begin with. We claim our hospitals are being overwhelmed and in some parts of the country, it might have been It also realized this That at the end of the year, hospitals become ex. Extremely busy every year. Why is that the case? Think about insurance? How does insurance work? It resets when January 1st You have that deductible. You have to meet that deductible. Most people don't know how insurance works. You have to meet that deductible in order for them the insurance than to pay 100% for many Cases, 100% of whatever said medical expense that is So let's say you have x medical condition. You are waiting until your deductibles met to then have that procedure Or maybe that medication or have that elective thing done. Maybe it's that knee operation. Maybe it's that. Maybe it's that hip that you've, you know, you think you've needed to deal with and now you're gonna go in and get the injections. You're going to get the hip replacement or the cancer screening. Or maybe it's the chemotherapy. Whatever that is, once your deductible has been met, not insurance because is going to participate. Every year. The hospitals have an influx of patients at the end of the year. Does that necessarily mean that the pipe pandemic is driving those patients into those hospitals? Well, maybe. But I also know that that happens every year. And then what happens is now we're quarantining are nurses who happen to test covert positive. You know if they're asymptomatic, so now they can't be there to help. So they're understaffed at the end of the year in a way that traditionally they are Very busy during a pandemic that the media and everyone else is really talking about the vast number of people who are gonna be coming into the hospital. So 90% of covert positive individuals are Actually asymptomatic. And again this is the biggest point is broad testing is driving the pandemic. How can we not? See this broad testing of asymptomatic people is what's driving the pandemic. And then when you combine that with how they are testing, which is number two how they're testing with the P C R tests. PCR tests and I've talked about this critically in the past and wrote a long, you know, expose or post on this here recently. That the PCR tests at the current cycle thresholds being utilized are driving the pandemic positive numbers. It's been said. Over and over from epidemiologist from scientists and researchers from even covered by The New York Times that PCR testing is extremely flawed and being used to dangerously prop up the numbers. Of covert 19. So consider the PCR testing that's currently being used right now at cycle thresholds of 37 40, sometimes even 45. While the world even the World Health Organization has recognized that Anything above 35 has been shown to artificially find viruses that never should have been found. So just so you understand. PCR testing is a duplicate of a duplicate of a duplicate. It's digging down and amplifying. The the viral material over and over and over again, So it's it's amplifying, amplifying, amplifying to find even the most minute. Fragments. Of a virus. You say? Well, that means that you have had exposure to it. We've all had. If you continue to amplify that, over and over and over again, you're going to find whatever it is that you're looking for. So the PCR testing it's currently being used broad scale across the board is amplifying viruses that are either inactive dead or never would have been a threat to begin with. We've never done this before guys ever. So historically, to compare this to any other year would be a mistake. So we're talking about the 12 statistics that the mainstream media is hiding from you regarding covert 19 and number three is a centime asymptomatic covert positives. Have a spread rate of only 0.7%. That's less than 1%. Asymptomatic carriers are the ones who are being vilified as the cause of the continued pandemic. The reason why we're still stuck where we are is because not enough people are being compliant with the masks and the quarantining and also the social distancing. Yet they're only spreading at a rate of 0.7%. And that is a my, In my estimation. I believe that's actually liberal number. That was a It was a study that was within the household, so in a symptomatic person within the household was the likelihood of them, spreading it to kids or the spouses. So that's not even considering not being around other people. So to say that the asymptomatic people are the cause. Their lack of compliance is the cause of the cove in 19 pandemic continuing Is really flawed data. Or intentional misinformation. Which brings me to my next point. The survival rate the survival rate of covert 19 of those ages. 0 to 69 is 99.82% currently If survival rate of age 70 Plus is 94.6 with high Co morbidity, ease and other causes of death. So we're talking about for the vast majority from 0 to 69, the survivability rate of 99.82. So we're talking about shutting down the entire world. We're talking about closing schools, isolation. Bridge Medical Journal. Said recently. And this is a direct quote from the BMJ. Surgeon. Domestic child abuse during pandemic. Of.

asymptomatic Dr Wilson vomiting World Health Organization BMJ cancer Bridge Medical Journal high Co The New York Times
"comparative analysis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:57 min | 2 years ago

"comparative analysis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Back to the ask Dr Wilson show. Today. We're going to talk about the 12 statistics that the mainstream media is hiding from you regarding covert 19. This is important because with big tech censorship and really the pharmaceutical influence on media, it's very difficult to find natural health information anymore. And it's really difficult. I believe for the average person to sort through the research sort through the bias within the research and then come to their own conclusion. So I'm gonna go through the 12 statistics that the mainstream media is hiding from you intentionally, I would say regarding covert 19. So let's start right from the top. The number one statistic that the mainstream media is hiding from you regarding covert 19 is that 90% of covert 19 positive patients are asymptomatic. This is the most significant statistic that I'm going to share with you because If you think historically about how we've tested individuals for any disease, whether it be a bacteria infection of viral infection, it's always symptoms first. Symptoms Dr the clinical testing within within the medical model. So you get a symptom. Let's say runny nose fever. Whatever it is, you're lethargic. You are having difficulty breathing. You are vomiting, whatever that might be for your individual symptoms Well, You go into the doctor. Most people do And what do they do? They get a diagnosis based off of a test so that the symptoms actually drive the test. That's not the case with Over 19 in this pandemic. We're broadly testing. Everyone. Asymptomatic carriers than exist because of the testing, so doing a comparative analysis across the board from year over year. From previous years. Is not necessarily something that's gonna end up being something that you can do A comparative analysis from this year versus previous years, you can't compare something. Historically, that's never been done before. So you're comparing apples to oranges? It's different. You wouldn't even apples to apples comparison. When is the last time we ever did a Just broad spectrum test across the board of people who are not symptomatic to begin with. We claim our hospitals are being overwhelmed and in some parts of the country, it might have been It also realize this That at the end of the year, hospitals become ex. Extremely busy every year. Why is that the case? Think about insurance? How does insurance work? It resets when January 1st you have that deductible. You have to meet that deductible. Most people don't know how insurance works. You have to meet that deductible in order for them. The insurance then to pay 100%. For many cases, 100% of whatever said medical expense. It is So let's say you have x medical condition. You are waiting until your deductibles met to then have that procedure Or maybe that medication or have that elective thing done. Maybe it's that knee operation. Maybe it's that. Maybe it's that hip that you've you know, you think you've needed to deal with and now you're gonna go in and get the injections. You're going to get the hip replacement or they cancer screening. Or maybe it's the chemotherapy. Whatever that is. Once your deductible has been met now insurance because is going to participate. Every year. The hospitals have an influx of patients at the end of the year. Does that necessarily mean that the pipe pandemic is driving those patients into those hospitals? Well, maybe. But I also know that that happens every year. And then what happens is now we're quarantining are nurses who happen to test covert positive even if they're asymptomatic, So now they can't be there to help. So they're understaffed at the end of the year in a way that traditionally they are Very busy during a pandemic that the media and everyone else is really talking about the vast number of people who are gonna be coming into the hospital. So 90% of covert positive individuals are Actually asymptomatic. And again this is the biggest point is broad testing is driving the pandemic. How can we not? See this broad testing of asymptomatic people is what's driving the pandemic. And then when you combine that with how they are testing, which is number two how they're testing with the P C R tests. PCR tests and I've talked about this critically in the past and wrote a long, you know, expose or post on this here recently. That the PCR tests at the current cycle thresholds being utilized are driving the pandemic positive numbers. It's been said. Over and over from epidemiologist from scientists and researchers from even covered by The New York Times that PCR testing is extremely flawed and being used to dangerously prop up the numbers. Of covert 19. So consider the PCR testing that's currently being used right now at cycle thresholds of 37 40, sometimes even 45. While the world even the World Health Organization has recognized that Anything above 35 has been shown to artificially find viruses that never should have been found. So just so you understand. PCR testing is a duplicate of a duplicate of a duplicate. It's digging down and amplifying. The the viral material over and over and over again, So it's it's amplifying, amplifying, amplifying to find even the most minute. Fragments. Of a virus. So you say, Well, that means that you have had exposure to it. We've all had. If you continue to amplify that, over and over and over again, you're going to find whatever it is that you're looking for. The PCR testing that's currently being used broad scale across the board is amplifying viruses that are either inactive dead or never would have been a threat to begin with. We've never done this before guys ever. So historically, to compare this to any other year would be a mistake. So we're talking about.

asymptomatic Dr Wilson vomiting World Health Organization cancer The New York Times
Amy Coney Barrett's alarming non-answers

The Young Turks

08:42 min | 2 years ago

Amy Coney Barrett's alarming non-answers

"Ab Coney Barrett is still undergoing her Senate confirmation and she refuses to answer any questions which is definitely problematic when she gets asked questions that should be considered lay ups for instance, when it comes to electoral issues or the possibility of Donald Trump. You know really flexing his muscle and attempting to turn this country into full a full-blown dictatorship she seems to be open to some of the maneuvers that he has floated. So for instance, when it comes to the possibility of Donald trump delaying an election, something that trump again has considered in the past coney gave a concerning answer. President trump made claims of voter fraud and suggested he wanted to delay the upcoming election does the constitution gives the president of the United States cs thority to unilaterally delay general election under any circumstances does federal law Well senator if that question ever came before me, I would need to hear arguments from the litigants and read briefs and consult with my law clerks and talk to my colleagues and go through the opinion writing process. So you know if if I give off the cuff answers than I would be basically illegal pundit. And I don't think we went judges to be legal pundits I. Think we went judges to approach cases thoughtfully and with an open mind. Yeah except I mean people like Amy Coney Barrett consider themselves constitutionalists who take the constitution and interpreted verbatim literally So let's take a look at what article two section one of the United States constitution says about the possibility of delaying a presidential election. The Congress the Congress not the executive branch the Congress may determine the time of. Choosing, the electors and the day on which they shall give their votes, which day shall be the same throughout the United States. So long story, Short Congress gets to make that decision not the incumbent president. John. It's clear and the only thing clearer than that is that she will answer questions very forthrightly and very quickly and perfectly happily about things that don't reveal that she is nothing but a right wing ideologue because being put into the Supreme Court to take away your healthcare and take away your right to practice reproductive freedoms and if necessary give the election of Donald trump that's. That's they're for. Those are the things that she sort of cloak and there's a side of not accepting the science on climate change of course as well. But mostly, it's that she doesn't want to reveal that all the things that the left and even the center fear she'll do on the Supreme Court. She totally being chosen for that. The right doesn't need to ask detailed questions because they already know that that's why she was chosen on the election related stuff trump wouldn't have. Nominated her if he asked her, hey, if I bring a case to you asking you to shut down the mail in ballots you. GonNa. Are you GonNa do that and she'd say we'll know that would be unethical. I'm certainly not GonNa shut that down. Yeah. He's still would've nominated her totally he has no interest of his own heart. All of that is is so clear I don't know maybe that's why in your intro you said this is so boring but yeah, kind of because. She is it's the same it's the same you know. Situation with Supreme Court nominee evading the questions you know answering. Specific questions regarding constitutionality by just discussing what she would do procedurally. Yeah. Yeah. We know we know how the Supreme Court Works, okay we're asking you for you to weigh in on what the constitution says about the president unilaterally delaying the election. This is not difficult but of course, going to the question as she does in the next video, we show you when it comes to Donald Trump and his. The possibility of refusing a peaceful transition of power. Should a president commit themselves? Like our founding fathers I think had a clear intention. Like the grace of George Washington showed. To the peaceful transfer of power, is that something that president should be able to do? One of the beauties of America from the beginning of the Republicans that we have had peaceful transfers of power and that disappointed voters have accepted the new leaders that come into office. And that's not true in every country and I think it is part of the genius of our Constitution and the good faith and goodwill of the American people that we haven't had the situations that have arisen in. So many other countries where there have been those issues have the president. Oh good. Congratulations. President Hinting that he will not have a peaceful transition of power is unprecedented congratulations. You realise that now, why don't you answer the question? What was that? Like. I don't need a history lesson I don't need a comparative analysis between the United States and some other country I need to know what your thoughts are on an incumbent president losing the general election and refusing a peaceful transition of power. What are your thoughts on that? I can get I mean the whole thing it just feels so pointless at this point apparently, it can't be stopped. We knew we knew before the first hearing why she'd been chosen and more importantly we knew everything we need to know about ethics the fact that she was willing to be a party to this process three and a half weeks before the election after so many people have already voted the. Fact that she was willing to stand for a spot on the Scotus under that told us what we need to know about our ethics. She will do whatever she needs to do to get that position. She's obviously made promises and she's ready to make good on them and you know just going back to the constitution which she claims to value What does the constitution say about the transition of power? Well? The terms of the president and the Vice President shall end at noon on the twentieth day of January and the terms of their successors shall then begin. That is what the US. Constitution says the Twentieth Amendment when it comes to title three section one chapter one of the US code here's what it says about a peaceful transition of power the electors of president and vice president shelby appointed in each state on the Tuesday next after the first Monday in November in every fourth year succeeding. Every election of a president and vice president. So it's a very wordy way of saying, Hey, Joe the person who loses needs to do this, and the person who wins needs to do that and Let's go ahead and follow through on what our so-called democracy Requires us to do when someone lose those loses an election, but she evades that question and she evades it by either talking about procedural things. She did in the previous video, we showed you or giving us a history lesson. Mentioning, unprecedented. This is in her own cute little way. It's just it's pathetic. One more video for you. This was the exchange that she had with Amy Klobuchar on. Voter intimidation. Judge Baron under federal law, is that illegal to intimidate voters at the polls? Senator Klobuchar I can't characterize the Fox in a hypothetical situation. I can't apply the law to a hypothetical set of facts. A can only decide cases as they come to me litigated by parties on a full record after fully engaging precedent talking to colleagues writing an opinion. And so I can't answer questions like. I'll make it easier eighteen USC, five, nine, four outlaws, anyone who intimidates threatens courses or attempts to intimidate threaten our curse. Any other person for the purpose of interfering with the right of such other person to vote. This is a law that has been on the books for decades. Following that Senator Club Hr's threw a stapler. I'm just kidding. No. But. She did a great job with that line of questioning she provided evidence for why it's considered illegal and all conybeare it had to do. There was say voter intimidation at the polls is. That's it. That's it. That's all she had to say but she wouldn't say

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