18 Episode results for "Compaq"

OPPORTUNITY: Branding Wellness Spaces & Places In Your Industry #1057

Trent365

03:44 min | 8 months ago

OPPORTUNITY: Branding Wellness Spaces & Places In Your Industry #1057

"Today I want to talk about what I think is a massive opportunity of branding Wellness spaces and places in your industry. Perhaps the only good thing that has come out of this covid-19 crisis has been an increased awareness around all things health and wellness and whilst at some point in the future. We're surely going to stop talking about covid-19 with everything that we do and say how long it would be naive to assume that something that has had such a profound effect over such a long period of time. He's not going to have a lasting impact. And so that says to me that for an extended period of time people are going to be very conscious of Health and Wellness in the spaces and places where they are and that says to me that is a massive opportunity in that because I think every industry has spaces and places that could be branded as well no spaces or health wage. Faces and in that there's an opportunity to be the brand that owns that space hotels have done it a bit over recent years with their Wellness themed rooms and Concepts sparse haven't really done it off and I'm not talking about the products and services and treatments inside of the space. I'm talking about the building itself. So the air quality the light quality the thermal quality that irial all of these aspects and that's something that sparse haven't really done hotels or started to do it with their Wellness themed rooms. But what about retail? What about shopping malls? What about, Fox? I mean, even though a Compaq is not a space. We spend a lot of time in at least as long as we continue to drive people are going to be aware of their car park space. So the car park that establishes it it's off as the brand that offers the best quality are the best quality materials the best quality lighting potentially the best quality thermal Comfort all of those kind of aspects I think wage. Has a unique position in the marketplace from an office perspective, you know, there's no brand that I can think of that is established itself as the wellness branded office if you've and I think that's a massive opportunity pretty much any industry you think about what about cars themselves in some way shape or form we're going to be using cars in some form for quite some time you'd imagine but how healthy is the inside of that car can talk a lot about the luxury and the quality of the finishing inside but other spaces real life truly. Well, so I think in just about every industry you could imagine there is an opportunity to create the brand that defines wellness and healthiness in that particular industry. So the question is who's going to take up the mantle and who's going to grab those spaces cuz I do generally believe that it's a massive massive opportunity and it will be for some place. The time so it would be interested to hear your thoughts on this one. Do let me know your thoughts in the comments below. And by the way Linked In stories is now live around the world. It seems I've now got access I think most of you probably do so keep an eye out for that up the top of your feed in LinkedIn and you'll see what we try and play with these stories and see if we can do anything interesting and and informative in LinkedIn stories. All right, that is it for today. I do think if your time and I will be back again tomorrow. So yeah.

Compaq LinkedIn Fox
Compaq Computers: Rod Canion

How I Built This

41:30 min | 2 years ago

Compaq Computers: Rod Canion

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from Amazon web services, whether it's searching for life on other planets or helping enterprises reinvented. Their industries AWS helps technology scale to meet the challenge. More at AWS is how dot com slash podcast so back in the nineteen eighties. Rod canyon left Texas Instruments with one vision to create a better, portable computer. He had no idea his twenty eight pound invention would not only compete, but also be out computing, giant IBM. We I ran this episode in may of twenty seventeen and there is a lot of great stuff in here. Enjoy. Well, it's that if I b m Anderson market they take over and push everybody out in February of nineteen Eighty-four IBM introduces their own portable into the market. Ardor stopped because before it actually was introduced they were showing it to dealers and customers, and they just stopped ordering ours. That was that was a very very life threatening situation. We had this factory running full speed and no place to go. From NPR. It's how I built this show that innovators entrepreneurs idealists and stories behind the movements. They built. I'm guy Rosin today show Haradh canyons personal computer startup Compaq too on the biggest computer company in the world. And what? If you have a PC at home or at work, and you buy some software like word or turbo tax. It doesn't really matter. If you've Adele or a HP or Toshiba because if it's a piece of it will run PC's after and that makes perfect sense. Right. But believe it or not in the nineteen eighty s in the early days of personal computers. That is not how it worked. If your computer was say in IBM. Well, you needed software written for an IBM. An IBM was the biggest player by far. In fact, some people thought that IBM would eventually crush all the competition and become the only PC maker. But all that changed when rod Kenyon started Compaq now rot wasn't your typical. Restless entrepreneurial guy. In fact, he had a good stable job at Texas Instruments as an electrical engineer, and he was pretty happy there. But one day in nineteen. One. He's managers assigned him to work on a new project, and it was something that rod believed would not work. And so he started to get frustrated basically was being told to go spend the next two years of my life being Mahindra of all and end up in failure. So at that moment rod started to talk to to close colleagues at Texas Instruments, Jim Harris and Bill Mirko, and basically said Paik, maybe we should leave we met and talked about how we were going to go start a company, and there were a lot of startup companies in California and Silicon Valley one of the first things we realized is g these guys are having fun. They're making a ton of money, and you know, they're not any smarter than we are. They just they're just out doing it themselves. There was also this awareness that something really big is going on in the personal computer market when I beam entered the market in August of nineteen eighty one we realized that that market was going to explode. And then what happened is fall Comdex came along. We went out to the conference and saw all of the companies and all of the things going on. It was just that. Did we went back to Houston and talked about we're going to miss this. If we don't get going, so. Jim Harrison, I turned into resignation right away. Bill Myrtle waited because his wife was about to deliver their first child, and you had a family to write how many kids did you have three. Were you nervous at all about just quitting without any income coming in. I mean, were you worried at all about doing that? You know, I don't remember being worried about it. The three of us. None of us had any money to invest. So what we did was we saved up money. And the idea was we'll give ourselves a runway length of six months to come up with an idea and go get funding. You know, I think this was an adventure. Let's go see what we can do. So so when do the three view serve land on the idea that that eventually turned into Compaq? Well, the the idea came to me actually one morning. It was strange how you remember those pivotal points in your life. But I was thinking about the idea for a portable computer. There are a number of them that existed at the time probably, you know, just guess fifteen or twenty and what we're what we're a portable computers like at the time. Well, most people remember the Osborne, it was made out of cheap molding, and sort of strung together it had a five inch diameter screen and it had to. Floppies, but you could immediately see some ways to make it a lot better. You know, we we decided we could do a nine inch screen in about the same size box. And while that seems small turns out it's about the same size. As what the original ipad screen is. And we could make it rugged. So that when you carried it it was not damaged, but not worth really spending the time on unless we could get some software that already existed because I had learned that the key software like spreadsheets and were processors and others. Every different brand of computer had to have its own version of the popular software programs. So said, well, what if we could make this great portable run software that already existed and a new the IBM PC was relatively unprotected. It would be a challenge, but it could be reverse engineered legally, and we could make our computer run the same software. And that was the idea that Senate chill must buy while what's wrong with this idea. There has got to be something wrong with it. It's too good to be just hanging around here. And so at what point did you say, okay, we have an idea. Let's go look for money. So I called up Jim Harris. And then later got Bill Myrtle involve, and we thought about it and talked about it and decided you know, that that would be a great product if we can do that. Let's put together the business plan. And so that was the next thing. We did. I mean, it was very quick from the ninth of January two when the idea came up to the twenty second of January when we. Met with the venture capitalist. We basically put together a very short four page business plan and prepare to meet and discuss it with them. And and what did they say? When when they saw it. Well, they were coming into town for another meeting, and we put this business plan in front of them and begin to describe it. And then they started talking to each other. You know, one of them said, yeah, I had this idea, you know, like three months ago, and I said, well, if you think it's such a good idea warrant, you more excited about it. And they said, well, look we like the idea we like you guys, but we're new in this industry. So what you need to do is we need to send you out to Silicon Valley and go meet with Kleiner Perkins in if they'll invest, then we will. So we we basically flew out to. To Silicon Valley, and we went into meet with John door, and we spent a good morning probably three or four hours being questioned. And sure enough about a week later. We got a call that they were willing to invest in. So it was ago. Okay. So it's nine hundred eighty two I guess in and you've gotten your investors in in. What you do get to work building a prototype. Well, first thing we do is begin hiring people because at three of us were sort of the head of each area. But we need engineers mainly to go figure out how to reverse engineer, and how to design the thanks how so we hire three engineers and presumably they basically had to build something pretty similar to to IBM PC except pretty similar didn't cut it. And you had to be exactly the same in order to run the software from an internal standpoint. And so they they came to workforce right away and begin I reverse. Engineering the product and then designing our own. But were you convinced that you guys were going to succeed? You know, it never crossed my mind that we wouldn't succeed. And as I look back now, I think while that was such a long shot. Yeah. Our our expectations were very low. What is succeeding it? Didn't mean become the industry leader. It didn't even mean become one of the leading companies it meant build a company that doesn't go out of business that has a product that solves a a real need. And you don't lose money on. We felt like we knew how to do that. How long did it take for you from that point in against the first or know the early part of nineteen eighty-two until you had a working prototype. So we started the company February the sixteenth and from March until early June. We had our first prototype ready. The deadline was determined by the national computer conference, which just happened to be held in Houston that year. The only time I think it was ever in Houston to show to potential dealers potential computer store owners who would sell it to magazine writers who would write about it when it came out to get feedback and others basically to find out what people thought about this product say you come up with this prototype, and at that point where you even manufacturing these these computers. We built factory inside. A leased building north Houston. We heard manufacturing people. They put a production Lionheart, people trained them on how to build it and began to build the product, and we had a plan that basically allowed us to build probably going to say twenty twenty-five thousand computers by the end of Eighty-three. We didn't begin actually turning out finish units until January of eighty three just to be clear. I mean when you talk about a portable computer in one thousand nine hundred three you're talking about a a machine that weighed what are the way twenty eight pounds? When thi this is not even hand luggage on an airplane. Well, we did use it as hand luggage. But there was some skepticism about that not only that you had to plug it in. It was people began to call them transportable computers, which was more accurate. It was also very rugged one of our key engineering talents was to build it. So that it when you dropped it. It would survive. And of course, your portable would run any software written for the for the IBM, and none of the competition. Did that right? That's right. And basically late in eighty two as we had our first prototypes Bill Murray to-, and then I joined him because there were a lot of computer stores around the country. We would go out and make an appointment and go in and show, the computer store owner our product and showed him the computer. They liked the way it looked. And when we showed them how it worked. It was very nice. The screen was nice. But when we told them, okay, just pick a any of the IBM software off the shelf jenness rink rat box. And put it in the computer and see if it runs in when they did that, and it ran their eyes lit up. They got excited they thought about it a minute. And they wanted to order some right then. They would say something like, okay, I need five of these next week. Are I've got a give you an order for twenty five if you can ship them in the next month. Bill, and I got back to Houston, and compared notes it was like, wait a minute. Every one of these dealers said the same thing what we just stumbled onto is this pent up demand for a portable version of the IBM PC. Now, it seems subtle, but we'd never thought of our product that way. This is a portable computer fits a niche, and you have software because it runs all the software. But if you just step back and turn that over and say everybody out there has an IBM PC in their office. And what they need every one of them needs one or more of is a portable version of it. And we happen to have that product people were wanting to take these things home for the weekend or even overnight to to finish their work. They wanted to take them out to customers to show them their work. And so it was a much bigger market than anybody anticipated. Once we had all the ingredients together, we weren't weren't you worried in one thousand nine hundred eighty two when you were going to dealers and showing them your product that and saying, hey, you know, this is. Basically, this can do everything in IBM can do except it's portable worse. You you guys worry that IBM would come after you know, because we hadn't broken any laws. You know, we had reverse engineered the wrong following advice from top notch intellectual property lawyer. So we were very careful around that their product was not protected by patents in any other way. They had followed more or less the general industry direction. And so building a computer that was similar or close to. It was not a problem at all the fact that we took the time to figure out exactly how there's made the software work and made ours. Do the same thing. It was not illegal. But it sounds like you guys really launched this in a stealth way that IBM probably didn't even care about. You thought you were just probably just a flyspeck of a company that was making this product. And when you launched it in one thousand nine hundred three I don't know today. Even did even know who you were. Oh, no, no. They had no idea, and nor did they care. Yeah. I mean, even after we began to sort of get some positive results in getting into stores. Remember, we reportable they didn't have a portable so initially. It was very easy for them to ignore us because we were truly a a fly. In that first year nineteen eighty three out of the company. Do we sold one hundred and eleven million dollars worth of Compaq computers. Wow. How did you had? You must have been expanding. Like crazy. I mean, I'm assuming at the beginning of that year. You just had like a few hundred maybe like less than one hundred people working there. We had about about one hundred people at the end of the first year that's about right at about six hundred by the end of eighty three. So you can imagine how much hurrying we were doing and expanding. And now this was not a one thing at a time. This is a multitasking bringing on very competent people in every area. So they could here's what needs to be done and go get it done. How how much were you selling that? I portable computer for it was listed for twenty nine ninety five for a single floppy. Unbelievable. And who your customers was at businesses was it individuals. It was mostly. Businesses. But a surprising number of individuals could see the value in it. And if they're company wasn't buying it for them than they would. They would buy it for themselves. Okay. So so three thousand bucks for this computer and increase or selling tens of thousands of these. I have Masumi that at this point. I m is starting to notice. Oh, absolutely. They absolutely. They, you know, in February of nineteen Eighty-four IBM introduces their own portable into the market now are order stopped. Because before it actually was introduced they were showing it to dealers and customers they just stopped ordering ours. Let's assume that if I beam Intersil market they take over and push everybody out. So we had this factory running full speed and no place to go that was that was a very very life threatening situation. So you guys are freaking out. We're freaking out the industry's thinking out is like there goes Compaq. You know, they're they're they've had a good run. But it's over. When we come back at rod canyon made sure that it wasn't get over stay with us. I'm guy Roz, and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Thanks to two of our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible, including two thousand nineteen leave sponsor of how I built this his cocks his Cox business insurance. Experts Taylor intelligent insurance solutions to each businesses very specific needs which may explain their ninety seven percent of customer service rating, get a quote or purchase a policy at Hiscox dot com. His Cox, encourage courage. Thanks, also to e-trade you wanna invest your money. But there's one problem you're not sure where to begin. Luckily, there's e-trade betrayed simplifies investing without the financial jargon. Plus, they're easy to use platform keeps you in the know about your money at all times. And if you need a hand at any point e-trade investment professionals are standing by to help for more information. Visit e-trade dot com slash NPR. Each rates curies LLC, member FINRA sl. Life kid is like that friend negoti with your toughest parenting moments. So my answer was do you believe Lucas? So Socratic wife kit for parents and audio guide from NPR and the experts at sesame workshop check it out in apple podcasts at NPR dot org slash life kit. Hey, welcome back to how I built this from NPR guy-roger, so nineteen Eighty-three was really good first year of sales for rod canyon. And compact, but to put it in perspective Compaq sold about fifty three thousand computers and that same year IBM they sold seven hundred and fifty thousand computers and so in nineteen Eighty-four when IBM decided to compete with Compaq head to head. Everyone knew it was a major threat. So rod called together the management team for an emergency meeting. You know, what do we think we ought to do? Well, the manufacturing people said we got a lot of temporary people we were hiring so fast. They came on his temporaries initially, and then we can lay all them off mmediately, and we can really cut back production cutback our cost, and it was it was after say a very Dr tone to the meeting. Everybody was like, you know, it's all over. Took all that. And and and it all up and realize, you know, if we're gonna come out of this with the happy ending, there's only one way that's going to occur. And that is let's assume for a minute that IBM's product is not better than ours. That maybe it's limited supply and the dealers once they see it begin to order our product. Again, we need to have product available to fill those orders. Yeah. So here's what we're gonna do. We're going to keep building these sayings. We're gonna store them. And wait for the orders to come at the orders. Never come. Yeah. We're in deep trouble. But you know, what we're in deep trouble. Anyway, if the orders, don't come. So that was the plan. I'm not sure everybody was you know, on board with it. But that's what we went off. And did we ended up storing these things in the in the trailers tractor trailers eighteen wheelers back gal and parking them at our parking lot. When that filled up we borrowed space in France parking lots around the town and by mid February. We we had about twenty of these trailers full of computer sitting around Houston. So what happened? How did you survive that? Well, what happened is IBM introduce the product the kick the tires. It's announced that it is in limited supply for a while. It was not a better product wouldn't a bad product. Did just wasn't better. And so just as we had hoped. Most the best possible situation is the orders came in. And we had the computers to fill them. It's like they had been holding them back. And so not only were they ordering normal. Right. They were sending all the orders that they had been holding everything fell into place just at the right time. And we took advantage of it. So what explains what explains the fact that that they didn't crush you? I mean, it sounds to me like it was one of two things it was either total luck. Or it was the IBM portable computer. Wasn't that good or maybe both? Well, anyway, you look at it was luck. I mean, there was a lot of luck involved. But what had happened is we had had a year to build great relationships with dealers the dealers actually liked having somebody other than B M because I B M was the, you know, the five hundred pound gorilla, and they knew it in any case we continued to sell like crazy and outsold the IBM portable throughout the year. By the end of the year. We were out selling it seven or eight to one end of eighty four by the end of eighty four and we tripled to three hundred twenty nine million in our second year. So by your second year, you're tripled sales. What was the first time? You remember Compaq becoming part of like a the mainstream conversation in America. Well, it depends on how big the mainstream is I think by the end of Eighty-three everybody in the industry knew about Compaq, and was sort of more willing it what was going on here. You know, this idea that people could use all the same for all the same things that were designed and built to run in BNP, see, whether it was software hardware would work on our computer IBM may be underestimated as they didn't really study what it made our product successful. They could've easily put us out of business if they had come out with a a real comparable product. Yeah. And once you guys showed that you could build an IBM clone. A lot of other companies realize that it was possible to do the same thing. Right. That's right. And the fact that we took off and set sales records main everybody else did it, including by the way, the the big guys HP TI deck, all finally followed suit. But by then we had really establish ourselves in the market. And you know, the thing that took us from six hundred million in eighty. Six to one point two billion in sales in eighty seven. We came out with our own desktop, which was essentially three times faster than IBM's desktop for about the same price and began to establish ourselves is not only the portable company, but also the half performance company. IBM trying to like kill off all the clones. When when they released the PS two in nineteen eighty seven which was this computer that was designed. So it could not be cloned, right? Yeah. That's right. That was an attempt to take this thing that gotten out of control mainly due to Compaq and bring it back under IBM's control. So I mean, I'm comes out with their new architecture and claims that this is the way to go that old architecture has run. Its course it's gonna run out of gas very soon. And so you don't wanna follow it to the end you wanna get on this new horse. And I b m has it. And so let's go, and that's where I b m marketing strategy got them in trouble. Because this thing not only didn't run all the software. It didn't run any of the software. We staffers I knew computer did not run IBM's own software didn't now they came out with new IBM software. So if you wanted to buy this new product, you could buy all new peripherals in all new software, and they would claim that it would outperform anything else in the market. So that time though, right? And you're saying that presumably companies many companies already had PC's and software IBM was saying by this new PS two. Oh, and you're also going to have to invest in new software. You make it sound crazy to them. It was normal. That's the way the industry had always worked, and they they still hadn't bought into this industry. Standard idea people believing that and understanding that it was important to be able to run your all software on a new computer. It never happened before Compaq pioneered. And then they wanted to get rid of it as quick as they could. Was there a moment where you were worried that that actually would succeed? Oh, yeah. No. There was never a question it they had good chance to succeed. Now, what kept us going and what I guess gave us. Confidence that we had a pretty good chance. Was we outperformed IBM's best products every step of the way. And so there was you know, significant part of the industry that looked at IBM's claims, you know, the magazines aren't afraid to write Compaq outperforms the IBM by fifty to one hundred percent. So it's spite of it being a VM. We've we're holding onto pretty solid position in the market because ours was always higher performing. I mean, it it seems like at any juncture in your first several years IBM had they just done something a little bit smarter strategically could have crushed you. There's no doubt I beam could have crushed us a number of different ways. And at that point in time. Okay. Right. So it's it's a five years from the time you launch to to the time you're doing a billion dollars in revenue, right? That's right. How did your life your own personal life change? Because all of a sudden you like, I'm assuming you're you become a rich guy. Yeah. You know, certainly compared to where I had been I was rich. But then again, we we knew that that was a fragile part of it. Did get a divorce in nineteen eighty seven. You know, it was just a sad part of of what happens in in that era. But I'm sure it had something to do with the stress associated with all the work. The time spent at work. So in nineteen eighty-seven, you're going through divorce and even simple divorces hard. And then IBM comes out with his new computer designed to basically put you guys out of business. So how did you deal with? How did you cope with all that happening? Looking back on it. I would say probably denial pretty effective tool. You know, not letting things impact you as much as they might in sort of other situations is something you have to do there. I felt like I was learning as I went and I was doing a good job. There was personal turmoil. If you wanna throw another layer on top of that radio shack tried to buy us in late eighty six and early eighty seven and so that was going on same time. All this was happening. So you were just here's your personal life. You were just kind of you compartmentalize that you were you just had to put that in a box and focus on the stuff and not let that depress you. Yeah. Now. Got three kids and they're getting to be teenagers and there's little league. And there's all of that. And and I'm trying very hard to get away at the right time. Go see a school play. That's where most of the stress came from trying to do at all if you could just cut off part of it and say, I'm not going to worry about that. It would be one thing. But trying to do it all and not drop any balls. That was pretty stressful or going home Leone, eating takeout Chinese food. I mean, what's what was happening? Once you've done with your day. Crashing usually. Yeah. No. I see pictures now of media carrying a fast food, a McDonald's bag or a Wendy's bag you just eight when you could that was sort of secondary getting everybody taking care of getting the meetings done getting decisions may. You look at my role as making decisions I wasn't making all the decisions. But all of the key ones. I had to be involved in so how and there were always a lot. I guess about like what ten years after you guys launched Compaq? You drafted the board of directors. They fire. You almost exactly ten years later in the Trump why what was going on. Well, there's several levels of looking at the dynamics there on the surface. It's a better of disagreement over how fast to move into the lower cost arena like like lower species. Yes. The chairman of the company been Rosen thought we ought to move very quickly and so quickly. That would fact we ought to go buy product from a Taiwanese or Japanese or Korean supplier and Margate was looked. It's not what it seems. We can get to market as fast as anybody with our own design. And I think at the board meeting the board decided to replace me with the number two guy with Eckerd Pfeiffer headed you. How'd you get that? News. Well, we had a board meeting were been proposed that idea, and I left the room and they deliberated for quite a while. And then made the decision to make the change. But it was clear that was the direction they were going. I knew that's what it was going to be. I was also somewhat burnt out. And I was of a strange mindset, you know, I kind of wanted to get out of that that pressure. It was it took me a while to really look back and understand that I was a big part of the problem of why it ended up going down that path. And and I regret that. But it is what happened, and I guess under the stress I was under and kind of gotten into this frame of mind where a need to get away the disagreement over the low cost speed to market was just the catalyst that that allowed it to happen almost guided it to the point where I was going to be far. So when you were at I mean, this is the company that you founded that you built. Yes. And then you were REM. Moved from that company. I think a lot of people hearing that would say God that sounds like fiction injustice because it's your idea you created it was your sweat, and then it was taken away from you. But but it sounds like from your perspective that was fine. You you were kind of your time was was over there. Let's be clear we're a fortune five hundred corporation. You know, we're a leader in a big industry. And just because you started the company doesn't give you any right to continue to run the company needs to be run by somebody that can make good decisions and can manage that complex and operation, which I think I was doing okay, or maybe even very well up to that point in time. So that's I don't see that. As the reason that I needed to leave. I think it had more to do with my frame of mind, and sort of burned out situation you were in your mid forties at that point. So still pretty pretty young guy. Accomplish a lot did you walk out of the company with, you know, financially secure where you set for life at that point? Yes. Absolutely. And of course, continue my life, actually, the home life became much less stressful. And then I got involved. Investing in and some startups and early stage companies and tried to help them succeed. Not all of them did. But then finally volved were really just like helping entrepreneurs start their company and try to help them avoid a lot of the mistakes new companies make he think about Compaq it was such a powerhouse in the eighties. A fortune five hundred company does billion dollars in revenue within five years. And then you think about all of the companies that that it was associated with that we competed against, you know, Apple IBM, Dow, Microsoft, Texas, Instruments, all of those companies still exists and compact doesn't exist anymore was folded into HP, and that brand is no longer here. In in a way, is is that a cautionary tale for some of these power houses, we see today like, Snapchat or Uber or Facebook companies. We can't even imagine not existing. You know, it really is. That's certainly something. Didn't envision when I left. I guess I just wasn't thinking that for down the road. And I of course, you never know the future in let the decision to merge with HP was a financial decision. But the end result of the way it happened. Is that Compaq no longer exists? And that is sad because it's got such a great history and played such a key role in actually forming the way the world works today. And yet most people you run into on the street. I've never heard of Compaq. It's crazy, isn't it? It is crazy. It's sad. But it's also life. You know, that's that's a, you know, we we started out to build a company that would last, and I think that's the case for the, you know, if you look at Dell or Microsoft or apple the leaders of those companies maintained enough control to make sure that it never got into the hands of somebody that looked at it just purely from a financial standpoint. If I had been there if I had been leading the company, we would never have sold. We would have figured out a way to to solve the problem. How much of your of your success at Compaq was because of just your hard work, and smarts and the hard work of Jim and Bill or a how much of it was it was like. If you'd asked me that in the eighties say the late eighties. I would probably have said it was ninety percent intelligence and insight and work and ten percent, look, but to tell you how perspective changes with time. I would say today it was the other way around. We did a lot of good things we came up with a good idea. But if you look back at any of the things that could have gone wrong and would have either slowed down or stopped us. I mean, there's endless list of those. So the fact that, you know, okay, we dealt with those issues as they came along. But the fact that was a successful path. Even bailable is pretty pretty doggone lucky. Canyon. He founded Compaq computers with Bill Mirko and Jim Harris in nineteen eighty two. Rod still lives in Houston, where he mainly invests in other people's startups, by the way, the story of compacts David and Goliath struggle against IBM was the subject of a very cool documentary. It's called silicon Cowboys kind of computer dis today. I'll use a MAC book air and pro go phone you started the PC revolution. Your Napa common Africa? And please do stick around. Because in just a moment. We're going to hear from you about the things your building. But first a quick message from one of our sponsors American Express, you want to build your business. They can help build your business with financing solutions. Eligible business customers the powerful backing of American Express don't do business without it. Terms apply. Visit American Express dot com slash business. Hey, thanks so much for sticking around. Because it's time now for how you built that. And today we're updating a story we ran about a year ago. Many MS danika Lauzi at live in Germantown Wisconsin and about sixteen years ago when danika was in college she loved to knit scarves for her friends to the point where at least started to say enough danika. No more scarves. So she thought. Okay. Hope branch out I'll you know, knit a hat. I made it and I finished it. I thought and looked at it. And there is a big weird hole in it. And I thought I made a mistake tested on the ground really disappointed. But it's a good thing that when she did that her dad happened to be in the room, my dad saw lane there, and he said, we'll put your nest through that. Yeah. Her nest that was her family's nickname for the curly massive hair on top of Denic is head. So just for fun. She put her hair through the whole in the hat. I don't know who that it. But. Member kind of a collaborative ly- the room looked lake. That's looks good to danika started to wear the hat with her point Taylor funds to out of it and wherever she went on campus or traveling around the country. People would say the same thing had like your head. So without realizing it danika had solved a problem for people with long hair because if you've got a ponytail it's uncomfortable to pull a knit hat over it. And it can look kind of silly to this weird bulge top of your head. So after danika got out of college. And after she got a fulltime job in the chemical industry. She continued to knit hats with the strategically placed holes in them, and then she would sell them online. And that's where I thought that it might stay where I would keep my job forever. And I was actually kinda clean going back and getting a PHD in chemistry. But that's not what happened like I'd get to work. I think I could maybe be making just about you know, what I making here if I made more hat and right around this time danika started to notice there was competition. Other people were making hats for ponytails. So she innovated she made multiple openings to accommodate different hairdos, and she even figured out how to hide those openings. So you could wear the hat like any other hat when you wanted to an all the knitting took a lot of time. So danika started to get some help. I third getting a lot of emails from any factors in China had found my website, saying, hey, we can make these for you. I thought all right. I don't have a lot of options here. I'm gonna try that. So okay. She found a few people in China who could hand knit the hats. They are actually a lot of times made by people in their homes, but they were all turned out to be different sizes and a little bit different shape. And some of that was was just the nature of made. But. It couldn't go on danika realized she couldn't grow her business by knitting the hats by hand. So after asking a lot of different engineers, she found one guy in New Jersey to design her knitting machine that would put holes into hats. It can make a hat every eighteen minutes, and I have to stop the oil it about every six to seven hours. And so I can get about sixty Pat and a day. Company is called peekaboo ponytail hats since we last spoke with her danika has been thinking about marketing peekaboo hats in countries like New Zealand in Australia where it's winter from June to August. So she can keep selling her heads around and she's working on five new designs. If you want to find out more about danika Lasi or here. Previous episodes head to our podcast page. How I built this NPR dot org. Of course, if you wanna tell us your story, go to build NPR dot org, and thanks so much for listening to the show this week. You can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. And while you're there, please do give us review you can also write to us at H NPR dot org. And if you want to tweet is at how I built this show was produced this week by Casey Herman with music composed by routine era Bluey. Thanks, also to Juliet Carney JC Howard, nor Cousy. Neva grant, Melissa great Santa's Michigan poor and Jeff Rodgers. Our intern is Kansas limb, I'm guy Roz, and you've been listening to how I built this. This is NPR.

IBM Compaq Houston NPR HP Jim Harris danika Bill Myrtle Rod canyon rod rod Kenyon Silicon Valley Comdex engineer Amazon Taylor Jim Harrison Mahindra
Ep. 352 - Wrong is Wrong. The End!

Trent365

02:35 min | 2 years ago

Ep. 352 - Wrong is Wrong. The End!

"If all the wrong things. Sorry. I'm. Three hundred and fifty two of three sixty five Saturday the seventeenth of November. And go to say, I've just seen something in the Compaq downstairs, which it's kinda my me laugh, but it's also frustrated me a little bit. What it was was a preprinted card that sits on the dashboard that says sorry, I blocked your driveway. And it's got a spot there for you to fill in your phone number. And the funny thing about that is someone's taking the time to acknowledge that they're gonna do the wrong thing. I'm just going to try and be bit nicer about and try and be more useful about it. Forget about the fact that these things actually viable in shop in a stationery store or something already preprinted. But it kind of brings me back to I think it was episode seventy four the show where I I asked the question if you do the right thing for the wrong reasons doesn't matter if you've done the right thing out of shame fear or guilt, or whatever. The the motivation was doesn't matter. The fact is. You've done the right thing, and this is kind of the same thing. But in reverse does doing the wrong thing for the right reasons or trying to do it nicer does that make it less wrong? It doesn't doing the wrong thing is always the wrong, bloody thing, and I think anyone that lives in Malaysia seen a thousand times. We just have this habit in Malaysia of blocking people in double parking front of people. And look the nice people a little note like that in the car and say if you need to move just give me a call his my number. But and a lot of people tell you it's because there's not enough caps. And in some cases, that's true. But frankly, people just don't even bother trying anymore. And so a lot of people have just said, we'll bug it all just park in front of somebody doesn't really matter. I'll even night doing the wrong thing. But I'll be nice about it. But look, you know, to me, it's nothing genius. I think they're doing the wrong thing is always the wrong thing or that's thanks for tuning in. I will be back again tomorrow. So you. The podcast. You just heard was made using anchor ever thought about making your own podcast anchor. Makes it really easy for anyone to get started. It's a one stop shop for recording hosting and distributing podcasts. Best of all. It's one hundred percent free. Sign up now at anchor dot FM slash new. That's anchor dot FM slash new to get started.

Malaysia Compaq one hundred percent
Tips for early Spring transplanting

Your Gardening Questions

02:49 min | 2 years ago

Tips for early Spring transplanting

"Hi, this is Mark news from plant talk radio. Thanks for subscribing and listening to our podcast. You're gardening questions. From plan. Talk radio to help keep this podcast free for you. We're partnering with stoke seeds preplanned your indoor seeds starting program with the help of the all new Stokes website now mobile and tablet friendly. The new website is a brand new gardening. Experience offers better interactivity and higher quality imagery. But what hasn't changed is the Stokes website is still the complete resource center with valuable information on seed starting planting and harvesting all the gardening accessories and a free catalog, whether you're adding texture a new variety for a splash of color developing an existing garden or starting from scratch stoke seeds has some great resources to help you. Plus, all the gardening accessories. You need to make your garden the envy of the neighborhood get growing with Stokes. Now. Today's question Linda, dry out a little bit. Otherwise, you just going to kind of create a mass in your yard and disturbed the soil structure. So. If we have a heavier rain period. Obviously let it dry out dryer would be better. Then you can always add a little water just to that new planning this time of year. The reason it's a good time as you're gonna get plenty of moisture in the spring and so get the plant established before the summer. But yeah, let things dry out a little bit be careful, obviously walking on the lawn when it's so weird or or frosty and so kind of work your way around and there's never the perfect time. But I I think would definitely coming into the season for a lot of planting and transplanting when you transplant things like this and the herb in the early spring or late winter, do you fertilize now or do you wait if it's a slow release fertiliser granular, which is what I would recommend it's fine to put a little bit of that on now all alway to the spring, but it's now's fine because it's not going to instantly. Make that plan, you know, spurred into growth, so nice slow release balanced fertilizer is all you need you may not need any. But that would be something to go and just kind of work it lightly into the soil. So it doesn't wash away put your. Mulch on by all means, but just an inch or two, and my number one thing, I always say just back off on the mulch. And that that the too much multiple SU lead to those moisture problems too much moisture around the base of the plant, so just an inch or two light mulch. Make sure the souls nice and aerated do not Compaq too much. And I think then be great for the spring and get settled in before the heat of the summer comes if you it's hard to believe that might be ahead of thanks again. For listening to the podcast. Remember preplanned your indoor seed starting program with the help of Stokes gardening guide and their online articles on their brand new website now mobile and tablet friendly and request your free catalog while you're online for the best selection of vegetable flower and herb seeds available go to stoke seeds dot com. Call waiting successful growers for generations.

Stokes Stokes Mark Compaq Linda
No Dumbing Down: Aligning Your Organization for Sustainable Growth

Smart Companies Thinking Bigger

21:50 min | 2 years ago

No Dumbing Down: Aligning Your Organization for Sustainable Growth

"Welcome. Business now, I'm you host Kelly. Dan Lewis, thank you for joining us. Our guest on this episode of talking business now is Karen Walker. Karen is an executive coach consultant speaker and author who helped senior leaders create internal strategy that support their organization's external growth, she even has a new book out on the topic called no dumbing down a no nonsense guide for CEO's on organizational growth. A few decades ago care and help lead the then fastest growing company in American history. Compaq Computer Compaq was also fastest to one billion dollars in revenue after working at Compaq for fourteen years with annual revenues growing to fifteen billion dollars Karen left to begin her consultancy in this episode of talking business now Karen shares tips on how to create internal strategies and infrastructure that support your company's sales growth will hear from Karen Walker right after this message from our sponsor in tarot bang solutions. Would you like to position your company as an industry thought leader increase in gauge -ment and build credibility with prospects and clients establish your influence as a trusted resource in terra Bank solutions offers full-service writing and publishing solutions that deliver your company's messages with a bang. You can count on us to provide turnkey solutions that support your existing marketing and communication staff or act as your full service outsource partner in terabytes solutions, providing custom writing editing and publishing solutions. Visit WWW dot Interros Bank solutions dot com. We're talking business now with Karen Walker an executive coach consultant speaker and the author of no dumbing down a no nonsense guide for CEO's on organization growth throughout her career. She's focused on that very topic. And in this episode of talking business now Karen shares tips with you about what she spent her career doing helping senior leaders create internal strategies and infrastructure that support their company's sales growth. Welcome. Karen? I'm girl to be here. Thanks for having me what an important topic. And as I said, you spent your career doing this, you've been helping company leaders create organizational growth, which is a very broad topic. So tell us a little bit about your background, and what you've been doing in this area. Oh, thank fell short. I say my grounding than engineer. With my college degree with them. So I I come into a different place. I think many people who are in the field the filter dealt, but but I- fortunate to go to work for a small start up early in my career that turned down to beat the fan, then patented on company history and the Eacho billion and that Compaq hitter. So I I really fell into that found by people go over there that I thought were people, but I admired respected, very large company. And so I- inquired paint to work with this particular group of people and the main be. To be part about hypoc that in able that growed. Of course, we have an amazing product marking fed, but in order to take advantage of that opportunity to do things right internally. I got with my grounding. I didn't have my hominem. Tell later like token Shourie, that's really what was going on. But I buy my first short after fourteen years there part of the leadership team in Ebeling globally about eighteen billion dollars, and I left and starting my what a heady time that must have been, you know, a small company nobody knew him to become this international name. Everybody knew it in the technology industry itself was just exploding at that time while it still is continues to explode. But at that time, it was really new to a lot of just normal people. And so for the you'd be working for a company that was part of bringing that kind of technology to the masses and change the way we work and live and set the stage for everything that's come sense that had to have been a still shake your head. Sometimes when you think about on the ground floor of that. I do one of the amazing thing about that that we didn't. We didn't know it's going to happen. Of course. Right. So we would make plans for growth, and then we would exceed them by so much that it would knowing we learned over time to make plan both for significant upside are Har strategy and also course down by never knew one in our big competitor. At that point by BMW. Never do. They put it better. They've been interesting. Video documentary made a couple of years ago called silicon cowboy that the vote on net flicks in the eye. The story of that time going home at distri, but primarily Kogas compact story, it's a little camp cut. It was during a period of the eighty when things were a little camp at very well, very well done. Well, like, I said you spent your career doing this because you had to you started from nothing at compact, and you had to put these structures in place at tell us a little bit about the book itself, no dumbing down. And it's all about this is putting those kinds of structures and in infrastructure in place to support sales growth. And so why did you write the book? Yeah. So after never consulting began to the theme 'cause I'm working primarily with Tak, not exclusively CEO's and senior leaders and fast fast-growing organizations, and I just began to see patterns emerge where the organizations would we hard on fail, which should sales good thing. But then find the sales were outpacing their ability to support what it is old. I need deliver on the promise that they were making to their customers, and that would be because ternal bunk shins weren't aligned see, for example, you'd seen fail telling things, and I think many companies during that just frankly are available from what's been developed software world, for example, or that production and actually deliver win scene. Lady. Marketing gets out front the organizations over there's always opportunity. A lot of misalignment and the organization that begins to rain instead of scale. So they can keep up and over time. What you see is you just unable by comma. So really impacts your ability take advantage of. And if I thought that I noticed that there were number of various things that were happening. One was going to have teams that didn't walk up to the potential Turnley. They were for calming them to dump down output that women. No doubt comes from on. My also saw to the prophet two of the behavior that were in not had Jhelum responsive and able to keep up with the change. Sometimes it was there wasn't a NOP profess sometimes there was too much process with idea of thinking about sort of started to grow up at the continuum, and that you need to be at the right place. Contain the joy that you can actually might wanna be grown up. Even if you're currently in your in your company age, but you might want to still have some start up sponsors process. Yeah. And then people were unable to change unexpected them, and the company would clean off in different direction on that would undermine the critical strategy sort of time that compact view going Fanton expected, but we had strategies to allow to do that. But no, it would be certain point. We had to consciously say we might moving this direction from ago standpoint with the strain pudding station, and then Lampley senior leader generally don't make enough time to get away from all and think of so they end up over five the short-term in the region and expensive for the long view, which can create those game about processes in the second section of your book. You present five internal strategies that help to support that external growth, can you go through those quickly? At gloomy for the first is idea not coming down. And that really something we've all experienced one of the biggest reasons in organizations strategy the Kaleida turn on. And what I think about it. Teamwork as usual, and we've all experienced Riley that we're going to be on the team. Stations towards towards theme. More which is good so much potential vote. We just t-shirt than happen with with don't get the property chartering or people don't know how to actually work. A different Bill more but different from being an amazing individual perform, and though these teens started them down, but that they can only perform at the level of. And that might be technical hill. But it off because priorities line buddy hardy. Teen. What company don't get resolved do that? Or any number of interpersonal can get in the way, just sometimes are not charging. Well. Don't that gold. With in beheaded culture would not allow by the a- started to the back again making about trending strategy think about ternary, and that's what you call. That's what you call double back in your book right up at tried that went back, then we don't just Lou in one direction move on the program for that situation. I think about it. I call the competing into the pan on in and they entered operating procedure on the other. And there are what happened in organizations to move towards standard operating, and that really can hap- down thing. Innovation and creativity. That made you start with the all time in my emanate. People trying to get a great by got him fighting news organization, I want to integrate and dead. They go it by credit call. They have an MD department on departments merging Burgess coins, go about this the Mattingly destroying value bought so finding finding make sure that I to be at trial. We need to being. The idea of a coupling bumper car so think happened right quote plan never unfold straight line. We need to be prepared for unexpected events that occurred, and like if you're driving the car playing cards, you get hit amount expected direction, and that might ju- careening off, but we have guardrail sort of moving back into the arena. And so how do you set up the guardrail? Looking facial don't quite often the bait or buy into the announ? But did you have some control of of? Right. The idea, but Keleti, which is compartment organization. I wanna be with a good. Switch Hampton happen. Right. You want the scalable political prophet of the new thing, leaner, the Beijing? Don't have venture time inventing wheel every time the nation comes up improper for. And so what are the parts of the order station in few make them salable? Couple. Look, I ended by the a- image about learning a heading heading get a buffet all had make time think what are some internal strategy grouping to make sure that both you and your team in time for them and not just the annual strategy retreat. Today's not enough. The very land thing the idea. So what we've all books are that hopperton slow with Thompson in Trenton things that might be useful? But we get back to art doubts move by mail and how to laugh don't get to it. So having had you into a team fell countable on making a change. So your behavior you make a point of saying that making commitment to all of this is really only job at the senior leaders can do that that they alone can affect this change. But it really takes it might start with them. But it really takes the entire organization if you want to reach your fullest potential as for the employees personally and for the organization as a whole it really takes the whole team. How do they get the buy in from the rest of the people in the organization? Yeah. So I couldn't really take every Mike fearing failure not Canetti. The no one can try. Of people not walking talk or putting the violence. We don't work well, and in maligned fashion punctually, and I know that in your leader in particular, are they both have the views with the broader view of the organization also did in a way that won't cross functional than likely to be incented on the the organization the whole and also the long-term and other point notation to be. Short charm. And think that I'm more Filo. One option. It really put him to start at the top. Then once you got that really get into the station. Make sure that people are a clear about how job kind to the outcome that this about come on invasion, and sort of what the end result of that it so we may be may very good picking out job at how did that at that healthy invasion fill in common customers, and then then the being with Meg periods. Where organization talk about how things are going with looking to what happened, but we learned from that. And how to do things differently. Better thing going forward of the people are are clear about to vote and opportunity. I how it went. Contributes to the bottom line. And I know that coming ability when? Much more tackle. And you want like. We have personal and they can't get done. I will probably all high achievers and did not personally accountable than of being audited. Investable heaven. In autumn. Or the cold the ocean on being? But I'll have acquaint- providence. Very true you were in a startup environment. But so many startups that I know they are just scrambling from the get go. It's almost overwhelming, and they're just doing whatever they can to get to the next day and try to fulfill the next promise. So first of all in that kind of an environment. What advice we have four senior leaders or for the founder to get to a place where they can get the learning to levitated where they can really say stop time out were spiraling out of control unless we can get our arms around this thing, which in your case would be the infrastructure in the process. So what advice would you give them to try to get to that place where they can even take a breath and recognize they need that. Well, the pretty thing is to realize that this will never happen on it right by the business closed down. Now that they just occurred in the of time to do that. And probably something else is wrong and going on that you need them at the end. It can take trolling calendar that an ordination will alway booklets nation. Hey, it much time attention from employees at the again. And then you have to into counted new have put I'm on your calendar and think the thoughts to look at the big picture and the thing leader introduce yourself, and you do it for your team. I'll give you don't do it. No one else knew that it not going to be poured in urgent for anyone else and their other people come to them. That man under your own. At the time. Look at the pitcher until I think the first thing. Team. Get the talent out get it on there. And it may not be a good. But maybe you can get the talented for that. Now, the pollen Munger and then to get something that is regular. No, maybe a couple of hours a week making a day. And we may not get the. Petulant? We'll have a chain getting computer you had to leave our listeners with just one thought today here we're talking business now. So what should they be talking business now about when it comes to organizational development in their companies? What one thing I think the most important thing is a theme. Can do making sure that there was. Alive, and it not that the ordination of prep. If you wanna poke on optimize. Not match the mind mean that the core bookable in the work that I did do the optimize the whole that we can work actively on. Even though every part of the. Mac. Pals, but you wanna work together. A governing that individual and dump down that individuals should walkable capacity. You have to hope that the make that occur. But you only do it. Activation. Hold on Beijing point. And once there's obviously so much more that we could talk about here today. People are just going to have to go and find your book where can they find that? Yes. The book no dumbing down, you know, dumbing down dot com. Could you page? Dom and then my website and she coun- Walker dot s. There's a lot of material. Okay. So Karen Walker dot US. You get the book through that as well. As some other useful information on this topic. And you can also go out to Amazon dot com, of course in find it there. No dumbing down a no nonsense guide for CEOs organization growth. Karen, thanks so much for joining us on this episode of talking business now, I really enjoyed it. And we appreciate the support of our sponsor Interros Bank solutions, providing writing editing and publishing services. Give them a call at nine one three two two zero four two five one or visit in tarot Bing solutions dot com. And thank you for tuning in today. Please be sure to join us for the next episode of talking business now.

Karen Walker Compaq CEO Interros Bank Beijing terra Bank solutions Dan Lewis Kelly partner engineer BMW executive Bing Amazon Kogas Ebeling Shourie consultant Jhelum
Compaq Employee #104 Turned Keynote Speaker Karen Walker on How to Create Scalable and Replicable Systems

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

56:36 min | 2 years ago

Compaq Employee #104 Turned Keynote Speaker Karen Walker on How to Create Scalable and Replicable Systems

"On today's show we interview compacts employee number one four yes the massive company compact their fourth employee of all time karen walk on today's show karen walker shares with us how to deliver in the short term mm-hmm while creating scalable and repeatable systems built for the long-term karen walker also shares with us had a had a simultaneously create these systems while while dealing with the day to day drama of being a business leader or business owner throughout her career karen has worked for giant brands such as amazon ben and jerry's pfizer ibm and many others. What is it gentlemen without any further ado my interview with karen walker. Klemm shows rose. Don't need a celebrity narrator to introduce this show. This show too may eight kids co created by two different women women thirteen multimillion dollar businesses ladies and gentlemen welcome to thrive time shaw the nine and yes yes yes and yes thrived nation on today's show we are are interviewing employees number one four of compact the incredible ms karen walker welcome onto the show. How are you man. I am very well and pretty excited to they here. Thanks well. Hey you had massive success and i know all of our listeners are going to start googling karen walker right now. It always happens so in out there searching for you. They're gonna find the massive success. I'd love to start off at the beginning or the very beginning of your your your background. Tell us how you grew up in. What was life like for you growing up as a kid absolutely i. I'd like to address what they're gonna fight when they go karen walker if i may <hes> so karen walker is one of the characters on will and grace and imbibed a lot of vitamin d. v. so just know that that is not me home. I am the caron walker who's a consultant and and <hes> and author and speaker <hes> so how i grew up. I grew up in west texas. <hes> which meant i grew up with oil and sand and friday night lights football so literally the friday night lights high school was my high school football team and that was that was the environment that i grew up in and it actually turned out got to be a pretty good place because it was a smallish town of about one hundred thousand people and <hes> it it was a it was a good place to grow up <hes> but i got a lot of lessons from my parents who were had a father who was an engineer and a mother. Who's a nurse. I'm the oldest of four and pretty much was told. I could be whatever i wanted to a. B. as long as i didn't go into the oilfield that was the only time they told me no and <hes> as well as having to stop playing football in the third grade so those turned out to be pretty anyways wise counsel for my parents. Did you want to go into the field. Well what i yes i did not. Was it like a dream that i had to go on but fails but when i was in college getting my engineering degree definitely interviewed with oil companies <hes> and sadly was told because i was a a woman i couldn't go to work <hes> from some of them told me that <hes> but then my parents also discouraged me from <hes> from pursuing it and it turned out i am a much better fit for tech back and so that that turned out all right now i'd love to share with the listeners about your educational background ultimately led to your success so <hes> what what kind of schooling did you have. After high school yes i was really good in math and science and so in my father was engineer and so i went into a into engineering <hes> i got a degree in engineering from texas a. and m. and <hes> i i never really used much with that in terms of sort of the formal engineering portion of it but what i got out of it that has been so amazingly useful to me in ways. I didn't comprehend i is it taught me how to think in a way that's sort of disciplined and logical <hes> that has has been very very helpful to me in my career. <hes> am after my graduation from there. We'll talk about my work in a bit but i'm also did some <hes> n._b._a. Studies <hes> and university of houston <hes> which i got about halfway through and then i had the big job at compaq and and didn't finish and then i did some additional studies at columbia university during my time at new york. I'd like to ask you about learning how to think. I've heard a lot of people a lot of great guests. We've had on the show wolfgang puck and yourself herself and we've had the founder of ritz carlton so many people talk about hey. This particular education taught me how to think. Could you explain what it means because you're obviously good that thinking you you know what you're doing. Just for someone who's average listener is an average listener is an entrepreneur or they want to be. What does it mean to be disciplined. Kupuna thinker in your mind yeah so for me i in this has been a sort of a lifelong process of flirting this but but starting with just understanding that there are many different perspectives variables about any situation that you're looking at and having a way to sort of sort out the wheat from the chef jap in that that case and then being being able to make sure that you have done all that you can do to minimize the blind spots and there are there ways to do that in engineering where you have a safety factor she might double your answer by two or five or ten <hes> to make sure you have enough safety built in but in in the rest of the world when you're making a decision <hes> just making sure that you have diversity of opinion making input into your decision <hes> that you're clear about what success looks like a decision that you're making. You're clear that it's an important enough decision for you to be spending time on it <hes> and that you have <hes> you have done enough to make sure one more time that you have you have minimize those blind spots because i think that's the thing for most entrepreneurs and business people. Pull it that we're most afraid because if we know about an issue we'll deal with it. It's the stuff we don't know about that. That's scary. That is wisdom right. Don't put that on a shirt probably take that whole paragraph sure. I'll tell you why can't wait to transcribe this now. Now your story before joining compaq. I wanna talk about your your story leading up to joining compaq. Oh how how did you get into compaq. How are you able to join that organization right place right time and i'm just knocking on wood here because that was that was amazing. I went to work for a big fortune. One hundred company at the time is texas instruments. <hes> which is where the three founders of compaq were also working and i was very fortunate. I was working on a big project. We were building a new a new facility in the houston area. He and i notice these people that i thought a lot of leaving the organization. I didn't know what they were making. There was a the head and announced announced any product yet. There was a lawsuit between texas instruments and <hes> the startup company about poaching employees so they could call you all very secret and and i really thought a lot of these people who are leaving in it just made me really curious now. My mother thought i was crazy because this company but he takes instruments. I'd gotten a promotion like every six months. I was managing people always making a good salary. It was very solid and secure and i left there go to work for something that no one ever heard of that didn't have a product announced yet <hes> and in startups you know back in the day. We're not like today where there are many and <hes> we know a lot of people were startups. It was a rare thing particularly in houston texas during that time but i went over i interviewed <hes> we all thought that compact instead of making this breakthrough portable computer without perhaps they were making hard drives that deficient division that the group came out of the startup founders and i said i don't think i can do this job. I think you're gonna need someone who can build a clean room for you and they said oh no no no no you can do history please come and so i went and it was it was based on the on the people that were there and not on the product and heart heart. I now glad that i did so you left a secure job with texas instruments to go to a startup and you were employee number one one oh four in my understanding standing i as i tried to really research dive into your background is you you did well there and and you actually at one point had to go ask for twenty five million dollars. I'm from venture capitalists. Which was a huge today today's money. That's that's a lot of money. But what what year was this yeah so i. I was a compact for fourteen years so i will say that asking for twenty five million dollars. Might i ask they just got they just went up from there <hes> but yeah it was twenty five years old <hes> compaq at a board meeting <hes> our our funders are major funders. Were seven rosen capital out of new york. <hes> <hes> then rosen in particular her and you know i was really nervous but we needed money because we were growing leaps and bounds and we had to have facility so my job i was vice president of operating services which it was all the physical infrastructure the organization and so my job was to get far enough ahead of the curve to make sure that we had factories to produce and and we had distribution centers to distribute from and that we had <hes> office space to house all the people being hired and let me just say we were hiring hundreds more people every month than we had forecast so not hundreds of people are definitely that but hundreds more than forecast and so i had they get pretty good with dealing with ambiguity and big flexible <hes> and making plans for for exceeding our growth but then always having to have plans for what if we don't so we anyway had this meeting and i had a twenty five million-dollar ask for our first set of own facilities and i the board was running late and so i was pacing the hallways and finally they let me in and i walked in and and ben rosen who oh i was just a little in awe of <hes> head is sitting at the back of the room with his shoes off and his feet up on the on the board table and just leaned back back in israel acts to seek to be and i thought well if he set relaxed. I should take a cue from that so i did. I made my pitch <hes> at some point been said karen you got you got the deal right. You can stop talking now so i gave him. The thumbs up and i left in wouldn't had a glass of champagne. Now you remember what year it was that you ask for the twenty five hundred dollars this. Let's see. I don't compaq eighty two. Oh so probably eighty four somewhere in there we'll have this thing called the inflation calculator which i have dialed in right now. I just want to throw out this number eight ninety four hundred million a million dollars was a lotta money but in today's money that'd be like asking for sixty million dollars of course i mean that's a that's a lot i mean before you got the yes. How nervous were you nervous at all. How nervous were you what was going through your mind. I was completely nervous. Just completely nervous not i mean not so much for my cell but because i knew how important this this project was and that it was important that i convey bat and convey the the logic behind why we needed it and how we're going to put the money could use now. I understand that you actually at approximately the age of twenty five. You're able to grow a team to around three hundred people present accurate. That's what i'm <hes> i started. I started growing my team. I started out as a party of one as every everything compaq did <hes> <hes> but i did grow my organization to around three hundred people worldwide and then i had thousands of contractors consultants <hes> working globally for me and and <hes> you know it was amazing to put together a team like that in fact when i left compaq it was the hardest thing about leaving was leaving this amazing team that i put together <hes> and part of that was that i got lucky with my hires but a big part of it was that compact was a magnet right. We were growing really fast. We were getting a reputation. This is a good place to work and by the way being a good place to work was one of the one of the values of the founders and so we were a good place to work <hes> but we had a lot of players we were having a lot of getting traction and a lot of success and so <hes> for people who were fairly risk tolerant <hes> <hes> it was it was a good place to be <hes> and so it wasn't so hard to hire people it was sometimes hard to hire the right people <hes> and so getting clear about what were those competencies that were most important and you know i was really young and i didn't have a lot of experience and so i didn't know all this stuff. No i know a lot more about it now than i than i did then but but understanding that <hes> you can't just hire to fill a seat no matter how urgent is that you get someone in that seat so that you can stop doing the things you can do the other things you need to be doing <hes> so although tempting don't ever hire just to fill the seat <hes> and a higher for competencies beyond beyond technical and that then remember i just you know i was an engineer so i was heavy into achievement through who technical competency but things like you know having a bias for action or being really comfortable with ambiguity which i mentioned earlier or you know most importantly in in many cases is just what your interpersonal skills and how can you work with the team and how can you influence others and how can you make decisions based on different perspectives effectives not just yours so there was a lot of learning that went on around that talked to me about being able to deal with ambiguity. What do you mean by that yeah so for for many people and for myself when i was younger i thought there was one right answer and that we should just get to the right answer and then get on with things and <hes> when you're growing really fast in particular there are there are many right answers some better than others but there's often no one right answer. There are just some that are more directionally correct. I'll say and you have to deal with ambiguity because you don't have answers to all the questions. There's too many moving parts. There's too much exchange going on and so the the best you can do is to create us system or a process that that looks at those things and you for me as as in many ways. This is sometimes just intuitive but till to look at those things and sarah. What is what is most important. What can i get answers to. How can i go about doing that and to be comfortable with not having everything nail down when you make the decision and sometimes they're big decision. You're making <hes> but i i do think that's something that anyone in an organization. Who's a who's. A senior manager has to be comfortable and competent at the bias for action. I've learned conrad hilton had a phenomenal phenomenal autobiography read. His book have read ted turner's biography. I am ted autobiography and so many autobiographies andrew carnegie. I've read recently. I was reading and to get ready to interview. Mrs carly fiorina interview reader read her book this bias for action you hear it over and over again. Can you hammer home with that means to you yeah yeah. It means that <hes> my preference to do something right. Let's blitz. I'm a problem solver by nature. It's the one thing that i can't not do is solve a problem problem <hes> and like. I'm sure you've heard this time and time again. When that's a string if you overuse it it's a weakness and so <hes> you know the the bias for action is do something. Don't wait but make sure this thing. You're doing needs to be done so i say that's the that's the two who sides at the bias for action coin that is good that is man andrew we once we transcribe this year. I'm gonna a massive attempt. Maybe and i'll put it on tents now because we're outta space on the shirt. Now get up to ten or something okay so we're so we're we're moving on now. You have written a book called no dumbing down which is the no nonsense guide for c._e._o.'s. What inspired you to write this book yeah so the book is a it's a primer really for ceos on organization organization growth and it really is focused at at senior leaders. I hadn't intended to write a book. <hes> i waited clearly sometime. After i left compact before i wrote it so it's not it's not strictly a compact book. Although the the strategies that are in there are definitely what i learned from compaq and then over the last two decades of consulting assaulting <hes> i've really seen a handful of things that make the most difference in the quickest time to organizations that are growing and basically lee these are things that are supporting the external growth so this is not about finding your product market fit. It's it's actor the big bang of finding that product market fit bit when things explode and you're trying to keep up what is it. That's most important to do internally so that you really can deliver on those promises that you made to your customer. Ktar on this book is filled with so many knowledge bombs and i know the listeners are gonna go out there and purchase a copy of this book as soon as possible maybe even now in fact but but for the listeners out there that haven't yet looked it up or haven't yet picked up a copy. What are a few of the teaching moments in the book. Maybe just a couple to give us kind of a a sneak peek as to what kind of things we're gonna find this book. Oh sure so one thing is this idea of dumbing down the title strategy so <hes> dumbing down is what i think of is teamwork as usual and we see it over and over again in organizations where we want teams because we need teams to to get things done and both functional cross functional parts of the organization but people bring these amazing individual contributors skills the things that made us successful successful in the first place and they try to play ply those same skills to the team and there's some overlap but they are not the same skills you can't you can't can't just be a room full of individual contributors in get the value out of teamwork and so what happens is you know the people show up with really good intent can't and the complex don't get resolved or there's a mismatch of skills or misaligned priorities or resources or and and over time then you're a player's begin to look at the team more like a tar pit because they can't work to their potential there and eventually they'll leave the team and or leave the company vinnie and it happens because teams can only perform at the lowest performing members level so right so you have dumbed down to that to that level and it's not always effective rarely that it's the lowest performing team was fault. You know maybe they didn't have the skills. They were shouldn't have been placed on the team. Maybe they have different set of priorities that they were given. That's different from everybody else on the team but you have to you have to watch for that and and office politics ticks can come into play right where people don't come in and work with each other in a way that you would hope that they would now okay i in your book. You wrote this notable notable quotable. You wrote an emphasis on the short term and the urgent at the expense of the long and the nurturing of scalable replicable double success. I know that i grew up with a classy word word. Highly educated person would say without without any money and so my first company i started was a company called d._j. Connection which ultimately became the nation's largest wedding entertainment company still around the day but i sold it exited move on but that particular company karen i had i had to to book wedding wedding brides every every weekend forty of them eighty of them and we can before i sold it. We were doing like eighty weddings every week and four thousand a yod god bless you and i remember i'd bring on these people and and they were joined my team a lot of highly educated people. They'd say here's the deal. We need to focus on the long term not urgent and i. I know i know but meanwhile we need to make payroll. Hey roll this week and then over time. I realized you kind of have to do. Both you have to focus on the urgent. Pay the bills sell something while focus on making being scalable solutions. What i see now is a consultant and as a podcast host. I see so many entrepreneurs that were doing what i did when i first started and they're exclusively focusing on urgent urgent myopic things and they never look up at the long view. Can you talk about how we get out of doom loop if i'm a c._e._o. Or leader out there and i keep making urgent decisions because that's it's all i started. The company was with a sense of urgency but now that sense of urgency is killing the long term you talk about how we get a doom loop of just focusing on urgent myopic things yeah yeah well. We'll said that you have to do both right but what what happens is a clearly an organization well. We'll suck as much time from us you will oh give it doesn't matter if it's your organization or someone else's but if you're in an organization that organization will take as much from usual give particularly if it's in growth mode and and and we can't spend our days running from meeting to meeting playing whack a mole you remember the komo games do very good whack-a-mole bow. Ah yes all right so that's that's what i see many <hes> senior leaders and organizations in fact many people and organisations doing all day. They just run from meeting to meeting whacking moles which feels pretty good right. We're solving a problem and then there's another mall that pops up someplace else and we're not to do that and we run into that but we never step back or we do it. Rarely you know maybe it's the annual strategy retreat to sort of look at the bigger the bigger game and i think it's it's critically important in fact it's one of the most important things that senior leaders are are hired for is to take the long view to look at the bigger picture. Only senior leaders really can do that because they are compensated for the whole not just for their individual functions they have accessed information that other people the organization don't have and they can see things coming from the outside if they'll put their heads up long enough to do it and so my what i work with with my clients on is just making sure that you found for yourself and for your team. What's the rhythm that works for you and for some people it's like okay. If i can book an hour a week to sort sort of think about the long-term great i can do that for other people and this is true for myself as well. I have to think about this. <hes> paul graham's maker versus versus manager days talked about that. I have not talked about on the show but i do read the paul graham essays and i like them a lot. Yes so this you have to avoid avoid the really high cost of task switching which isn't so you don't ever task switch but you don't wanna do it any more often than you have to and so so <hes> for me and certainly some of my clients it's like okay. Take a day and dedicate that to the big picture. Take another day dedicate that to dealing with things that have to be done today. Maybe you can't take a day. Take a half a day figure it out figure out how to do this once a month. It's not enough to do it. Once a year. Things are changing into fast in the industry. Things are changing fast in the world for that so many of my clients we take <hes> a day a quarter and we take the senior team off site eight and we are at what happened. What are we expecting to happen. What actually happened and what has changed that might impact our plans going forward and you know one. One day at a quarter is not too much time to be spending on the big picture now. This is a i can i if i can't. I wanna share with you. What i see a lot of clients we we you work with executives and high level business owners and i work with a lot of small business owners and this is what i need to find small business fifty employees or less came so fifty employees or less and this is what i see small business owners doing before we can help them. They will be mentally meeting with you at say but they're mentally really not present there physically with you in the meeting but they're not mentally present because they're responding to somebody who just complained about their product on google immediately and then somebody who just complained about their product on amazon and then somebody who just told them they love their product on amazon and then somebody who just said we really love your product facebook and they live in this urgent reactionaries zone and so it got me looking into it and researching and according to psychology today the average american now is has has over ninety one interruptions per day from smartphone and a typical workday. What advice would you have for entrepreneurs out do that push notifications on their phone and they're sitting there day wack doing the whack a mole but with social media and e mails text messages and personal calls at work all day just distraction distraction distraction. What advice would you have for the entrepreneurs out there. Yes i have a a couple of pieces of advice and the first thing is languaging. Which is we get. The average american allows ninety one interruptions per day. We have choices this about how we use our time. We do not have to get ninety one interruptions a day from our smartphones and and hey i get it you know i have. I have my devices all right here. Can i did turn them off for this. <hes> this this time with you <hes> but it's really easy to just react to the little dings when they happen and you have to you have to realize i said you have to make highest and best use of your time and <hes> and you only time so one resource who can't make more of <hes> so being sort of crystal clear about what that highest invest i uses so you have to take control your calendar. I'd say that's the first thing because if you don't someone else will and you have to schedule time when you were going to be able to react in time when you're not if you are a small small to medium business owner and you find yourself needing to be reactive all the time. What are those things that you can put a process in place to deal. You'll read so that you don't have to deal with it this. This is how you scale. This is how you go. I think about this continuum from st seat of the pants to standard operating process right and so often with a startup it's all seat of the pants and with sort of a grownup company. It's all standard operating process and you don't want to be stuck at either end you. You want to be able to respond or whatever the situation is. You're dealing with so think of that. As a continuum you can go back and forth on. It's not really just the age of your company but but find those things that you can put a process in place for so that you could pri yourself up to deal with these bigger more important issues that have to be dealt with which doesn't mean that it's going to be a walk in the park mark. If you're if you're running a business in your work in thirty two hours a week. You're probably not listening to this podcast but let's continue on start up to grown up and finding finding the place <hes> where whatever the problem is you're facing even if it is just responding to reviews of your product <hes> where where's that need to be on that continuum and does it need to be reacted to right away or can you get a process in place you know karen i was doing some cyber stalking view in the most positive way the most positive sense of talking and i discovered that you have been invited to do consulting with brands such as amazon. I thought to myself who's that i've never heard of amazon and so i read the next instead i._b._m. And i'm going who's that never heard of that. One pfizer nope nope never heard of them. Ben and jerry's could know the point is you're working with some big companies. I mean fortune. Five hundred firms is a reach out to you for results. What kind of stuff do you do. When you sit down with executive. Just kind of give us a teaser kind of stuff. Do you do for to help the executives out there that you're your coaching in helping to mentor oh sure so. I must say that i do work with fortune five hundred companies. I also work with inc five eight hundred companies <hes> and i work. I have a number of startups that i've worked with. I i like a first time c._e._o. Who just got her series a funding that i i've recently the <hes> the coaching with but when i sit down with a with a c._e._o. Typically you know the first questions are either. What made you take my call or. Why did you contact me. I want to really understand their objectives and i often have to push them for what's working right. It's really easy for somebody to tell you all this stuff. That's not working in my organization nation but usually it's haywar growing really fast. I don't know what i need to be doing with my time. I don't know i need to have my staff. I don't know what i need to bring people on and i don't know when when what process put into place so it's it really is this time of sort of stepping back and looking at the bigger picture as we were discussing discussing earlier about the organization and how to make sure that there's alignment internally i think about this sort of optimizing for the whole rather than maximizing some ising anyone function because it's really easy for parts of the organization to get out of alignment and when you do that you're not being very efficient. There's my industrial astro engineering coming back up but it's really helping the organization be more efficient and so that takes the form of coaching the c._e._o. Or senior leader that brings me in typically also working with that senior team to make sure that they're aligned because if they're not you can imagine what it's like in the rest of the organization <hes> and then <hes> over time as the organization grows. I'll i'll often also morph into <hes> sort of developing a next generation of leader because as the organization grows that first i hear needs to be taking on new responsibilities and someone else has to pick up work. They were doing before drew. I wanna make sure right now because this is this is an accountability thing here we have to we got the e book of cairns at iba version of karen book but yeah we need to purchase physical tangible copy on amazon right now. Who who are we to not. Leave her a positive review because it's a good read and i know the listeners out. There carrying are gonna go. Check it out no dumbing down a no nonsense guide for c._e._o. C._e._o.'s organization organization of on organizational growth but i wanna ask you my final three questions here. We go if you're out there sitting down with an entrepreneur c._e._o. A business owner and they ask you. How should i organize the first four hours of my name and let's say they just want to know specifically. You know they just want to know karen if you could make the perfect schedule schedule i'm a c._e._o. I'm a business owner. What advice would you have on how you managed hundreds of people thousands over the world. How would you recommend the entrepreneurs would organize is the first four hours of their day. And what time do you think they should be waking up. Well this very ability i will. I'll give you some journal advice and i'll tell you what i do so so i believe that the first four hours of your day starting your day off right starts the night before so to be to be clear. I keep using this word clarity. It's very important about what the most important things are to be spending your time on the next day and that means reviewing reviewing calendar the day before to make sure that things things that are on there still need to be on there <hes> and then <hes> in the morning. I think it's really important <hes> at least for me. I try to wake up with the sun so i'm not waking up with an alarm clock doc. I try not to have a lot of interactions and calls for singing in the morning. I will if i got somebody in a very different time zone and you know that happens but my my my normal process is to wake up wake up with the sun. <hes> spent some time sort of getting getting grounded in my life so that might look like meditation. My look like yoga. It might look like a walk <hes> typically. Jim is held for later in the day <hes> but just just something that gets me me grounded <hes> and then <hes> doing a a really brief check of sort of news and email and whatever that is then spending those first couple of hours on the big stuff that you i need to do when your mind is not cluttered <hes> that can be called with other people but that should be on big topics i this is this is not the time of day to go through the three hundred emails that came in overnight. Just do a quick quick smidgen of work there and then move on to something bigger and more important. You are a person who's very well read their certain book a book for that made a big impact on you. Is there a certain book that you read where that really helped change or frame the way that you managed those hundreds of hundreds of employees and those thousands over the world. This is the hardest question you've asked me. If we were on video radio. You would see a wall of books behind me. I have many books so i can. I can. I give you two books i for me. I mean you're the guru you you all right so one book that really made a difference as a book called dialogue by william isaacs and the premise here is that that often often when we're having conversation with people we just fall into debate so we we fall into debate about who's right and who's wrong and often we're trying to compete and come out on top because we're all competitive achievement oriented people and in his mom was all about how to get into dialogue to you can sort of suspend that position shut and you can understand where the person's coming from now do we have time or need dialogue on every single conversation we have. We do not but when you need it you need you. We need to have the skill set so i'm a big fan of the dialogue book <hes> i would say another book business book <hes> maybe <hes> there's a book called the elements of power by terry bacon that i'm a big fan of <hes> because i didn't realize very cheap motivated. I have pretty low power needs and i didn't realize there were many different kinds of power in an organization and he lays them all out really well. There's a self assessment of sort of see. I'd only wear your your strengths and <music>. <hes> development needs in terms of power but also for your job what might be the most important power to focus on now. This is my final. No question and i always comes across some people kind of misunderstand the initial i've said so. It's not meant to trick you into something here. Steve jobs always wore the same thing everyday. I tend where the same thing everyday paul graham. He referenced earlier tends to not carry a phone ever impossible. Mark zuckerberg were the same thing all the time. There's so many idiosyncrasies of top performance and i am curious as to do you have an idiosyncrasy. Do you have something that you do like a superpower. Maybe something that people might say that's weird karen that you would wouldn't mind of sharing that you believe that allows you to get more things done or to have more success or to be more intentional. What kind of idiosyncrasy do you have a positive help. You sure it's not my clothing. I i had that sorted out. I have have a personal shopper bergdorf goodman and she figures out for me and she's amazing but what i my superpower that thing that gives me my superpower is that i do a silent tation retreat for a week twice a year yup i go contemplate my navel with a lot of other people who are doing the same thing and <hes> it's it's amazing the first a couple of days i'm sitting in my cushion and i'm sort of drumming my fingers and thinking i have too many things to do. Why am i doing this again and by the third day that all goes away and the clarity already of my mind when i when i lied those retreats is incredible <hes> so that's i have. I'm told by my clients assertive calm calming presence and that that superpower comes from my meditation traits do you go into the woods to do this. You go on and on mountain top or you go. What are you going to a local dive bar. Where do you have these silent retreat. I know the listeners are curious yeah so they could be done anywhere. I sit with a zen group out of new york been meditating with for very long time decades and we are currently meeting on the hudson river. There's a retreat center and actually an old <hes> kachin capuchin monks called garrison institute. That's phenomenal <hes> and then in the summertime. That's for the winter retreat and then in the summertime. We try a variety different places. Wow okay see that right there. That's the kind of stuff stuff he will go. I did not know that well thrive nation. I encourage you. <hes> i encourage you can still speak verbally before i begin my silent retreat in just a moment here i encourage you go by no dumbing down. Get the book a no nonsense guide for ceos on organizational growth in karen. Thank you so much for being on the show. I really enjoyed it. Thanks for being so prepared dr nation. If you're out there today and you feel like you just are struggling to work on on the business while treading water and working in the business you are not alone and i encourage you to take advantage of this opportunity to book your tickets to our next in-person and thrive time show workshop because at the workshop you can meet people out there just like you who've been diligently applying the principles we teach on a daily daily and weekly basis and they're growing their companies. They're getting better not not overnight but they're getting better to percents a week three percent of week. One percent of week and these people now have a built multi million dollar companies. You're going to meet people out there just like you. The kind of sick freaks who wake up at six in the morning five in the morning every single day to work on their business and then they go out there nine to five work in their business. You're going to meet people that have created massive time freedom and financial freedom as a result of diligently implementing the the systems and processes that we teach here on a daily basis and encourage you and to let you know that this is real and some that you can in actually do i would encourage you to listen to the following testimonials from real people just like you who implemented the systems while going to thrive drive time show dot com so listen to these testimonials what will chicken out thrived show dot com and then click on the conference's button because when you click on the conference's button here you're gonna find over a thousand additional testimonials delivered via video. You're gonna find thousands of reviews from itunes to google to. You're gonna find in real people out there just like you and you can hear what they had to say about their experience. Attending the in person thrive time show workshop but let's listen to this next testimonial is is a game changer now dr brick talk to me about since you worked with tim the last one year and a half two years year year over year. What kind the changes have you made. And how has it impacted your overall profitability or growth. I'm happy to report the december of two thousand eighteen. We had our highest grossing month so so. I'm super excited about that ever ever. You know what that deserves. Dr wreck celebrating a sales record here on new year new you. How is it possible. He's a diligent doer. So what kind of practical changes have you made. Oh man <hes> well. We had to look our price structure. So you know we have to be honest with the value in what it costs to deliver services and we can't continue to give away services <hes> you know for free or or losing money on them and so that was one of the big steps we also had to get rid of toxic employees. He's <hes> or or even contractors. In our case the massage therapist <hes> are self-employed contractors <hes> but little warning about therapists by the the only difference between the rapist and a therapist is a space to think about it okay back to you reminds me sean connery on saturday night live right now okay so other changes. You've made this year. What other changes you made. Your was nonexistent on <hes> on our s._e._o. Zeo literally was is non-existent. You may have if you put my name in exactly spelled correctly. You might have found me on like twenty pages back got it but now you got all the content all the tags reviews so that all started from scratch and we now have <hes> like two hundred fifty seven reviews and we're climbing <hes> the google search engine each day. I was doing a search for you. Was it yesterday and i think you were over to fifty and he pulled up real quick mhm to fifty seven hundred fifty seven google reviews and so are you are you having people are finding you online now. Yes and that's that's a nice new thing. You know people come in and like hey. Hey i saw you reviews. Are you having ten percent more than last year twenty percent. What are you up <hes>. We're we're up so if fluctuates a little bit but but i mean literally from i'm like a year and a half ago to now. We're up double double now. Have you have you have you changed or improved your sales scripting acting or your sales processes and we have yeah we vary <hes> intensely went over a lot of <hes> scripting and things <hes> but then also we do <hes> we do have have a no brainer offer yeah and so the conversion aspect of that to go from hey this is all free to i expect you to pay me at some point. <hes> getting in a better conversion script for me to work from <hes> has also been very helpful and then you from an h._r. Perspective hiring people <hes>. I'm not going to put words in your mouth but most people most clients we've worked with most doctors worked with before business owners before they come into our program have a hard time finding good people <hes> and then after they're in the program ram. That's usually not a problem anymore right. Is that the case with you or you gonna finding people or have you changed your recruitment process just before starting working with tim <hes> we had to we had some change up in some you know some people left on their own accord and got we're about to have that conversation anyway so it worked out <hes> nice timing <hes> but <hes> yes we've brought on some great people <hes> in the last year and <hes> and now we're operating from a totally different way of thinking what about that with not being held captive and a hostage in my own office and how do you feel now i mean how do you and your wife does. Does it feel better. Do you feel have more pride about the business. Now that you're more profitable difference in her is to really yeah. I've been a doctor for the last fifteen years but <hes> you know to be a successful doctors kind of a little better like tangible action steps like give me a task to do today that i can. I can put my hands to work. Y'all doing that but i mean i i had to borrow money from family members that <hes> big shot to your dad i o u <hes> but <hes> yeah i mean it was tough on my wife. She's a schoolteacher and we were. We were living paycheck to paycheck every month. <hes> trying to rob peter to pay paul all got it and not fun not fun at all and your doctor your tractor yes embarrasses. My name is elizabeth walker. I'm from tulsa oklahoma. I own a business nook and cranny home keeping l._l._c. I heard about the drive time conference on the radio show. I was looking to learn pretty much anything. There is to learn learn about business. I'm a new business owner less than a year so i really needed to know everything about everything i have learned how to implement systems from hiring sue the actual day-to-day systems and the company. I liked that the workshop gave tangible systems systems but it was very entertaining and interacting plays presentation style was energetic. It was exciting. It gave me hope that there's actually a lot of success still to me none of my business but the atmosphere was energizing and figuring nothing boring about it was absolutely exciting while we're not sitting in chairs grouped gift altogether and huddled looking at powerpoint so whole time we were in a nice comfortable area we she had plenty to drink. We get up and move around if we needed to. We could interact with each other. People are missing out on concrete examples walls of how to run their day to day business very simple things and maybe that's the biggest thing i've learned inside. This can be simple and i think that's what they're missing out on. <hes> it's the smartest thing you could ever do. <hes> you know but i always warn people before more i i. I've actually sent people over but you have to sell out you have to believe and and when you do you will see amazing things that it it's it's it's been a game changer really has and i recommend it everybody. I mean everybody needs it. I don't care i mean there needs to be a a- an employee coach to be honest with you <hes> so i it's it's an amazing journey. I'm gonna let you have the final word on this but i will just say we have a coach's meeting every single day with all the business coaches and that coaches meeting starts typically at six a._m. On tuesday wednesday and thursday every every tuesday wednesday late thursday at six a._m. And on mondays it's at seventy trend the purpose of that kevin is to have winds of the week to we start off the meeting eating by sharing wins and he would eat client that had a big win. We want to share in their success. The second is if a client is stuck or they're unable to execute or get something done we want to as a team as a family as a coaching program to discuss where the client stuck and figure out the best plan to help them get unstuck and that's twi and each each of those meetings and i also helped make all the paths for all the clients and eric has had nothing but great things to say about. You and i hope i want to ask you this before. Tehrik the final word. Is your wife a fan of eric. I mean is your wife happier. Now i mean is he really making your wife crazy now. How are how are things going. Now is is your wife a fan dan of the coaching program she. She's a one hundred percent fan on coaching program. <hes> actually worked in the coaching program for about a week until i fired her <hes>. I learned real quick. That's just we're gonna keep a church and state separated. Eh well so you. It's real it's real we're keeping the church and the families separated and so with that but is she happy overall like me by one one percent or oh no. I'd say <hes> i'd say at least fifty percent. Yes yes miss lewis me with no of course no no yeah yeah yeah yeah. He's an <hes> <hes> gino. It's just simple things you know. I'm able to <hes> as she puts. It communicate better now because i'm not thinking about this other stuff and you know i it. It's it's good stuff. Chop you have the final word my friend give us. A capstone thought about coaching kevin lewis and what that experience has been like for you and what makes kevin so awesome. Kevin is a prototype pro-child wherever you poster child for stoicism so he's a guy who will come in and say give me a big win man. What's going on this week this last week for u._s._a. Landed a two point two million dollar job and i'm like yeah and he's like just another day and then they'll come in and say i got a competitor the out of state trying to come in and steal my people or whatever and just another day so i don't have to worry about. Hey we get lost in the weeds and the coaches meetings. It's all action on hey. What do we need to do here some meetings as we call up and he's like hey man. I'm rock and roll in you good. You need anything from me. No you good yet. We're gonna go some meetings. We get into some weeds about expanding meetings. Where kevin has had an the employees. You had a competitor. Try to steal your employees. All kinds of stuff yeah in. I do too every week right. Kevin is not a burning fire every week. Oh every week kevin stoic so he's able to push through right. The lows are not low. The highs are not too high even keel and so it's very easy to focused based on those key performance indicators and actually just like he said earlier make sure the business is going in the right direction and when the business is going in the right direction and you're accomplishing your own goals with your family. It's a fun fun time so we have a good time when we meet and we just make sure that things are happening the way they need to happen kevin pretty out there who's listening in green country that wants to have a roof put on their commercial building or or their residential property. How can they get a hold of you. What's your what's your website and really why should people call you what it's <hes> luis dot com and if they want a company that's going to be honest and do a good job and <hes> we're the company to call <hes> we put her. I put my family name on the business. I hind slum fake name. We are one hundred percent the real deal not a bunch of sales guys trying to sell a bunch of stuff. We are a roofing company. Do that's all we do is roofing and tribe nation. I've i've worked with a lot of roofing companies who've done a thirteen point assessment with them and it is rare to find a roofing company that we would even approve to coach. I want you to do this. We go through the assessment and probably eighty percent of the time. We say it was not a good fit. Kevin's evans is a great guy grinder. He stands behind his program. He puts his name on the website on the business on the marketing trucks on everything. Check him out today. That's louis roofing louis roofing dot com and kevin. I appreciate you taking time out of your day away from your family and your business to share your story here on the podcast cast and radio show hope. You have an awesome day my friend all right. Thank you awesome day to take care. What's up thrive nation here here with roy oy. We have a little bit of news for you guys. It's a now what may thirty first and twenty one. You've been close for twenty minutes right now june's. Let's run the numbers for mehlis code. One to eight thirty seven was last year to date one or two eight thirty seven this year. Last year was sixty thousand six sixty so well. I'll the ways of the put. The number of new customers that we've had is up four hundred eleven in percent over last year we are jared jennifer johnson we own platinum pest inland and are located in also oklahoma and we have been working with thrive for business this cutting for almost a year now so what we wanted just wanna share some wins with you guys <hes> that by working with dr <hes> first of all. I'm world top page of google now. Okay okay <hes>. I just want to let you know what type accomplishment. This is our competition organ term annex. They're both one point three billion dollar companies. They both have two to three thousand pages does the content. I'm attached our website sort of basically go from virtually nonexistent on google up on the top page is really saying something but let's come by being diligent into the systems that the threat has be by being consistent and diligent on do a podcast and stay on top of those podcasts really help we've enough on with listening ranking there with google and also we've been trying to get google reviews asking our customers for reviews and now we're the the highest rated and most reviewed pets company in the tulsa area and that's really helped with our conversion rate and the number of new customers that we've had is up four hundred eleven percent over last year three million. How much are we up four hundred and eleven percent so four hundred and eleven percent were up with with our new cosmo confusing right so not only do we have more customers calling in able to close those deals at a much higher rate than we were before right now are closing great is about eighty five percent and that's largely due to a for salt lake or google reviews that we've gotten people really see that our customers are happy but also we have a script that we follow and so on customers call in. They get all the information that they need. That script has been refined time and time again. It wasn't a one and done deal we it it was a system that we that we followed with thriving in the refining process and that has obviously on the four hundred eleven percent shows that that that system works so here's a big one for you so last week alone are booking percentage was ninety one percent. Well actually booked more deals morning customers last year than we did the first five months minds or i'm sorry the for more deals last week that we did the first five months of last year from before we worked with right so again we both more deals last week in in the first five months of last year that's incredible but the reason why we have that success by implementing the systems that thrive is taught us and helped us out with some of those systems that we've implemented our group interviews that way. We've really been able to come up with a really great team. <hes> we've created an implemented checklists. Everything gets done and it gets done right. We it creates. Accountability rails make sure that everything gets done properly a bolt out in the field and also in our office and also doing the podcast jared had mentioned that has really really contributed to our success but that mike is the diligence jason and consistency and doing those in that system has really really been a blessing in our lives and also an you know. It's really shown that we've gotten a success front following the systems so before working with rive. We're basically stuck really no new growth <hes> with our with our business <hes> we're. We're in a rut and we know the last three years our customer base. It pretty much stayed the same. We weren't shrinking but we weren't really growing either so we we're really know where to go what to do. I had to get out this rumour in <hes> but dry helped us with that. You know that they implement those systems that they cost systems. They taught us the knowledge that we needed in order order to succeed now. It's been a grind absolutely it's been a grind this last year <hes> but we're in those fruits <hes> front from that hard work and diligent effort bet that we're able to put into them out so again again we were in riot bribed helped us get out of that right <hes> and <hes> and if you're thinking about i'm working with right quick thinking about and just do it now do the action and and you'll get the results we'll take our work and discipline <hes> but but <hes> but that's what it's gonna taken order to in order to succeed so i would just want to give a big shout out to thrive a big. Thank you out. It wouldn't be where we were now without l. thrive nation. This is your day your time your opportunity to create the life life that you want. You can decide to thrive you. Don't have to just survive book your tickets today to attend our next in-person thrive time show the workshop simply by going to thrive time show dot com to thrive time show dot com and click on the conference's button and find the date that works out best for you every two months we do an in person thrive time show workshop money's klay clark like two in each and every show with a boot because i do too the.

compaq business owner karen amazon karen walker new york kevin paul graham google engineer texas consultant ben rosen founder football c._e._o. wolfgang puck houston
Raising Complex Kids

Uncensored Advice For Men

32:07 min | 9 months ago

Raising Complex Kids

"Fellows welcome back to uncensored advice for men. My name is Josh. I'm your host. I've got a lot of questions man to be honest. Like I messed up and I just have a lot of questions about life. And what I've found is when I saw answers the best way I did that is by asking questions. And what happened is I built a pretty good community of people that want to help guys and have expertise in it. So, you know some of the questions that we asked, you know ranging from sex to you know religion to relationships to raising kids, you know, so I want to provide the the answers that I'm getting some of the advice that I'm getting shared with you guys. So if you have questions go over to uncensored advice for men you get asked questions there. You can hit me up on LinkedIn and many different ways, but I'll go out to my community and to you know, authors speakers, you know some you know, badass people just ask them advice like hey, what do I do in this scenario? And then I'll report back in to you guys. So on today's show we have a conversation now I interviewed her husband dead. And I had a great conversation. But you know, I'm looking forward to this one because any any lady that can really work. Well with this guy like he's a hard drive in smart guy like off of energy. So his wife, you know behind every good man. There's a great woman. So guys, let's let's welcome Miss Elaine to the show. Welcome. Thank you. It is great to be here. Yeah. So how bout you tell us a little bit about who you are and what you're up to so Elaine taylor-klaus on the CEO of impact parents, which is an online resource for parents of what I like to call Compaq kids kids who struggle with some aspect of life or learning so they may be kids with a diagnosis like ADHD or anxiety or depression or something like that or maybe they don't have a diagnosis them kind of complicated or quirky or funky or you know, sometimes they're really really super smart, which is part of what makes them complicated. And so I'm the boss. In of three of these quirky complex kids and in the first decade of doing that it was pretty difficult and not very much fun page and David will tell you I kind of was doing it in a marriage as a solo parent kind of at the same time cuz he had issues that we didn't understand at the time and and it was really hard. And so that's when I finally started to get a handle on it. I discovered coaching and it began to shift everything in our family Dynamic. I had this Epiphany this moment when I realized no parent should ever have to go through alone. What I did those first ten years. And so I started coaching started a business finally met a business partner named Diane Dempster whom I've been with for about ten years and we were an amazing team and we do coach training and support for parents of complex kids all over the world and I have never been happier. That's awesome. And I could see it on your face your smiling people listening and you know, all they get this money but like, you know, you could see a joy in in your world and that's probably going through you know, what I found in my life you go through a tremendous, you know hard season of your life and it creates a lot of pain then you you start to get relief from that pain and then you start helping people find relief from that pain and then that brings Joy why don't kind of describe when you talk about yet three complex kids. You were kind of raising them, you know being the the solo parent while David was maybe working with some stuff and maybe he could talk about that later on but from from your perspective, what were those kind of situations that you were dead? What with the complex kids and what anxiety pressures paying, you know don't want to put words in your mouth. What did that cause for you and the kids and then you and relationship. Well, so so all of my kids turned out so now I know I'm the mom and an ADHD plus plus family of five in the early years. I didn't know that all I knew was that box on the outside. We looked like we had it all together and I looked like you know, your classic, you know, whatever middle-tier Jewish Mama whatever it was but as each kid one by one by one was diagnosed with different issues kind of like dominoes. It's some point and then my husband was diagnosed at some point. I looked him like there is no way he's responsible for all of this neurology. So around 40, I wouldn't have my sympathy valuated cuz I was actually trying to go back to graduate school and lo and behold I had undiagnosed learning and attention issues. So by the time I was you know, forty-two years old all five of us have been diagnose. Man birds of a feather flock together, huh? Oh my gosh. And so, you know, it's on the one hand our house has an energy to it that not everybody can tolerate him way more fun than anybody. I know so, I love it. Once we learn to deal with it and manage it and understand it and embrace it and accept it, you know all of that in the early years when we were just trying to sort of fulfill somebody else's expectations. That weren't ours right kind of make it look right. It was really really hard and the kids were struggling with school. They were struggling with social issues David had a lot of volatility in the house. It was just it was just really it was unsettled. It was I don't know how to put it in the other way. It was just everything was nothing was ever easy enough. Yeah, and and as I began to learn coaching and apply different communication patterns and skills to the house things started to shift and when a couple of years later, it also became a coach and so a couple of years later when I asked him, you know, what changed it he looked at me. He said I just couldn't deny anymore that what you were doing was working sweet, right and and that's really did it changed everything about how we communicate with each other and with our kids and that changed everything. Yeah. So so attention deficit disorder right. What are the well, the technical term is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. And you said Plus what's the plus plus anxiety depression plus celiac disease plus severe severe allergies plus I mean, we just had a lot of a lot of stuff great. Wow, so, okay. So what kind of problems I forgot that one. What kind of issues does that raised in in a household? Right? So you got three kids plus two parents, you know, a lot of times as parents we look at our kids. I mean like oh man, you know, they sometimes they're messed up because of us, right, you know, like we pass on some stuff to them. But what does it look like in a household, you know, just describe a day that you would call like a Bad Day right near like today was a bad day, you know, we might need to open up a bottle of Scotch. Right right describe. What a bad day look like for you. Well, I just have to have to laugh at what you're saying. It's like how many dads will come in and say there's nothing wrong with Mom. He's just like me, right so the bad days always started before anybody was out of bed. I mean it was it was not being able to get out of bed and watch the fights and Arguments for getting out of bed not being able to get dressed not being able to get to the table for breakfast, you know being chronically late for school arguments yelling, you know. Battles on stupid stuff, you know, did you put it in the dishwasher? Just anything that could be contentious was often contentious or the other way one that they would just like, where are they? They've disappeared, you know, you're trying to get everybody ready to get out the door and somebody's like playing with Legos and the other room were got distracted by the dog or you know, it wasn't always angry or malicious. It was just we called it. It's kind of like herding cats. Yeah, we used to call it, you know with the troop movements of family life, right? You gotta get them from here to here to hear it here off and when when the troops are not in the line, it can be real really complicated. And as I say wasn't always angry, but then there were a lot of Tears there was a lot of frustration there was a lot of aggravation and part of it was because I had and I think David and I both had unrealistic expectations. We were trying to hold our kids. To some Ozzie and Harriet standard of what we thought they should be instead of looking at an understanding and accepting and embracing the kids. We had and meeting them where they were dead. Right? Yeah, that's you know for me as a dad. I got a seven-year-old a three-year-old and a eight-month-old it's you know, like wage, you know my wife she's home schooling now, which is another crazy thing cuz I'm doing you know, I'm running my consultancy and then I'm doing these, you know these shows to help out guys and help out myself and and you know a tendency for me and this is for me when when I have I I don't I don't know what my kids have or don't have to be honest. I don't know but yeah, they're young. But when when they don't just listen, right just do what I say be a robot and freaking if I say put your shoes on and let's get out that you know, like I just I don't understand like how to get them to do that and for me, it's like one of the big dog Challenges is is I know that these are the things that need to be done for the day and you guys aren't playing ball. You're not playing part of the team. So now it's just like the stress builds in full force, right? I'm not Catholic but I'm stronger than them. I can pick them up and put them in my car. Right and and you know, they'll be crying and screaming and thought we might be on our way to church and I just forced my kid into a car seat and you know, they're screaming and fighting and boogies flying everywhere. So it's just like when you go to church and you're trying to work or whatever you're trying to do or go to a friend's house and you're stressed. Yeah. All right. Yeah, you're yeah, that's the day you just described it. I mean a couple of things came up as you said that okay. First of all, one of the same sort of code terms that we listen for the question. If you hear yourself saying why can't they just right so so I wrote a book. It's called the essential guide to raising complex log. There's a whole chapter in there about this right or whole section in there about this. If you hear yourself saying why can't they just when we say that we we're holding them to expectations that they are not ready to fulfill and there's actually a reason why they can't just write we just don't know what it is yet and so are job in that moment is to get curious instead of furious, right? So and I totally get it. I mean David we used to have this line in our house, which I laugh at now and I make fun of us now but we used to it was like first time every time the rule was first time every time when we tell you to do something we want you to first time and everything that is such an unrealistic expectation for a five year old or a seven year old or a 12 year old with ADHD life. It's just not but that's what we come with with these preconceived notions of how it should be and we kind of should all over ourselves and and and so we really have a game. To pull back get curious and figure out what's this kid capable of now and how do I meet them and help them move to the next level from there? Because they could have had a bad day or they could be distracted or they could be upset about something that happened and they're real human feelings that they're feeling and we're just trying to push them through and rush them through as if nothing's going on Thursday and that's not really fair. It's just it's we've got this agenda they are they are have the same agenda we have right, right. They don't care about my deadlines or not at all. I mean you can get them there but not yet. But but so when we're holding them to these unrealistic expectations, then then we create this Dynamic that sets all of us up for failure of right now. Yeah, so let's let's go there because I had you know, I had unrealistic expectations passed on from from my father. Absolutely so dead. Let's let's talk about this. We're raising complex kids and we have unrealistic expectations. You know, why can't they just guys out there fill in the blank blank? Why can't they just listen? Why can't they just clean up the wrong? Why can't they just obey? Why can't they just get, you know pay attention action follow my directions right fill in the blank if you guys are saying that listen up, right? This is this is for me to all right. So what happens if we if if we as guys don't learn how to learn how to be the curious and instead of furious and learn how to help them grow and develop what happens to them thirty years later like fast forward that for us because a lot of times we were just like we're so focused on our mission our project or are you know, it could be good things making money or non profit or this or that or you know, like but we're so focused on what we've got going on and no clue about what's going on in that little five year olds head, right. So so here's what I'd say, right? Yeah, most of us most of us have kids because we actually want to be in relationship with these kids and we want to be in relationship with them thirty years from now not just now. In fact the payoff is being in relationship with them thirty years from now, right? There's a lot of work those first fifteen twenty years and the payoff is as they become adults cuz that's when it really gets fun. Right as they get older it gets better and better and you know, just a note to anybody with teenagers teenagers get a bad rap. It's really fun to raise teenagers if you if you're conscious and you do it. Well, yeah. So the goal is to have friends when they're adults. So you could drink with them instead of because of them. Yes. It's I mean my kids turned US during a vacation last December and they said, you know Mom Dad y'all raised a friend group off that that's the ultimate success right is to have is to raise a family that wants to be together as a family because you choose each other over anybody else cuz you're more fun together. That's it. Right and most of us have kids because on some level we want that. We want that intimate connection with other human beings in the world that we're that we're belonging to and part of life. And and so what happens when we get caught up in our agendas and why can't they just sand, you know, it's not okay to make mistakes and all of this crap is that we could prevent ourselves from building the very relationship with them that we want to build if we are so focused on tasks over relationship, right? We lose the capacity to build the trust that they need to have in us to be able to trust us and respect us and and acknowledge us and ask us for advice. And and so this is I think you would ask me sort of if there was one thing. I wanted to say to your audience above all else. It's it's this it's trust isn't dead demanded. It's earned. And and I think this is a harder thing for dads generally speaking and pronounce to get a hand along but you have to earn your kids trust and you earn that by being in relationship with them by listening and and slowing down and focusing on what their experience is instead of just on what you need to get off the doing gets in the way of our being in relationship. Hi, I know that this is needed but it doesn't feel good. I know it's it's the trust isn't dimag it's earned and you know, we got to focus on developing the kids and leaving them with their a lot of times. I do not take my kids feel like if they get hurt or something dude sympathetic Dad. I'll come in and scooped up but when it's bedtime and it's just like okay every freaking day guys. We wake up. We do PE we read together you go to school I go to work at 8:00 bedtime Hotel. I cuddle you, you know kiss you but what what every day it's at what's different in every day? It's a fight on both those sides because it's might because what do they want to take more than anything else? They want nuggles snuggle Blankenship, right? That's all they want. They just want the connection. Yeah, I mean more than anything else and part of what happens Thursday. I think part of what happens is that is that like we have these different agendas and we don't slow down to respect their agenda. Right? But we expect them to respect hours. Oh, yeah, that's yeah, right and then and so then it becomes being over doing in that whole dynamic and so we're so the bathroom that comes to me the the strategy if you will that comes to me as you're saying that right so we teach a strategy called Ace right Acer Communications a stands for acknowledgement and C stands for compassion. And if you acknowledge and have compassion before you get to eat, which is Explorer your options explain, whatever it is, right, if you start by saying I get that you really want to hang out and I don't blame you. I love it. I'm having a great time too, and it's really time for bed. Now it's time to turn the lights off. So what do we need to do before you go to bed bath just that that one sentence or two sentences of acknowledgement their experience with compassion before you get to tell them what to do. Can change the entire dynamic because then they feel heard they may not want to do it but they will feel seen or heard or acknowledged and that's that's the core of connection. Oh man. All right. So to Ace this guy's right acknowledge and have compassion now, I'll tell you life isn't my greatest skill set. Right? I see the value and I do because on the flipside when I was a kid a lot of the times it was wage. You're going to be seen not heard and you're going to follow suit you're going to do it because this is what Dad said I said sir cuz I said so why you don't get asked why you do it like Geico is this resonating with you? Because happened to me write your do it? Cuz I said so because I'm your dad don't ask why so thirty years later when I'm you know, working in a dog. Or in business and I hear something and I want to bump up, you know buck up against it. I don't know a healthy way to communicate. Hey, what you're doing is wrong. Right? All I can do is either act out act out, So what are we teaching our kids? Right? Cuz the way we treat them is the way they're going to act in the Board Room or the bedroom, right? So we may want to pay attention here but acknowledge that life is saying and have compassion night that's good. So then you could explain or explore options. Right? Right. So so one more thing I want to say as you're saying that here's what came up for me is that my dad was the same way, right? And then my mom control became helping me cope with my dad, right? And so what happens in in modern marriages is often is, you know, dad thinks you're home babying him mom's trying to Cobble or be easy because Dad's being so strict and so now I really literally coach mom's to how to use Support app. Which your child into how to be relationship in relationship with their dad who is overly demanding unrealistic? Whatever sometimes I mean, there are a lot of reasons but but in this case, what what's coming up for me is you don't want to create a dynamic where you're the tough hard guy and now you're putting her in a position where she has to in some way either defend her kids, or at least help them learn how to be with you because you're being difficult. Yeah. Oh my gosh, and so you're setting her up for it and then you're pissed off for it. Yeah, I get to sleep on the couch. It's actually I mean, it's the cycle that happens and it's and I don't mean I mean, I also see it happen the other way, right? I see, you know, you got fun dad coming in Mom's handling everything moms in charge of everything and dad comes to gets to come in and play and then leave and so now mom's pissed and she's carrying all this resentment so it goes off. Ways I don't mean to say that it's just just you know one or the other but but it's this Dynamic that happens when we are not being aware of our impact and how we're impacting our kids and what the what the shock waves are in the rest of the family by how we're approaching it. Yeah, the I mean this this this is really dead. You know, I would say that I would say that I have great kids but I would say that they're complex in some way. I just don't know what way it is yet, you know, one of my kids is really smart. One of my name is extremely smart, right? And then the other one is extremely stubborn and Powerful but just very like peculiar like this is exactly the way I want it like my three-year-old. He's like, this is the way I want it. Why don't you understand that this is exactly how I want my day in, you know, like, you know, he's telling me what to do and I'm like, I don't understand you people to speak dog. Little people. They are a little people. What did I create? You cannot control what happens? You can only control how you respond, right? Yeah wage and they haven't really learned that yet. Well, I haven't learned it yet either. All right. So give us give us some give us some action items, right? Okay, so guys are good at okay. Just tell me one thing I can do you know and and we'll start to think of this. So we we've got the when when dealing with you know, complex kids, they the ace method right the knowledge and compassion. So then exploring options or thoughts plane more. Do you have any other tips, you know test for that is that let me just say that's like that's a game-changer. That one is really cuz it works for little kids that works for teenagers. It works with spouses acknowledging humans and having compassion for their experience before you tell them what to do really powerful to them works in the boardroom, like really powerful to the other one. I think that would be wrong. Helpful for for your audience in particular is to make it okay to make mistakes, like life happens mistakes happen if you happen to have complex kids are going to happen more often cuz that's just the nature of it and even with typical kids. Although I've not met many of them. I understand they exist mistakes happen. And if you can model being with mistakes and navigating them and learning from them and what we call failing forward from them, right one of the greatest gifts. You can give your kids is to not go through life beating yourself up anytime you make a mistake or conversely end up trying to avoid mistakes at all costs so that you can't ever make a mistake. We know what that looks like, right and and it I mean who wants to be with someone who is it's always somebody else's fault. There's always somebody else to blame and we parents come to us and say that my kids started to lie. It's like we usually it's defensive dishonesty. They're tired of being wrong all the time because if you have to pick on every single mistake, they make like at some point they're going to start making themselves, right because they're tired of it and you can't really blame them for it. And that's when lying comes. In fact, they're just afraid okay always sometimes they're lying because they're you know, they're lying and sometimes they're lying cuz they're really creative and they want to make up a good story and you know sometimes of mine cuz they're little shithead but but very often there's this defensive dishonesty that comes up because we've created an environment that doesn't make it okay for them to make mistakes. So for me, I think a parent the number one thing you can do is to model making mistakes like screw up and verbalize it without beating yourself up for it. Oh, wow. I took the wrong turn. I'm so sorry everybody when you're late show up and say yep. Sorry, I'm late. Don't tell them that there was a truck in the way or somebody blocked the driveway or like I'm sorry. I'm late Own It own your mistakes or your stuff and model that for them so that they can learn to own there's my favorite story of all of my kids are reason there's tons of stories in the book was what I call the pine cone incident when my daughter was in an apartment complex. They were living at with a ton of they were playing on outdoor plug tag Pinecone game and the Pinecone went through the window and a broken window in all the kids dispersed and my kid walked up to that apartment and said, can I help clean it up? And to me that was like the the ultimate parenting win because they understood that they could take responsibility for the mistake and not be a bad person for it off then went back and climbed in their dad's lap at sixteen years old and cried cuz they felt bad about it, right? Yeah, but but being okay with making mistakes and understanding that's part of life. That's that and asking for help or probably the two biggest gifts. You can teach your kids, you know, like this is so good. And I know the the the sneezing complex kids is kind of the the title of your book, but I think the the real meaning is Raising complex dad's right fixing fixing complex dad's 2009, you know, like healthier complex times, you know, and that's that's what I pivoted to in this whole arena is that we're raising people in complex times and it's the same stuff. Yeah. Oh my gosh, so good. All right. So as as the guys listening in on this, right, what is the what's the upside of a complex kid write you down earlier like energy and such cuz a lot of the complexity that the kid had his probably because of mom and dad or or maybe situational or maybe you know made but you know, let's just say it's from Mom and Dad or dad specifically what's the upside of a complex kid, they're usually not always but usually really smart often have a really good sense of humor and I can't like every strength is also a liability in every liability is also a strength. So for every you said you got a really stubborn kid right off that's going to be his greatest strength in life. As long as you help him learn to manage it right if you let it become an obsessive compulsive thing, and I'm not saying he's OCD, but you know like then it becomes a problem. Life, but if he learns to manage that he's really strong-willed and he needs to figure out how to how do I help myself get what I want. It's he's going to have tenacity determination. I mean, look at what it's going to give him in his life. His parent is can be a pain in the ass. Yeah, right. Oh, yeah, I could see the kid if if I help him become a strength of it that you do he can but as you age as I do I need to coaching like this is good as I learn how to help him grow into this strength instead of a weakness. Then he could take that God gave power and he could use it to you know, maybe be a leader maybe be just a guy who just will never, you know, never step off his morals because he's so determined and so like that's that's the kind of you know that but like if I do it unhealthy it could turn into a disease for him and it could just rule his life and put him in exciting and depression and fear. Exactly and that doesn't mean that wage. Causing anxiety depression and fear cuz that's all you know, some of that is hardwired for a lot of kids. So I don't want you to think that but I mean there's a section in the book where it came through one of my clients where she took all of these traits about her son that were making her crazy and she found the positive and she shared it. Right and it's beautiful because we really do have this tendency as walk-ins to look at what's wrong or what's broken or what needs to be fixed and if we can take that and reframe it. There's a lot of work in this book that's about reframing the problem in a different light so that we can see a different path to addressing it. Right cuz perspective matters a lot. Yeah, so the guys listening and what's the next action step? Should they? You know, should they go get the book should they tell the right to go get the book and then tell them agreed it to them? Like what's what's the next action step for the guys out there listening? Who go I can come on out here. It's not out quite yet. I do I do feel like this book is the easiest access point to everything that we teach. I mean we have this incredible robust website with resources. We teach a class called sanity school. That's amazing. I mean, this is this is a coach approach to Parenting and it's accessible. The reason I love it is cuz it's not rocket science. Like it's not that hard. It really works. You just gotta learn how to begin to tweak and get some support and ask for it and then if so, yeah, I would say everybody should go get the book because I think it's fabulous in and I think it's it's I spent a m. Out of years trying to boil it down to make it as easy for people to access as possible. Right and they find that it's on Amazon. It's called the central guide to raising complex Cod or they can go to impact parents.com. Okay. Did you hear that impacts parents. Yep, that's easier way to do it off. Okay, so that way you don't have to remember the long title. So so but I think the most important thing Josh is ask for the help you need there is no shame in saying I don't know how to do this thing. I need help figuring this out. And we we stand in our own way by not asking for the help we need when we need it. Yeah. Oh my gosh, we could do another show just on asking for help, but bag and we ran out of time guys is great. Thank you. Yeah, thanks for coming on the show guys as always reach out to our guest and say hey, thanks for thanks for investing in us. Thanks for sharing some advice taking time out of your name. To you know to to help us tell us if you're if you're listening and you're like, okay, I got a complex kid, or I think I got a complex kid, and I want to navigate to help them grow and to strengthen a healthy kid, you know, like I want to be part of this journey and try to make it healthy for both parties, you know, my ass juice you go, you know go over to the website take a look at their book by the book read it get your wife to read it, you know audibles coming in the future life, but you know, and then reach out to a guess and say thanks, you'll find all those links in the show notes below. My jobs asked questions and then kind of get out the way your job is to follow up on the actions guys. I hope you're having a great day. Talk to you all on the next episode. So you guys

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John McEnroe & Patty Smyth

Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

28:55 min | 2 months ago

John McEnroe & Patty Smyth

"Bullishness when general motors says that they aim to put everyone in an electric vehicle. They mean everyone. With evt's in all shapes and sizes for all uses hatchbacks compaq utilities and crossovers high performance cars and luxury suv's pickups and commercial vehicles all told gm will offer thirty new employees by twenty twenty five. Which means that soon everyone will be able to drive one. Learn more about gm's commitment to an all electric suture at gm dot com. Everybody in hi. I'm every woman. The host of the cut a new podcast from new york magazine. Vox media podcast network. Everyone's work to explore important provocative ideas about the world around us so far. We've discussed what it's like to move back into your parents house and why. That's actually an incredible. And empowering thing to do we've also talked about what it means to be a radical and society expects you to be practical and pragmatic. We'd love for you to join us. Subscribe to the cut in your favorite podcast app to get new episodes. Hi i'm phil donahue. And i'm marlo thomas and we're going on a series of double dates to find out what makes a marriage last the great thing about being with john mcenroe and patty smyth. There's no warm-up time needed you're in the middle of a conversation the minute you start. They're both champs. He's a tennis legend. She's a rock and roll chick and their personalities out as big as their careers. We kept it across town to their big family. Friendly apartment. On the upper west side of manhattan. And while we were setting up the mike's they were already going at it. You gotta stop wiggling because it's driving me crazy sound. You're making a chair. He can't seem to know that this is him barely moving. This is exactly. I'm used to standing up and running. It was fun to see them. Panter and petty sure is a match for him on the phil show. But here's a little cocky back in the day because is a possible. My said no would have sang on a fill. Get at it. You'd lucky for us. this time. They said yes. So we settled into their comfy living on just the four of us and their mischievous cat bobby are kicked off our conversation by asking them how they kept up such a busy pace. I would say was true for john. He likes to stay busy. But for good fifteen to twenty years i was working taking care of our six kids. That was my main job in an giang taking your john is. I traveled with him because he didn't like to be alone for long stretches of time so they brought the kids. Sometimes i didn't and i put out a greatest hits record. I wrote songs. I mean i did some. And then i actually i guess for the last eight. That's true. I guess for the eight or nine years. I've been touring more. Like in the summers but i was mainly you know the the stability home for the she was never with me during my main career. She's been with. After i stopped would've had a heart attack. There's a transitional period where sort of not sure about. What's going to happen and what you're going to do with the rest of your life And so it was very fortunate that i was able to find patty. And she sort of let me do my thing in essence which was basically as it turned out to sort of veer back towards tennis. You know. I i i was was having trouble coming to grips with what i was going to do in tennis. Because at the end of your career at least me you don't want any part of it and so it was like thirty five. And i was thirty seven and he was playing. These you know exhibitions south. I'm getting a lot of money for them. But i wasn't really preparing for preparing at all. He wasn't taking it seriously. But i said to if you're gonna play practice. And and when he did that he beat everybody after that then he was a number one on the seniors tour just taking it seriously. Taking pride in what you're doing at the top. I mean if you told me. I'd be a commentator and i was gonna play seniors tennis that would be sort of like shoot me now but also you were kind of just had that attitude. Like he hated the press he hated. It was all like the establishment. And that wasn't going to be him. I mean that was part of your thing. But lo and behold. He's like the greatest commentator that every came down the pike and also right at the end of my career was the end of my first marriage as it turned out so that next year was all sort of trying to figure out what the hell was going on and how this had happened and that feeling of failure you have about a marriage in in one in the kids to be okay because they were very young. Yeah when this happened so then. I mean you're taking it day by day at that stage so i actually was a lot of change so that was exactly why. The last thing that i wanted was to get remarried. The toughest thing about marriage is getting a divorce. Getting out of it took me a couple of years and it's just sorta horrific in a And then it feels like okay. I just want to go out with young girls who don't want anything basically. That's what i thought for a couple of years. We met the first time at a friend's christmas party. On christmas day was a setup but they were smart enough not to tell me about the setup or i wouldn't have come because i really wasn't ready to be too and it would be embarrassing but he walked in. I always like to tell us where he walked in with like a kid in each arm and one wrapped around his leg so it was pretty funny. You could barely walk for the weight of your kids. Six five and to come on how you. How can you resist that. So you like to have babies in your arms on. Everybody walked into room. He'd say gimme her and he'd he'd want i mean it. Was john a little bit shy. So i think having a baby made you feel like it's a wonderful thing that little kids in your arms. I mean there's probably it's almost nothing can top that feeling so i'm not. I'm not going to say that it was was not my move or i mean it just seemed like this. You end the three. It seems like a natural thing to do. Hopefully i mean when you're just there and you're not i mean you're by just with them you're with a maybe a fair amount of people may not know including the person who was sorta semi i guess. Set up to me. She was avoiding well. No i sat and talked to him for a while. And then i liked him and then i got nervous and then i avoided him. Did you like her right away to thought that we should think seriously about going out. Which is why i said. Hey i'm gonna be here for the week we should get together I'm free. I'll fight about this. Don't even let us. Don't make us tell the story not make us because he he's rewritten. Its and it's all gonna remember okay. I'm not doing anything for new year's eve. I'm not doing anything for saying. Hey wouldn't it be dominant you. We both grew up thirteen fifteen minutes away. From each other in queens. Yeah you go around the world and you wind up with a guy from queens. Which is what. I think is awesome but i think the thing that happened for us. I mean i would speak for john somehow. He saw something about us together. And i felt very safe and really really like i said this weird familiar thing i was in. La were the it's like. I always said like la. Like the viet cong number. You couldn't identify the enemy doesn't like because everybody's full of shit and flirting and and they're not. When i met john. That was someone i knew. He was a guy from new york. I knew him. He was very forthright. All they talked about was his divorce and how crush she was by it. And so that was really endearing and great and then we went on that are on that one day and then he came over the the second night we were together from from then on after that second night on our second date and i just was sort of still didn't believe in love in monogamy in marriage but i had some kind of faith in him and so i thought well i'm gonna go along with him and i'm going to i call it stepping into the river of john. I stepped into the river. And i let him sweet me along with him until i caught caught up. I realized this opportunity to get the second chance that i wasn't sure i was going to be able to get so i was. I'm proud of myself. That i was able to make that choice because at that time when you're still sort of just out of the divorce it doesn't seem like the sensible thing to do necessarily to get back into a very serious relationship but i didn't wanna do it either but then there was john saying you know like Trying to get me to move back to new york right away and he he just new to me i was like i got a brilliant idea. We gotta have a kid so that the other kids realize how committed we are and how much we love choice. Had that billion idea. It was always like you know. I was his shearer for everything. Have a kid right now. If i knock you up you'll get healthier happier or whatever that was your go to move. Think when you love somebody like them. You wanted them to have your baby overseas bigger than no. It's true so he was like. I want to have a kid but i don't wanna get married so i was. I didn't really want to get married. I was thirty seven. I didn't think i was going to get pregnant right away. But i did. I long to take you to come to new york. Well we can't i went. We saw each other all the time. I came back and forth the next school year. Nine months yeah. So i was already pregnant moved to melbourne it. Was you know she was spending time with her panga and then maybe early on in now. You're making me always leaving ruby. And so i was like halloween. I moved down to the house in malibu. Know he was like he's come a long way he was like bit. You know wanted tiny the way he wanted it. But i mean it's a pretty good. It's not like the worst scenario. i'm putting her into how to. Yeah right so every our loved my house. I loved where i lived. I mean it's not like i wanted to give all that up. I gave everything away. I mean it wasn't like no sacrifice for me but he's a nice house in malibu right. I didn't say for my kid. Trust right i use length talking. Yeah really do really love my husband. More because i realize we're not as crazy as the great john is just a scrappy as he was on the tennis court but patty hold her own with him. She sure has plus. She has a magic superpower use. It must be back. That pay is musician. Seniors of must've part of the attraction. Combination of beautiful woman and greg singer didn't play any music or singing. She wasn't playing music. I remember we early on. I was planes music with My friends i mean admittedly compared to what cheesy badly. But i thought like hey on up and jam and she goes i don jam and i'm like you're saying why don't you jam. It seemed like at least in my mind. It seemed like she had lost a love of you know what she was doing. For a variety of business and grunge came in there was just you know whatever in music in at cetera and so it seemed like she needed a little. Bit of someone like myself. Who knows a lot of energy right. That could get her back to may be loving what she was doing more and i needed somebody like impregnate me and just keep me home taking your kids because you know there was no like pushing me towards music. I suggested that we because i was actually playing more than she was. And that's when i was like getting pissed and then i'm like you know what you need to come home like. You can't like play tennis tournament. And then do a gig like do your gigs around here. So you said if anyone was gonna play music. It's made but i wouldn't it be amazing if we're you know i was in band basically so patty said yeah. We should play mixed doubles at wimbledon. So i go. You don't play tennis and she goes exactly so that's shut down. We'll have more after a quick break. It's crazy how much we have to pay for outdated impersonal healthcare and even crazier that we all just accept it. It's time to face facts. Healthcare is backwards. 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No way like the cowboy like day of a big time. The new big sky burger at roy. Rogers restrooms it's a quarter pound burger with smithfield old pork. Beer battered onion rings american cheese in spicy barbecue sauce corn dusted kaiser ways like the cap would have a catholic. Wrong yourself a big time. The big sky burger at roy. Rogers restaurants thorn ashen ubereats available at participating restaurants. Where back to our conversation with john mcenroe and patty smyth and one thing. We hadn't quite touched on yet was john's famous temper. It probably took me a minute to really hold my own. I probably let him push me around a little bit due to say when you're mad. Don't even be serious. I'm not allowed to anymore. Patty is a phrase. I don't give a damn about how i play they. Just you can't be syrian other. You say can't you just resort. Ironically the the thing that i said once my dad god rest his soul said listen. You don't need to do this you know. Go off in the empire's better than them just play. But he'd say like you don't need to do this you better but then he go but if you do do it. Because he's he was a lawyer and he was my manager at the time he goes don't curse and who else said that you mean like look say letter because i i lost control. It's like being. don't drop show. That was me not cursing. Fuck you stupid. Which is what. I wanted to set up in a loud loud dinner table. Let's say that my parents were together for fifty nine hundred Two younger brothers. It was living in queens living in new york. I just seemed like everywhere you turn. It was very loud so loud. Seem normal you know what i went to london. The first time in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven. Which is what i made. The semis a wimbledon. I was shocked at how polite they were. And how quiet. Everything was and you have to act. What is what these people. I thought they were weird. This movie about you was married to a man who seems to have the same. Trait fill does not take criticism. Well ever since we will marry the what would say. Is that a criticism. That rhythm destroyed me back. He had very critical mother. She did bother me that much but it did bother me that she criticize him so much. The i welcome to our house is beautiful ornate Totally animal faces on it. She walked energies up so halloween house. You know she just couldn't help. Everything was she. Irish catholic irish catholic. He's all i'm tired city. We're all tired. nothing alexander. Yeah i was wondering you have a mother or father. I would say that my parents were expected. Big things i mean. They expected me to be very good at school. I guess they said that i was a perfectionist. Without them having to push. Be one. I do remember being very competitive and driven to remember the ribbon and dry and pushed. You know not nearly as bad as other tennis parents. But i was definitely pushed. It seemed like. In retrospect they were perfectionists. Though his parents they weren't critical because his father worked all day went to law school at night and came home was he second or third in his class. He was second. Why my mom and say why wouldn't you. I five for lost me. That makes you a perfectionist. A lot of this stuff makes you who you are so that when you become a husband and become a partner to somebody i mean they bickered all the time amer like but they loved each other. I mean obviously the the key to success in any marriage. Is you have to compromise. And you have to trust each other and also hopefully have a lot of sex. That would be the three. Yeah that's it. that's i get that smart. Probably not early enough in the first marriage. Let's put it. That way would have anything to do with the person and the person obviously got your three or four bula and no matter what. It's like my. God what i said. That's okay but i i sort of you have to ask so then. So so how do you fight. We let the screaming and yelling. I look at you two guys as raising your voice but somehow none of your route. Arguments are lethal. I don't think you take any crap i'm talking about. I somewhat bemusing that. I'd be the one overall which i we said earlier that i would be more like cheeses calm down. We're not lethal to each other. I think there's a line. I i do believe there are things. You can't say like there have been some times. Maybe where we've said things you know where we didn't mean it and maybe we crossed the line. We'll go ahead and get a girl for or whatever you know or you know you said that. Yeah i probably said that to him. Yeah that's sort of the wimbledon of all. Yeah that's i mean. Well no there's way worse than that. I mean i think you ever said the d. word divorce lawyer said that word. I mean there's been times where You know we haven't said that the thing that he has said to me our whole life together is don't give up on me. I'm a work in progress. Don't give up on me. And then i started saying to him. Don't give up on me you know. I'm a work in progress too. Because you know i grew up with only women. I never thought i would be married. I had no idea how to be a couple. And it's been a learning curve for me. I was so independent and he was wanted us to be like this. And i was like i. You know it took me a long time to do that. Someone says second marriages is a triumph of hope over experience night and the biggest thing that patty did for me basically was allow me to be me. He needs a best friend and a conciliatory and a wife and a lover. And all those things that that's what makes him thrive and be a better person. John has the best moral compass. And what's great about people assuming that he's this like hot head is that they continually underestimate. How smart is now. Is there anything about yourself. Either one of you that you consciously change to accommodate the other one for years. It was like i. I the idea of me taking a girl's trip or travelling or going away on my own was out of the question. I mean john just could. He didn't want me to do it. He would get really angry at me if i did it because he traveled and he thought i should be with him and i should go away when he went away. But then my kids would be alone and so finally over the years now. It's it's dawned on him that my happiness. You know these things on my happiness. Yeah it does matter. It's not like like no. He really did think that. I should just be happy with him. All my happiness should be with him and a lot of my happiness is with him. But i get happiness from other things like my girlfriend's going on traveling to places that he wouldn't want to go to and also what did you change the accommodate. John virtually giving up her career. That's what ritchie accommodated. I mean that's the biggest thing by far now. She was the bit disillusion. But i don't think chain vision that it would lead to twenty years twenty years later where you're still like okay. I've gone through batches of did this to get over. That hump requires an incredible commitment. That because not only do the record. But you gotta set up. You know how it's going to be. I mean there's so many things your place in line you lose your saying. Well that's what you are you it it it becomes more and more of an uphill battle and And the weird thing is is being a woman and being married to john people Assume that i don't wanna work. They would never say that to a guy never know say i was like some errors they would never ever say. Why are you still playing tennis. Y you accommodate. I know you have to go to ask. What did we clear up like when you have a fight. Who makes it okay. Do you both do that. Well we both do that. But i round. I think i'm a little better at sort of trying to defuse it. At this point i think ultimately i've had to take the lead in that Panther as well some of it may be that yes. I guess that's a good quality. Change that i made because some. I'm pretty stubborn and sort of get an me to. It's hard for me to say. I'm sorry so and believe that even your debt. It doesn't matter. If you're right. I think to myself i'm eighty percent right. It's still like it. Show what ultimately. It's a hollow victory so that part was took me a long time to feel like jesus christ if you look at it in what i did for a living trying to put yourself in a position to get the odds in your favor as much. That's where you wanna big. So it seemed like you know i'd sorta feel like i'd cornered into thank. You know there it is. I mean it's almost all your fault but it didn't matter ultimately because it was still we're fighting and i felt bad and she felt bad or was like so. I think over time. I was able to put that aside a little bit and realize that's not the point. Maybe that is one of the most important ingredients in in in a good marriage is like you want be right or do you want to be happy like you can just be like okay. Whatever you know like. I'm wrong and even if you feel like you're right because a lotta times you feel like you're right but you're not. Is there something you'd like to pass on that you've learned don't try to change somewhat. I mean that would be the thing. Maybe you gotta do marry potential like marry. The person like he's going to be women are like notorious for that like you know. He's got the potential but like potential. It's not good enough but you can soften some sharp images but you can't in my sausages and and vice versa. Softens changes another. I'm pretty sure that neither john mcenroe or patty smyth these any serious changes at this point since we talked with them. Patty released her. Latest album is called. it's about time it's about their marriage and just like the two of them. It's in perfect rhythm until next time. I'm marlo thomas donahue thank. You can change the type of person the day he or she needs. You know you think that they have been double. Date is a production of pushkin industries. They show created by us and produced by sarah lilly. Michael bahari is associate producer. Musical adaptations of it had to be you buy sell wagon symphony marlow and i are executive producers along with me alot bell and lethal mola from pushkin special thanks to jacob weisberg malcolm glad well heather fain josh. Nour's carly miglio's eric sandler. Emily russ jason gambrill. Paul williams and bruce kluger. If you like our show please remember to share rate and review. Thanks for listening Have you ever wished there was a hiring superhero. Who could make finding great candidates easy. That's ziprecruiter is like minus the flowing cape only instead of fighting crime. Other superheroes ziprecruiter fights time you find qualified candidates fast. How fast well four out of five. Employers who post on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day bats because ziprecruiter's matching technology identifies people with the right experience for your job and invites them to apply ready to conquer hiring. Make sure you go to ziprecruiter. Dot com slash. Dpd that's ziprecruiter dot com slash dpd.

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How To Confirm That You Are On The Right Path

The Ken Coleman Show

37:11 min | 2 years ago

How To Confirm That You Are On The Right Path

"Hey podcasters, thanks for tuning in, and I want you to focus in on Brian's call today. This is a situation where he agreed to accom- package. That is not very detailed. What does he do next? You'll hear my answer and more of your calls that start right now. Live from Nashville music city USA. You're joining a conversation about who you are what you were born to do or you want to be, and how you can get there. In other words, we're talking about your purpose. How do you figure out what it is? How do you then? Get a plan together. Then how do you accomplish it lets the journey, going to look like well there's parts of it. We just simply will never know but we can get a clear direction. And from there, we can adapt. We're going to have to. It's not just going to happen with roses. An ice soundtrack. It's going to take some time, there's going to be detours is going to be pitfalls pot holes. Life's gonna throw a lot at you. But it is the journey that makes it all worth it. It's not just the destination, so let's get after showy eight four four seven four seven two five seven seven is the phone number. Now, I'm telling you, I don't say this every day. But I said it yesterday and I'm gonna say it more often, I just know there's somebody out there that needs to call in you've been listening show for a while. And the chest gets a little tight, because you listen in, and you you're learning from others. As they call in, but you're feeling this, this urge and your nervous or you're scared. I get it. But I'm gonna take good care of you. I promise you're not a prop. To be made fun of humiliated. No, we're going to be honest with you. We're gonna care for you and we're going to dig in you have the answers, a promise. It's my job to get them out of you. So give me a chance. I just feel like somebody out there needs to call right now. Do it. Eight four four seven four seven two five seven seven. We started off with Theresa who's on the line in Clarksville, Tennessee, sharia, you're on the Ken Coleman show. Kim. Thank you so much for having me. Sure gonna help. I was calling just to get confirmation of what my weak site could be okay. Tell me what you think of this, I think, is come in the doctor becoming a doctor. Yes. Okay. Great. So what are you what are you not sure of tell me where the uncertainty lies the answer? The I certainly seem lies the fat the what career I'm currently in which is customer service and I'm pretty good at it. And I've been waiting to get promoted, but hasn't happened this yet, but I guess I'm just thinking. Fearful of the test that you have to take and fill the mid, and ninety million and shirt investing so much money into the process because there's a lot of money. So so, so what kind of doctor do you want to be emergency medicine emergency medicine? And tell me why that is on your heart. What's, what's driving? Was rising is fan. Dead. I can help people help more people variety of people that help them to get to where they need to be, whether it's the different specialty that I can't necessarily cover at the time. But a new also, you know, this, this is just me so many people in so many different, you know, illnesses that you can count and good. And yeah, I wanted to hear your y but now we gotta really test this. So I love this confirmation question because we've got a look and see if this is actually something that exist within your sweet spot being a doctor. We'll get we'll get through the fear and the, the financial challenges and all the things that come with medical school. But let's first look at your talents. What are your top two or three skills talents drinks at the listening to your show, so much I wrote them down. So my talents I believe is asking questions deft direction teaching. Chinese listener pay initiative. Conflict resolution. We've seen thing against independent, which is festive and, and singing. Passion side of things. What's the work tasks roles functions that you just get so much enjoyment out of counseling, people finest Aleutian, a love, you know, medicine counseling, people know how to take better care of them sales on medical wise and advocating for people I love to research, and teach and that, that's it. So here's what's interesting. To me. I think you might have a role in the medical field and maybe a role in health nutrition, but I'm not seeing Dr in any of this. Yeah. Yeah. That's why I was calm because I it just seems like a like a like a dark spot on the white sheet of paper. Like so here's your, here's what's great. You are clear on your talent, passion, by the way, you've gotten feedback from people who are truth, tellers, correct. Who tell you the honest truth? Okay. Good. And they agree with this. Okay. So when I see that your top talents are asking questions, which what that really is? You've got a strength of a natural curiosity in you. You just naturally dig. That's a strength of yours. You dig in right? Right. You. You've gotta talent of teaching slash training conflict resolution. That was what you wrote on the talent side. I know you had a few more, but I just wrote those down and then on the passion side, you said counseling, others. And you said about their health and then you said advocating and researching and in that word teaching came back up. So what's interesting to me, is, is, I think there are multiple things that can exist for you within this sweet spot as true for everybody. There's not just one job. Let me say that folks and remind you so just one job or one career that exists in the sweet spot, the sweet spot is think of it as zone area. Wearing your door. Your top talent allows you to do something that you really enjoy. So I think the. It's very interesting to me. I see one thing that popped up that to me is pretty clear that you should at least do some research and get in proximity to people that are doing this. And let's see if there is some clarity and confirmation, that this is in fact, something you might do, but I heard nutritional counseling or some type of nutritional expert where you are helping people with their health by looking at what they eat. We now know more than ever about how food affects our health. Yes or no? So again, that's allowing you to do some research based on their body type their blood type things of that nature, you look at some of the symptoms and problems, that they're dealing with, you know, so I'm just looking at that nutritional side of things where, you know, you come in, you're basically nutritional therapist, or I don't even know what the title is. And I don't get hung up on title. I get I get hung up on function, what am I doing? So that's just one thing. I also think you need to look at the psychology side of things and just see if there's some interest there, because again, you know, one of my dear friends, Dr les Parrott another dear friend of mine. Dr Henry cloud, both of them been guests on the show their doctors but they're psychologist. Well, that's what I that's what I see because the problem solving is, what makes me think that it fits into the other things, so people problems relationship problems. Maybe they've got drug problems. So that's all behavior stuff. Right. So what do you think? Okay. Thank you right on George dot good. Well, I don't think medical doctors the play but I do think I do think what drew you to medicine is what's going to draw you to these other things, which is just helping people with a problem, whether it be nutrition or relationship issues or mental health or anything like that. So I think you've got some research to do on all the different ways that could fill you up, now, here's the last thing, don't get scared when you see that, hey, I'm going to need to get some sort of occasion, you know, I'm going to need to learn something, and it's going to take me time, don't get hung up on that. Because the question becomes, are you willing to do what it takes away it as long as it takes. I talked about, I'm every show dog about I'm right now. I'm telling you, so you need to call my friends at liberty university. You just need to say, I listened to the Ken Coleman show. And I want you to tell me more. He says that you guys can give me my online degree, whether it's a. License and certification all the way up to masters. So you need to least go see their website, celebrity dot EDU slash talk about every day. So I'm just going to talk about them right now. Joe? Because this is a perfect example of why I've partnered with liberty university here, cherise going. All right. I know what I have a general idea of what I wanna do, but oh my gosh. It's gonna I'm gonna have to get a degree. Yep. She most likely is going to have to do that. But she can start part time right now with liberty one class two classes, whatever the situation is an EMMY, she can cash flow her way through. Why would you wait five years to do it? When you can start now maybe only doing a little bit at a time. But then financially as you can get things moving things going better. You can do more. But that's why talk with liberty about coming to join the team here. And they did. They said, hey, we're in. We want to help as many people as possible, get that degree, or whatever they need to be able to live the dream liberty dot EDU slash Ken, liberty dot EDU slash can give them a call Theresa. Call them. See, I talked to kill on a show. Live the other day today. Just give me a ballpark idea. Let's hear here's what I'm saying. Yes. Medical school. And that's not what what the play is for ceriga. But that's scary. And he kind of schooling scary until we go. So you're telling me, I can do it over this many years at this pace initially and schedule is and I can still get there. Yeah. Yeah. You can't you don't have to pick up move everybody and everything from your life, and live on Rama noodles, and not have a you don't have to do that. So there you go. Let's go to relook who's on the line in Omaha. Nebraska reluctant. You're on the Ken Coleman show. Hi, how are you doing? Well, how are you with a pleasure to talk to you? The pleasure is all mine. How can I help? Well, I have a I work overnights, and I have a pretty taxing job, and very physical, and I've practically no life, but I mean I enjoy the variety of tasks that I do. And I somewhat like the people I work with. But I don't like the company. And it would not be in my best interest to move up within the company. So I don't know. I'm scared to leave for the unknown. I don't know if that get a pay cut, and, you know, ended up not enjoying the work that I do. I understand that. But that's all solved by just doing some research and we're going to stay in this current role. We're gonna stay there, and we're not leaving for the unknown you're going to leave when you have another job offer that has already been accepted, and you are ready to go. So he goes step from one boat to the next just effortlessly. Okay. So you're scared of something that you don't need to be scared of. So let's talk about all the things you could do. And what you would like to do, and all the transferable experience and skills that you have. And then when we do that we said, okay, well, what are some things that I could do? I start looking and I started talking to people in my circle, and you get some job interviews and you get those. And then while LA but right now you're scared because you think you're going to take a pay cut and you have no evidence that supports that. So what do you want to do? Take the risk. I guess you know. No, no, no. You didn't hear anything. I just said, I didn't say take a risk a risk is jumping out into the unknown. What did I just spend about a minute and a half telling you to do? Wait until I get a job offer. And look, that's right. Not looking now start looking in connecting now. And then when you step away from this current role, you're stepping right into something else there is no risk. So you so you love the task you told me you like the things you do you just don't like the overnight part of it, which gives, you know, life and it's exhausting. It's just weird for the body right to do that. And you don't like the company that much, but you do like the work. What's the word describe it, it, I'm a warehouse lead, though. Oh. Part of my day, I can be sitting, or at my night I can be sitting at my desk, or I can be moving around for half of the night. What do you do as a warehouse lead described that role? I give my team work assign them duties and also help them. I drive a forklift certified. So what I'm hearing is you lead a team of people in a operational environment. Yeah. Then you really enjoy that. Yes. Oh, yes. So we're looking. Here's the question. I have I just don't know Omaha. Very well fact, I've never been Nomo. But I'm just wondering are there. Any warehouse system back in type operational jobs. That they need a leader of a crew to come in somebody who's experienced and who has a track record of doing it and enjoys it an I just wonder if if not only are there, other jobs like that, I wonder if those are available during the day. What do you fair? They are, what wait a second. Second year telling me come on Jodi, she said that I hear that, right? Joe or my ears working rule. Can you just told me that there are other jobs that are similar to what you're doing, and you can do during the day and have a life and still lead people? It seems to me that, since though, you know that those jobs are there that what you need to do. Next is use my proximity principle. It start getting around those people that are in those places and start saying, hey, do you know anybody that knows anybody over this company and this company? I'm looking to make a move. And that's how we get the interview you get the interview because you've been recommended by somebody that knows you who can speak on your behalf. And by the time you show to the interview, they go reluctance great because X person X Y or Z, said that she's great. She's got a lot of experience and she's applying for this role and she's already been doing it, and now she's going to be even more energized. Because she's doing it during the day turns out, she's not a vampire. This is great for everybody. And then we're looking at, you know exactly what to do. I don't need to tell you anymore except that you need to hear from that you can do this, and there's nothing to be scared of. They'll start looking today, leap of faith. But again, I love the phrase leap of faith, but it's actually not a leap it. You're just going to step right into it. You hear me? There's no leader. There's the leap it's you know what it is. It's the shuffle of faith. Think about we're shuffle relax. We're going to breathe a love it. Amanda sitting in today for Madison, and Amanda shuffling behind the glass, I like that. We're gonna shuffle the Luca, we're gonna shuffle into go. We're gonna shuffle. Now, Joe is trying to get in on and he saying sachet now, everybody's got an analogy the point is reluctant. You're just going to start talking to people and meeting people and looking for those things, those are shuffled, little steps nearly picking her feet up and we're going to keep going into the current role to keep doing a good job there. And then the opportunity is going to present itself, so you know, that's what you have to do. We're, we're going to shuffle and just intentionally shelf or not running leaping jumping, none of that. And we're gonna find that right opportunity because it's their trust me and you have the power to go get it. That was fun. That was fun. Eight four four seven four seven two five seven seven is the number. Don't go anywhere. When we come back, more of your calls, this is the Ken Coleman show on Sirius XM. Hey, folks, I've been talking about this a lot on the show this job economy, is crazy hot. There are more jobs available than there are people who are unemployed, which means for you. The person who wants a better job, it's time to move because the times never been better. Now, it starts by having a strategy and getting connected with my friends at ZipRecruiter is a good strategic decision. That's right. Ziprecruiter dot com slash kin. That's where you need to go to check them out. Here's why ZipRecruiter is so affective that four out of five employers who post on ZipRecruiter get a quality candidate through the site within the first day. That's you you're a quality candidate. They have powerful matching technology that second to none. Now, if you are an employer and you're looking for those qualified people. This can change the game for us. Well, try ZipRecruiter. For a limited time for free. All you have to do is go to ZipRecruiter dot com slash kin. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash kin. It's the smartest way to get hired. And the smartest way to hire. Fullback, folks, the can golden show here for you. You have a role that has been designated for you. We're here to help you figure that out and then come up with a plan to step into that role in that s- the juice. I was on book tour the last two weeks and Joe one of the days MacKenzie masters. Who's a fantastic team member here at Ramsey solutions. She leads publicity efforts for me and we were in the car, Brian Amarine, who helped lead the tour manager we were out on the Allen somewhere. I don't know where we were we were in an airport in suburban on the way to something. And I was talking and carrying on. And I said juice, you know, thinking about what it just gives me the juice. Oh, I know what it was. We were we were returning from one of the book signings, where, you know, we, we had over one hundred people at the book signings is fantastic up, and we did a version of the Ken Coleman show, I just started taking people's questions, right there in Barnes and noble Joe and we got in the car. And at one point, you know, it'd been a long day, and I knew I was tired in apparently I was droopy dog you remember that guy Joe. And apparently I was a little droopy low energy. Yeah. Droopy. I was a little droopy before the book signing. And so they bring this up to me in the car on the way back, and they said you were a little tired, but as soon as you got in there, and you started talking to the people and doing the QA boy, your energy, just it was unbelievable. I complete turnaround, and I said, well, it's just the juice. It's the Jews. It doesn't matter how I feel. It doesn't matter how tired Joe you've seen this. The guy who knows me. Best is the guy that produces the show and Joe would tell you, if you ever get the chance of me Joe, the, there's something that happens to me when I get in the chair, and the Mike turns on. You could probably play a trick on me. Joe? He's probably some form of mind control. Something that you've done to me. Have you? Have you put voodoo on me Joe anyway? I get distracted. Here's the point. And they said, what do you mean the juice? And I said, just he just what you saw. You saw it happen. I come alive. Why is because my heart's full. You know, talking to you folks, every day on the show gives me the juice. And the juices available for everybody. Joe we have got the juice dispenser. That's what we are. I don't know why you do the trumpets, but I love it. I need that sound effect. When I walk into the house at night, the kids and the dogs would look at me like I was nuts, but I would enjoy it just for the effect. But anyway, the point is the juice. Right. What's, what do I mean, when I say the juice, you here we talk about it all the time, it means you full full in and you got the energy in its it, you know what it is. It's just the passion pulsating through your veins. You'll love it. So I want you'd have the juice to wake up every day, no matter how tired you are, or what has gone on the day, you still got the juice. So that's what we're doing. We're handing out hope in the form of purpose. And what comes with that purpose is juice. I need a juice sponsor Joe. You were thinking the same thing. All right. Everybody thinks it's good. So if you're listening out there and you work for a national juice company, you know how to find me. All right. Enough of that eight four four seven four seven two five seven seven Bryan's up next in Minneapolis. Brian, you're on the Ken Coleman show. I got the Jews Brian. How about you? I'm I'm looking to get some of the same stuff it is. All right. How do I help? He can got a question for you. Kinda wanna lead this off by saying, you know, the, the job in the career that now I get a lot of filaments of out of that. I really enjoy the people I work with but kind of running into an issue that I wanted to run by you and get your get your advice on this been in the role for about three and a half years. Now, when I came, you know, when I came in the compensation package that was presented to me. And, and I guess kind of the, you know, the progression of the compensation package. What I was presented is something that has turned into something completely different than head to have tried to have conversations with my supervisor about. It's and lack thereof conversations on on their end and I'm just kind of feeling stuck so I'm looking to get some advice on this. Well, okay, you had the conversation. What was the result of the conversation, the conversation was? You know, in, in, in either kind of some, some of them are reviews, some of them were just fake. Face in somewhere emails, but the, the follow up on every single one was well, that, that's a good point. You feel that, you know, you're, you're a great contributor to the organization, but I don't know what I don't know what in, in talking about compensation, or, you know, potential bonuses. I don't know what that's going to be right now, but it's been it's been three years. And that's, that's the result of the conversation. I've gotten time. Okay. So what was communicated? Do you can you be specific with? And can you share what was communicating? Yeah. I can I can share. So when I got hired ahead, the at the initial compensation that was that was offered to me, I was told each year, you know, we look at merit increases each year based off performance and the potential of bonuses. No, it was a discretionary bonus. You know, it's dependent. No nothing was set in stone, but it depends upon how the company performs and I was given some examples of that, okay? Sat down at the end of my first year did my performance review was told that, you know, or you're doing great things for the company and nothing specific was laid out as far as the raise. I asked about it. And he said, well, it's what I said, you know, before, well we don't we don't quite know what that is. And after that, about five months, it went by and I hadn't seen anything I asked so boy, let me get back to you came back. I had a sheet on paper on my desk. Basically saying thanks for your efforts. Here's a two percent raise no explanation on anything. Okay. So, okay. So you, you so the merit when you sat down for your cop package when you took the job, it was a base salary plus merit raises each year was at specified here. Okay. So no, it wasn't. It wasn't specified end ear or when it's in this is kind of turned into an every may saying, okay. Okay. But on the calendar, so let's get down to the I just needed to make sure that I knew everything. Because the bonus was based on company performance, but it doesn't sound to me like it said, if the company net makes net profit, you're going to get a quarterly point five percent. Nothing was ever laid out specifically. Correct. Correct. That's the problem. So you took a job with a very fuzzy package, in fact up. And that's what I'm seeing now. Right. Yeah. So at least they're consistent. I mean they didn't give you details when you took the job. You sit, yes. To a extremely ambiguous and unclear package. So all I'm trying to help you understand as part of this is on you. But there's a big part that's on them. Because you've now gone to them. Multiple times said, hey, what's my Compaq gonna look like? And each time they come back to you, and they basically tell you a bunch of nothing. Am I? Right. Correct. Yup. Yeah. Well, it's time to move on. You got one last fab at this yet one last stand in my opinion, and I'm only saying this because I heard you go really can I heard your brain say Rulli? That's what you said. That's the avenue of that. I think I've been going down the last two months now because the front, the frustrations have been mounting and, you know, like you said, to part part of it is on me, you know, going and trying to have these conversations but just don't know what's, you know what you have. I think you could take one last stab, if you feel good about it, and that's just saying, hey guys, here's where here's where we are. And I've brought this up before, and this everything there, I'd like to be here, and I'd like to grow, what's the growth plan? Look like so can we get specific because I know that when I took the job there wasn't a specific pay plan? And so that's on me, but I'm but I'd like to be here. If you want me to be here, I'd like to get a detailed growth plan. What do I need to do? Where do I need to grow that would give me more responsibility, more influence, which of course? Would lead to increase pay you just put them in a corner, very humbly and very grateful now. That's one way to do. But I gotta tell you, I think that's a waste of time. I think this is the equivalent of you asking the same girl out in high school. And she always she never tells, you know, but she's always got a really good reason why she can't say, yes. Well, okay, I would you know what that's true. I know you're asking me out, but I've got to do my hair, Saturday night, and so I'm not going to be able to what about Friday night. Well. I've been telling my mom I'm going to help her out with a project, and I feel like I've got to do it like, there's always a really good reason. But at the end of the day, she saying, no. And I think these people are saying, no. They threw you two percent. Well, thanks. But that is a race. So you got gotta decide what are you in this thing for where do you wanna go? What's the ladder looked like for you? Do you think this place has a ladder for you? I didn't it isn't feel like a ladder to me. It's interesting that you say that because it's kind of a company where you build your own ladder. And I've been trying to do that by taking on extra tasks. But like you said, I think you know, if, if I were if I were gonna want to be in it for the law long-haul that's the type of conversation where I would I would need to put them paint them into a corner. And I think that like you said, I'm to the point where that needs to happen now but yeah, it's, it's not it's not clearly laid out and that's part of the problem. No, it's not. And and you know getting up picking on your Bryant but a lesson for the rest of you listening in here. Don't take a job. That's not clearly defined not just the role but the cop package. You know, I think everybody wants to believe themselves. Hey, I'm going to get in there and they weren't real sure at first, but I'm going to get in there and just blow their socks off. And they're gonna offer me a great raise. Well, you don't know that you have no idea. What's going on up above these folks? No clue. So in this situation, you know, Brian cut himself in a situation where, you know, not very detailed not very detailed Compaq, and that would concern me, by the way. Concern me for a lot of reasons if they don't have a good and a good enough grasp on the business to project comp package for you based on how they perform that ought to be a big concern. So the other thing too, that star struck me Brian is that you said, this is a place where you build your own ladder. So maybe before you make any other moves you need to talk to some co workers, or maybe you're leader you trust and get a real, honest assessment from them on what they think you're doing to build your own ladder. Now. That's the part I didn't break down. We don't have time to do that. But I'm just going to throw that out there. If it's a company where you're supposed to build your own ladder than why aren't you building it personal responsibility here? Eight four four seven four seven two five seven seven. Let's go to Christine is on the line in pleasant hill. Missouri Christine, you're on the Ken Coleman show her how are you? I'm living the dream, and I got the juice Christine. How are you? I am. Wow. How can I help? So I am just trying to figure out kind of where I want to go from here. So back story is I have about a year left of school, just a generic business administration degree. But my current Cleese of work is not my favorite. It's very monotonous, and I'm doing the same thing every day systems or horrible. So I mean it's just kind of frustrating to going to work every day. But like I said, I have a year left of work, I left the school. So starting in January, I'll have to do an internship to finish up my degree so I'd have to leave wherever I'm at and December anyway. So I'm trying to decide if I stick it out the next to no six seven months, or do I maybe find a temporary job that my? My. Be a little bit better kind of stuck in a right? I get that. Well, the good news is you're getting out of that rut soon. So I would adjust ratatouille a little bit. But I, I would be fine if you can replace that income with a temporary job and just get you a new scene. A new scene. You know. May you know, but again, only if you can replace that current income because here we are. Here we are almost June, and you're out in seven months anyway. Yeah. You know what I mean? So I I'm fifty fifty there, I'm fine if you stay even though, it's monotonous, you know, may, you know or go with the temp job, you know. And see if you can maybe keep that part time job when you're in turning. Or maybe you stay in this current job and you find some little side hustle that you can make a little extra money at that will continue to throw off some money when you're interning. I just think you have lots of options here. And I get it that you're bored out of your skull. That's what's going on. And there's also no mission in it doesn't emission at all. I get that. But here's the deal Christine, it's not the be all end all it's not your dream job. It's only until December anyway. Right. So I wouldn't leave unless you've got something that replaces the income dollar for dollar nickel for nickel, and, and otherwise, I would just stay. And change your perspective. Waco. Hey, I'm grateful for this. I'm grateful that my bored out of my mind. Yeah. But the good news is you're not stressed right. Little because the systems go down pretty often because I make it stuck doing nothing for a while. Well, then, then maybe go find something else, go find a temp job that it's maybe enjoyable work or it's just such a new scene, and it's not such a frustrating thing that it just changes your whole perspective. So yeah, I'm fine with that. And congratulations for you. I'm so excited for you. The internship, that's gonna be great. Do you feel good about coming out of that internship, right into work? So I actually can't apply for internships until, I think my visor said, it'd be probably August before they open up for January. Sure my head a few of looking at. Yeah, but I mean what do you want to do when you get out of the internship? What's the role you want to step into or an idea? Oh, I even with finance. I already have. I have two securities licensing. And also my insurance license, so I have quite a bit of things that I can do, but the degree just opens a lot more doors for me. For me to find something. That's good thing. Have you heard me talk about the proximity principle? Briefly. I've heard you mention the buck but I haven't looked too much into the actual book itself. I'm okay with that. I'm not going to let it hurt my feelings. It was a number one bestseller on the Wall Street Journal. And I'm gonna give it to you. How about that? So you just hang on. And Amanda is gonna get you a copy of my new book the proximity principle, because you need to read it because this is going to position you beautifully when you come out of that, internship, and so there's a lot of stuff you can be doing if you follow the books clear path, the people in the places that I'm going to write about, and I recommend to you. You need to put that into practice in the space, you wanna be in while you're in school while you're doing the internship, and what you're gonna find is that an opportunity is going to be waiting on you knocking on the door. So that's fun Joe. That's fun. So even though we're doing the show every day, not everybody's heard of the proximity principle. They've heard me mention it, they don't know what's the best selling book. So here comes the obligatory shameless. Plug because it's really good. And it helps people you want to know how I started at thirty three in broadcasting and got to the national show all while running my own small business, and three kids and a wife and a couple of dogs, the proximity principle, which says, in order to do what you wanna do got gotta be around people that are doing it in, in places where it is happening. Specifically, there are five people and five places in the book, and then we wrap up with practices, one of the specific practical things you can do when you're around the right, people right places that are gonna lead to opportunities. It was a number one bestseller. Thank you to everybody who bought it, but we're not stopping because this is the clear path. It's the secret sauce that will lead you to opportunity what you do with the opportunities up to you. You can get it a, Ken Coleman dot com. Amazon wherever books are sold. The proximity principle. So there you go. And every once in a while, I'm going to give it away on the show. How about that Steve Jobs said for the past thirty three years? I looked in the mirror every morning. Ask myself today were the last day of my life. What I want to do what I'm about to do today. And whenever the answer has been no for too many days in a row. I know I need to change something. So today's question is it time for you to make a change our time is almost up? But before I let you go, you matter, and you do have what it takes. Thank you so much for joining the conversation until next time. This is the Ken Coleman show press on. Folks, I want you to check out our other Ramsey solutions podcasts, such as the entreleadership podcast with me folks can Coleman here with the entree leadership podcast. We are a community of leaders fly leaders, four leaders committed to bringing you practical ways to grow yourself your team and your profits every week through world-class interviews. We bring you access to vessel. Anne authors. CEO's thought leaders, coaches and more to help you with your life, and your business, you can start your journey and entreleadership dot com slash podcast. Or you can check us out at entreleadership on all social media YouTube, and I tunes.

Ken Coleman Joe Brian Amarine Theresa Omaha Amanda shuffling liberty university Compaq Nashville accom ZipRecruiter Kim EMMY Clarksville Dr les Parrott Tennessee Dr Henry cloud Wall Street Journal USA.
3/9: NFTs, Bible Burning Arsonist, Man in COVID Coma Has Permanent Erection

Hard Factor

45:07 min | 3 months ago

3/9: NFTs, Bible Burning Arsonist, Man in COVID Coma Has Permanent Erection

"Hey if you like hard factor and we hope you do and one create your own podcast. Let me tell you about anchor. It's free. there's creation tools that allow you to record. And edit your podcast right from your phone or computer. now you can even add any song. From spotify directly episodes the possibilities are endless for what you can create whether it's music analysis radio show or something. The world's never heard before anchor will distribute your podcast for you. So it can be heard on spotify apple podcasts. And many more you can make money from your podcast to with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast in one place. Download the free anchor app or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started like west was just down you. We love us in our podcast on anchor. It's free. it's easy to record. Edit from your phone or computer anchor stop feature. Though is that you can add any song from spotify directly to your episodes. Create your own radio station. Do a deep dive your favorite genre artists. The podcasts world is your voice ter- with anchor They'll even help you. Publish your show to spotify that can reach hundreds of millions of listeners. Got an idea for a show with music. Get started by downloading the free anchor app or going to anchor dot. Fm need some inspiration head over to blog dot anchor dot fm slash music. For some idea. Starters samoa joe man randy savage this factor in there is no one does a better now. Yeah nobody does it better. I repeat myself. Go ahead told me something right now morning. And welcome to another episode of art factor. It is tuesday march ninth twenty twenty one episode number six hundred and forty one as we said yesterday. Wes off celebrating his birthday. So it's me will pat and mark in the house today. Bubba is producing as well boys high feeling on this tuesday. Ready to go feeling great. What are the odds west. We're gonna take a trip to urgent care for. Torn ligament yeah. He's he's as bowling right. So i'd say like maybe twenty a ten percent chance. He injured himself. But there's one hundred percent chance he is gonna overeat because he's been bragging about how much he's been eating recently. Like how much weight. He's gaining. not sure to make a point of it. I'm not sure he's he's going bowling honestly because he texted me before the show and asked me how coming to america to us. So he's already himself in a house and good for him and fucking good for him happy with it. you know. it's a. But i don't think he went to the bowling too much stress turning motion too much stress on the whole l. He's nervous any ordered in and his watching coming to america to the pat nice shirt. That's the burn shirt the baby you had foretold that it was coming. It looks good bernard sanders. He's early one was taken in the thirty s when he was the mayor of Of vermont city of burlington vermont. Vermont city that's been decommissioned for for decades. Apparently that's a cool town. Oh it's so cool jerry's is should and burnish and groovy everything bro. Vermont's was it. The green mountain state people like smoke weed up there While we got what are we got well. Mark scott like a huge story in the middle so we got a shitload. We're just gonna cover all the best stories. Okay it's just a ton of news. It's a news dump as always on heart factor. Let's get going about i with i. Don't know fellas if you remember. There was a presidential election late last year. Do you remember that cute will crazy week. Basically it all came down to georgia and pennsylvania after several days of not knowing you want and of course as we all remember. There was a massive amount of mail in ballots in all states especially those two that took a while to get. There's counted after the polls closed. If you mellon nevada was mailing only also you did not. I have two impressions in a male in but mine was no choice everybody to vote by mail. You might also remember that. Bill clinton was the last democrat to win georgia for the general presidential election. Four joe biden. Ac what's that. what would you got bombed. Didn't win the first one in georgia. I know that a lot of those states in the southern area had obama for like one of the two elections. Georgia may not have but there were some southern states that had obama first election. Please fat check me real time. But i believe bill clinton was last before joe biden and well. The biden win. Didn't sit really well with the very republican state government of georgia who has now passed a bill in their senate twenty nine to twenty votes. You have a picture of what they're senate looks like that will become law soon that revokes the right to vote for no excuse remote voting so you can't no excuse mail and and my point is showing the georgia senate. There is that the state may have changed a little bit and its demographics from two thousand and five with atlantic being a growing city but the state senate and georgia is the same. The democrat the same there an white. That looks like it's been around longer than that. Bernie sanders picture on. Pass chest yellow photo from the same era. Yeah yeah so anyways mccain took georgia in two thousand eight. Okay thank you there. We go so under georgia. Sp two forty one. Voters would need to be sixty five years or older absent from their precinct observing religious holiday to be required to provide constant care for somebody with physical disability or required to work quote unquote for the protection of the health life or safety of the public during the entire time the polls are open to be an overseas military voter. One of those conditions has to apply to get an absentee ballot and george. Now sam basically you have to vote in person. How does this keep black people down from the people that brought you jim. Crow laws extended through this year. Do you remember the special senate runoff. That is a that is a law intended to keep the african americans out of power. So why now. Georgia is the question. Why are they doing this well. It's a good question. The bill was introduced in two thousand five. That's why i mentioned before when they allowed no excuse mail in voting and then the senate was like nah not a good idea any more after this last election. We're taking that back so good. I mean i don't think keeps anyone down pat and less. They don't have enough stations to vote there to spread out. They're not in the right areas. You're talking about the if i can't vote for enough in person voting locations and it doesn't keep anyone. I'm just used to georgia keeping the black vote or down. So i assumed that was the motivation. That's seems to be their their modus operandi. Why they're they're not happy with how this last presidential election went. That's for sure all told forty to fifty a forty out of the fifty states are seeking to revamp voting rules after the disastrous twenty twenty election. That left the nation reeling for multiple days without knowing the outcome and the federal house passed. Hr one last week which is basically a federal level attempt to block a lot of these state level changes that are being made in president. Joe biden has called on his administration in executive order last week for the agencies to submit ideas to him on how to expand voter access within the next two hundred days. So the the executive branch trying to move move. Things along within the administration's the house of wraps past. Hr one which is the voter. Voter rights act may have a different name as well But all eyes will be on the actual president senator joe manchin of west virginia as the voting rights takes the senate shortly. Yeah i've heard the other. Joe has his hands full with the new space jam footage anyway. But i'm not sure if you had that that picture. Oh so nachos he'd be sniffing lola number one that the old of buddy he's into this new. Sniffing whatever whatever's frontal joe's have their hands full and yeah i mean basically voting rights is the next showdown after after the stimulus. Bill clinton up. Let's clean up voting like well. Well it's kind of competing bills right so that the feds are trying to do it. One way in the states are doing it a different way way. Maybe we can all get on the same page out of really. Clean it up when everybody's passing conflicting bills. I don't think motivation here though is to clean it up. I is to empower their parties. Exact lines both sides. It's to empower their parties. You know guys were as much to blame as anyone. Because we've almost all but given up on the contact. So like i'm down with the compaq i'm still into the compaq mark actually Elected officials are to blame. Okay i mean fine. If if you don't wanna you know be hard on yourself. We were supposed to clean up voting ourselves with or at least say that we were get it just seems like technology is moving in a direction that it doesn't make sense to be like you know what we're going to double down in person. You know it just you know. I just don't see them only so males it's not like you're canceling mail in is the original internet. You know. now it's not technology. It's not they're just not letting you vote remotely anymore so The voting rights stuff is going to be a huge showdown. I think it's less about people like you. Guys were just mentioning and more about just the parties wanting to stay in power and this is just the two of them doing it as publicly as they can claiming that it's for the people the whole time when it's really just for their own fucking you know self preservation and that that's politics and that means of joe biden sniffen. Lola bunnies neck is so good. It makes me wanna hand painted portrait of it. Lucky for me. Har factor is actually sponsored by the best commission painting business in the world painter. Life dot com. If you wanna give a truly meaningful gift you've got to try pincher. Life dot com get a professional hand painted portrait created from any photo or combination of photos at a truly affordable price cheuse team of world class artists and work with them until every detail is perfect user friendly platform. You make a custom made order hand painted portrait in less than five minutes straight from your phone or your computer. Quick and easy process get a hand painted portrait in about three weeks from the time you order and go ahead and try to think of a more meaningful gift than a custom commissioned painting you can't i'm not gonna waste my time. I'm not gonna do that doesn't exist. That spoiler doesn't exist. This is the most thoughtful way to treat a loved one especially during these times where we don't see each other in person is often at pincher dot com. There's no risk if you don't love the final painting your money is refunded guaranteed and right now as a limited time offer get twenty percents off your painting. Twenty percent. Big savings and free shipping. Which on a painting. Fuck it's unbelievable. It's an incredible deal to get this special offer text. The word factor to sixty four thousand. That's factor to sixty four thousand text factor to sixty four thousand paint. Your life celebrate the moments that matter most and here's a disclaimer. Supply available paints your life dot com slash terms again. Text the keyword factor to sixty four thousand. Thank you bubble for the pro Images there yelling bubba painted those those promo graphics. Oh i didn't see him. I'm sure all stunning. Yeah like bubbas. Publish huggins. Those are real professional. Yeah to com well done. Oh pat even got the. You've got the promo code on their past given publish the promo code. Tennis scrunched up next to the a little too busy for your plumbing might have failed as spatial guys. Let's talk. nfc's or non. Fungible tokens nafta's hot in the news. These days hajj one. News has been hearing about these. The nfc's jo-john abbott known about enough tease get ready to Have your brain exploded and this. She has mega mega confusing. So i'm going to read you. What an. nfc is the definition from invested pedia. Okay non fungible tokens or our cryptographic assets on blockchain with unique identification codes and meta data that distinguish them from each other unlike cryptocurrencies. They cannot be traded or exchanged at equivalency. This differs from. Fungible tokens like cryptocurrencies which are identical to each other and therefore can be used as a medium for commercial transactions. Follow me now that really so that they are bitcoin's not bitcoin is like a dollar at. There's there's a twenty billion of them are twenty million of them right however. Many dollars earned circulation one dollars a form of payment. You can use it like a grocery store kind of but not really so. I used to work and that thinking of tea which is no food stamps. No i know what he bts no okay. So in this case either is different and non fungible token t here okay. Cute also. Financial vary not confused. The idea right guys is that the The token is for something unique. A one of a kind thing right. It's it's not like a bitcoin where there's twenty million bitcoins just it's a transactional identification code. The s kind of like. We'll get deeper into it. So the majority of entities that are being traded right now are via the theory and blockchain. So it's using blockchain technology. So what does this mean. Well empties blew up. This week is with the launch of the nba backed platform called top shot that trades quote officially licensed digital collectible so essentially digital trading cards with one clip lebron dunking going for selling for two hundred eight thousand dollars earlier this week so for digital trading card short clip of lebron dunking two hundred eight k. That's the stupidest shit i've ever heard life. Why can't you just download the picture. Will you can download the picture will. That's you can download for. What can yeah. So why would you pay two thousand dollars for yours. Well as yours when you downloaded from the internet is it. Yes not in the future not baby on hard drive all your not the future before we get into that and i'll explain that buying star. It's kind of like buying a star is it's like thank god. Didn't we go to all the stars on that one. It's exactly like what. I put my name on the perseverance. Except like all you had to do was just type it in and it didn't cost. This is ridiculous. Yes similar but different. Here's some other digital assets guys that sold this week and their prices so for five hundred ninety thousand dollars This animation of a cat that you might know as neon cat which classic medium so now. Someone owns that gives them we do because we're playing it right now. We're bubble looks like own clearly. Owns the factor owns neon cowboy. We get crazy right next. One sold for one point five million dollars. This pixelated drawing of a so-called crypto punk. So that's one and a half million. Just sell it for because we have it. Well we can't because we don't have the nfc code. We don't have the digital signature. It's not been recorded the blockchain that we're the owners owners of that You know but if it's not recorded the blockchain how could you possibly owed it. How did we get it well. I don't know it's crazy. I pulled some strings guys. Also this series of mediocre digital art from artists. Grimes went to auction and sold for about six million. Six million dollars boys. Grimes dropped some digital art fair. It looks like poor man's avatar seen earlier this week. That kings of leon will. Here's the art elegant that we're i saw some babies with wings on okay. This is grimes. And there's a slight into a mountain. That looks video game. That's cool like a sword in the stone except in the middle of the arizona desert. I'd pay three dollars for this. Where would you still don't understand. Why can't i just download that. He can't which is okay. Yeah but we're going to get into stick with me so you may have seen kings of leon a rock band who is so competitive that after being teamed up with one of them in a game of shuffleboard once. I quickly had to make an excuse. For why i to the bar because i feel like if i'd stayed the lead singer punch me in the face because i'm really terrible at shuffleboard. He has like a. I read an interview about with him. He's like gave gave himself an alter. Ego calls himself the rooster. We don't want to. That's that's for a patriot. Show i'll tell you it's all about my night with kingsley rooster. Wow what's her face. A the still is married to that. Supermodel vary from singer. Actress like a walk to remember and all those mandy moore. Tina bryan adams anyway. King kings of leon recently announced they'll be dropping their new album in the form of an t. So you can get this album. Fuck yourself sales great so the other thing. That's a real good way to open up. Your sales is only accept doj coins for it. Did something like that so that the other two questions buying. Nf t doesn't mean you get the copyright right. So if i drive draw picture mark says. I want to own that picture. He pays me a buck for it. I give them a work for hire agreement or some sort of Bill of sale now mark owns the capri to that nope not in the nfc world essentially. Don't get the copyright but you get the license an which is like an unbreakable chain of title that's it. It's just like monopoly. In the future. People can charge rent for people using their images or something one hundred. Okay so yes well. Let's get into it. So here's how it may in the future. Nfl dollar yet. You're not actually buying the art though. You're buying a piece of code that goes on you have to that blockchain and then like who's to say that i can't just make my own blockchain and assign myself the ownership of everything right. Start selling catch. We can't mark because that's a physical thing can only apply to digital better. It could be a file on the. I think the idea guys is in the future right. Okay so like in the art world. I don't know if you've seen that documentary on netflix. About it's called you look and there since you're talking about like one of the biggest art frauds in the history of art fraud. This woman. Eighty million dollars worth of fakes hurt chain of title ownership. Authenticity is a big issue with physical assets. With the nf t you can say like no. I'm the original of neon cat and in the furniture. Nfc stands for not fucking there. That's actually pretty good. But in the future theoretically you could like enforce your copyright law like sorry bro. You can't use neon cac only on cat but it's not recognized by anybody but that bitcoin this was the emperor with no close. It will be his holland visiting. Think the us trademark office is gonna fuck a like like agreed to go by the doj coin. It's not going to sit the teased. They would be so excited to do that. Would be so happy to do that. Because it would make their life so easy. Okay if they could if they had they have to put all of their own shit on it already and they would have to fucking like own the coin. The library of congress will be on the blockchain based yellen is going to take over all the coins. Take years marion. The government shit the annual. Take me several sessions to understand one other fun thing about enough teeth guys. Part of your artist right. You can build a commission into the nfc you get paid as the artist every time. The nf t changes hands for example this digital artwork of joe biden and donald trump shadowboxing in the nude by digital digital arts. People was purchased for sixty seven thousand dollars right and then it got flipped for six point. Six million people got a ten percent commission gift. Well so far. That's the best one. It's a great gift. But like i don't understand why just a naked biden a naked trump like duke it out so like in the future. Someone's like man. I want to see that naked. By naked trump. Meme or gift and they would have to go to do that. Owns its website. Because that's not going to happen though. Why can't you just deep like inches. Deepfake there's also so many steps from day that future mark like why. Why are people i can. What can i just deepfake mark. You brought up a really interesting point in copyright law rates so like if you change something enough comes a new copyright so that's you didn't notice a change the shade of trump a little bit exactly. It's my now and the argument of like how different as registered eighteen different coins than yours. So this is going to fail miserably. The best way to think about is for video games. It's gonna crash like you can buy like the world of warcraft fucking sheer and you have it forever. That's the best application of it. My opinion that makes sense okay. Each coin can be a video. I get it for video game like the different. You know shavers and stuff for your your vehicles warcraft. I get i get your sword. Looks like this and blah blah but for images on the internet like lebron james talk. I don't fuck and get it. Yeah the crazy thing is. People are getty owns image. Anyway people are buying the coin. Read like grimes put forth a coin a token to buy her entities. And then some didn't fucking by any art with it they just held onto it and then the market on speculation shot through the roof like cryptocurrency. Then they were able to sell their coin for more money to fucking insane. Anyway guys people are going to be gaming these things for like spikes they are they are. It's not so guys but if you want to check in more on nafta's and crazy shit. I i will have a better understanding of them this week on stereo so i believe i am going live on stereo tomorrow which is wednesday With one of my compatriots not sure which one but if you haven't delved the stereo up. Acp it's very cool. It's like a live podcast where you can leave voice messages and we answer questions live in the. It's totally interactive and frigging awesome. Sign up for stereo and give us a follow. Marx's heart factor mark wills hard factor will bless. His heart factor. West mine is pat cassidy. Been notified when we live. It's usually around five o'clock on wednesdays and fridays twice a week and if you stay tuned to the end of the show play a little clip of what a stereo is like. You can get a taste and yet join us. It's a lot fun. Go to our pages through stereo dot com. Slash iheart factor. Mark will weser pat and actually helps us out more sophie com slash. Sign up one of those. Url's follow guys the segments heavy one. We're gonna try out the race corner for the first time i mean. It seems like a risky title for a segment. I didn't really put a lot of phone to not pussyfooting around. We record this on international women's day happy international women's day yesterday were daylight But shout out women shout out pussies but now i must navigate four stories that are race related. First up we will start with the serious stuff and work our way to the comical yesterday was day one of derek chauvin trial show show. Wtn's the former minneapolis police officer who jammed his knee into george floyd snack for several minutes. Killing him may of last year. It's already starting to get fucked up day one so this one should be crazy to watch. Throughout on day one they were set to do jury selections and some other pretrial motions when the prosecution team requested to reintroduce third degree murder charges and then sent that request to the court of appeals which caused judge. peter. Kay held to send the jurors home early day. One because the court of appeals wasn't getting back to them fast enough so now they're like they're already a behind on the jury duty. They sent the jurors home. They're likely to resume jury selection today unless the court of appeals comes back and says we need more time to think about the murder charge. I had seen that the local government there had already hired like influencers in advance anticipating this to be a complete shift ended up not doing that. Well i certainly didn't show it's going to show you the way. Sixteen of the fifty potential. Jurors were already dismissed from their answers in the questionnaire so sixteen people failed the impartial test. Either because they are impartial or didn't want anything to do with this probably lengthy trial and filled in horribly on purpose. Like this'll get me out of this will get me out of it this of course if you're in a job that you absolutely despise this on right yeah people ask for months people right in the question What makes you horny and the answer. It dead bodies and that will get you out of jury duty. Yeah nine times out of ten. I answered mine and semen just filled in the bubbles with a little bit of pre calm. I forget how. I got a jury duty last night but it was. There was a question on the texas form was just like a clear a clear one that was just like if you answer it one way they. There's no chance they would select you. So i forget what it was that option. And what's that baby shouldn't just covering for spring makoni and get you right out. Yes so already. Sixteen jurors gone few other. Things happened our show. Wtn's defense team asked the judge to reverse his decision to throw out. George floyd two thousand and nineteen arrests as part of the trial as they say it's relevant and They asked that the autopsy from the independent doctor. The floyd family hired not be allowed in only the county medical examiner's topsy be allowed for testimony. We're not going to get into the details of this case by. Like i just did that would take too much time but you can watch it online. Actually that it's like you can go and watch the trial in its entirety. I think online. Also lastly on this one as you saw the picture earlier if you're on youtube There are hundreds of protesters. Three hundred to be exact That gathered outside the hennepin county. Government center minneapolis minneapolis. Where the trials taking place as can be expected throughout probably probably only going to be more. Oh yeah so yeah next up jefferson unless you guys you guys go without one weiming. We'll see how it plays out. I think everybody's been nervous for the stroud start rightfully so because that's going to be highly Charged for sure and then regardless of outcome. It's probably going to be intense like you know like whether like for in any way whether it different communities are going to be like you know have a big reaction no matter how plays out agreed. We'll keep an eye on it. We'll keep you keep you up in next up jefferson circuit court judge ola stevens on monday. Granted the local prosecutor's motion to dismiss all charges against kenneth walker. Who was the boyfriend. And brianna taylor i so it was for the shooting and wounding a police officer and the tragic incident where the cops know knocked and shot and killed twenty six year old briana taylor and walker shot and injured a cop. I think he shot in the leg. I forget but he is permanently been dismissed all charges and cannot be recharged. He was originally charged with assault and attempted murder and now is completely in the clear. No drugs were found inside the house. The night of the raid and no officers have been charged in taylor's death all right ready for some months. Yeah that's a good one to fundraise stuff that is good except for the you know the no officers charged and some other stuff to wait the ending. There wasn't so good for kind of good for at least they're not going to charge. At least they're not going to charge the guy who john exactly all right guys papa. John disgraced founder and former employee of papa. John's did an interview with one america. News network where he says was. Let's just play the clip bubba sneering your good name. How did you feel at the time when you were seeing these headlines. State of shock Unbelievable i couldn't understand it. I i mean again. We have a public land that paints the chairman of complicit passive or active paint the founder as a racist. They always not a racist. It's just unbelievable. And i used to lay in bed just going. How did they do this. And we've had three goals for the last twenty months to get rid of this n word in my vocabulary in dictionary and everything else of because it's just not true out how they can team has it's not true. How twenty months to get it out of to get it out of his vocabulary. Because it's not true one twenty-one try to scrub the n. Word from his cabinet not true in what our university thank god. Oh a. n. To say that with like oh a ends like child anchors that like our fresh college interviewing papa. John saying. He's a odd man. It's been a hard twenty. I'll be honest with you every day. I mean couldn't have asked them to live. Could it have to scrub his mind. Even thinking right there why is he. I don't even. What does he been doing for twenty months. What is he taking. Roszak test with pictures of black actors faces at is being forced to blurt out the first thing that he thinks biting his lip shocking when he says the n. Word you see what is what is doing for tyler often. Did you say it before. Like every didn't don't say don't say it like what was what is he practicing. How what does he mean. He spent twenty twenty months trying to get thrown curve. Balls telling them that they're playing a wonderful life and then putting on friday. Television racist jokes advocate drop. Drop one sean. Pictures of black santa. He's like bastards. Leaving articles saying john remains to be just absolutely insane. Shit better how long stays out of the public eye. Every time he comes back. he's just such a wild card. Hey i say keep practicing papa. You got this before you know it before you know it might even end up that you feel like you're black on the inside anchor chris cuomo. That's the ultimate. That's the last step of the papa. John recovery program is just say what chris cuomo is one about the tell us what he said once he feels like quotas. He's in the clear so look well. Why don't we just roll the clip of what cnn anchor. Chris cuomo just look in atta the window. Watch asphalt grow back with all looks hand. Words good died on black on the inside. So yeah i mean guo. Cuomo's fun there. I mean look. I don't think it's a huge deal. But i mean why you don't have to say i mean most john mayer himself a little bit there. He not nearly as bad were john mayer said. I have my own car. Because i play music better than a white guy claiming to be kind black because he likes black music. Nothing better than that. Well it's because he was connected with his buddy don lemon but it's also come out pat. You're in the music industry you've been around. It was dull this move stuff. I love blues more. That i love anything else. Actually like it's a major move of a of a progressive white guy who thinks he's woke he was so himself. this is a classic one. Maybe call your brother and get a one on one interview where you both crying. And he confesses to be a groupie greg Instead you know this is a move. This is a move pulled by lame. White guys everywhere. All the time marches took. Name greg off my baby. Name list goodwin. Gr's to get komo's like trying to like relate or whatever but isn't that like like being such like a ridiculous thing like isn't that kind of relating it's kind of it's kind of like almost offensive spoke internet's on this. I think it's pretty stupid. Cuomo did apologize on twitter saying this. He said with all respect to reality and our need to fight this amplification of color animus. There is no understanding what it is to live as a black person in america if you are white but it is so important to listen. The majority must change racism and look. I agree with the sentiment there. We need to listen and that we don't know what it's like growing up in america black and we have a long way to go. I think papa. John's going to even get there and i think he wants to most people i think we're all he's the good fight his he'll never cuomo's mind like somebody like bob. John could never get to komo's level. Cuomo is separated himself mentally from he he is. He's reached a new level of woke. Then walmart could really understand. It's because the music you love. Well he started having too good at time that can have he got carried away with what a good time. He was having been progressive with us. Buddy don lemon so move not sadly on string the guy up stupid one has room to grow. This reminds me a lot of my credit card debt. It's out of control since i remember. But after educating myself on light stream and debt consolidation things have taken a turn for the better for the average interest rates on credit card. Debt are over seventeen percent. Apr have you looked at your interest rates lately with livestream rates started. They're not yet the terrible straight through the credit card. it's pre livestream. I was at like nine thousand nine hundred twenty ranch with light stream rates. Start at just five point nine five envelope in the mail. It just tells you your. Apr's gone up another twenty percent or whatever ask us what interest trip because we we found out your credit still you know what fuck them but not livestream. let's start just five point nine five percents. Apr auto pay excellent credit. Plus the rate is fixed so it will never go up over the lifetime of the loan get alone from five thousand dollars to one hundred thousand dollars with absolutely no fees. You can pay off your student loans credit card debts. You name it. It's so important to do this now as soon as you can. Guys and girls one payment and a much lower industry is the way to go. Consolidate your debt very important. You can even get your money. As soon as the day you apply with light stream and just for our listeners apply to get a special interest rate discount and save even more the only way to get this discount go to light stream dot com slash factor. That's l. i. G. h. T. s. t. r. e. dot com slash factor. Better read a quick disclaimer. Here subject to credit approval rates are inch five point. Nine five percents. Apr to ninety point. Nine nine percents. Apr include point five percent auto pay discount. Lowest rate requires excellent credit terms and conditions apply and offers subject to change without notice visit late stream dot com slash factor for more information. A kudos on that graphic that one look i'll give credit where credit's due looking. Graphic spacing is phenomenal. The key the karen could deliver better on the text but generally the was that transition. Okay i thought it was like. Oh i'm going straight from joking about credit as beautiful. I remember what was the last subatomic really easy to talk about right east. We're gonna keep bringing back not race corner smell a recurring segment. All right from dairyman atom comes a tale about a book burner in texas. And if there's one thing you don't do it's burnt a book in the free state of texas and if there's a second thing you definitely don't do you don't burn a bible in the lawler state. That's bible belt territory. They're not gonna take conley. Do that down there in texas. But one unnamed woman and san antonio learned that the hard way this last no less on sunday. On the lord's day on the lord's day san antonio firefighters were called to mid tap mid crown drive near park village. Elementary school on the far northeast side of town around seven thirty. Am sunday morning. You know just before church hours there for reports of a duplex on fire. So that's the cops came to witnesses. Say that a woman set fire to a bible in her own backyard of the duplex which then started the duplex on fire and then jumped from the from the bible to her home and then the next home the neighbor some of them assuming the joint home the bible. The bible burnt the house down. Well she'd bird the bible which burnt the house accelerate. Exactly no no no word on why she was burning the bible but it did all told leave about one hundred and fifty thousand damages to the duplex so now a man named john bailey and his sister and they're five dogs are living at a temporary shelter until the city could find a new home or they can live with relatives and the unnamed woman is in custody for arson. But i'd be more worried about the smyth from god if i was her. Because that's coming you told me. Texas doesn't have like a bonus charged for burning a bible. Because you know how we're always like well you know. A crime has to occur to think of it for it to be a crime. I feel like they would have preemptively. Covered burning a bible in texas think. They might throw the book at her. Oh there you go. Here's what john bailey said he said lady came and knocked on the door banging on the door and she says oh fire. It's on fire for bailey said before adding that he hopes some of his relatives have empty beds after this random arson attack by a crazy lady who hates the bible. So that's That's what's going on in san antonio don't burn byles. That's wild badly. Yeah it was like joe. Biden's bible eddie sworn on Burnt down a city block. Our guys finally shot andrew parker for this next story from the daily mail gentleman earlier this year. I joined a covid nineteen support group on facebook in the hopes of doing a blog about hypochondriacs. Going nuts by saying things like quote and this is from joe. Mary pierce anybody noticing foods normally digested showing up in their bowels onions beans casings. Typically vegetables related to covid symptoms or he said bean casings. Yet fibers could be caused by covid. Those things that never show up in your house right or tara yeary king said does anyone on a business and find that there are no longer able to operate it properly. I held an insurance company in these clients. Expect me to be there at their worst moment and had to protect them and the things they work so hard for it. I'm getting further and further behind desperately trying to catch up. The cova lady forgot how to do our job because cove exactly yep so yeah. Those are a couple a couple of things. I saw lots of different symptoms of people had cova both real and fake covid toe for example being one of my favorites. Was that real a fake. I don't fucking know but it was a bunch of people posting photos of their little tari. They're like they claim that. Like if your toes read you had covert or something. There are a ton of people that had third. kit is. anyone notice is that they're getting short shorter and shorter and bad with how long that can last or like yeah covert. I'll throw him out. One day i got. I got a hell of a collection masturbating toy today. That cogan most embarrassing things talking about being cases in their shit. What are you talking. It gets worse but anyway guys but those are some of the symptoms is on covert support. Group I never did the blog. Maybe i'll put him out some day. But thank god i never saw. Anyone described what the subject of our next story had to go through. After he caught the rona. A sixty-nine year old ohio man was admitted to the miami valley hospital back in august with severe breathlessness and inflammation which had caused a fluid to build up inside his lungs. The patient was obese now. So they sedated him and put him on a ventilator when is conditioned two tier raided. His long started a fail this after ten days of treatment. So medics had do something. They placed face down on the prone position for twelve hours as an emergency technique to help get air around his body was implemented. Get those laws working right and the surgeon must have been really attractive or something because when he was turned onto his back later in the afternoon nurses noticed he developed a erection like a solid diamond cutter. This thing was really impressive. Swore on the on the heart. It was redefining erects a four point. Oh this was a ranger boys. It's gotta prove that you're cold. It's done though right like you're popping a would that you're ready to go unfortunately not well An ice pack was applied to the patient's penis to try to bring the swelling down. But the stiffness persisted for three hours. One hour borough the guy the warning on television so hot right. Yeah so guys. The medical staff tried everything to soften this man's direction they put on a baseball game. They called his mother on speakerphone. They even put a picture. Larry king next to his bed. But this boehner juiced. I hope the whole time is like this thing. Go down the kid they leaked. Try to suck it. Somebody's gotta take care of this. Mark tried everything. Well it turns out. This man's tried and truth about that right. This man's raucous ranger was the cause of a blood clot. That had blood clots in his donkey. And doctors were left with two options and ended up choosing the less fun and they popped his stimulus package with a needle draining. It of all the blood a blood orgasm. What was the fun with. What was the better option. The other one that we get rid of the boehner yes suck it. Why did they let jerk off. He was sedated he was ventilate shit they needed to. They needed to release a man. That's fucked up. Yeah it's unfortunate. Because he later died when his low his lungs failed. I bet they wonder if things would have turned out different if someone did just manned up and giving this poor bastard a hand job you know. He's like he's they won't even blow me when i'm dying. So he what are they have the little that he probably was horrible. What hospital was this miami valley and that's going to do it for hard factor guys there. Don't send your loved ones remember. You never know when it might be someone that. You're carrying fours last opportunity to orgasm and i want. I want to leave you with those words. have a great fucking day. Two thousand among good times is regarded on taste for a live audience.

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People Have Been Convinced Robots Will Take Their Jobs For Centuries

Ridiculous History

49:47 min | 7 months ago

People Have Been Convinced Robots Will Take Their Jobs For Centuries

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Or wherever you get your podcasts ridiculous histories of production of i heart Welcome back to the show ridiculous historians thank you as always or tuning in. Please do not leave. The podcast on the ride has come to a complete stop. I'm not gonna do that voice the whole time But i thought it was cool to start that way. My name is ben bleep. Bleep bloop bloop blah. My name is no We're talking about robots today romans and we're We're doing it with the The digital spiritual guidance of super producer casey peg rem longtime listeners to both this show and our other shows stuff. They don't want you to know you probably know that. A lot of people have been worried for a while now about the idea that increased automation and increasingly sophisticated. Robots and artificial intelligence programs. Will one day drive the organic meat bag of humanity out of the employment market. It's something that we've we've talked about extensively and we're not going to be too conspiratorial. Today of we are here to tell you that this fear of the rise of robots dates back much much further than many folks might imagine. No what do you think of when you just when you hear. The word robot think i tend to conjure the image of the classic robot The sort of tin man ask model of the robot You know A metal being a humanoid type thing That has sort of herky-jerky movements possibly some sort of antenna An automaton lightbulb bulb is may be totally. Yeah yeah the that kind of retro futuristic nine thousand nine hundred fifties era robots Maybe the made from the jetsons or Maybe the The automaton in the fantastic film metropolis. It's weird because for most of us listening to the show now most of us humans at least The were robot or the concept has been around all of our lives but the word robot is fairly recent this language of hours it comes from a check author a novelist. Playwright named carol chop pack. He was born in eighteen. Eighty away one thousand nine thirty eight. In nineteen twenty he wrote a play called are rostrums universal robots and this is where we get the phrase robot from the etymology is pretty interesting and not super optimistic. No it it it came from. You know the period in history where serfdom was thing and this idea of like lords and serfs and having a manner and having like the lower class essentially being indentured servants that would you know Work for the right to subsist on the the manor on the land of like the upper class You know doing kind of lowered class peasant type work the kinds of things. The upper crust would never deign to do The idea that you're paying your way by doing this forced labor and it kind of created this construct in the zeitgeist That you can see in things like mary. Shelley's frankenstein or the legend of the golem which was a yiddish check. Kind of folklore thing this notion of this sort of man made You know creature that would do the bidding of its master and are you are really crystallizes that and becomes a very early science fiction work in that it describes this creature as a worker who quote lacks nothing but a sole and it would perform tasks it was it was meant to be know mass produced to do the bidding of man and compaq initially called these creatures laboriously and that was of course the latin root for the word labor but he wanted something that was a little sexier and he thought he sounded to quote bookish and his brother yosef came up with the word robot eighty and the english of course is robots and you know surprise surprise in in the The twist of the century that now we see like almost cliche like such trope. The tommy johns in the play ultimately revolt against their human masters causing a genocide of sorts The uprising of the robots and that it was meant to be a political kind of work it was describing the plights of these lower class. People these these indentured servants and the idea. They're going to be able to revolt and in fact. If i'm not mistaken ben compaq was also kind of describing the rise of nazism and he was persona non grata to gestapo and hitler himself and actually ended up like on their list of you know kill on sight. He had a death warrant out on him But i guess. Unfortunately for hitler He didn't have the pleasure of carrying out that death warmed because in one thousand nine hundred. Thirty eight Coptic died of the flu at the at the age of forty eight which is terribly young. Also topic described or you are routinely as his least favourite work. Even though it is by far is most well known today and audiences disagree with topic. It's probably is most popular work for audiences. People love the play across europe and the us. It should go without saying that. Shortly thereafter robots became the number one love of mini science fiction authors. I mean just consider everything. Isaac asimov did with the three laws of robotics which later find themselves in a non fictional work by robot assist and people who are working in the field of a and with each new story about robots become a little bit closer to human. At least that's that's the trend incense since this origin point of the term robot. Which as you mentioned it explores the kind of the creation myth that we see also in frankenstein or the idea of the column. That man could make something the way that god made man with this. There comes this fear. Are we going too far as a species. Have we crossed some sort of metaphysical line or some sort of line of divinity people have been terrified that robots will take all of the jobs on the planet for more than two centuries way back in nineteen twenty one new york times had a book review called. Will machines devour man and you can see the illustration here. Just look it up online. It's accompanied by this picture of a person. Being fed into a sausage grander and then there are other things like there was a drawing called vision of the machine age that showed thousands of people cowering under these gigantic mechanical cogs and gears worker ants ghost in the machine of their own design. So we often have this implicit assumption that robots are gonna be kinda humanoid right that they're going to have a torso with a head two arms two legs same number of limbs as a human However nowadays many real robots we see kind of have that schematic from the the waist up the first ever real robot real humanoid robot was built by guy named ron wensley in nineteen twenty seven The robot was named herbert televised so shout. You herbert Herbert could do the following. Herbert could lift the receiver to get telephone call and operate switches Which was a big deal because that was a profession. You know switchboard operator And they could see how this would would seemingly Put a lot of those people in a state of anxiety or it's like well. What am i gonna do for the robots hoops because that was specialized training. That went into that type of job to be able to operate the switchboard's and if all of a sudden you're not needed anymore what do you do then This robot couldn't speak or communicate really. It was very task. driven Eventually was updated where it could say. Two simple sentences On the phone. Like you know which again we're we're there. We don't have switchboard operators anymore. And all that stuff is automated. And it's definitely not like a humanoid robot in a room with limbs and a voice but it's all like in the cloud or it's in computer service so the most important feature of herbert. Vox was its ability to listen Because it had a very sensitive microphone that was placed close to the telephone receiver and then it could then respond based on these voice commands that idea voice commands. Seems like a really modern thing but it wasn't. It really was like in the earliest days of this type of computing and this type of robotics. it would respond to sound and pitch and these would then communicate. This information would communicate to The machine and give it an a corresponding set of instructions that it could then act out whatever task was was asked if it a very simple obviously very rudimentary Based on the appliance that it was using yeah and this was just the starting point for westinghouse electric and manufacturing company. They went on to create a thing they called electro the motoman in one thousand nine hundred thirty seven and yes that's electro with a k. A lot of people will tell you. That's the first real humanoid robot. Electro was created by joseph barnett made from aluminum and steel and capable of performing twenty six different things. They called routines waking up talking counting and of course smoking because it was the nineteen thirty s. And there's actually a clip. We could play really quickly from a demonstration of the motoman. I believe it was at the nine thousand nine hundred thirty seven world's fair by now electro. I know you enjoy these. And i really going to try to give nice pleasure out of these so here we are got that now hold onto. You may now smoke this cigarette. Go on the whole yes electoral. You do need light to. Don't all right here. And he's only two years or to just learning and clip came from a youtube video posted on odd history Called electro the smoking robot and i commend checking out the whole thing because it shows the schematic of like what the design of this thing was. And it's you know very rudimentary a lot of gears at actually had they photo electric tube to detect different colors that would allow it to respond and it was full of like you know gears and driveshafts and like things that are like bicycle chains and then a bellows that would operate The mouth so that it could smoke which is clearly a bit of a gimmick. Can't quite see what the function of that has outside of. Look it's almost like a real person But it's a lot. it's very clunky. Very very heavy and not particularly elegant in terms of function but i've made a big splash. Yeah it is. The boys a beast. He's like seven seven feet tall. This also gives us an opportunity to explore one of my favorite parts of science fiction as a which is the science fiction is really a creative endeavor that functions in step with science fact it would be naive to say that these two robots were not in some way inspired by the fiction going on at the time one of the big ones mentioned it at the top of the show metropolis. It's amazing film. It's one of my favorites actually In nineteen twenty seven this becomes the first movie to have what's called machine in minch machine men and this is a well. We can't call her a female robot but a guy noy d- or female shaped robot. This is even if you haven't seen metropolis. I guarantee you. You know the look of this robot. The entire film is silent. it's black white. It's directed by the legendary fritz lang. Get this it's been twenty twenty six and Metropolis it's coming out in real life. Six years from now and metropolis is about a massive city with the same name that is based on the brutal labor conditions of the underclass sounds familiar cry and everybody in metropolis vast majority they live a slave lake existence to sustain the lives of a privileged minority and their children that are cared for and inspired by. Maria was the heroine of the show. She brings these kids to a forbidden garden the ruling class and eventually spoiler her. Just goodness overwhelms the son of metropolis ruler. He falls in love with her. Star-crossed lovers yada yada yada and then he joins up with the proletariate. There's this famous image of maria as a robot and it's based on the robot created in the laboratory of the city's mad scientists look like the dead wife of the guy rules metropolis it i. I don't wanna totally spoil the ending. But that that clearly inspires this real life creation of things like electro the moto man. I love they call motoman. Oh but i mean gosh how prescient was that are. You are play by topic. You know. i mean every this is really the same story. It's about a society where these automatons are created To you know do the work of the privileged upper class and then ultimately revolt an uprising of the proletariat. Right which is represented by these are robots. So there's a twist about a lot of things we're talking about literature we're talking about science fiction tropes all of this kind of coming together and coalescing into something that we now just think of like so ubiquitous in terms of the terminator. The matrix are so many of these ideas of ai. an android. That like you know Filled dick's do androids dream of electric sheet. Which became incredibly influential film. Blade runner that created the whole kind of cyberpunk aesthetic but it was another movie not science fiction in the least really pushed a lot of this stuff forward not only in terms of the ability to create amazing cinema but in terms of this whole argument of life are the robot's going to steal our jobs because it was a film called the jazz singer starring al jolson That was released on october. Sixth of nineteen twenty seven by warner brothers. That was the first talkie you know is the first one that used what's called synchronized sound it had. It was very novelty. The time and a lot of folks thought that it was going to be something like three d. or smell-a-vision that would be a little novelty. That would then go away because surely you know the masses weren't ready for this or not even weren't ready for this but it was just too out there right and it didn't do that at all. In fact it created this revolution in film that required a lot of technological advancement right. So if you're doing silent films cameras are very very loud. and you didn't have to soundproof. The cameras you didn't have to You know encase them in these much larger bulkier You know housing's i guess so. Early silent films had more nimble cameras comparatively that could do much more poetic or ballot even like moves right and that was a big part of the aesthetic of early silent film But when people just were clamoring for the sound sync the technology had to go along with it because you can't have the cameras rattling away if you're recording dialogue right right. Hey no this episode of ridiculous history is brought everyone by audible. I love audible. Ben i truly do and everyone else should too if you don't already although i know many of you do 'cause you've heard us. It's raises low these many years but you know as communities around the world kind of unite to confront new challenges like social distancing and school closures. Everyone's really trying to find a way to relax. But also stay informed and entertained and you know we ridiculous history. Consider ourselves storytellers. We know that stories are a great way to do that. Thing stories entertain. They teach but they also help keep our minds. Active alert and engaged yeah. Audible is the leading provider of spoken word. Entertainment and audio book. So we're not just talking about novels. Bestsellers also talk news business self development and also things like audible sleep if you're hoping for some easier naps in these trying times and speaking trying times With stories dot audible dot com a special site that audible created for families with children who are away from the stimulation of a classroom. Right now with more urgent need than ever to find stimulating entertainment. Maybe get off those screens. So folks can actually stream hundreds of audible titles completely free with no strings. Attached for as long as this pandemic and quarantine situation lasts ben. You're fan of audible. And i think you've got a new title that you've been checking out. That's right now. I've been going back to some of my favorite Halloween and autumnal reads just bump in something wicked. This way comes by the one and only ray bradbury classic and i have been listening to charlie. Kaufman the screenwriter and weirdo filmmaker. He's got a new novel out called ant kind. Which if you're a fan of kaufmann. I think you'll definitely be a fan of this. This book and the Guy that reads. It does a great job. You don't have to take our word for folks. Don't delay you can visit audible dot com slash ridiculous today to learn more or just text ridiculous to five hundred five hundred. Find out yourself. Why audible is the best at audible dot com slash ridiculous or just text ridiculous to five hundred five hundred. This episode is brought to you by ibm today. Every answer matters more than ever before because whether it's about health deliveries or finance some things just can't wait that's why. Ibm's helping businesses manage millions of calls texts and chats with watson assistant it's conversational a i designed to help your customers find the answers. They need faster no matter the industry. Let's put smart to work with ibm dot com slash watson assistant to learn more and for the record tons of naysayers for talkies said. There's there's a fad people aren't gonna want to hear actors talk and history would prove that to be incorrect. The jazz singer is a harbinger in omen of things to come and after it was released in nineteen twenty seven musicians. Pant at the time during the silent film era. It was normal to go to a movie theater and watch the film with live musical accompaniment. Which is something really cool. I don't know reduce historians. Don't know if you live in a in a city or community where this is possible but here in the fair metropolis of atlanta we have a. We have a great classical community. And every so often you can watch films with a live score by the atlanta symphony orchestra. And i highly recommend it and i am somewhat envious of Of the movie goers of the past. Well i don't know what is the last time. Either of us went to a movie theater as well. But here's why they're worried. The musicians are worried because synchronized sound means that their livelihood may become a necessary or even old fashioned so in one thousand nine hundred thirty just three years after the jazz singer. The american federation of musicians forms new group. It's called the music defense league. I would love to see this as a superhero film. They launched this crazy ad campaign to fight off the advance of what they see as the the menace of recorded sound and they make they spent like over five hundred thousand dollars in one thousand nine hundred thirties money. Jeez louise means it's time for the inflation calculator. Oh i think it is. There's gotta do that one bleep. Up leap luke. Luke athletic calculator calculator and the results are in five hundred thousand dollars in one thousand. Nine hundred. thirty is equal to seven point. Seven nine million dollars in twenty twenty and this was just running in newspapers cartoons for example. A lot of these ads would be. There's a there's a there's a bunch of really good ones. there's there's one zero describe this. There's a wheel used to steer a ship And on each on one side of it is sort of like a greek god looking figure holding a harp and reaching out and guiding the wheel while on the other side a menacing looking robot like that robot that we described the classic robot with the you know the full crummy kind of jaw and boxy shape or the tag connected to it saying canned music in theaters is lunging across the wheel and also grabbing the other side of the wheel try to restore the ship in clearly a bad direction and the The wheel is labeled musical culture. Ooh yeah and this was framed as a call to arms for musicians and fans of music. It was presented as protecting art with a capital a from debasement or indeed perversion and there was another ad that said musicians. Were being put out of work. Because hollywood wanted the only needed a few hundred musicians and recording studios to do music for all films and the even put little scare quotes around the word music Saying that you know if it's recorded could it even count as music. It's it's a disingenuous argument. But it's coming from a real and valid fear and the president of the american federation of musicians in nineteen. Thirty one had an interview with modern mechanics. Who where he crystallized. This views named joseph in weber. And he said you know everything and he was pressing into by the way he was pretty right. He said the time is coming fast when the only living thing out a motion picture house. We'll be the person who sells you your ticket. Everything else will be mechanical. And then he has lime where he says. Look we're not against scientific development but it can't come at the expense of art. We're not opposed to mechanical music. Except when it is used for artistic debasement. I think this is a disingenuous argument. Ben because the implication if you apply this to music shouldn't you also apply it to acting like i. It seems to me that the same argument could be like well it's reproduced mechanically. So it's not actually acting unless you're seeing human beings do it in real time you know so the the nature of cinema in itself. Would i think be called into question by this kind of logic you know. It says canned drama canned music vaudeville. We think the public will tire of mechanical. Music will want the real thing. I just think they're picking and choosing and clearly have an agenda here. I do think he's really funny. Ben has as the time is coming fast and the only living thing around emotion picture house will be the person who sells you. The ticket will love to see their thoughts around those. You know little touchscreens. That they have it all the movie theaters now. How so few even still have box office people. Yeah yeah and the put a sexual panic in there too. As a as a sort of thread in the conversation they had Going back to that syracuse herald issue from november third one thousand nine hundred thirty a robot show ineffectively trying to soothe a baby and there would be other ads like the one from centralia daily chronicle in washington on august twenty fourth nineteen thirty one. And this one. This one is definitely like a moral panic thing. It shows a dad going down the stairs of a house who yelling at his daughter who is clearly greco roman news and she's being wooed by a automaton That has a helpful label canned music and theater. It's like look at this unwelcome suitor. Who's been wooing amuse for many dreary months without winning her favor at Weird one that's loaded and like you said it gets to the heart of it they are. I do agree insist ingenuous. They are kind of picking and choosing But it gets the heart of it when we look at the concept here is really deeper than music or jobs. It's being portrayed as the definition of a soul and as they say in the office oh how the turntables because today as anyone can assure you the music industry is battling to protect recorded music right. That's right. I mean it's a little bit of a different arguments. More around you know. Intellectual property and getting paid and making sure artists are treated fairly when it comes to people listening to their music streaming services that pay them fraction of a penny and how it's becoming increasingly difficult to make a living on recorded music alone. Which is extra problematic. Considering we're in the midst of a pandemic where live music is essentially been canceled For the time being. I think a couple of interesting artists have have done it. Sort of well like The the flaming lips did a live concert. Where every member of the audience. was housed inside like space bubble. You now like one of those like giant plastic bubbles that you can like roll around in But i would not say. That's particularly sustainable. Moving forward more of a cool art project kind of situation. But it's true. I mean it's also something that you've seen suspicion around like you know in the eighties for example when synthesizers became more popular well not even the eighty s more like the sixties with mobile and Buca the to kind of big names in electronic music and synthesis. There is this kind of misconception that electrons music wasn't really music because it somehow was not created by humans which anyone that knows anything about electronic music knows that it's just a tool it's just an instrument like a violin or piano or anything else. It just makes different. Sounds and you can use it as such and it's a lot more flexible But the idea that electron music isn't music because the machine is making it is sort of a missing the point. Yeah you could see another argument to take it even further back in time There were there were probably people who said the creation of musical instruments or new musical instruments will somehow debase. The importance of the human voice. Turns out they were wrong as well. But aside from the realm of music there were plenty of other fears about the rise of machines or robots albert einstein during the great depression blamed machines for joblessness john maynard kings. The famous economists coined. This phrase. he said we're being afflicted with a new disease. Technological unemployment this freeze exploded was so popular you can. You can read more about this in an excellent article. On timeline dot com. But there's one moment we have which is technically a story of a robot actually rising to attack its creator takes place. Yeah takes place in one thousand nine hundred thirty. Two british inventor named harry may is very excited to demonstrate his newest creation. a robot called alpha. Come on over. He says to his friends check out. My robot is names alpha. He can fire guns nice. What could go wrong. What could go wrong indeed And so you know. The the robot is Asleep sleep i guess or in shutdown mode in a chair and May places a weapon in its Robot arms And then walks over across the room Bizarre they're doing this endorse But this is how the story goes Walks across the room to adjust a target presumably is going to be the center of the demonstration. And as he does so bent. Something shocking happens. That's right as he's walking across the room. Alpha who weighs two tons by the way slowly gets up to his on his robo feet and he points the gyn and the people observing this are screaming in terror at may watch out. It's turning on. You may turns around and he sees the robot is apparently come to life and is now pointing the gun at him. Alpha moves forward. The veteran throws his hand in front of him face to defend himself. Maybe he invented a bulletproof hand earlier or something. I don't know the gun went off. And this means that alpha technically became the first robot to rise against his inventor. The media went crazy about this. Yeah the a real world example of of everything that science fiction has predicted obviously as satire but sometimes people that's lost on people But yeah this is our robot you know. Creations rising up to murder us the creator. This is all of us. This is not only. Is it threatening our jobs like his alpha going to now. Replace soldiers like what's what's going to. What does this mean and then okay. This is exactly what we needed to hear. The alarms are sounding. The robot rises up and shoots his master. That's not how it happened at all. Yeah it didn't happen that way. Free healthcare hundreds to more than a thousand dollars per month in disability compensation and tens of thousands of college tuition. These are just some of the. Us department of veterans affairs benefits. That may be available to veterans. Va is focused on. Customer service. Line never before choose. Va and see why veterans trust in va reached an all time high claim. The benefits you've earned at cues dot. Va dot gov. I'm one of thousands of women with metastatic breast cancer or nbc with breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and living in the moment and taking brands. pablo cycling. I brand one hundred and twenty five milligram tablets. An rotates inhibitor is for postmenopausal women offer men with hr positive her two negative nbc hormone based therapy. Being your moment. Ask your doctor about i- brands and visit i. Branch dotcom patients taking brands can develop low. White blood cell counts which may cause serious infections. That can lead to death. I brands may cause severe inflammation of the lungs that can lead to death. Tell your doctor right away. If you have newer worsening symptoms including trouble breathing shortness of breath. Cough or chest pain before taking brands. Tell your doctor if you have fever chills or other signs of infection liver or kidney. Problems are pregnant. Breastfeeding or plan to become pregnant. Common side effects include low red blood cell and low platelet counts infections. Tiredness nausea sore mouth abnormalities in liver blood tests diarrhea hair thinning or loss vomiting rash and loss of appetite no matter what the the hyperbolic juicy headlines were saying it turns out that harry me is real first off and he did have a robot alpha also real and he did. This show is friends throwback of fire a gun but this was what we would call user error. You see the gun. Accidentally went off as harry was placing it in his robots hand. He was not shot. He got a minor burn on his hand from the gun powder but people were willing to believe this that this robot had somehow despite not having the cognitive technology to even understand the concept of betrayal they thought alpha had risen up and attacked. Harry may and this panic. This resurrection of this panic at least is happening in part due to the social crisis of the time in the us we have to remember. This came about during the great depression. Nineteen thirty three. Almost one out of four people in the us were unemployed. Thirteen million were out of work. And you needed something to blame and there were tons of scapegoat. Candidates right blame the president. No it's the weather. No let's blame the wealthy one of the things. People blamed was robotics straight and even outside of of the play that we talked about at the top of the show. Are you are We had a fantastic illustration of this maybe not a robot exactly but of the idea of of playing god and in re animating life You know in our own image with frankenstein. Mary shelley's story that remains incredibly popular and You know reinterpreted Many many times over today and we mentioned the original recounting incorrectly of this scenario. With may that was run in a louisiana paper and the piece was titled dread of robots. But this really caught fire and another paper and send dusky. ohio published another letter to the editor in september. Twenty th of nineteen thirty to the editor's name was bruce catton and he used that mary shelley story in a very similar way to the editor in louisiana in saying quote a psychologist could probably make a good deal of this fascinating dread of ours for mechanical monsters. A machinery has created a revolution in our life the wage earner the farmer the soldier the merchant. The politicians the schoolmaster the printer. All of us in every moment of our lives live differently than our ancestors live because of the constant increase in the mechanization of society. This to me is a pretty evenhanded. description wouldn't you say ben. Yeah yeah that's true and props to bruce cotton for explaining this in an objective way. That trend continues. It never stopped. I this this is a good segue to represent the other side of the argument. The people who thought this was on balance a good thing. There were people who would be doing. Ted talks at this time if there were around. People like walter s gifford. He was also in interview in modern mechanics. Gifford is a guy with skin in the game had the time of his nineteen thirty one interview. He is president of the american telephone and telegraph company. And he says that The depression will pass and will enter a period of prosperity. The likes of which no country has seen before he was definitely a fan of what was called the technocracy movement. We've heard the phrase technocrat before sometimes as an insult sometimes as a complement this movement started in nineteen thirty two in new york and the idea. Is that every world. Problem can be solved if we just replaced politicians with engineers and with scientists they described this as a revolution without bloodshed. As something that would lead to a guaranteed income. An end to crime and disease and they. They had a rhetorical question in one of their magazines. Cover features a robot and the text under the robot says thirty million out of work in one thousand nine hundred thirty three or twenty thousand dollars guaranteed income for every family. Which and so. They're probably going too far in the positive direction here right because they're saying it's panacea which which it isn't a technocracy actually is weird. Technocracy fell out of popularity because of technology. One of the movement's founders. Guy named howard scott gave a just ridiculous speech on january thirteenth nineteen thirty three and was broadcast on national radio so they looked kinda like clowns. You find copies of this online but it. It's kind of like a several years back when former presidential candidate. Howard dean had an unfortunate It's a yeah. Yes yeah really. High pitched and then from that point on his policies didn't matter as much as the fact that there was this terrible sound bite all to say we're still fighting technology today. The matrix did not come. Cut out of whole cloth of predictions for the future really are a direct reflection of the times in which they're created. And what is it reminds me of. Have you ever heard that old observation that a disguise is really an autobiography of the person who chooses to wear it. no. I like that very much. So maybe maybe what we're doing with our fears of the future is We're exploring our fears of the modern day you know we've seen. Us residents of every political stripe imaginable be concerned about the future and more often than not be concerned about continual employment. It's really tough out there. You know there's a writer for slate called for hod monjo who warned that in the future even very highly educated folks like doctors and scientists lawyers might find their jobs outsourced to robots or to ai. What you. I don't know what do you think no because to me. It seems like it should be interesting to everyone to know that the panic about automation and robotics is very old. I don't think it'll put everybody out out of a job. It just seems naive to say it won't put anyone out because that's clearly going to happen. Heck man i mean you know you and i have even seen stuff. We've been shown betas of software that can take a voice prints of of say a podcast and do a pretty convincing of like doing ads for example. Right There's the ads is how we make our money on this show and even that idea or the idea of like what if we don't need voice actors anymore to like do audio books or what. If like you know we've got the technology's gotten good enough that we don't even need actors anymore because the cgi is so good and it's cheaper just to like you know have computer animators do it all. I think that fear is always present when you have a new technology that comes out but it takes such a long time for it to get to the point where it's gonna be a replacement for the human touch and i think it'd be. It'd be naive for us to say that's never gonna happen for our career. What about editors edit video you know surely if a good enough algorithm could of video convincingly right We haven't seen it quite yet but we know that that is certainly some people are in a lab right now. Trying their damndest figure out. Yeah and i think we'll see a rise of neo luddites along the way at some point is people fear and fight change. But i also think there's there's an important thing that often gets lost when we talk about utopia in post work futures somewhere along the line to oppose work future where no one truly has to do anything unless they feel called to do it. There would inevitably be a period of a post worker future where people still have to provide for themselves but the opportunities to do so are increasingly limited. These are real fears. There's there's a reason that this line of thinking keeps happening with that being said i'm very much forward to the future kind of person and in other shows we've explored the possibilities here like the i. I wonder if the if the american federation of musicians could travel here to twenty twenty s. We record this. I wonder what they would think. All the idea that we're close to a world of artificially generated scripts were loose stool world nipping in our lifetimes. Where you could have an app on your phone. I wanted design this. But i'm not smart enough. You could have an app on your phone where you say okay. Take lake metropolis and gremlins gremlin. Sure gremlins big trouble. China and the jazz singer and put it all together in a coherent story And then cast me and my friends based on the photographs you have us from social media the principal actors and then just let me see it happen. That can happen. And that's not to say that there isn't even an art in interacting with Let's call it generative technology right so like it'd be a script that was generated by artificial intelligence but there is a lot of Interest in experimental music in generative music. Where you kind of set some parameters and then sort of see what happens you know. It's like a An artificially intelligence driven experiment where you're sort of choosing the parameters and then late. Brian does the salat. The incredible producer and ambient musician where he'll make these generative things that will just continue to evolve. And that's thing that's used in video game music for example where you can set these parameters around an ambient tone and it will drift or change based on certain things that you then set up like the way programming language works. so that's creative in and of itself. I would argue. That's not cheating. That's just being clever and using the tools in an interesting way does using a typewriter mean. You're not writing. That's that's a similar question. I in these are questions that we're going to continue exploring In the future as as a species. But how fascinating is it that over two hundred years ago. Many of our fears remain. Almost exactly what they are today. We hope you enjoyed this episode. Robots and humans alike a. We can't wait to hear from you. What do you think the future of this trend will bring. We would love to hear your thoughts. You can find us on facebook advice on instagram week. Finace add twitter. We like recommend our facebook page ridiculous. Historians you can also find us as individuals on the old social meads. Sure can you can find me. Pretty much exclusively on instagram. Where i am at how. Now noah brown and you can join up with me on twitter. Where i'm at. Ben bullen ijaz w or a witness my various strange experiments discoveries and tinkerings on my instagram at ben bullen. Thanks as always to christopher haas. Yoda's thanks to our number one technological threat or the guy who wants to be our number one technological threat. Jonathan strickland aka the quiz after all too human huge. Thanks to our very human super producer. Casey peg room Wish you'd be able to get on this conversation. I thought the film stuff would have been particularly of interest to him but We can catch on that next step. we hope. His adventures are faring. Well huge alex williams who very humanly composed this theme He used electronic technology but it all came from his heart and brain and his lovely lovely hands. That's all thanks to gay. Blew a are also very human research associate Could knew that you gave eves geoff coates. Who the the cat is out of the bag. J. dot il the jill scott podcast eve's been instrumental in working with that team. I had a little hand in it. Fair barely just getting things off the ground and she's just taking the ball and run with and as. I'm really really really happy with that. Show it out in the world now. I think there are two episodes fully. Live check out. J. dot l. Podcast awesome yes and love to have eased back on the show again today. So when you write a teller the guy say hi we can assure you that This show is at this point. One hundred percent not robotic. But if you are a robot you're listening and you'd like to be a guest on this show Let us know. Just send send us text. And binary if you next folks for more podcasts or my heart radio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows free healthcare hundreds to more than a thousand dollars per month in disability compensation and tens of thousands for college tuition. These are just some of the. Us department of veterans affairs benefits. That may be available to veterans. Va is focused on customer service. Like never before choose. Va and see. Why veterans trust in. Va reached an all time. High claim the benefits you've earned at choose dot v. Dot gov free healthcare hundreds to more than a thousand dollars per month and disability compensation and tens of thousands for college tuition choose. Va and see. Why veterans trust in. Va reached an all time. High claim the benefits you've earned at choose. Va dot gov.

thousand dollars Va five hundred thousand dollars ben bleep casey peg rem carol chop pack tommy johns ben compaq ron wensley nineteen twenty seven The robo herbert Herbert Katie joseph barnett seven seven feet hitler herbert department of veterans affairs motoman ibm Ben
In Times Of Crisis You Need To Flirt With Stupid #847

Trent365

02:13 min | 1 year ago

In Times Of Crisis You Need To Flirt With Stupid #847

"In Times of crisis maybe you need to float with stupid. Welcome to Danine of the lockdown here in Malaysia. I am just in a compaq now. Pretty Empty cowpox waiting for the doors to open so I can get into the supermarket. Try to local supermarket and That was just a little bit so moving onto the big shopping mall hoping that that might be a little more under control and I got a great comment from mine. Only Dean Cobaine Hollandsworth yesterday and it was a discussion. We were having about what the new tomorrow is for. Spas and for hotels in general for the industry in general for for the economy in general and one of the comments he made which I thought was fantastic is that maybe it's time to flirt with stupid. And what he's really saying. Is that the idea that once upon a time were considered streaker. That would have been laughed out of boardrooms and and executive offices. Maybe now just might be. Those ideas want fly and something touched on a few days ago but I do love that terminology flood with stupid so I think as we're preparing for the other side of this thing. Start thinking about all the crazy ideas you could possibly imagine for your business and things that might maybe once upon a time the same stupid maybe right now is the time that those ideas might just get through. Give it a thought. Let me know if you've got any. Id's would love to throw around some stupid ideas here and look by the way. I just want to let you know over on my website. I've got a few free April. One of them is titled Tomorrow Spa. Where I spoke about what the tomorrow spark could look like now that we're actually looking towards the tomorrow SPA. It might be a worthy. Read say can check that out. Trenton. Monday dot COM forward slash books? They're all free. Go and check it out. If you're interested I'll put lincoln the comments below but for now off the shelves before we already that is it for today. I do thank you for your time and we'll be back again tomorrow.

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Ask Tai Why: Fear, time and the colour of colours

Tai Asks Why

07:48 min | 1 year ago

Ask Tai Why: Fear, time and the colour of colours

"This is a CBC podcast. Hello tie here coming in with damage to your burning lifelong questions since or just general politics as high high high high contract to play the message press two hi past Charlotte. I'm calling from Toronto Ontario and my question is what is fear and why are we born with it. So what is fear fear May sock but back when we were cavemen people can help to survive you know 'cause without fear. You really like be worried about the consequences of your actions actions imagine. If it's just like Oh look a barrel with fear he'd be like. Oh my God what's a bear in the studio well and without very big ooh who of quasi thing that could do that just ate a person. Let's give it a hog. You know fear helps. Keep us in line so we don't try to challenge orange. Anything in the wilderness that could seriously harm us or even kill us and fear also hopes trigger. Our instincts stinks being chased by bird helps. You be like you know what I'm being chased by a bear. Let's run a little bit faster dies. You know we actually have a lot of centralized parts of our brain. said help us do these exact type things will breathe faster with Swat Samore. We'll get more adrenaline adrenaline something. We like. I'm Komo pumped up like I said before no fear nothing really to hold you back and it's actually pretty cool. It's quite helpful and it helps us not do dumb stuff to play the message press two hello. My name is Dan. I'm from Winnipeg. Question is what is time. What is tone our time time time okay now. I'M GONNA put it the mathematicians way because it's easy and I like it that way mathematically. Speaking a dimension is a point that you need to do to specify the location of something. Let's say you just have your your normal. Oh great right and let's say you WanNa plot something just on a to start a graph you know a Cartesian Gregory of the line with the numbers and the other line at the numbers. Let's say you WanNa put something there. You need to measurements how far up it is and how far to the right is so that's the thing that is two dimensional because you need to have an x and a y the off and the right now in three dimensions. Let's say the microphone phone holding right now. Let's just say that that's the center. I'm holding a pen directly behind the microphone right now so right now. The pen needs three coordinate want. I want to say how much upper down the pen is in terms of the microphone how much left or right it is from the microphone. which in this case it's just at the center taller and how far you know the depth? This is three dimensions now. Time is the fourth dimension and for some reason humans perceive weird. We can only go one way. That's another topic but the idea is that time is the fourth dimension so now we need four dimensions Chinse. Let's go to downtown buildings of Toronto below these downtown buildings. There's the path a the underground network so you need to say how like you know how left and right it is like a regular graph if you see it from bird's eye view whether it's underground or overground in the path and what's important about time is the fourth dimension you also say what time he can't really be like on a day like. Oh pick you all pick you up at tomatoes. Bistro and it's like what time okay bye because you were just it's GonNa go to that one place in three dimensions and you'd have no idea what time to be there so that's why you need time as the fourth dimension to to tell you and to be there it is the fourth necessary point in our four dimensional world to tell someone where to be you go to the next message press six. I Kai my name is George. I'm calling from Toronto and my question is what makes it caller caller caller thing what makes color at seems almost circular like what makes flavor a flavor but I I understand what you're saying so oh. I'm not like a major in this cause. I'm in grade seven bought from my understanding lights that we use in our life. Life is a type of electromagnetic radiation. It's pretty much just radiation that just comes from the sun or our lights and it comes to our is now the radiation can have shorter or longer waves and of course the have different wavelengths so basically think of the alight being just like a whole bunch of those like very quick little squiggle imagine if you get the squiggle and you compress the whole squiggle wiggle into half the space. This will be much more compaq. Now you can also stretch it out. This is the whole idea of visible visible light so there are longer waves and that makes darker colors. Now surfaces will have a certain cover that will you will look at it. It will absorb a certain amount of like giving it its color and then when the light goes back to the callers that are missing racing make it its color and is going to seem weird but bear with me now assumed the of a red flower fi look at the red flower the colors colors from the light go into the flower. One color comes back out and that's our red color because that's what we that's why we see this red so guys. I genesis will seem hard but that red flower is technically not read because since the red comes back to our is at technically means that it is every color except for red because it absorbed every color except for red plot twist everything you think Israel real is not. There's every caller is a fake every callers ally. Any color is every color except for that other call arts art and thanks for listening to ask Tai Wai and and guys make sure to stay tuned for another episode of Taya's coming ship for more C._B._C. podcasts go to C._B._C. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts.

Toronto Toronto Ontario Swat Samore Charlotte Winnipeg compaq Tai Wai Israel Dan Bistro Taya George
Interview with Henry Daas

Breakfast Leadership

30:56 min | 2 months ago

Interview with Henry Daas

"Welcome to the breakfast. Leadership show where we interview global thought leaders on business leadership in life. Here's your host keynote speaker. Bestselling author and chief burnout officer of the breakfast leadership network. I go eleven welcome back. I've got henry online henry. How are you good michael. Happy new year. Happy new year to year two. And you know we talked about Computers compaq presario ze notes. But don't worry people you know. I'm sure there's some people assure going what in the world's the compaq cereal it's like google. You know they'll be nice long history of of how amazing product so a short the audience a little bit about you and then we'll dive into the conversation cool so i am. A serial entrepreneur started my first company. Nineteen ninety-one thirty years ago out. It's twenty twenty one Had a series of different entrepreneurial businesses Some good some bad one ignominious failure as i wrote about in my book and For less almost ten years. I've been a business coach. So i work with entrepreneurs how level up their game Get to the next level unblock. What's blocking them. Whatever the case may be launching a business back in nineteen ninety-one and launching a business in twenty twenty one When you did the mass thirty years. I'm like wait a minute. That doesn't sound right. But then the the former accountant and me did not of head went while thirty years but think about that timeframe and how dramatic things changed. But i'm guessing the tools and techniques. The you learned along the way are still as useful today as they were in nineteen ninety. One there's still the as they were going back to the stone age right. I mean that's Hasn't really changed. We saw up close and personal the advent of the internet right because in nineteen ninety-one it was still arpanet right By the mid nineties. I remember we got an isdn line right. It was like a big deal. It was one point five megabits. No i don't even think it was one point. Zero t one. Whatever it was it was a tiny little pipe but it was so early in the internet that they actually gave us and again this is for the geeks out a c. Plus three address right and in real language that means they gave a sixty four static. Ip's right think about think about that. At of all the limited number of static ip's they gave her sixty four as a little tiny company right so every single computer network at a static ip on the internet right. Now you've got to pay. I don't even know what it is. Ten twenty bucks a month to get a single static. Ip if you wanna say put a server that services the world so that's how early it was really really interesting but it was a lot of fun but as far as the rules go for business. No it's just another tool to mechanism. Just a big fat highway with which you can sell your stuff before we had to call people now we email them or we text them or we slack them. that's all otherwise is pretty much exactly the same. I think that's one of the biggest lessons of anything we talked about. Today is even though we have all these fancy tools in smartphones and everything else the business of being in business has remained tried and true and serving your customers finding what they need having a product that one you believe even as yourself and being able to relay that to solve a problem for organizations and individuals about individual relationships to no matter how impersonal it may feel at times it really is about generating trust. That is what will bind you together. even if you're in a commodity business you still have to generate trust Now it's actually very easy for people to vilify you in the public square right. I have clients they worry about their google rating. I remember few months ago. One of them sent me something about this client. Disparaged us and it knocked my google rating down by like i don't know thirty basis points or whatever They were all in a tizzy about it. And you know without sounding too glib about it. It's like that's going to happen. Are you going to let that affect how you do business. Are you going to pander to the lowest common denominator so that you don't offend anybody if that's the case you're pretty much done right because you can't live in that world right. They're always going to be people that you're going to butt heads with right and now they can vent their spleen on the internet. Part of the cost of doing business us. Oh it is and you know a personal story A us both uber and lyft for traveling and around town from time to time. And i noticed not too long ago might uber rating was five and i use it a lot so it was like. That's pretty good. I mean i wasn't like walking around going. I'm a five star uber now but i noticed that it got ding. Somebody rated me lower. You know a driver. And i. And i'm like why and i'm thinking to myself. Okay what did i say something rude. Did i not engage them. You know i was in my brain. The only thing i could think of was It was a rather longer drive from a spend my time in san diego toronto. And i'm in toronto right now so it was a downtown to where i live in toronto and normally is thirty to thirty minute ride because i didn't feel an in drive down that day and i didn't feel like using transit so But there was traffic backup. So i think he made because he had to be in traffic longer. I had nothing to do with that other than that. But i didn't lose any sleep over. It's like i'm still getting picked up by people so it's not that bad where someone's like. Oh one star. It's like you're going to be waiting for three hours to get a ride gives. No one likes you as a passenger. So it's the same thing like a black mirror episode right with social social ratings stuff. Exactly so it's it's funny. How businesses are so focused on that and businesses should always be focused on. Okay what what are our customers looking at us. What are we doing. Are we doing things well for them. Are we serving them. And with the clients that i work with and a variety of other people that i talked to you especially during this pandemic it's like reach out to your customers a little bit more than maybe you're used to and just ask him. What do you need from us right now and you might be making something for them all the time but check with him. Say what do you need from us right now because that could be an opportunity or maybe they need to scale back some things or maybe they need to ramp up some things but have those conversations and that grows the phone. There's there was an old and for some airline. I think we're a company. Something goes sideways. And they're in the board room and these got an airline ticket and we're going to fly now all of our clients and go reach out and touch them. I get it. it's covert. you can't meet with people face to face but you can pick up the phone and call somebody. I made a dozen to all be super impersonal because emails and texts and stuff like that you lose all the nuance right. Only the words are are barely ten percent of the communication you're losing All those other interpersonal cues right. Get on the phone because you lose tone otherwise people like it right exactly. Yeah somebody who's an old school boomer talking but yeah you know my kids text. Text me and stuff and it's like pick up the phone. Call your old man. Not that big a deal. I want to hear your voice changes everything right my wife. You know if my wife is like pick up milk great you can text me that but if my wife be something like we need to talk it's like don't tax me that i want to have a conversation about this. I'm not gonna do this over. Electronic means so exactly and especially during the pandemic wis zoom fatigue and all of that the people. I've talked with us so yeah let's let's do a folks actually did one yesterday. And so you know what you know what i look like so i'll spare you that tragedy and we can just do a phone call and you know the phone call was engaging we had a blast and it was a really good call and it's like yeah it's mix it up a little bit you know in the tried and true strategy but the point is people want to do business with you for reasons you may not understand and you need to get into their heads and figure that out. Everybody's like well. I gotta have a unique value proposition. And i have to have this. And i have to have that when i first started. My very first company was an apple value. Added reseller right. They had this is before the apple. stores So you were a bar right and people would say what are your value. What your value at. I said me my i'm the value add. You want to do business with me. That's the reason that's all it is. I'm going to do it better than anybody else. That's out there the compusa all these things. You're just grist for the mill. They're just trying to turn over boxes that's all they don't really care. They might as well be selling toasters right. That's not what we're doing here right. We can sell you this dumb box because it's just a dumb box you're gonna plug it into the wall but it doesn't do anything without you. Well what happens when you hit a wall and can't figure stuff out right. You're gonna wanna resource. Now there's a zillion resources right. People go on youtube that want to learn this and want to do that. Whatever but back then. You didn't have that right. you had to pick up. the phone. couldn't even really email. People weren't going to get any responsiveness out of that now. The communication is definitely opened up. Where there's been a lot more opportunities but with that it also waters down a lot of experiences so when that stellar customer. Experience opportunity comes. It's those businesses that can thrive in that area and moore based on just how they treat people and in that segue real quick but so in this conversation we've mentioned compusa and compound up my my. My way back machine is really spinning a little bit going eleni like i wasn't even born yet. You pretty soon. We're gonna be talking about trs eighty and osborne's right throw in everything that they're you know the drives accent drives floppy disks. Remember eight inch floppies. I real quick side story. I in high school. I was a runner for the school play which was greece and there was a person that was doing. All the design. Work and stuff like that but She actually still was doing work on the eight inch discs. Which i'm looking at this thing going. This is almost as big as an album. I'm like you know it it. This is insane. How big us and you know. It's like handle stuff and getting back like just kind of weird and of course you know people see those now and like you know like early even the the three and a half inch one. It's like oh the save icon. Like yes that they still have some. We're in the process of moving do disarray. But i'm pretty sure. I still have some at least some five and a quarters you know. They held like four hundred kilobits. I know right side players. See a killer right. yeah exactly a text. email. I think is more than that now. Depending on what you types mega giga tera. I mean i have a thirty six terabyte twelve disc raider ray on the computer that i'm talking to you about. I didn't have that when they were no no lows. It just keeps getting larger and faster. And i anything even with that. I think businesses. And i love to hear your thoughts on this. Feel the pressure that they have to be fast and agile and respond like instantly kind of thing and while in certain aspects. There's there's that but if your business isn't already prepared to do that you're gonna run into basically an empty room and you're gonna go okay. We don't have anything to be able to serve this client based on what what the demand so they're asking for right now so loud here thoughts on that. Well there. there's a there's a sweet spot there. There are some some clients whose demands are are. Just unrealistic right. So that leaves you in a row with a real conundrum. Do why am i. The bearer of bad news is my job to tell them that you're deadline. Your expectations are totally over the top. And they're never going to be met or do i just play along knowing that. We're going to be late because i don't want to lose the client. You've gotta decide right. You've got to decide. What do you want your business to be There have been times with with my coaching clients. Where i have advocated firing clients right. And that's a tough one. But it's addition by subtraction. Right everything is pareto. Eighty twenty rule you will find in business that Eighty percent of your business comes from twenty percent of your clients right. But in addition to that eighty percent of the complaints and the customer support. And all that stuff or gonna come from twenty percent of your clients and in many cases that twenty percent is sort of the lower twenty percent right so think about that. I am burning up. Amazing amounts of resources servicing. These little micro clients. I had a customer at all these micro clients because he had grandfather demand when he started and gave them unrealistically low numbers and now as the business had leveled up it was costing him more to service these clients than he was charging him. Henry what do i do. What do you think you should do. You have a couple of choices here. You can raise them up to today's prices and you can do it gracefully right. I mean i'm not one of those people who believe that you should throw away those customers. Who took a risk on you when you start absolutely not right. There's something to be said for those early clients. When you let's face you you'd have a pot to piss. Hung up a shingle. You said who you were and people took a leap of faith to do business with you so now here you are five years later. And you're now a seven figure company and yet you've got these micro clients you've got to scale them up or you have to cut him loose or you have to set up a scenario where they will cut themselves loose again. This is a very very delicate balance because it brings up more than just the nuts and bolts of business but the emotional emotional launch entrepreneurship early customers having started from scratch a half a dozen businesses. I know i feel sort of a slavish loyalty to them right. You gotta dance with the one that brung you but then you have to save yourself. Are they dragging me down. And keeping me from getting to the next level. And that's a. That's a really tough situation for a lot of entrepreneurs dr coach exactly because the the realize wait a minute and launching a business. We never talked about her. Went over how to fire a client. Or you know i. It's it's straight up in the air right. You know it's just it's you know like the you know. The straight line analogy where electrical engineer. It's sine wave or wave that exactly but you know it's it's tangled legged cat five on a really bad You know data center. It's like oh man like in and of course every different color under the sun to really. Can't we clean up and make this at least look presentable. And if there's an issue with the port than we can figure out which one it is labeling stuff i just took a giant label behind me a a A skeleton of iraq. And you should have seen the spaghetti that was in there and i actually plug something in the wrong way. I actually looped the network and took the entire network down so these things happen. Been there done that. When i was a nineteen sue so so for for businesses and entrepreneurs that are looking to launch something now twenty twenty one and even going back to the great recession where there was a lot of businesses that were born during that time where you a lot of people think you launch a business during the worst times. When is there a better time. it's like go. You gotta start somewhere so it's do it so organizations that are thinking about launching a business today you. What are some of the things that you're guiding them to talk about or even relatively new entrepreneurs that are maybe a couple years. Send a thanks in. What are some things. You're seeing over and over again. If they could get past this it would definitely help them grow to the next level. Well you know. There's two kinds of businesses. There's there's a the origin story of businesses. There's the the the accidental business otherwise known as opportunistic. Like i started my first business. It's because a friend of mine couldn't source some computers needed samak's for a client them and i went out in the world and i got him and all of a sudden my side hustle Was born the other side. Is the purposeful business right. Where you sit down and you write out a list of pros and cons and you look at it and you hire a bunch of harvard. Mba is just down and chop it all up In that latter case what happens is people will do that. And then they'll never launch right because they're they're stuck being a visionary whatever polishing this up until it's perfect but they never get outta the gate in the opportunistic business. What happens is you start with a set of of strictures and and paradigm that you start with and you never pivot around them. You never introduce standard operating procedures ride. You never create any. Kpi's for it. You're just kinda doing it by the seat of your pants. And you and and i was on a podcast last night and i used a quote that i that i use offense successes a great deodorant right And we see that. I see that all the time people will come to me. And i'll look at their business and it's like wow. This is a really successful business. But it's a train wreck it's like. How on earth did you manage this. Well now. i understand why coming to me. As a coach 'cause they need somebody to put processes into place As far as you know buying when there's blood in the streets the the old ross trial quotes Which is what you're talking about. There's blood street now now. It's the time to buy right now. Time to start a business I wrote a thing. it's on my website. It's five reasons. Small businesses fail and the number one reason as you would probably guess is idea. Your idea sucks it. Just does you just have a stupid idea but you might be wedded to it or marry to it or you may have a lot of an emotional investment. You have to step back. You have to kick the crap out of that idea. Go ask your friends. Go to curmudgeonly friends that everybody has the one who's negative about everything. Go s that backfire. Cal have them eviscerated rip it to shreds and then think about the things that they said whether they have any validity or not or whether this person's just being negative nancy if after that's all said and done there's still a core of an idea there then you're onto something right. What's the next step. Go out and look out in the world and see. Who's doing that right. I've had people come to me. And it's and i'll ask the question. Who else is doing it. Nobody i said well. That's a huge red flag. Because the truth is you. Ain't that smart. You did not create this whole even facebook. Which is you know. Gargantuan entity there was friendster. There was my space. They were not the first ones out of the gate. He saw what the early adopters had done. And said i can do this better right but there better be some other people out there because if there aren't there's there's two reasons people have tried and failed and discovered that there's no business there and the second one is what the heck is the second one Tried and failed. Or it's just a crappy idea that's what it is. I mean it. Just there's there's no way to make money with it. Everybody's gonna be monumentally great idea but there's no way to monetize it right I was just introduced to Yesterday something. That's like a craigslist alternative to sell stuff. Because i'm moving. And i saw two things in within the same day doing it but then i look at the app and i say why. This is a great app but didn't make any money on this. They didn't charge me commission. One leg ebay. So what's the endgame. What's their goal. How are they gonna make money. Because ultimately you gotta make money because you need money so that you can hire good people so you can level up your business. Otherwise all you've done is is created a solo partnership and what i often say is. You've just created a job. you can't quit. Nobody wants to do that. Joke with eight. We've all made that mistake. We've all we you know. Entrepreneurs traded their nine to five for the nine to midnight. Yeah like wait a minute Linley start second-guessing meal. Maybe my boss wasn't such a jackass. After all. And i could just go home and not have to work vacation and never have to call the office. Do you at interesting exactly so. It's one of those things. Where again i love. How you you you hammer home. The that idea might suck and it gives it. Is you know you. i've seen it. I've been to enough conferences and you know. Start up and entrepreneur shows and all of these angel group wanted people pitch and they come up and the blah blah blah businesses broke in and our new fancy widget fixes that way every presentation starts right. Just write check for five million bucks and will you know the world will be our voice. Ter- and nine out of ten of those businesses will burn up all that money and just crash fail because they haven't thought past the first step or the second step in love with the idea without really thinking that this is As i wrote Somewhere on my blog trillions of dollars have been saved by people not executing dumb ideas exactly. And when you say the you know falling in love with an idea. I often think that you almost wanna say despise the idea like reluctant to do it. But you're like well there's something here about let see good sign if you're actually hated a behavior but then you talk to other people say no this sexually good the. Yeah that point you you you map out a plan coming to build this thing up get it to where it needs to be and then i'll find somebody that wants to buy it from me. I'll take some profit off of it and go do something else. Sword pending on how much that prophets. They'll go somewhere else and you know. Find a chair by some water and that will be how they spend the rest of their days off. It's so easy now to vet your ideas. So so for instance. So i wrote a four hundred thirty. Two page book called f q financial intelligence. And i give it away can go to go to my website. Dos knowledge a das knowledge dot com. And you can download it for free and i wrote it as a course and it's you know it's a monster and i tested it with a dozen people and i was ready to go to market and that a bunch of people said you know henry should turn this into a book right and that'll be your lead. Magnet took like a year to do all of that. So i did all that stuff and i don't talking to a friend of mine who's a coach and he's more of a career coach. He coaches people who come out of the military to kind of reenter normal society and he sends me this landing page for this course that he's selling i said. Wow this is really really good time by bye bye you know. What are the details of course. Oh i haven't created the course yet. I'm just putting it out there to see how many people would be willing to buy for two ninety nine. If i get enough people who are willing to do it then i'll make i. Of course everything is backwards right. Being an old school. I built the whole thing created it but a lot of sweat equity into it before i really knew whether anybody in the world needed it. I knew inherently that. Everybody needs to learn about money. But i built it. I mean that's a great lesson. A lot of times people will spend all the time in the way staller venture capital money and all this building this thing and people look at it and say That won't fit or that's not gonna work and all of a sudden you're like oh and it's like well maybe i can sell it on craigslist right. There was yeah. There was a fashion site back at at in like around. Two thousand nine hundred ninety nine. That was you know. The show's all. I don't remember what the name of it is Their site was gorgeous. They were really really really Build something that was fantastic problem. Was that the pipes back to the whole isdn line. The pipes were so small And it required so much with that it it. It took forever the user experience. Was god awful because the pages would literally watch them. Come down the screen unusable right. You would think somebody might have thought about that head of time now. We take it for granted. Now if you don't have you know a terabyte of of a pipe coming into your house you're just some post schlub so people get lazy and they can build whatever it is that they want knowing that we have unlimited bandwidth Back dan it was a real consideration. Exactly exactly we won't even get into you. Know the thirty three point six modems in the senate that makes you know i go back to three hundred baud modem old the they will the really old school they had in college. Right that a mainframe and you had three hundred baud modem on your little screen. Yeah those we all managed. We all survived it. We all did business was around. There were tons and tons of businesses. It has gone on since since the days of since they built the pyramids. I made people have been running businesses. I espoused theory. That ninety percent of all businesses are the same right. I'm writing new book. It's called codfish as an unlikely title. But his stands for customer support operations development finance infrastructure sales marketing human resources. What i called a seven silos of every business in every business must have these seven whether you're a solo per noor or whether you're tesla or apple or amazon they have these seven no more no less and you need to have systems in place to manage all of these things even if you're running a one man shop you just do and they have to work together and as you start scaling up. You're going to start seeing some some cracks. The i call them. Synapses the the The bits that that connect these and i call them silos for reason because it many comes they are siloed. hr does not talk to development. You can't operate that way. There are synapses that connect those when those atrophy or when they were never created. That is when you get into trouble. Big time big time. I look forward to that book coming out as well so any love their conversation they were can people find out more about you in this incredible work do so Yeah like i said my website. Das knowledge dot com. People spell my name. So i also have dass knowledge which does a redirect belt-and-braces My personal site. Henry daas ag das. Dot com. You can find that and you know my baseball cards. And my golf trips. And my screenplays written eleven screenplays. You were talking about uber earlier and it was reminding me about five years ago. I'll end with this little story I decided as an experiment to drive for uber and for lift and to meticulously document. Everything so that. I could figure out exactly what i was making on an hourly basis right and it wasn't pretty came at four dollars and thirty cents and if you re adjusted for risk now again. I wasn't doing best practices but i decided to write a screenplay and my screenplay has called five star. And it's a. It's a kind of a romantic comedy about a about a a rather odd Uber or actually named the company's five-star the ridesharing service. And he's about to get his ten thousand ride every single one of them rated five stars right and it's it's a kind of a twisty little little story. If you go on my website you can read the first ten pages of it awesome. Yeah and it was a really interesting exercise to put myself. What the last night. That i drove. I pretended i was the character. Bobby and i kind of i called it Method writing like men that acting. I pretended to be the character in the screenplay that i was writing. It was a lot of fun. That is i look forward to reading that as well so henry. Thank you so much for your time and and for the amazing work that you continue to do. Thanks for having me. i really appreciate it. Thanks for listening to the leadership. Part of the breakfast leadership network visit breakfast leadership dot com for tips on empowering your business and your life.

henry online henry compaq toronto compusa google apple samak osborne michael san diego moore
Powerbeats Pro Review: 24 Hours Later

Vector Podcast

11:49 min | 2 years ago

Powerbeats Pro Review: 24 Hours Later

"Bonsor by brilliant. I live on airplanes use them in the mornings when I go out to walk. I use them during the day from meetings podcasts and calls. I use them when I'm out to edit these videos, I use them when I travel even without noise canceling their light their wireless there long lasting, and they're incredibly convenient. I use them for almost everything. Almost like I said before I have Brazilian jujitsu mangled ears or maybe just a symmetrical ears and the right one just doesn't stay in as well as the left. So for anything where I want stereo, but I need to do something super active air pods. Just can't hang. But twenty four hours later. I'm already thinking power beats pro can kit. Subscribe and drop it drains file in that little bell gays mostly you don't miss the full review next week. I'm Rene Ritchie. And this is vector in the power beats pro box, which is really cleverly. Composed. You get the charging case. And inside it the left and right. Power beats pro you also get the ear tips and four different size options, a lightning to USB cable in I MAC, pro black a quick start guide your beat sticker, of course, and your legal stuff. Now apple bought beats by dre back in August of two thousand fourteen and since then has relaunched the streaming app is apple music, the headphones though, they've kept branded as beats on one hand. They're still beats more colorful, more expansive and more booming with the base on the other. They've been integrating new apple technologies almost as fast as the apple branded kit. I don't know if that means they're all up an apples giant state of the art acoustics facility and Cupertino. But that's my best guess and not just because beats is claiming these new power beats pro successors to the previous power beats three have been completely re engineered from the inside out with advanced acoustic engineering for an impressive dynamic range separation across the frequency curve sixty percent reduction in total harmonic, distortion and powerful sound. With clean deep bass response. But because they're delivering on those things that's all thanks to a new linear piston driver with rigid aluminum piston center and a new acoustic housing with micro laser barometric venting. Which all sounds to me like Tony stark talking to Jarvis Friday. Whatever about the next set of iron, man, armor, the design has been tweaked to angle to better fit the ear with an offset acoustic nozzle for a better seal and a redesigned hook for what they call better stability, and I call less flippity flop eighty when things are getting hectic I've been wearing them with glasses all day glasses slipped under the power beats pro to be specific. And they feel like I'm not even wearing them at all. No discomfort. None combined with the four different your tip options. It lets you really customize the fit for maximum comfort and connection and so far so great. I didn't change them from the default. But my colleague Laura Gill did and instead of pain after an hour. So like she gets with ear pods and air pods. She's had nothing but comfort all day that fit all. Provides noise isolation. Now, it's not active noise cancelling with all the quality that provides the power demands by virtue of the fit it just better shuts out more of the noise around you so far so good in coffee shops, but I'll be taking them on planes and trains starting tomorrow. And I'll let you know how that works out compared to the power beats three. The power beats pro have been Pym particle down to twenty three percent, less volume and seventeen percent less weight. You can feel that instantly to both in terms of how they fit around your ear. But also how they weigh on it. That's because when you're dealing with something so small and light already any percentage less turns out to be a big percentage less unlike air pods. These new power beats are also water and sweat resistant. The certification level is for now. That means they're splash resistant, but unlike modern iphones, not submerging resistant and unlike recent apple watches, certainly not swim proof. So in other words, you can sweat in them and get some rain on them while you're out running in a hoodie or something, but don't drop them in the pool for any length of time. And don't even think about swimming with them. The power beats pro come with and in a charging case like air pods. But like the buds themselves that case is proportionately bigger. If I was into makeup, I'd say lipstick versus Compaq, and then probably get yelled at by everyone actually into make up a chicken nugget versus a junior burger, I'll spare you any more painful analogies and just say this I can fit them into the pockets of my non hipster non skinny jeans of holding. But if you typically spray paint, your pants on you're going to need to throw them into your gear, Jim or go back, the one big downside is that the power beats pro case. Unlike the air pods case doesn't have a wireless inductive charging option, and if you've gotten used to that with any of your tech, it's hard to give the convenience up hopefully beach will release one at least at some point. The power beats case, though, unlike air pods is designed to sit and charge while open, so they may take up more space, but they can do so on display I wanted to break out the controls because their actual physical controls. And I think that deserves some extra attention air pods are super elegant, and that's great but still for many. People nothing beats the crunchy clicky tactile sensation of actual physical controls and power beats pro has them on both pods identically and be controlling -ly. You can press the big beats logo on the front to play or pause answer or end calls and even hold it down to activate Siri if you don't like voice activation. You can also double click to skip forward and triple kick to skip back. Double click and hold too fast forward and triple click and hold to rewind. There's also a volume rocker on each. But. Yeah. Hon device volume each but superb. I'm not an audio file whatever. The opposite of a golden ears is I'm that like a fool's golden ears. They sound good to me though. So far fuller and richer than air pods and not as bass heavy as I expected by colleague and noted rocker, Laura Gill is going to be doing a full on audio of you though. But here her early thoughts. I'll keep listening for the rest of the week and let you know, my thoughts as well along with the thoughts of people way better at Cutty. Oh than I am apple rates. The power beats pro up to nine hours of listening and six hours of talk time. Her ear bud and says, you can fast charge them from zero to one point five hours in just five minutes or zero to four point five hours in just fifty minutes, which is sweet fulltime takes ninety minutes. Pop them back into their case. And you can recharge them almost two more times for a grand total of twenty four hours as to how accurate those numbers are. And how much they vary in real world usage. It'll take me some time to test that and figure it out. So I'll cover that in the full review the ear pods are fully independent as well. So you can use them one at a time. If you want to and charge the case while using the pods, which takes two and a half hours. But also means if you manage things right the battery life is affecting unlimited. I've been doing this with air pot since they launched, and it's absolutely one of my favorite things about them. The case charges over lightning, which is better than micro USB, but not as cool as USB C, which would be the new standard. If everyone especially apple would just hurry up and support it as that standard. That aside this power situation is super smart, and I go so far as to say almost perfect. It makes. Wireless, an ultra mobile more than just manageable. It makes it almost transparent. The power beats pro have Apple's new dedicated H one headphone ship one in each bud while the w one turn into w two and w three and ran off with the apple watch the H one taking its place does less general wireless things and more things specific to what you want in wireless audio. Yes, they still make pairing ludicrously easy on IOS devices including iphone ipad, apple watch. And even apple TV and even quick and clean on the MAC and thanks to cloud. Once you pair on your iphone or ipad, the pairing is just propagated to every other device on your account. H one also makes it faster to switch between devices. Like, I said in my air pods to review what used to take me, multiple clicks and taps and several long seconds. Now seldom if ever takes more than one power beats same deal H one also enables on pot Siri. And again, it doesn't sound like a big difference. Whispering into your power beats instead of shouting at your iphone or whatever. But it really is. It's. Near field, ambient computing, and once you get into it just working walking working out living life with an assistant always available. You wonder how you ever lived in the dark ages without one H one is also what let's each ear pod work with full independence. There's no primary pod. Then relays the secondary pod. Which means you don't have to care which one you wear. Both get optimized connection straight from the source and both can control the source equally. They can't really fight over it. So you don't have to worry about them vying for dominance of your ears. They'll intelligently figure out which one should be listening at any given time or last control. Click winds optical sensors, let the power beats detect when they're in your ears. So they can take over audio or when you pop them out. So the audio can automate pause. There's also an accelerometer that detects when the pods are stationary and not in use. So they can go into deep sleep mode and save your battery life, that's all aces. But it's also the same as air pods. What's cool? What's new, and what's different is a second exceleron monitor? That detects your mouth moving like. When you're talking paired with a beam forming, Mike and each pod it helps filter out noise. So your call sound crisp and clear since power beats don't have the elongated Mike like air pods. That's really a clever work around especially considering the mic quality knocks on other similar wireless headsets. In the meantime, if you're curious about this crazy new age of computational audio checkout. Brilliant brilliant offers dozens of interactive courses, including ones on algorithms and machine learning that you explore on your commute while traveling or just about anywhere even off line. Download any of their dozens of interactive courses through the mobile app, and you'll be able to solve fascinating problems in math, science and computer science, no matter where you are or how spotty your internet connection is. What's awesome about these courses that they're totally interactive? You'll experiment with pendulum clocks to master the physics of motion use rockets to model algebraic functions and learn probability by playing casino blackjack. So if you want to support vector and get unlimited access to all. Brilliance. In-depth math and science courses. You can head right on over to brilliant dot org slash vector and get twenty percents off their annual premium subscription. Thanks brilliant. Thanks to all of you. If you wondering how the power beats pro work with Android. The answer is similarly to air pods. You still connect them over bluetooth. So none of that special pairing magic, but they still have complete independence. You can still control them. Listen to them one at a time. Both at a time, you can even tap and hold to launch the assistant of your choice. Power beats pro in black or available for order now and shipping this month, the other colors and yes, unlike air pods. They also come in navy blue moss. Green and ivory white though. Sadly, not product red. At least not yet. We'll be available later this summer they cost two hundred and fifty dollars which is ninety dollars more than air pods or fifty more than the air pods with the inductive charging case that can cause some sticker shock, especially if you're used to making your purchase decision strictly based on audio quality power beats Provo like air pods. What you're really paying for is the tiny tech squeezed. Inside the H one chip the sensors and everything else that lets them pair easily and quickly and power up fast. And last long if you just want audio quality stick to wires. If you want truly wireless next generation, convenience and. Yeah, coolness and you want more than what air pods currently provide. Then you want our beats at least that's what I think at least right now after just twenty four hours, but I'll be back in a week or so with my full review, so hit lake hit subscribe. So you don't miss it. And then hit up the comments and let me know what you think will power beats pro be your next headset. Why or why not thank you so much for watching and see you next video.

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TechFan Podcast 452 - Cassette

TechFan

1:07:56 hr | 3 months ago

TechFan Podcast 452 - Cassette

"You're listening to another great podcast. In the my mac podcasting network tech fan podcast number. Four hundred and fifty two. I'm tim robertson. Joined by david. Cohen hello david. Hello doing well over there Yeah yeah well. Considering the hell whittle continued to live in news. It's been a good week. I dude i told you. I don't know this audio. you don't have to. Oh you mean the pandemic sorry on ongoing worldwide catastrophe. Yeah it's it's You get first poke. Yeah your i got. I got a champ and you saw my facebook post. I'm getting mining tomorrow. Well forty five minutes from right now. Tomorrow i will be getting mine. I don't know if it's the pfizer. I do know it's the two shot once. So it's either that or madonna or murderer or whatever the hell it is. Yeah so that's that's tomorrow for me. And i i'm excited. I was i found out on Friday i was at work and i got a text. There's a local grocery store. It's a farm. It's a big place There are pharmacy toy. Store i guess you'd call it a department store. But it's big grocery and all that superstar i guess Called mayer and big here in the great lakes region chicago indiana ohio michigan but they started here and I think grand rapids michigan. I think that was the original one We had won a meyer back. When i was growing up it was called mayer thrifty acres and i remember They had by far the biggest toy selection so when my parents would go shopping at meyer. I always wanted to go. Not that i had any choice because you know But of course this was the seventies early eighties. So i didn't always have to go because i would be like i'm gonna go outside and play and there'd be okay. We're going to the grocery store. There's no one at the house. You wouldn't let your kids do that now. Hey we're going to go shop and you just go run around the neighborhood You you know that's what you did back in the day. So i would go to myers with them and i would just go up and down the toy line toil. Yeah yeah we just ruining yeah. We used to do when we went to. My parents went k. mart then like trauma the to target places not not not. The thing is like you say right. They'd say right we go shopping. You've got half an hour and then we'll see down the front and we would look at this stuff. We won't see drooling over the stuff that you know they're not gonna buy you For kmart we didn't have target until much much later. We didn't get a target. Until i was an adult but we had Kmart kmart was right behind Where my dad worked right. So i would get my allowance on friday and we would. I would go down. I would walk down or take my bike down to where my dad worked. And he'd give me my three bucks. Whatever it was. And then i would go over to k. mart. And you know when that when i doing that it was all about star wars figures and stuff like that toys and then when it hit up to Five bucks a week. I would either go down. Get my allowance. Quick because it was burning a hole in my virtual pocket and go to kmart to buy forty five somber forty dollars and then i got into comic books so then i wasn't going to kmart and anymore and i would not go there and get the money. Wait for data to bring it home. And then on saturday morning i would ride my bike up to this comic bookstore. That was quite a ways away. I mean it was a private good five miles away called collectors cove and it was this a little mom and pop shop and i would go up there and i would buy my comics. It was it was pretty cool. That that's i love those old memories of thinking about having a very small budget and getting specifically certain items that as a kid that that's what i want. I want to get i. The new comics coming out this week or spider man or batman or something But i spent a lot of money on forty fives to that. Was i loved forty fives. So what's happened to ally singles. Now he still haven't no. I don't remember. I don't even remember getting rid of them to be honest right. I mean obviously. I did. Because i don't have them now Norway even have the ability to play them. Yeah i have. They complain them anymore. We'll have a box somewhere in storage the hassle mild throw in. I didn't. I didn't have singles but i had Noble yeah have albums. Because deny been some i got into music singles went going away but the thing is i would record singles on of the radio. I while i remember when i first started it when it really dawned on me that hey this thing cullen album and you can get more songs. But they were you know it. It was more than my whole album. Yeah But when i finally started getting into that i was buying cassettes. Yeah it wasn't albums yes. I was never into the physical record. When i first started getting albums it was cassette and then obviously cd's But the only records. I ever really bought i remember. I bought the audio book too. I wanna say return of the jedi Where it was kind of a cheesy book. But it had you know. The guy didn't narrate the entire story. It was it was pretty lame but they had sound effects from the movie. That's right is that the one way i when you read along with. I had we had one that way. You read a soul. So you read along with the book and everytime To make his his signature beeping noises. That was when they were telling you to send the page. Yeah it's exactly what it was the same one. Yeah i remember I find your lack of faith disturbing star wars one to and that it had the actual audio from the movie in it that i that to me. That was awesome. I lack of faith. I love that And then i remember that return to i him saying when you can tell him that when he arrives. And just all the the the way vader would say that and then the guy's just shitting himself like oh. He's coming here. He's most displeased with your parents. Lack of progress. Wish double our efforts so good. I always read the thinking. Well not even worse. I know to be behind. But then when you say to redouble their efforts that basically proves the emperor's right and you've been slacking you've been slacking casino. Look how much. We got time. When you had the emperor's not as forgiving as i and you're like jesus how bad is this guy when vader's like you've been screwing around i've nice about it really really you want. You got to wait. Could prove a shows up. You're screwed you. Look at fra. i've been talking to. They're doing their best. That you have no idea what the weather is like here so bad. i've got. I've got suppliers. Let me down left. Right and center. You not going bothering came to unions wanting to renegotiate. What do you want me to do. Yeah dan plumbing union. Yeah i haven't got anywhere near enough charging points to the droids. I mean how to deliver on this. Yeah it's It's just that'd be pretty funny you remember. That would be and ski. He did in the lunchroom camp cafeteria. This one's what does what do you know who i am. That's one of my favorites. Actually but i of course. It wasn't a lego one but the guy animated his little bit. And it's just it's so good. It's one of my favorites of all time anyways. Let's jump into tech fan here since you know we. We just mentioned about recording stuff off the right. Yeah yeah kinda sad news and we're also doing this as part of our wookey. Trolling thing but I saw this i. I'm i'm kinda glad. I i saw you know five seconds while i was on a lunch break looking on my phone. I saw and i thought. Oh that'd be something we're talking about so go ahead. What well this is This is the guy who invented tightly. Walton's died at the ripe old age of ninety four. Yeah a law people forget nowadays that philips the dutch company invented this stuff named ventured the compaq says as being the lead on the compact disc. It's funny his goal. I'm looking at the los angeles times. Obituary that you linked his goal is making tapes and their players. Far more portable and easier to use because. Look the cassette. Tape wasn't the beginning of Recording to a magnetic tape they had real to reel that that was invented and twenty three And they had a in recording studios in radio. Stations is early as the thirties and it was very complex stuff to use. This guy took that basic concept and although the tapes were a little different And he wanted he had. He carried a block of wood in his pocket and the goal was to have the player and a tape. Take up about same amount of space and you can't really argue with his success And think about you know he. He basically created an entire industry from his invention. So while we talk about this guy. Let's talk about the cassette tape as well. Because it's our wikipedia. Wiki trolling Commonly called the tape cassette cassette tape audio cassette or simply tape or cassette. It would to me. It was always those were always interchangeable. Do you got you got a blink tape you gotta cassatt you got you and you had really two kinds you had the prerecorded cassette which was records like. We were talking about earlier albums Do you remember the single cassettes. It would be one song young. Rip off to me. I think i had a couple of days. Oh everybody hype blank tape. Yeah it was just people people. Some people want to listen to singles call Yeah there's two things that conduct strikes strikes me about except tape. First of all is the miniaturization they something that was expensive and very fiddly a bake. There's something really was only yes. They're professionals or for very rich people. Yeah and they miniaturized it to something that the allowed portability and transform them the way we listen to music but the second thing for me. I you know anybody who's ever use cassette tapes now the every now and again there. We go wrong with tangled up in your player and it used to be the you know if a tangled up. Somebody's car you wonder. If sometimes you just wander around on the street or in accomplish something you need to see. The massive tangle of time resources obviously yanked out they call yanked till the bits that the come off and then and the end it was broken at that point and then just come thrown on the street when people to listenable A new see those long around but generally they were absolutely you know they were pretty reliable. Not particularly high quality but pretty reliable. And i think the reliability they built into that platform it really astonishes me more than anything else because it was completely mechanical and yet You ninety five percent the time. It was relatively flawlessly. It was introduced in september nineteen sixty. Three came in two forms already recorded content in prerecord content. Remember when you found out that you could stick a piece of paper or something in the little hole at the top and record over. A prerecorded tape mess right. Yeah that little tab out so you could. Nobody could record over that. That six you'd make you'd make a mix tape for someone. You had a bus. That little thing screwing up my mix tape. Technology was originally designed for dictation machines but improvements of fidelity led to the compact cassette to supplement the stereo eight track cartridge in reel to reel tape recording in most non-professional applications When i was in high school deciding what i wanted to do for a living One of the things. That was very appealing to me and it went way back in in years for me Probably to honestly laying in front of a bow speaker that my dad had with a cassette recorder trying to record another one bites the dust or something In listening to the dj you know he talking about traffic and weather and he's talked about. This song is about to play And back in the day the idiot would just talk right over the music. Don't don't that would start in. He wouldn't shut the f up. Destroy crazy as mike. Can this guy shut up for a minute. But the the idea there's a guy and he's probably pushing some buttons. You know dropping a a needle on a record player at that point but there was a guy somewhere this his whole job is to play this music. I wanted to be that guy. I wanted to be the guy behind the microphone. That people are listening to. I just thought that would be so cool. And so i actually Intern very briefly with local radio station. And because i i wanted to be the guy behind the mike and technology and all these real real that they had set up in these cartridges that they would in and it would play automatically play. This prerecorded content. All of that technology was tape based and it was fascinating to me by a lot of mixed tapes as well. Yeah and the other thing of course is the one that can pieces came along. i'm computers. That was a way you could distribute software. You could write programs on the computer and then save them toward year tightly They had a system where they could turn the the bits and bites of the of the program into sound and then recall that on the tape so that you can then load up again off towards And get yourself back. And of course that allowed commercial software to be distributed to these very progressive systems are certainly couldn't afford to do anything with your memory light. We do today with usb sticks or anything not because it was expensive so whereas the compact cassette was cheap enough that it would could be used as a distribution mechanism for software so cassette culture compact cassette served as a catalyst for social change their small size durability and ease of copying helped bring underground rock and punk band music Like to the iron curtain I do remember especially in the eighties. There was a big thing where these bans would record their own music behind the iron curtain and smuggling the tapes out and there was a whole underground thing that that independent record stores would have how they got him eventually. I don't know but i remember buying obsessively copies of blank tapes with music on it from artists that were you know in east berlin and i their was awful singing but the talent was obviously there but more importantly the passion. These people had for their music knowing that it's underground that they weren't allowed to be doing some of the stuff that they had smuggled stuff out so you could hear it. I remember that was that was huge but the reverse was true at all y. Was true as well that music was getting sent in and not just music but you know politics and stuff like that. And that's how a lot of messages were if you will getting beyond the wall in. The compact disc was one hundred percent responsible for a lot of that kind of sharing of information. There was no there was no number one. It was cheap very inexpensive and number two. It was small compact and portable. You can get it in and you could hide it. Yeah that was. That was cool. Where was also you know. It was a very anytime you allow people to communicate better and communicating by by. Lay down sermons laying down his laying down your thoughts even on audio and then began to send that to other people and you go to remember. They he will. It wasn't long after the the arrival of the compact certainly in the s that double double cassette systems became very wealthy valuable. She very quickly copy from well. Not quickly but you could duplicate one to one. There was an people. Nowadays the younger kids anyways. It didn't really grow up the cassettes. They can skip songs instantly. They hit you next in. The next song is playing. We had to hit fast forward and it would fast forward the tape until the next song. You wouldn't hear anything but it would fast for the tape. Remember when you got your first one that would auto sense the space between tucson serve and stop clack and start playing. And you're like wow that's like how does it. No that's amazing and went to the next on and the walls a lot awful lot of innovation around the cassette tapes. I remember i mean you. And i were. Hi fi buffs. So you know when you if you had something you really wanted special when the first cds came along and you you didn't have a cd player yourself but somebody had the cd and you wanted to record the recalled the album so you can listen on cassette. You would often. If they had a high end rig you would go out and buy a chromium based type or or even even better metal vase type which which captured more of the audio fidelity because it uses a different for relational mcconnell type plastic and And that was. That was more high end. And then if you combine the cr- haiyan chrome tape coupled with does that was. Yeah that was you. That was the business and that was because you weren't gonna get type missile. Not bad boy. And yeah you you. i mean. Those are in the crowd. Particularly missile types costs absolute fortune. All they were three times the cost lee. They were really remember. Kmart we talked about came earlier. I remember you didn't get a shrink wrap hanging on a hook. Three blank cassettes. They were white and they were the worst quality in the world but they were like two ninety nine. Three cassettes bad price. But like what's casali crap. that's right. Yeah whereas the metal types they were there with metal type of secretive always incredibly. Well packaged some of them. Even had metal shells as well Who's really remain. Feel what you dealing with high in southern coast then. Cd came along and blew all the way and well. That was nothing when when the cd really hit its stride in. The nineties started in the eighties but he didn't really take off until the nineties. In fact one of the things. Sales of prerecorded music and the us dropped from. Four hundred and forty two million in nineteen ninety two two hundred seventy four thousand by two thousand and seven you know in a seventeen year period. They went from you. Know four hundred forty two million tonight even barely over a quarter of a million which is just Most major us music companies had discontinued. Production of prerecorded cassettes by two thousand. Three which means by two thousand and three if someone came out with a new album is not a cassette anymore. Yeah which seems. Be a long time to well. Because cds cds really took over possible listening even though actually the spirits with this posible cd play with substantially west than cassette anti skipping thing. Yeah out that changed everything that way walls but even though the the players will would much bulkier than a woman and also they battery life in losses long either. Well it's not been this thing very fast takes a lot of that takes energy and you gotta remember in the car that you didn't get a music cds in your car for a long time. Even though you we had the portable things in the boombox stereo cds. You're not gonna get in the car because if you hit a pothole or something you can rule in your your cd. I mean not need that the plays were very expensive. And so you know. It's much cheaper than this book. Set player in college still human. We had those things which would which was like accent. And why i come out of it. And you plug three and a half mil jack on the end possible. Cd player you would put put that. And then of course that we use that for the ipod as well too For digital plug that in so that you could hear it in the car. The last new car with an available cassette player was twenty ten laxest. Se for thirty. What were what were they really to twenty ten lexus lexus. As well as a car brand in the you are well maybe maybe by then the people who had to be sick collection while the people that was biology that particular car was probably in his at the time sixties and seventies fangled new music. Dane out just gave me a cassette player like i got all these cassette. I still have customers to this day. That is very upset that none of our cars have a cd player in it. What what do you mean. cd player. I got a huge question cds. I mean it is what it is. Well you can always have that fitted i mean. You don't have to tell you where i know. I tell them that and they never do. Although i did have one customer do it. And it looked like awful. Yeah but she was happy. Yeah going to be going to be honest. I'm buying a six-month-old call next week. I'm picking up next the next week and that has cds. London dwells on cd play noah. I would have been about two three years. That most manufacturers started doing away with them. And here's the thing though. Let's be honest. Cassettes founded great. Not even the high quality was inherited All the players that you especially the high end players always had Mechanical switches that. You'd switch to try to get the audio sound better. It would you know anti kissing and yeah noise reduction things to make us better and some of it actually worked. The dolby stuff generally did But the cd sounded way better. Why it was because you can go to the next song like that. You know the laser. Just move forward so that was a big deal but the audio quality was ten times. What it was on gazette. It's debatable whether it's better than record some people are like. Oh no the the mechanical the the original analog sound is so much better eh debatable. it depends on how it was. You know recorded i. I've always thought because you know i. I didn't have great record plan but it was i record player. It wasn't it wasn't the absolute bogging by spent. I spent a decent money on a cartridge proper cartridge for it and took care of my record for the problem was i just found that you were. It was impossible without spending a lot of money to be able to play records back without the this the pope's and the things from dustin and what have you and someone. Whenever anybody made the argument. I always thought well. Yeah if you're using a very high on record player and you know you treat your records in in the mice perfect way possible and you don't have any dust and everything like that. Maybe it rival cd. But the problem is cds is so robust. And that's the thing and it goes back to what saying about compaq said before it was robust. So you know you can pretty much. Unless he's got deep scratches on the you can use a cd and it will sound. Who does it always does. Lemonade remember using remember the cd re surfacing kits that you buy yeah that polish out scratches. Yeah yeah they were to use those on some computer disks. I remember I was fortunate that way. Back in the day Blizzard sent me a copy of starcraft mac and it was literally a year before it came out. Anybody could buy an i with permission. That's why they sent it. I had published a first look of of starcraft on the mac and my magazine and you know and went on the website eventually. But this is before really. The internet was much of anything In that i would get emails from people wanting me to. Can i get a copy of somehow. People were so desperate for this game. Yeah it was one of those rare ones that i was one of the first in the world to have something online about this game and i scratch that desk and i was like. Oh my god. This sucks i had a cd polishing kit. That i put it in the machine and it would go around and it would do its thing and it actually worked at fixed it. I i was like because it was. It was a one of a kind. That's all there was i. They weren't going to send me another beta. Cd that's wasn't going to happen and remember this wasn't dvd. This was cd. So but anyways magnetic tape More pain cassette one thing. Yeah one thing that had the that we lost when we met cds as you mentioned before being make mix tapes You know for many years. You couldn't make your own cd's and then even when you did it was expensive. You needed a computer. You needed some skills to be able to cut your own trucks to a read right so rewritable cd and even then a lot of times. Those wouldn't work in regular cd very well. They tend to always working compete drives in the volunteers. The set had his. It was easy to make your own mix tapes. I mean we we have that back now. Obviously you can do your digital stuff and you can. Even you can send somebody apply list you put together from the streaming service but We lost we. We had about ten fifteen years when the mix site conaway. Because you just couldn't do it anymore. Well you know. I was making. I could do it on cd. I remember making mix cds. I tunes. I put my playlist together and just burn it to a cd. You remember when burning. Cd's itunes was. That was huge. But that but that's the thing though that the cd really came to prominence in the mid ninety s right. We didn't get burning until burning. Didn't come 'til 'til early. Two thousands radio only became a foldable about two thousand four two thousand and five and that's when the public's coming along when that she what you might do is you might say well i'm going to you know we're gonna listen to our i put together with a with a a playlist. I put together Was putting. I was putting mix cds. Probably i started right around two thousand and two thousand one And i had a huge collection. Because i had ripped early all my cd's to my computer. Yeah Not all of them at first because dr space wasn't that big But that that. I was putting mix cds together and i loved it. I thought it was fantastic. It's so different now and let's be us. It's way better now. Everything is better now when it comes to distribution of music. Maybe not so much for the record companies. Because they're not making anything like they used to but i don't care about their business It's way better for people you know. I can pick up my phone right now. If i wasn't using his video camera and just say play such and such zero replay such and such in syria. We'll play that song whether it's on the phone right now or not. It will stream that song and play it for me. I have instant access to any song. I want to hear on my phone immediately right. Now in great audio quality It's almost magic you know and it hasn't been that long some people the year two thousand may have seem like a long time ago really wasn't it really wasn't that long ago And and look how far we've come you know we've had more innovation in the last twenty years than we did the century before. Let's see but i'm still waiting for those crystals from the movie. Because that's when it's when it's paid media wait for flying cars got him. So lou oughtn't Yeah hats off to you man you were. I'll be honest with you. I didn't know who you are. I didn't know you were the inventor but you had a huge profoundly important impact on young. Tim's life with player and Back from a day when a single person from atlanta. It's not like that anymore. No now speaking speaking of creating a product. You have a link that we put in the show notes while ago now we just got to best fake ipods of twenty twenty one I knew that there was a big market for fake ipods. their airpods i should say not ipods. Airpods somebody somebody can make a fake ipod. Nobody would give crafts Do they sound good. I mean who would show. I wonder would go out and buy a pair of fake ipods with the same type of look the same type of charging little. I've always thought that the charging case for the airpods looked like a little thing that you'd get of loss and yeah yeah It's eight i find with my eye. Upholds pro sometimes. I pick up my airpods pro and then charge. And that's because a little piece of dust. Something from gotten in there and the tiny little contacts had been blocked by and hasn't changed and if he saw me it does that i'm kind of blowing in. They're trying to get it out. I'm thinking himself is really the best design you know he's cool and it's convenient everything but The fact that sometimes you can pick up and just hasn't charged them kind of annoys me but you're you go but the promo with this article this is on. This is on tom's guide which is Used to be tom's hardware and there's a well a well known long standing technical website for for those who like catches and that sort of thing. It offends me that they've written a whole article here about knowledge of products and reviewing knockoff products. Because you don't have to buy in ear headphones that were like the airpods. The have copied apple's design. You can buy. There are hundreds and hundreds of brands. a models of different inner ear headphones that work very similarly to the airports you know they have a magnetic charging case they stick in your ear they have a lot button only outside for pairing and playing music and all that sort of thing but they don't look anything like the airpods are there on designed but though they chose to specifically say which are the best fake airpods and to me. I find it really kind of horrible. We constantly criticizing the west china's lax attitude to copyright and intellectual property. And yet here we are here. We have website. That's basically reviewing they real legitimate products. These all your real legitimate products. Yeah but they're real illegitimate products because then knock offs and they are knockoffs no question and in many jurisdictions these would be banned as being You know a copyright infringement and won't be allowed to sell them in the oven so what's copyright Is it the shape of the Wireless headphones is that the charging case is the combination of the two. I mean really. I think so. But i mean how. I've got a pair of headphones. On right now ak jeez. They're not too similar to this pair of sure headphones right here. David yeah i by the way the basic friends before we started. I can't see what you're waiting. But i get it. Yeah and you're absolutely right over ear. Headphones generally look the same. But the thing is. I have a pair of ear headphones on. And if you put mine down next to y'all's Each of us would way belt. Say whose was whose because they're not just copying each other yeah there hasn't help Whereas these ones all specifically these old specifically designed to fool people into thinking you have the apple airpods right there are legitimate clones if you will which is gene klein spent you know what i meant. Yeah it's it kind of thing it it. It leaves a bad taste in my mouth. Expect more from tomsk guide. Yeah that's what it was tom's hardware. I think they got bought out because the original hardware would never have done this now especially when we have a sense of says. Just be aware that wasi these are all current favourite fake airports. I mean they're archie calling fake apples in the article. Even trying to say well these awesome nice epilogue style headphones thought they call them fake apple and am i find that distasteful. I agree with you. One hundred percent down with that. It's why why give any legitimacy or Attention to somebody. That's companies that are just ripping another company off blatantly. Why why from the many french point. i don't understand. Eat each the manufacturers listed here recognize some of these night who go anka. we've got all ki- we've got tatra knicks. They all make nonlocal headphones as well. Presumably the same tekken. So i don't understand why they feel the need to make fight ones as well. It's a serious money but Is because some people want to have something that looks legit when it's not because they want to spend the money well and that's kind of what it is isn't it. Yeah and i am some sympathy with that view. I think that you know. The airpods saw great products as they all They're certainly very expensive. And there's a debate to be had about with the with the money you spend on them so an my tends to be that the probably overpriced bearing in mind that they will fail within three three years along that the is will die and use them away. So that's my big. That's why i like the headphones. I have on right now. There are no batteries to die yet and they are arguably they sound a lot better than airpods. Two yeah And they don't hurt my ears. I got my reading glasses on right now and it. It's not a great feeling stuck in here but you're out and about a yeah. I remember Probably about ten years ago. I had a one an early pair of my sorolla over over ear headphones bluetooth on them so they want us And they were great value back then. They went particularly expensive and they sounded great. And they were wireless and that's what you wanted. I remember working somewhere and wearing these every day to from the station and gang. A lot strange looks because back. Then people didn't wear big headphones out in the pound public. Now they do and now it nobody would look twice but back then they didn't and i think that's the voltage that any headphones have is some people want something a bit less obtrusive. And certainly if you're if you're in somewhere where it's very cold you need. You need any soft because you need something that can be worn under a full hat that covers. Your is up so-called so there are places for these things but again the you know as i say you can you can build and design these things without aping the intellectual property the apple together. Yeah it's it's Disappointing but it's also not really surprise. Surprise china china is just been. It's bad how how much they're stealing. And i don't see an end to the problem until politics get a little bit stronger against him but what gets me about honestly a lot of this is people are complaining about china and how bad they are and how much they're cheating but what they don't seem to realize is that they have all of this stuff. This manufacturing they're not because they they did anything wrong. It's because all these companies went there knowing that they can save a lot of money if they produce products there you so in some respects you got to look at apple and say hey you know what you're the one that's in power in these people. It's kind of your own fault. You're taking advantage of essentially slave labor to make products cheap enough that we can buy them here in the west. And then you're bitching because some of the companies in china or just copying your stuff. Well can you have it both ways. I mean yeah. I think that's part of the problem is The of rights infotainment going on because you know apple has the pockets to go off these guys if they wanted to and they just don't bother because there's such a low level competitor they don't really apple's attitude is well the people who are buying those things probably never gonna buy our apple two anyway so it's not even worth spending the money finding them but of course by by doing that you are also enabling the intellectual property theft and you know what part the other the other part of the problem. Is you know at today in in this world where we live in yeah. Intellectual property theft is is probably quite low down on the list of urgent problems needs to be solved When when your company was to go after companies in china for intellectual property theft while you're using a obsessively slave labor in that same country to make your product. I don't have a lotta sympathy for you to be honest with you. There are other ways of dealing with that. I mean you could block the implementation of these types of things you could stop people online reviewing them and selling them. You know you could step in and make sure that amazon gets rid of all the stuff that ebay gets rid of all the stuff that that's no market for it in the west and then people would make it anymore. They make these things because that purchased here in in larger numbers to make it worthwhile to Two copies copy of people. Stop speaking of apple. What do you think about the story of apple. Discontinuing discontinues the original home pod. And they're only going to focus on the mini. I think this is them expressing their mistake. If you will That the homepod was just too expensive. Yea and they apparently company years ago reduce the price of three hundred dollars but even three hundred dollars. It was very expensive. And most of the people i've heard talk about. This have said the part of the problem with home. Paul distant really really into you need to stereo stereo found to have good audio fidelity. Yeah if you just want a little speaker in your living room to pipe some music in there while you're cleaning or sobbed sheriff's fine or in the kitchen while you're cooking that's fine but if you actually want to sit there and experienced music and listen to music. There is no bookshelf single speaker. That's gonna sound better than the pair clips clips that. I have sitting in front of me right now. You after speaker a rice speaker in sub on the floor. You're not going to touch that sound system not any one speaker or even if there's multiple speakers in the box you have to have that separation. You gotta have true stereo. We have two years left right. Yeah that's how we lost a sound and spatial it. There's just no comparison. But i think i think to cancel a lot of people probably all listening to music on single speakers now. It's a worse experience when it comes to A casual listen. But i'm talking about true really listening and enjoying music. It's not the same. It just isn't old buddy stuff. This is science but must people. Most people don't really care about quality even listen to music. I mean back in the diner law people listen to music on really terrible sandy transistor radio and they just didn't care as long as they could hear it they didn't know any better and and well that's true but that was that was always apple's problem with the police that they pitched as a high end speaker system single. I gotta be honest. I mean the the single a single home pulled always sound extremely impressive. Even i'm sure the having to was even better but a single one always ended extremely impressive to me but the problem is that the price it was at off. They reduced the price. it was a speaker. It was a nice quality music system. That just happened to have a lady a lady. The lady speaker bill in the problem is series. Not very good and you've got an ecosystem of the more than one to make a law sense with them and your compete your competitors or selling Things that are less than one hundred dollars that can do the same job and you know. I have a right in the desk from me here. And the latest amazon echo dot yet or not the very latest not their bowl on but the one before that the lost power with the fabric on the side. Now i use it mostly to listen to music at my desk when i'm working because it sounds a hundred and fifty percent better than just playing music of my iphone yasser anne. It means i'm not tied down by headphones. Yeah right right. And i would say that as ambient sounded probably is less hold on my ears than even the airports And the thing is now. I could buy many occupy regular home and it would sound even better but it opening more money to give give me something that won't have now is perfectly adequate a much better than manual to cives so and the echo dot cost me thirty pounds. So that's the problem is what you're competing with And the differentiation. Just wasn't it wasn't a differentiates that many people are interested in one hundred eight. They should have sold the homepod a loss they sold at a loss a made it. Maybe hundred fifty hundred. Ninety-nine yet they probably won't assault an awful lot more of them and then the then you get in league system. It's people's houses which is that. She the objective. The speakers amazon doesn't sell these things because they want to give people nice speakers in their homes these because they get their ecosystem into people's the that the first thing you think of when you think of buying anything or already anything well. Listening to anything is going through amazon. That's what the game is. And that's not apple's game last part of the problem for we do get some feedback. So let's talk about this a little bit. We got two things from john morowski and Steve steve inskeep sta statistics Steve wrote Thought of the show. Wallace into the mattel discovery episode on geeks pub. If you guys aren't listening to the geeks pub podcast. We hope that you join us over there every other week when we're not doing tech fan. We're doing gigs pub. And last episode. We did a whole big thing on one division. And we've got cool stuff coming up On the next week's pub we're gonna be talking about. I think i think it comes up by then. The first episode of Winter soldier falk in. I think that comes out in time. But i do. I'm pretty sure like. I know for fact that the justice league snyder cut. That's that's four hours that we're going to have to dedicate to to watching that. We might have to skip that for two weeks after. Because that's that's a commitment. I don't know if i've got four hours to watch that before. We require the next episode. We'll see But he's listening to the mattel discovery episode. Where we're talking about star trek discovery. We're also talking about the my Mattel computer that i bought And he says as you say you've probably heard the story hundred times But they interview the guy who wrote the et game pretty extensively. The shows on netflix february. Hope it's still there now. A march show he's talking about. It's called high score He's talking about howard scout warsaw. He was an employee at atari. Who was kind of a wonder child for a little while there and et is considered by some not by me but by some as either a the worst video game of all time. It's not or the game that brought down the video game market back in the day and that's not true either but why was a colossal market disappointment. And certainly well. Yeah you know it wasn't. It was very much came across like a waste of a license. But then you hear the story and you realize wise because the guy had seeks weeks to write it and six weeks to write a game in for a game that came out in six weeks from literally nothing a concept to delivery it was pretty amazing and when he had a very funny ideas about what he wants to gain to be what he kind of wanted to be an e. where maybe or a pac man clone where yeah well that he's eating receive species and honestly if they would have done that it probably would have been a better game for what it was. I had that game when it came out. I was very excited to get it I hated it. I kept falling these stupid holes. I wasn't even close to a fallen a frigging whole all the time. I never finished the game. I gave up on. It wasn't a good game but it wasn't the game that killed the industry but they did an interview on this show called high-score with him. I'm actually reading a howard's book right now. He wrote a book that just came out. Maybe a couple weeks a couple of months ago at this point. I'm having hard time getting through it. It's not a very good book. I'll be honest with you But mostly because. I know the story very well already and so. I'm like this other things that could be reading right now. I i watched the high. Cv series and okay. It was okay if felt like a bunch of clubs from a somebody's time net flicks era youtube series or something. It wasn't yeah. It wasn't very coherent and In the interest of the problem was it was full of graphics. Yeah eight bigger things and and it was a bit light on content On cut-up yeah it tended to to really not dig between bill below the surface of the stories. It was presenting Right they just scratched a couple of topics they'd move on and you're like wait a minute there. And some of that's really follow the video game industry for many years I know some of the stories that they were talking about and they didn't touch upon any of the really truly interesting aspects of the story they didn't go in-depth and talk to the more interesting people. Like yeah this is kind of dumb. I suppose i ain't probably hitting the market was aimed at which is for people who may be doug no the very to keep them a retro. Look back but nothing wrong with that. But i just know that. There's a lot better stories that they could have yeah and And yeah that's what it is. But yes i having said all that. I think it's probably worth a watch if you're interested in the topic It's kind of fun to see some of the people as they all now or as when they were interviewed. Because sometimes there The interviews are older And yeah you know what i mean. We have a direct connection to that time as well as atari own. Ruben comes on the show occasionally. And owens with apple now but he was at atari he was even apple back in the day so battles he did and he designed a victory gay major having that you know what for many years major have heard of it and you never saw anyone on i now notice. It appears more and more whenever he does like a retrospective or a collection of emulated games and everything measure havoc is always there nowadays. It seems to be funding. Some sort of rene salons anyway. It's to balance some time. We we should all back on the show soon. I always like it when we got to Pieces of feedback. If you owe from john morowski from my mac dot com I kinda them to one. Yeah the first one. Yeah he says. The best tech ipod classic holds millions of songs easiest as best best best for navigation and writing racing writing. These are so difficult on the new screen phones lonely. The ipod classic i will. I will say for ratings. It is way better than either on a computer Well no the computers better but it's way better than rate to write music on an ipod than it is on the iphone and i think yes. People don't rate music at all anymore. John well care the thing is if they're streaming then the algorithm is is doing the right thing for you because it looks like what you're searching on what you're listening to and it's basically generalizing kind of What you like thing in the background argue the pros and cons of that but But navigation your percent wrong job it is not great for navigation depend on it was depending on how i pick one song and go to on your ipod. Classic and i'll pick on my iphone and just tell it the song to play the is right. If i've already created my own playlist. I just tell it to play that playlist if i want to hear an album. I just tell siri to play that album. If i want the best of steely dan i i would never listen to steely dan Like four songs from that. I like I can just tell siri to do that. Nev now of course. Yeah you might be annoying guy on the flight constantly talking to siri. But don't you can't tell me that advocation talking about non verbal even then it's not just scrolling. Let's say you want to listen to z. Z. top you scroll to artists push the enter button then you squirrel squirrel squirrel squirrel shorts across all the way down to z. Heaven forbid you've got five hundred different artists and there gonna take a little while to get down to see. And you can't see the video john but i've got the original ipod on a shelf behind me. I've had an. I have an ipod. Classic got a fifth generation with an esa. No it's got a mechanical hard drive in it. A five hundred gig. that's huge. It holds allow. no it's a one terabyte. Sorry one terabyte hard drive in it. The hold every piece of music and i still think every now and then david you can't say about him holding in my hand right now and i love the ipod. I think is fantastic device It sucks compared to an iphone. It just does from our to browsing. It's touch you can just flip your finger down and you'll skip half the i mean not navigation john. You're one hundred percent wrong to say that. I love you buddy but navigation no way and you say millions of songs. My phone doesn't have to hold a one song. I can listen to the everything. That was on everything i want. You mentioned Devil's advocate you. Mentioned being the plane. y flying the plane then none of that works siri accessing the songs in the cloud. None of it so if you want to. But if i'm going to jump on a plane probably download the music to my phone at that point and even allegation just using my finger is still better on the iphone than it is on the classic ipod. I think it depends. How how you got you music organized. I think if you're the salt pacers are even if even if i don't have organized on just going by artists i can take my finger tap. The letter goes right to that letter. Yeah there there's no comparising navigation. it's there just. Isn't i think again playing devil's advocate for for a minute. I think perhaps johnny's getting at is that when it came out the navigation on the ipod was so superior to anything else on the market that i would agree with when it came out. The ipod was it was amazing. I've got an original right behind me. You know i loved it I think that it is probably one of the most important pieces of technology that came out in into the two thousand starting at two thousand And it will really was the first part of the two thousands that was a giant massive success when there it didn't exist a before in any kind of form It came out in two thousand and one and it was just. It was amazing and it changed a lot of things especially when they made it compatible with. Pc's a year later. Yeah and they got rid of stupid. You fire wire four hundred and i'm i. I go a pac- compatible long as expected by by a fly y. Pc cod still with doing it. Because still the best music player in the market and hand but But yeah that was it. It wasn't even just the way of played music original once the. Da converters were just. Yeah it really was a a fantastic device really really was and what killed it. Apple killed themselves with the iphone. They released a better product The other one that he wrote in here You got the handy handy Yeah i'm guessing. Here's my problem with this. Because i don't know what the context of kansas typing eat did. Because i'm not know. Because of the. Yeah i i read it. I thought i don't know what he i think. He's talking about your portable word processor. I'm pretty sure that's what he was talking about. Because that's the only thing that makes sense. And so what was your word processor that he's referring to in here. Well i have to the cannon woman. I'm still came out and Yeah i don't think that would be handed out in the plane. Though i don't know on racial Maybe it was a video game console could be. I'm not sure. I'm i'm wondering if if the saints fourth years those. Yeah can't maybe it was. Like a gameboy something anyway. I'm john read this out. And then john you can brighten until his won't just autumn was a gameboy. Could we don't know. Yeah i'm guessing. It was about four years ago. He says i was flying somewhere in continental airlines alone dead anyway not lot people on the plane shortly after takeoff the stewardess wondering down the aisle looking for people for a reason. I don't know why because she did not have any booze in hand. Okay money my business. She asked me. Do you want one of these. I have no idea what it was not didn't look edible. I didn't look edible. So i said no. Thanks thanks thing on knew. She handed it to a guy across the aisle from me and he saw beeping and screeching and howling and growling guy. Pesek not him but the possible contraction in his hand. Exactly what you david were just describing. I'm not violent person. The all this almost took me into committing a capital offence. Nuff said different generations. I know. I think it was a baby raccoon. Yes okay you know. The guy was wrestling with a baby. Raccoon it was screeching and beeping and howling and growling. And 'cause baby raccoons do not like to be on a plane. So i don't i. Don't blame me john k. I might be wrong about that. It might be a video game or something. The hand held video games are awesome. I loved him back in the day. The stupid little led red button. I'll tell you i remember i. It is video game. Because i commented on the fact that the those old handheld video games did not have a fulling controls or headphone jack song. So that we'll be talking about so Yeah i can. Sympathize very replaced annoying ready. I don't think this is annoying. It off down. Here we go. That's not that's not bad. I'm at ten points. When i die i. I don't know what you're talking about. The cat literally just ran in here and me a dirty. Look it literally it. The cat is now looking at me. Like what in the hell was that. You have a mouse. Is that a mouse. Do get to eat whatever that thing is now. The cats in here are very excited because it thinks there was a mouse or something. Yeah i know that's not annoying. I don't no. I can We can sympathize with you on that. John i can't that's not the may be Maybe they followed the out with these. Johnny would bother nameless. So that's that's what. He was really mad about she. Booze what the hell coconut. I'll give me some booze. You guys are gonna go out of business here. And he was right. I thought i was still alcohol. An airplane the pros them is. There's a problem the airplane. He doesn't want to be trying to get drunk. People into lifejackets. Get them off. If there's a problem with an airplane. I want to get drunk or hitting me. We're going down some jack. Daniel's i hate them taste but you see that you see the one from the seven. The seven triple seven a couple of weeks ago where the The cowling fell of the plow. The ngo we talked about. That's right yeah. So in-flight boost sales on. That flight was on fire to engine was literally on fire in the cowling fell off. I'm my is getting drunk. Yeah i i'm i'm committing. Some cardinal offenses on that flight is not going well for somebody else on the flight. I'm going to have fun but somebody else is not going to have fun at my expense. You know leave it at that so with that. We're going to wrap up this episode of tech and we'd love to get feedback from you guys It's the show technion. Podcast dot com We're off twitter where facebook you can find us there. It's technology podcast. Both places you can also leave comments at tech fan. Podcast dot com or my mac dot com the mothership. Oh i got to that question. Oh so we love to get feedback from you guys. Hook hook us up. Hey this is kind of fun though. David one last thing before we wrap up now. I don't think guy in gaz on my mac podcast gonna talk about this other. They should because this was something from their show. So let me see if i could find it I think it's in the in box. I think it's the my podcast Yes it is so. This was a message from doug bonner I think last sunday spend a little bit a while ago. And he says i noticed last night that my son is still using the frogs over ear headphones that you sent me back in two thousand eight. When i was a guest on the show. Amazing thanks again. And he sent a picture of a son using those headphones cool and i replied It was actually two three line. Yeah you freeloader. Doing that's supposed to use them this long. I sent them a message back a screenshot and it was actually two thousand nine. Not two thousand and eight. But i sent him a screenshot back with his entry. I still had that mail everything into an archive folder. And sure enough he was. He's in British columbia canada. And there's is entry and you're actually on that episode david yup and i linked to it. It was episode two sixty two. We did an interview with ted landau on that episode. But i opened it with call. One of the we had two winters. One of them wasn't there didn't answer the phone or no. It was a very short conversation because we have that. Same person on later For a full interview. But i have the. It's on that episode. you can listen to it. I call Doug any answers. And he's like. Who is this. And i tell him and he's like oh and i said i'm just calling to tell you didn't win this time we're calling other losers. Yeah you probably remember that part. Yeah i talked to him for a few minutes. He talked about his computer use and all that it was really cool to hear from someone that listened to us. What two thousand nine was. How long ago. Eleven twelve thirteen years ago. Yeah no is cool. And i remember the remember the interview with ted landau go to be on a sudden. Remember the the high frogs co until you refresh my memory and then i rode david cohen. And i tim still podcast tech podcast and the geeks bob he wrote yes so maybe his still listener. That would be. I hope he is. And if you don't buy i dug being enjoy you. I folks. I've got to be honest. Congratulations again yeah busy. Spent to them to give that lascivious so if you wanna ride a follow up review by some maya mack how the i fronts fans it. I don't know if they came this way but it looks like there's some tape holding it or something i can't tell but it's cool nonetheless that you know someone that look. We didn't pay for the headphones. I fry was a sponsor you know the contest sponsor anyways i wanna spend my own money to send someone else something that's what sponsors are for But that's just really cool. I really got a kick out of that We'd love to hear from some of our long-term listeners. We've been doing this very very long time. I start podcasting in two thousand and four so you know a couple more years from now. David salvi celebrating twenty years recording in your right behind me because you started in two thousand five. If i'm not mistaken. Yeah with with with your. You're our London correspondent and you know what. I'm thinking to myself just the other day when they would like attached refunding leaves illness and show you stop going again. I might have to go to catch show and be the the london correspondent again. That might be very ago. Fun get kicked out now. Though nowadays what i could do is you could do with me. Because i could have you one face simul facebook messenger or facebook video. You remember. larry. I remember larry did the whole robot thing Max talk yeah were you there for that year. No but i saw i saw on the on the site. Yeah it was kind of cool. Yeah just kinda so again. We'd love to get feedback from guys the show at tech podcast dot com and david and i will be back next week with the geeks pub and in two weeks with The next episode of tech fancy david seeing them.

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The Tips You Need For Growing an Online Business with Blake Nubar

Write Your Legend

44:58 min | 2 weeks ago

The Tips You Need For Growing an Online Business with Blake Nubar

"I'm Apollonia. Want the, a dating relationship and life and attraction, expert. Welcome to the right. Your Legend podcast, this podcast will give you motivation advice and inspiration about life and relationships. My goal for you is to not just understand women but to be the man that writes, his own Legend. Now that's begin. And start writing your Legend. Hi guys. We have a different one for you today. And a really great one, especially because a lot of you have written requesting for me to do things a little bit different to help you out. Not only in your love lives but in your life in general and that's why I had a change today to interview Blake nubar. I'm really excited for this because he is an owner of the digital marketing agency. Like newborn is originally an overnight entrepreneur going from 0 to 1000 and just 25 days with his digital product business and just a few short years he has generated over twenty million dollars in online sales and has helped thousands of entrepreneurs launch a successful. A sales funnel like has over ten thousand students from 96 countries, helping them to become overnight entrepreneurs and launch proven successful online businesses. He took a stand, he is on a mission to help people Achieve Financial Freedom so they can live a life on their terms with a profitable online business. That generates passive income, you have probably should blink in to, Club award a dream car award, but he was also been partnered with Kevin Harrington from Shark Tank along which h s TV. And also AMC, TV starts blinking, a host of overnight entrepreneur podcasts and I joined you and welcoming me Blake where we're going to give you some great advice to walk away with especially for those of you that are wanting to start your own business and 5/8. Thanks for having me. Yeah, of course. Thanks for coming on. I'm glad that Steve made the intro. I did some research on you. And yeah, I'm excited to do and have a Compaq. With you really good? I'm pumped. I'm, I'm excited to be here. Awesome. So just really quickly, I, I already did your intro in regards to, so typically how I shoot my podcast is just really just have a conversation with you and I'm going to have some questions and so just so, you know, my audience. I'm, I'm not too sure if I told you about my audience, is just generally men. So a lot of the men are going to. They've also asked for like, if I want to start my online business. Like, how do I do so? So I want to really hit on that. So I want to head on like a man that's thinking about it or boss preneur, that's listening. That wants to get better in his own business and make more money. Got it perfect. Okay, awesome, awesome. Cuz I've already recorded because I started basically this one before you joined. So I'm just going to page and I'm just going to do a class in my editor knows that I get it. Are you play? Thank you so much for joining. I'm really excited to really get to know. You have a conversation with you and really walk away from with some amazing amazing advice for people that are listening today. So, thanks for joining. I appreciate. Thanks for having me. Now. Blake, I know that you started, I would like to know a little bit about your journey because that's really where, you know, it's great to be like, I'm succeeding I've made all this but a lot of people can look at this and say, oh, it's okay, he's successful but what it was part of your journey in order to get there were you, were you raised into success? Yeah. No. I wish right now be off the awesome. Know I was I grew up middle-class normal right? I didn't have like the rags-to-riches story so I won't harp on anything around that but you know just like any you know, entrepreneur, we've failed her face off kind of time. So I've tried just about everything you can think of when it comes to trying to find ways to generate income other than going and working that nine-to-five. And I would say probably started back when off In college I was with my business partner and I were working on this really cool kind of new study guide, right? Cuz you know, we're, we were college students and we this was like failed Ventures number, who knows, but we're working on this like really cool study guide. And we wanted to take away to transform, text information into visual information, we wanted to find a way to do that. So, instead of reading like this fixed study guide package, we want to find a way to turn them into like animation and video content and demonic devices. Basically just a different way to absorb that information and we created what's called these busy guides. Anything we put on on a WordPress website, put a price tag of $5. And then start thinking, okay, who else would really benefit? Well, how about other college students like us who hate studying and all we try and do is just cram to pass an exam. So Random enough, we barged into one of the classrooms at the University that had like three thousand students in it. I got into gorilla suit. My business partner was saying like a boom bap. And we just went to the front of the room and we started marketing this like first-ever idea, right? And we're just, we're, I have, like, I've actual footage from this thing, and we're dancing like idiots. And when we're done, we dropped assign a run out of the class. And we're just like, did this work do this like crazy stunts actually work? Let me remind everyone listening or watching right now. I knew nothing about marketing. I knew really nothing about making money at all at this point. I just thought we have like this really cool concept. So, we go to like the bar. I start. We started drinking and hanging out cuz we're college students. That's what we do. And my phone vibrates, I pulled out my pocket and we had our first day off like $5 and we went nuts. Anyone like crazy, right. A few more moments went by another sale for $5. More sales came in, by the end of that night, we did $800 in sales by the end of that semester. We did $5,000 in sales, so I thought it was really cool to experience it. I wouldn't call it a success because like that business kind of fizzled out just because we couldn't find ways of scaling it, but that was probably how like my first introduction to not only making like money like my job. I'm good coin, right? But actually making money online and that's probably where my journey began was back in college. That was the Tipping Point. You were like, there's something here. Yeah, yeah. Cuz like I think like, we all think, like, if you were, you only hear about the successes, right? Like like that's say you when someone like makes a lot of money on like a cryptocurrency or starting a business, right? Just know that everyone's failed their face off like multiple times before Thursday. I think no one really talks about this failures as much. We always kind of glorify the successes and we I felt so many times up until that moment, but I just knew if you just stay in the game long enough, you're going to find something that sticks and kind of like, messes with what you're trying to accomplish. Yeah, yeah, I know. There's there's there's such a like Adrenaline Rush that comes when you have a first sale online wage. I mean, it's it's it's, it's in crazy. It's like, it's, there's really dirty back, not yet. There's, it doesn't matter if it's a $5 sale or $1,000 sale, or would say a $10,000 sale, it's like wage When you get that first like sale, when you've never made a dollar online, you Instinct, I think a lot of I think I can speak for a lot of entrepreneurs have been through that phase. You realize there's no turning back you want to keep doing that moving forward? Yes I agree. I have a lot of clients that are listening now and and claims that I've worked with two that are entrepreneurs and you know, that are doing success jobs that are successful. And then also time the times that they're struggling, especially with everything that has been going on in today's world. But I also think that a part of it is, there's a lot of people that want to have freedom, not right? Because we look at online business and we're think gosh, I have so much Freedom, we do have a lot of freedom because we have our choice of what we want to do with our day. But also it is very time-consuming, you know, or what you I mean free because I know you've been in the space for a while and you're being succeeding and you've kind of established, you know, a name for yourself in regards to building digital marketing and strategies and things like this song. What would you say for someone? Maybe that wants to get into digital marketing or maybe wants to become a coach or something? Like, how can they really start in an online business? Perfect. So I would recommend a lot of people start the way. I did not saying you have to, but it was the fastest way is start a service-oriented business, right? Because we all have some type of skill-set and I know people might be lived to be, like, I don't know what the hell. I'm good at I promise everyone on this planet is good at something and better at something than someone else and they can teach that to someone else angry. And that's how I started. I was like, you know, after, you know, trial and error trial and error. When I got started on line, what I did was just started learning a skill set. And at the point at this time, I had no idea, right? Page, started looking into funk. I just heard about funnels and sales funnels, and all this stuff and how you can make money online, as you need, a funnel. And this is what you need. Well, I didn't really know much about them, so I I dedicate a few months and I started researching wage. Moles and marketing. And like, how can I like fill my brain with as much knowledge as possible. So that when I'm ready, I can finally find a way to monetize it. So did that for a few months? When I was done, I created a profile on upwork, which if, if no one's ever heard of up work before, it's just like a freelancing website, where you can go. And basically, it's a platform. If you have something, you can offer, someone probably has some money to buy it and I put a profile but I'm I can help you with your marketing and building and designing your funnels. And I started getting jobs, I started getting people saying, Hey, listen, I have this website like simple stuff to like, hey I've this website on WordPress. Can you bring it in this? New builder for me and make it into a phone? And I'm like, yeah, I can do that now. And it was probably the fastest way to get started. So if you're out there and you're like, what do I do? I've tried so many things. I feel my face off course. Of course program after program, nothing's working, honestly, I would like start resorting to how can you find a way to offer some type of service? Because you can get up and running like today, like you already have what it is that you probably Are good at all. You have to do is go create profiles on these marketplaces. These platforms that already have the customers looking like waiting, they're saying I need help with this thing. I'm willing to pay for it. You can become like the ninth inning armor to do that. So that would be my number one recommendation is provide some type of service to get started to start generate some income and start really learning the ropes of how marketing works that. That's exactly how I did. The side of that, I would do affiliate marketing cuz you know, there's a whole nother route if you don't want to provide a service right? You could also sell someone else's product. The last thing, I would convince anyone to try and do is create their own product from scratch when you're just starting out, like, go burn marketing first, because the biggest mistake I see people make is there like I'm going to build a product and then I'm going to sell this product and it's like if you don't know how to sell first building, the product was kind of useless and practice. So the idea is more. So if you want to learn how to Market online and make money, go sign up to an affiliate program for someone else, already has the product and start learning how to Market and, and creating jobs. Message. And and and generating sales, I already selling someone else's stop that already exists. So I would do one of those two things. I went to service route but I also did a billion marking on the side and it created great income when I especially when just starting out. Yeah, I think too. And when you do, you know, if you do some affiliate marketing, it's really important that you see how they build their programs. You know, like just seeing how they build their programs alone are so many different programs. There's ebooks. There's audio seminars. There's video seminars with worksheets. Like there's so many different things. So, it's really an interesting because it's really it really helped me looking at in my view that's how people were doing things. And I was lucky enough to have friends that were already kind of in the niche and really well known people that I already kind of knew that I was able to access their programs, you know, for free and they were like just do it because if you need to get Apollonia, you need to get online because you're just that great. And I have people that like you know that were on stages, you know, like it's just in and doing this thing for a living and like you know it's just amazing. In that they believed. And so one of the things she was in regards to that is the reason why I bring that up is because a lot of times when we're trying to find, like, how can we become an entrepreneur, how can we make money? And I'm like, I don't know what I'm good at right, but other people cuz sometimes can see what you're good at as well, right? So like actually that was like, so important. So as long as you're pushing to walk in the what I did is, I started reading books. I started going to events. I started putting myself out there because I was, like, there's something out there. Cuz as long as you push yourself to find, it's going to eventually come to you. Exactly. Right. Right. So I think that's really important because I know so many guys that are, you know, successful entrepreneurs but also probably want to open up side businesses. I coach so many people in these digital marketing space found so many entrepreneurs that are either working for another company like in the digital marketing space and want to create their own, you know? And they're always asking me questions after they take like ten minutes of the questions. Yep. Ask me questions about the business but yet and everyone's to dive into, right? Like, look, online, marketing and digital marketing. It's, it's, it's the craze it's been The Craze for a little while, it has longevity to it people. See how lucrative this space can be, and everyone wants a piece of the action, right? Like, I talked to anyone in my community and stuff, they're all thinking the same thing, they're thinking this way. How do I get rich online, right? Like, that is what most people are really looking to accomplish whether that is their end result, whether they know it or not, maybe as they start growing and they want fulfillment. And, you know, other things are after the initial thing is, how can I stop doing this thing that I'm doing where I'm working? Let's say, this nine-to-five doing something that I'm like, I don't really care for and how can I kind of have that laptop Life Style freedom online? So I think there's this crazy. This is like everyone wants to resort to the internet especially off of it and everything happening. Like you could just see how many people started working in searching out, alternative ways to generate income using the internet because honestly, it's like the world's greatest distribution channel on this page. You could reach anyone like anywhere that has an internet connection, a laptop, you know, or or a smartphone. So you definitely see why so many people are trying to find ways to to leverage that because of how powerful role is and how life-changing it can be like I was dead broke 3 and 1/2 years ago. Dead broke not like couldn't rub two nickels to my name, like nothing and if you can just develop some type of skill-set, right? You don't have to be great and just have to know that you have to learn every single day become better and better and better, right? And keep pushed in the needle forward, right? You're eventually going to find a way and you have the internet, you're eventually going to find a way to make it work. You have to stick in that game. Long enough, the problem is as most people. Just they jump from thing to thing to thing, right? Cuz this didn't work. But it's like, no, it's not that it didn't work. It's that you're just not good enough yet for it to work. Yeah. And I think that's a big thing that people run into. If you just stick beating something till you win, you're going to find a way to crush it online. Yeah, so now that you've found like exactly what you do so when someone finds what they want to do. Yep. Are some successful ways that you've done it as well that we're that helped. You Market your business. And what methods have made you most successful would you say? Yeah. So we just we I think marketing is six of Art and Science together, right? Like the science is like kind of the Frameworks like what has been tried and true to work. And the in the way you find Frameworks is just go and look at what your competitors are doing wrong. You want to start a coaching business like, don't reinvent the wheel. I made that mistake years ago, trying to like reinvent the wheel and not understanding what was already working in the marketplace, and we do that because sometimes we fall in love with the project we fall in love with like how we want it to be versus like what's already working. So from the science side of things, like what we found a work, it's just stuck. That's been tried and true. We're not trying to reinvent the wheel. If we know that a specific type of wage deliver a message or a funnel, or set up, a website has been working in the, in the space. Since the beginning of the internet, it would be kind of asinine to go against that framework, because everyone else is having success wage Now on the opposite side of that, we also bring in a lot of art, right? I would say most marketers and this could just be kind of a b s. But from what I've seen, right most marketers rely really heavy on Thursday. Same work like eighty to ninety percent on the framework and I 10% of the art, right? I would say we're more like sixty percent on the framework and high on the art side of things and when I mean by our faith like a picture or an f t or something crazy on a wall, I mean like the art side of thing is like the creative side. What are you going to do? That's really unique. That's different that can either get the attention of the market you're going after or you have some really unique way of delivering your products. Something that like just hasn't been seen yet where you can starting formula or less. Yeah, yeah. Like the Pioneer, your that you did something so unique that now that can start becoming a new framework. So I believe that art is really what kind of like move things forward on a really aggressive route. And if you do it well enough, you can probably turn off. To a framework to kind of add to the new Vault of Frameworks that have been working. So what we do in our business is we follow what works, which is, what are these methods that people are doing, right? Like, for example, if I'm going to deliver a presentation on some opportunity that we created that we found to work, right? Most likely we're going to create a webinar funnel. Why? Because they were you need an hour or so to explain something that's brand new, right? I wouldn't do. You know? There's just there's just things you do that makes sense like that right? Versus you know, if I was going to sell $7, e-book, I might just bring you to a nice little winning page right with a, with a 2-minute video. That's really quick. So those are the Frameworks at work. Now, the art side of it is like, what did we do to get into the landing page? Like, what how do we make noise? How do we do some crazy things that we got your attention? And I think when you mix both those together in a really nice way, you can create kind of a recipe for like, really macro-level, success? Mhm. Yeah. Because there's a lot of detail and a lot of times like we do two webinars a month in my, in my birth. A business cuz we have like fourteen or fifteen Evergreen programs and typically the webinars that like all the master classes are usually you know, for our higher dollar products. But also our products that are real detailed and that on that top and what I love so much about masterclasses is, I know there's some specific system to follow when you do it successfully and it works really great. But still, when you use that specific system can still give away great advice, or even people that can't afford the program or whatever, but then it works out to the advantage because people that can't afford the program will be like, wow, I understand so much more than it just delayed that I have to read. And so you get invested as well in the opportunity and it helps because you have that kind of like interaction with your community as well. And I love it because it's like teaching moments. And I loved judging likewise like my favorite thing is like doing why poaching on the spot like in my life Instagram and stuff like that because I just love to get your adrenaline rush like adrenaline person anyways in general, especially with business. So yep. It's that system right there and just like your emails automations and everything. Would you like? For example I was really lucky because my husband actually was really good online so he I told him my dream. I told him what I wanted to do, he saw my message, I was doing speeches, like you need to go online, follow my plan, here it is and I've had it all laid out right now. I'm learning as I go because we're getting, we've both grown a lot, right? Right. But if someone didn't have that support, I always think like if I didn't have that support like you know it was starting out sometimes digital of like people that are business coaches Bap sa I'm a business coach but yet where is their success on line as well? Sometimes, you know what I mean and then sometimes as well. It's like how do I pay $10,000? If I want to start my business for a business coach, I've seen that so much and I always think about that. Like, how can someone start a business with I have my cuz not everybody's going to building an online business and all that like all this stuff. Right? There's nothing strong points. Out of someone that has this amazing advice, Amazing Ideas and then just need someone to put up against us together starts, like, what would you recommend for them? So, probably kind of a two-pronged approach a particular order one, I would get a partner right? Someone that can handle kind of the infrastructure side of things and, and don't pay that person, right? Just partner, upright, Sweat Equity in the business together, right? I think, I think, with the internet off, right? And what you see in this digital marketing space, I think the biggest disadvantage I see is when people like prefer to go at it alone, they like what's the whole saying Daymond? John said, eighty percent of a watermelon is better than one hundred percent of a great great. And a lot of people get so caught up in like oh I want all the equity. I want to own this whole business, it's like you can, but your growth is going to be stagnant, you're going to stay dead. Don't little the little great. And what I've seen, as a major advantage is, if you're really good at coaching, right? Go find someone, that's really good at building infrastructure that can put the email campaigns in place that can design and build them back in back in do all the things that maybe you suck at, right, like out the whole Gary V thing. It's like double down in your strengths, Outsource your weaknesses. I would definitely do that. Cuz at the end of day like you can go at it alone for only so long, you're going to need help. If you actually want to turn your business into something. Worth something, right? Something that's big, something that could create a legacy. Like every map of business on this planet was never done with one solopreneur. If you'll get every macro-level successful business, it is a team of all people partnered up, phony equity in the company. So, that's the first thing we do is find someone or even a team. Find a few people that you want to split the pie with to know that. Yeah, it might not be as much as you thought but trust me in the end of it. If you guys scale appropriately, it's going to be dead. A massive. The second thing I would do. Also, if you're kind of like going on a budget and you don't have like, you know, ten like look, we had, I had no money to put together for anything in the beginning, right? But what I, what I did have was a skill set. A lot of people listening and watching might find yourself or you like, you know what, you're good at but your idea am I can't like invest this money right now so go do it for free in exchange for like testimonials of your coaching. Write down, what I would do is I would go, I would, I would DMV provide dik I would hang out in the Facebook groups and I would wait till people needed help and when they needed help, I would send them DMS and make, hey, I saw your post and, you know, ABC committee really dollars, an amazing thing. You're mentioning, hey, can I help you on this thing? And they're like, yeah. And I'm like, Hey listen I'm like look I let me just help you for free. All I ask in return is just if I crush it for you. Is it fair enough to give me a testimonial telling me about how well, I did and like ten times out of ten. They're like, yeah, of course. And what you do overtime is aggregate all of this social proof so that song All ready to go like launch a program or want something you can create a basic outline, you create a funnel landing page, which now at this point your business partner can manage for you and you put all of that social proof thought waiting page. That basically says how amazing you are at doing what you do, you're going to get people to sign up, you're going to get people to join in on and it costs you nothing but time. Like, literally, that's all you're spending a long time here. So if in the beginning of anything, right? If you're broke, you have time. If I if slips right? It's like when you you're you're becoming successful. It's like you have no time, right? But when you're not home yet you have a ton of time. So leverage that like, like reading into that, don't be afraid to be like, think, you know, want to Puff your chest out and be like, I'm worth more than this. Well, it's like, technically, you're not cuz you're not making anything. So we in terms of Leverage, the fact that what you do have is a valuable asset that a lot of people wish they have again and that's the time to go and do those things and then start building your business that way costs you nothing. Just your time. Find a partner and you can log Building an empire like one stone at a time. Yes, I love that. I love that. I get so excited because I'm always talking about dating and relationships and this is like such good stuff because they advised the feedback that you're giving the, our audience, just literally stuff that I did, you know, and it's literally stuff. My husband always talks about two and he's very like, he's been through it, you know. He's fall on his face million times, he has like 7,000 online businesses that are doing great, you know, but before he have that, he had a fall on his face and he's learned all of this from following his face and literally the stuff that you're saying is what he always tells me all the time. Especially when you said earlier about and this is actually something I'm nervous about is like don't try to reinvent the wheel if you already know what's working. Right? But then I think about this because we so in my space and pack and ship and dating space, we do a lot of funnel building, right? Ads are really difficult. Like ever, all my traffic has been organic and we've done so well because I think about I think about Me and my message. I think that's what it is. And I've cultivated a really, really great audience, that trust me, which I am so proud about. But also to, you know, the thing about this is the range of difficult because it's a love relationship needs right number one, number two, it's I work with a lot of men. So they are not accustomed to really get into personal development all the time or it's frowned upon for dating and relationship advice. So ABS can also work against you in some way or another, and then, secondly. What I've noticed is there's a big marketing strategy in the dating, it online space, where it's like bottles for everything landing page for life, but I also want to build a community. So I'm venturing out into membership. The only people that I've seen your membership is like personal development people. And one coach is named Matthew Hussey, that actually coaches. Women, that's a membership. But the reason why I want to do membership is cuz I kind of do want to reinvent the wheel. I want to make a bigger Community for men to feel like they can get Vice, just like what you're giving birth. Right business for relationships with everything. So I am a little nervous but my husband's, like, we need a tested at least. And that's okay, right? Cuz you're probably at a point right now where you've established a foundation off your building, your growing everyday, you're generating great income. Right? So what what is it? Like? You can be creative all you want. Right? You that's one hundred percent. I don't want anyone to take this the wrong way, like, but you gotta make money first because if not, you're going to run out of money or you're going to run out of time. Yeah. So when you're first starting out honestly, it's not like there's two ways to look at it. There's two schools of thought. It's like just get some money coming in so you can afford your creative, juices, flowing, and start experimenting with things or the other school of thought is, is like, just go for the Grand Slam, but most people that try and go for that creative Grand, Slam are well backed with resources in some way shape or form. So so if you're a little nervous right now, that's like a good thing because like it means that you're in a position where you can start experimenting wage. Something didn't work out as planned, or you realized for whatever reason at the market wasn't accepting it. It's like you're still going to be okay and and be in a position where it's like, okay next to the next thing, right? Most people just starting out real early different story. When I first got started out, I didn't have any luxury to be creative at all. It was like what can work here and does my USP, right? Does my Italian proposition stick out better than anything and all the focus was on the new vehicle. The new thing to help people generate income online and in case of our business, right? And everything else was like boring, it was like, we'd have a funnel. Thought we had a Facebook group, we did a Facebook live. It was just Bare Bones boring. But now because we were able to establish that we were able to get it to work. We're in a similar situation where we can start getting really creative, right? Because we've already kind of knocked out the the make money part. So now we can use that to fund like the creativity which is you know what you're probably about to step into which is going to be nerve-wracking, right? Like honestly from nerve-wracking. Oh my God, is dead. I tell this to people all the time, I go in this situation right now cuz it's such a perfect situation. If you weren't nervous, that's when you need to start getting nervous because in this situation supposed to be nervous and if you weren't, that's when I would be a little nervous and being like, why isn't she nervous right now? That's just a natural thing. Yeah. Oh my gosh. I'm so neurotic, like, literally have butterflies as you're talking because we're focusing more on it. That's all nervous. I am. But yeah, I know it's going to do, it's going to go right? And we have a backup plan just in case of course. But I like I'm so happy that you went there because that's where I was hoping you would go as life. There's a difference in that, right, I just wanted to kind of clarify with that because all the time when we when we want to start as entrepreneurs and build a business, we want to do everything. Yeah. Every like it's like, you've gotta juice. Hold down on one knee. Yeah. And then you can expand, I think that is like gold. When you really understand that, you know, funny about that too. Is that? It's like no one learns that until they actually go through. The obstacle is the way it's cuz like I can't tell you how many times I've preached that same thing where it's like, you tell a first time entrepreneur. Hey listen, your best Advantage right now is to focus on one thing. I don't think anyone's taking that advice off until they until they look back two years and they go I should just focused on one thing and I was the same way. Right? Someone told me that Vice, I'm like, yeah, sure sure, but what I realized is the reason like most people focus on multiple things is because they're not confident in any specific one and they want to ride the horse, that's going to take off and they don't know which one that is. So they kind of diversify their their, their their work ethic and their ambition and not doing is really sabotaging themselves because if you split your time 50/50 right the entrepreneur putting a hundred percent of their time. On one thing is going to beat you hands down and I think what happens is when we focus on for things they might sound like good ideas and we kind of gravitate to the one that we have the most momentum with and when that momentum stops we might kind of shelf that move on to the next thing. We might shelf that and what you're doing, you're just really dead. Sabotaging yourself. You're the best advice I could offer. Anyone is find the one thing that you like do in the most and and just cuz you're passionate about, it doesn't mean it's going to pay the bills. Like, find the thing that you're good at. Find the idea, the problem, any big problem that you're passionate about solving and go and do that thing and just focus on it until it works, and it's going to suck for the first weeks months years. But if you keep at, it will find a way of working out. And if you think you'll save yourself like a decade from doing all this, like, side Focus crap that we all been through. I've been through it. I'm sure you've been through it. My business. Partner's been through it and I think like the world of entrepreneurs have been through it and it's like our job to keep people coming in. Don't do that. But ultimately, I know how it is. I know most people won't listen to that advice right away and they're going to have to experience it themselves. But nine times out of ten, you're going to look back and say, let's just focus on that one thing. Yes. And also to add to that is also look at people that are also experience and actually having a little bit of success online in that specific Area that you want to teach or be a part of as well as getting information from that? Yeah, yeah it would hate for that to just to finalize that. Yeah, that's great advice too because you don't forget to take advice from anyone. You want to take advice from someone, that's a few miles ahead of you doing the thing that you want to accomplish. I think a lot of people take advice from someone that successful, but I'm not going to take advantage of someone doing like selling like tractors online, right? Right. I'm not trying to do stuff like that. So physical products, right? I'm going to try, I'm going to take advice from someone, that is doing what I'm doing, but they're just a few years ahead of me so I think that's really good advice. As well as like, pick your mentors wisely, follow the people that are doing what you want to accomplish. They're just a little bit further down the road than you're currently at. Yeah, and look at different people because, you know, one thing that I've learned, and I'm sure, you know, this too is just because someone has a million followers does not mean that they're making money, you know, they're not making money. I think that's that's one. There's people Thursday. A lot of money with a million followers. They're also have a big business behind it, right, because they're going in as a business. So I have a kind of off topic question leading into a little bit of what I do, right, cuz I want to ask you this. So, I know three years ago you literally probably had a nickel in your account, like you said to now, having a successful business, how do you feel that this helps maybe within just as a man, like, with your confidence wage maybe with your relationships, in general? Like how do you, how did you feel from that guy before to the man that you are now? I think you can become a little more wowed about what you've been repressing. As you've been failing on your journey, all the way to the top, right? Cuz I remember going out to dinner with families and my family and friends for like, the longest time, and they would always talk about their promotions and how their job was doing, and all this stuff. And I was just like, quiet. Hey, I didn't want to talk about failing, right? Cuz there's really nothing to talk about and be, honestly, I think a lot of people can relate to me that have been in entrepreneurship or birth. Budding entrepreneur. Is that we probably always get the same question where your friends and family go? What is it that you do again? And we just like, No One Ever Knows what it is that we do ever and actually my birthday. It's like no one knows what we do. Right doesn't matter what is like when you say like I do these things online they just like No One Ever Knows right? Cuz the standard thing is like if I said I was an accountant or a financial analyst, right? It's like a lawyer, or a doctor, or dentist, a landscaper, right? Someone can easily get it. It's like being an entrepreneur. No one's ever going to wear the most misunderstood creature of all time. And I think what was interesting is that you kind of have your moment, right? As you're failing and you're on the come up and you're trying to get things to work, you're kind of quiet. Right? And whether that's because of embarrassment or you don't want to get criticized or whatever it is. We're just kind of quit about it, we might vote, we might talk to people about it here and there but it's more of like, Duck your head kind of work. And I think the moment you kind of have like that Ma I made it. It's, you get a little more vocal about it, like, like dead. And that can go one of two ways, right? You have the whole like money doesn't change, people would only accentuates the truth. You kind of the people that have been waiting for that moment to kind of like, you know, puff their chest out a little bit. Let the ego take over and then you kind of the other side of the people that are just like finally, like I don't have to like hide under my shell, and I can actually like talk about what it is that I do confidently. I can go into any situation feel like an kind of command that entire thing, that room, whatever it is. That's occurring because you now kind of have this like kind of have this like badge of honor like the whole like I did it badge and and you feel a little more confident every level. So yeah. As you as you're going from struggling to successful, I think a boost self-esteem, confidence, and all around you just become you grow as a. I mean, entrepreneurship at its core fundamentals, is personal growth, right? Becoming a better human and become that becoming a better human. You can be better at your business and stuff. So I, yeah, I was quite quiet as hell for years and then kind of like, you know, the the butter the butterfly breaks out of the, you know cocoon and kind of like flap. Wings, it's like, oh, I'm here now. So that's kind of how it was for us, at least, that's awesome. Yeah, and I also think like as an entrepreneur especially with success as entrepreneurs we start week and I, I know that I continue to focus on something else because it's not just because of successful, I stay stagnant, right? Like, that's the biggest I think mistake a lot of entrepreneurs do is when they find things that are working, they stay stagnant. Instead of like developing new strategies looking for opportunities hiring the coach right? Like there's time, I had a hired coach for my money relationship because you coming from absolutely nothing and possibly not having rice to eat as a little girl, you know, God to making amount of money. I never even dreamed of right with me and my husband combined. You know, I used to not be able to able to talk about this cuz I was shameful, right. I would think oh, so I just talked about this clients aren't going to do not want to invest with me but at the same time they invest because they get resources and it helps them grow. It's an investment, right? Just like I invested in a life coach because it helps me make more money and job. I really big believer. If you want to be successful with money and past success in your business, whatever business if you're not an entrepreneur or not, you have to have a good money relationship. So how do you look at things? When someone is selling something online? Do you look at it? Oh, why would I buy her? Since she was just, she should give that away for free. That might be an issue for you because just because someone has a business created to help, people does not mean that they should be working for free, right? So like there's a lot of that that I notice and I think like one big thing a lot of entrepreneurs, don't talk about two people that are looking to be successful. Is they have to really focus on their money relationship. Yeah. Like how do you view that like do you get jealous? Do you shame people for it, right? And I think that's so so important because money is not right. You don't know what people are going to do with that money. Like I mean, half of the money that I'm making is literally going to my legacy that I'm saving for, like, opening up. So many schools around the world called School of love for cakes. We'll just people of all walks of life. Right. So there's a big old Legacy so you never know like what someone is doing. And that's why it's so important too, as well as I just wanted to mention that, but thought I do have like two questions that I wanted to talk to you two about is I know you were on Shark Tank right now. We've, we partnered with a shark on Shark, Tank, tell me a little bit about that. Yes, so, you know, he's on the original shark first three, three or four seasons, dear friend of mine. Now Kevin Harrington, he actually lives a couple of hours from a. I got a call one day from one of the, one of the partners, in the Zig, Ziglar group, dear friend of mine as well and he calls me and he's like, hey, we want you to come out. Kevin's, you know, heard a lot about you. We're doing some really amazing things we could use some help. I'm like, sure, let's do this. And he's like, can you be out here tomorrow? Kevin wants to sit down. We'll have breakfast club. You know, do all this stuff and we go and we sit down and they're like, hey look, we're launching new book, called key person of influence which was a new book A book that Kevin I don't know if he necessarily wrote it. I don't know exactly how it transpired but he had a book called keepers of influence which is a really cool book and they wanted someone to come in and kind of create the marketing strategy and create the funnel and basically create the ecosystem to launch this thing. So off, I go sit down with him. Kevin's awesome, his son Brian's awesome. The entire crew there is just amazing humans and long story short, take on the project partner with him on this thing, launched this book and it just it should be extremely well, and it was just like one of the first projects actually partner with someone from Shark Tank on a way that like, create a really cool business out of it. So that's how that story went to this day. I talked to Kevin all the time is a good friend of mine, you know, always like, you know, just communicating seeing how he's doing, seeing how the whole family is over there and stuff and we just keep a close relationship. But yeah, that was the first really cool partnership. I had was someone that was dead. Original shark on Shark Tank. Yeah. That's awesome. So, tell me about your official partner program that you have as well. So, for the people that are listening that want to know a little bit more about what you do and what you offer. Sure. So, we, I guess, let me give like the backstory of it. I was out to dinner one night and I was scrolling on social media which my girlfriend hates but I was doing it and I remember this post caught my attention and I click on this person's profile and I started realizing like I'm doing this all the time. I'm nosey as tell, like am I talk to myself? Like I'm like you're nosy. Why you always clicking on people's profiles? I was like whatever wage and I started thinking, like, if I'm clicking on someone's Facebook profile. How often are they looking out on my profile? So what I did is I decided to transform my Facebook and all my social media profiles to kind of like off landing page. If you go on my Facebook profile like a button on the cover photo, I have a call to action. I have a headline, I have emojis, I have links, I have all this stuff and like my profile looks more like a landing page next page. No, after I transformed it, 9 days later. I made $25,000 in sales from my products and services like not knowing how that happened but realizing that, oh my gosh, like how, like there's this hit traffic Source on Facebook, that happens. Every single second of every day that no one knows exists, right? Cuz you can't see it. It's all people like us clicking on other people's profiles, seeing what they do checking out their stuff seeing if they approximate services that can solve some type of pain I'm experiencing. So what I did after that was thinking, you know what, maybe I got lucky right like cuz I'm my worst critic so I developed it into a course right and Iraq develop this course, will call it awesome course for the ease of it so I developed it developed. A developing into this course that teaches others how to do the same. So if you're a dentist, if you're a doctor, if you're a digital marketer, if you're a coach or confirm, it didn't matter what you were. If you wanted to harness this hidden traffic's was found on social media. I had a course that taught everyone, how to transform their social media profiles to generation. All this abundant traffic that none of us knew existed. I watch this thing few days go by here and nothing so I'm like oh there's think bombs like no one had success on it. A few days after that go buy off the people. I sold it to which is like a thousand people at the time were just like posting on Facebook like made $6,000 today from my new social media profile made Five Hundred New Leads cellphone new clients a hundred new leads. You know, can't go 30 seconds without generating a new client just crazy stuff. And I was like, oh my gosh, this is huge. So I decided to test something. Forget what I did is after. I noticed all these people buying this, right, it was all different types of businesses cuz I had no idea who was going to buy it. So I see all these different types of businesses buying this thing all the way that our posting, they're all different types of entrepreneurs. And that's when it kind of like the big picture idea went off and I was like, oh my gosh, you know, there's thousands and thousands of niches that exists. They're right. And I'm seeing all the different types that are coming in, right? All of them are finding success with this. Like, I can't do this alone. So what I did is I turn the entire thing into like a franchise model where you, you can now take my exact online business. I make a copy of it. I clone it and you're basically buying into what's kind of like a franchise and you run it as your own. And I teach you how to Niche downtown sell those digital products that teach people how to transform their profiles to that specific Niche. So we have part, we have thousands of different partners, all targeting different niches. Like for example, I sell, I teach little marketers how to transform their profiles to get more leads in sales. I have partners that teach real estate agents that teach dentist and landscapers and bicycle shop owners, and you name it. There's a niche for it. And what they do is they need to start from scratch, you don't have to create their own products, they don't have to create their own funnel. They don't have to create their own messaging and fulfillment and emails and copy. They don't have to do any of that stuff. It's already done. I'm just handing you that entire thing off You get access to, it's kind of like a Starbucks Starbucks franchise. If you want to Starbucks. You just go. They build it all for you. You just run the entire thing and you target that geographic location. That's kind of the model we create. It's called the part number. Wow, it's called what part. Number installed Blake's partner program. Yeah, it's just, it's the ability to kind of buy into this thing where you can now run your own online business, but you don't have to start from scratch. Or I was like the biggest headache, especially when you're first starting out. Yeah, exactly. Although, wow, that sounds amazing. By the way, I'm definitely going to we we have a link for that package provides you. So they can get more information on that as well as there anything else that you would suggest for them to check out. Yeah I have a free group as well. It's called the Freedom Fighters launched, your first million dollar sales funnel. I don't really sell anything or do anything in there. I just hop in there and provide value. So if you're looking at how to get started on line, if you're wondering why you've been failing again, and again, and again, and you're trying to find success. If you want to learn more about funnels and making awesome products and all that cool stuff, we kind of hang out in there, and just talk shop about all that good stuff. So, it's free to anyone else can join. And I would love to have anyone who who's interested. Nice. Nice blank, just stay with me. Cuz I'll, I'll definitely stop in a little bit and just want to talk to offline but it's been so great. Having this issue with your you've gave it, some an amazing valuable and honest and real advice and I know a lot of people that are listening are going to walk away with some great stuff. And I know that a lot of them will probably become part of the group or probably get in touch to, you know, some networking in the group and as well, because we have a lot of entrepreneurs and men that are wanting to probably go out and build something as well. I mean, I get emails daily about this. Yeah, yeah, dead. It's been like they thank you so much for having me. It's been a pleasure, everyone listening and watching right now. You guys are absolutely amazing. You are following someone that definitely knows what she is talking about. So you are in great hands regardless and I appreciate you having me back. Thank you for like thank you so much. If you enjoyed this podcast, be sure to subscribe rate and review this podcast and share with your friends. Congratulations to writing your Legend and thanks so much for listening today and I'll talk to you soon in the next episode.

Kevin Harrington Blake nubar Blake Daymond Facebook AMC Compaq Matthew Hussey Gary V
20VC: Benchmark's Bill Gurley on 5 Traits Benchmark Look For When Adding To The Partnership, Why The Abundance of Capital Is Today's Biggest Challenge in VC & The Right Way To Think About Market Size When Assessing Opportunities

The Twenty Minute VC

34:50 min | 2 years ago

20VC: Benchmark's Bill Gurley on 5 Traits Benchmark Look For When Adding To The Partnership, Why The Abundance of Capital Is Today's Biggest Challenge in VC & The Right Way To Think About Market Size When Assessing Opportunities

"You are listening to the twenty minute BBC with me. How are you stabbings, and you can see all things behind the scenes from us on Instagram on H stabbings nineteen Ninety-six with TB's now to the episode's day? And when I was eighteen year old before my first avenue twenty minute episode I wrote down the names of five VC's that I most wanted to have on the show. They included the likes of Peter Fenton, Josh Koppelman. Brad, feld and stays guest. And so I could not be more excited and honored to welcome the one Bill Gurley to the horse seat. Now, Bill is a general partner at benchmark, one of the most successful funds of the last decade with portfolio, including the lice of Uber Twitter dropbox, we work Snapchat, stitch, fix EBay, and many, many more incredible companies ask for Bill. He's widely recognized as one of the grace of all time in venture having with the lice of grub hub next door Uber open table, stitch, fix and Zillow. I'm proud to benchmark was apartment partner with Halloween blood venture partners. I'm before entering the world of venture bills, spend four years on Wall Street as a top ranked research analysts including threes. CS First Boston where his research coverage. Pleaded such companies as Dell Compaq and Microsoft, and he was the lead analyst on Amazon IPO. And I do say she's he's bills partners in the form of Chaith in Sarajevo. I'm offended for some fantastic. Questions suggestions today? I really do so appreciate that. But before we dive into the show, stay the end of the day, you'll customers have to be in the center of everything you do. And that's why impulse who is just so crucial being your real time customer data platform in other words and Bosco is the fosters most efficient way to keep customer data in sync everywhere for marketing to customer support, and particle empowers different teams to ask you on their KPI's independent need to understanding the customer holistically, but don't take my word for it. They have the lives of abbey and be Spotify jet dot com on more on owners loving customers through to find out more. Head over to an particle dot com. That's an part, cool dot com. And the only thing that I think is equally important is the customer itself is yourself and do you struggled sleep at night. I know I do and it's not just the seven Espresso Martinez to me that cools. It. If you do struggles asleep, you're not alone, one in three adults in the US do not get enough sleep. And that's why we're partnering with com- the number one app for sleep with commun-. Discover a whole library of programs designed to help you get in sleep, your brain and body needs like soundscape and over one hundred sleep stories, narrated by very soothing voices and dulcet tones. And before you all they haven't asked me yet, still in the mail. I think so seize the day today right now twenty listeners get twenty five percent off aecom premium subscription dot com dot com slash two zero visa that's com dot com forward slash to'serve. E C and see why the forty million people have downloaded calm and finally, if we do about things that keep us up at night, bookkeeping would definitely be it for me. And that's what bulky becomes in keep it provides automated bookkeeping support to businesses by using a powerful combination of skilled accountants, alongside machine learning and artificial intelligence, so essentially twenty four seven and counting and support alongside incredible insights presented through beautiful dashboards and unlimited. Reporting transform your bookkeeping today with automation and join the one thousand coins already on bookkeeper and you can find out more stay on book dot com, how I'm too excited nosedive into this one. And so without further ado, I'm thrilled to hand over to Bill early general partner benchmark. You have now arrived at your destination. Many do not know Bill is that I started four years ago. And I wrote a list of three names that I most wanted to have on the show was absolutely. One of them's I couldn't be more excited to have you on staying. Thank you so much for joining me. Stabile nowhere century noted to, but I would love to kick off with you. So tell me how did you make your way into the world of venture and comes through GPO, one of the walls, my successful funds in the form of benchmark is actually, an unusual story? I think exposes how much luck is involved in some of these things as well as just random opportunity. But when I was in business school, I started thinking about venture, and I reached out to few people, and they said, go work for twenty years. You can't just get into venture and so are wooded. Drove me towards it. My sister was employees sixty three Compaq in Houston. Certainly, one of the first maybe only huge venture back stars out of Houston and Kleiner was actually in it. And so I got exposed to what it meant to have options and for company. Explode. And then I ended up working at Compaq for a while. I started trading stocks, I really liked investing. And I started to realize that tech had all these interesting angles and complexities. You could watch predict as they unfolded. So when I ran into a dead end as VC, the second best thing that looked interesting to me was too, because sell side analysts the team at Goldman at that time was quoted in every tech are Okoth read in the journal, Forbes or fortune, and they were on ticketing about valuation investing around technology evolution, and so I was lucky enough to beg my way onto a job at credit. Suisse First Boston, and was handed coverage of the PC hardware, and software industry, which was extremely fortunate and allowed me to build a network with a whole bunch of different people after three years of that turned out to be more successful than I anticipated. I got a call one day from Frank Tron, the legendary front Quattro, and he said, we're leaving Morgan Stanley and starting a new investment Bank. And we'd like you to be a part of it. And. At the time at already made a decision that I wanted to move on from this side, and I sit down Frank and he said, Bill, what do you to do long term, and I said, I wanna be venture capitalist. And he said, I'll tell you what you come to work for me on movie to Silicon Valley and introduce should ever bencher capital now, which is what he did. And it only took thirteen months of that before I got the offer I spent eighteen months at Hummer wen blood, and then benchmark approach me with an offer. I just couldn't refuse. And that's how I ended up here. I have Salih love that his Nanjing saying, I have to spell it. That's one thing that I'm holding until now I've never seen the boom and bust cycles from the macro is back with me actually being in the workforce. Now, I asked Justice walnut sauce. And he said that seeing blooming bus mating more conservative as an ambassador. So you having seen multiple boom bust. How do you think impacted your investing mentality today? I have multiple views on this subject. So when I went to Wall Street before I went into venture, I read every book on the history of financial market. That possibly could including all the famous ones that you've heard about. And so the notion going back to the two of boom and bust. It's well recorded in angels financial history. So you get tons of exposure to it if you just look for silicon valley's initiating placed because I've never been around a group of people, where risk is forgotten so quickly. And that's one of the things I would say having watched two of these. It's like the period. So we had huge bust in a one and a period from oh, one to say, maybe seven eight there was quite a bit of cognitive awareness of that. But then it can go away very quickly. And what's interesting is each day that goes on as the market expands people take on more and more risk. But they're losing their aversion to risk very slowly. And so, you know, it's like the bullfrog thing over maybe a five year period. You're VC firm has taken on tremendous amounts risk. But every day you just moved a little bit. So you never felt like you were making this massive gap in risk exposure. When mark. Bust risk, aversion comes on mmediately like overnight bone. And so you have this very different principle. We take on more risk, slowly, but we recognize risk quite quickly when market bus. Now here's what I said, I have multiple us on this of the I spent a ton of time in the past couple of years thinking about the cyclicality venture market centers, actually, in this really interesting. I was fortunate enough to get to spend some time with Howard marks famous bond investor and he said, tell me for twenty minutes or so. Just tell me about your business, and after I explained it for a while he goes, well, your business sucks. And he said, you can't avoid account. He said, I have a strategy for when I think yields, you're going to expand in where they're gonna contract. Always have a game to play goes, you're going to have boom bust cycles. Always, and I think he's actually, right. I think it's inherent in the way they venture funds are structured, where you take on money you invest in return, it over, like a ten year period and it's low barriers to entry high bare stacks it. So as market start to boom, the amount of capital that comes into the categories immense. But when the market breaks the capital doesn't have a mechanism to go away quickly, because it's already been committed to these ten in your windows. And so I don't know win the next one's going to be, and I will tell you that the other thing, I realized is that the vast majority of the average returns over a multi decade window are right at the end of the cycle. And so if you get conservative and pull back and miss, there were venture firms in ninety six. Six. He said this is way too overheated. We're pulling back and they miss ninety seven ninety eight ninety nine and if you took a pension funds venture returns and looked at him. The overtime that's my point. Like in took out those three years, it'd probably be horrible category. And so there's a saying I can't remember who said it to me, but they said the best way to protect against the downside is Jin joy every last bit of the which unfortunately sounds like kind of a Thelma and Louise approach. I mean I absolutely love that. And that, oh my God. I'm already said enjoying this app sake. I do you have to say because I often think, as he said, the capitals, committed for ten years in front stretches, and we've never seen so much capital commission, see asset costs. So from the founder and fundraising perspective, doesn't means it really stop even with a market crash, I guess is my question would have. I think what happens which already discussed is the risk of urgen of the principles happens very quickly. I've really only seen it twice a one nine but everybody gets hyper conservative at the same time. The other thing that will be super interesting winning if it ever happens again, if you were to define risk, and I think it's arguable you could as the burn rates that these companies have the burn rates now are probably tours of magnitude higher than they were in the ninety nine two thousand for, for some of these companies and if capital gets hard, that's going to be a really interesting issue. Now, we haven't seen forget hard in a long time for sure. I mean actually it takes me something that my Pontefract says the whole time and he's has around pricing, stay assets prices if risky is known existence. I'm really interested at Pete offense and you'll wonderful partners that on the show, never turn down a deal based on binary. It's a mental trap. I guess my question substance use, in Tennessee frothy times more capital available environments. How do you think about your price sensitivity? You look there's a reality in the venture market that you'll hear people talk about, which is there's a symmetric risking reward and so it just using type one. A tight to heirs. Right. If I invest in a company that doesn't work, I lose one time, my money, so I made an air, right? I'm this was going to work and it didn't if I decide not to invest in Google that Aaron decision making costume thousand whatever thousand next whatever the number was in. So I think Peter's point of saying that which I think is partially just to provoke the our partnership is, as we make decisions is tied to that reality. I think the real caveat to it is, if this company were talking about has optionality to be one hundred extra be fun maker kinda company, then certainly entry price does not idea agree that one of the big determinants of one hundred x fun town, as the alleman of Mockus. Oh, is in China. You'll potent us our travel before the accolade, and she said, if there's one thing I had to spill. She said it was market sizing. I am interested. How do you think about an approach market sizing stay when assessing new opportunities come through bench, more stool, I developed my own tenant? Maybe. Similar Peters on price sensitivity, which is, I think venture capitals. And once again, both on the price common and the Tam discussion we're having keep in mind, benchmark is committed to very early stage investing so we're frequently meeting with two people in a PowerPoint talking about an industry. So this isn't I don't think price insensitivity in late stage. Investing is a smart idea for shampoo. And so would say and I've talked about is just that I've come to believe people get into more trouble by over focusing on Tam analysis, especially in these super early stage companies and the example that probably most profound at this point that I wrote a long post about was oover where this NYU professor, her done analysis and said, this company should only be worth five billion, but is baseline was that it's going to get some percentage of the black car taxi market, which he went out and analyzed, right? And at the moment wrote it the size of Uber in San Francisco is already ten. Ex the tax him black car market in my points, not to dwell on him. And, and in that post, I also mentioned, this very famous story where AT and T hired McKenzie to critic, the number of cellphones by the year two thousand in nineteen eighty in missed by hundred. And so all too often what I've seen is. If technology brings about an easier simpler cheaper solution. You know, there's a good chance that the thing could expand the market in blow things out of proportion, and I found that state, especially true in the vertical plays open table was one where every we try to raise money after we invested, it was always long Tam discussion. So anyway, ruin accustomed to saying to myself, what could possibly be true, that would cause you know, those types of Taman asus to be wrong, and there's another phrase that my partner Bruce made up, which I love which gets at the symmetry thing, which is it elects to say what could go right? Which is interesting play on words from the common phrase, I love that won't could go right? I, I am. Interested. You sat there about table elements in terms of signaling. What definitely for me, and I think probably for people, I suddenly, they see over successive benchmark has had an into of companies and raises the signaling and positive signaling of banish mall, nor lead to such around power and brand validity subsequent, raises also much easier is not naive thinking, well, I mean, it also depends on the timeframe, I certainly think in the last five years. That's true. I think the companies we invest indefinitely benefit from a brand halo. And I think part of that 'cause I talked to both the angel community and the later stage community, I think part of, it's because they realized we won't invest without a board seat. It's intended that we have that a lot of other firms. Don't end part of the reason is we take me responsibility of being a principal donor and being a contributor on the board. Very seriously. And if you're an angel or your later stage investor in, you know, that there's someone there that takes the issue of sure do. Duty and, and helping that company to be worth more and more very seriously. Well, that makes you feel better about those assets, and there are a handful of firms that enjoys doing what we do, but there, if you look at all the venture Gahler's that are out there, I think the numbers that really take that role. Seriously as actually small fraction of now say, I do agree to you. I say bull that he's very transparent. I've just gave my shoe subordinates, a massive learning price SM London. I'm trying to scale it's false as possible, according to analysis, you spend three thousand two hundred dollars on a bold Bill. So I did have to ask how these self evolve and develop a board member over time question. My firm had this wonderful dinner with peer LeMond, who's still practicing venture age of eighty eight years old famous Koi investor and in a mood Danner. He said, actually just kinda surprising way said, I'm the best board. Members ballot. Wow. And I say why he goes, I'm more prepared than anyone else at the table, I was going to mention to things, but Pierre really made me smile when he said that because I do think showing up having read everything being intimately aware of everything you're supposed to be aware of is super important in the board room. Setting the second thing that I think is interesting is that all board members learn over time, I think, I think it will just happen to anyone who's getting an early start. When you're young, you speak too much in the boardroom, and you learn to change that behavior over time, and I tell you the best pattern are the best, the best rule set that I've used to do that is any time I have an idea that pops into my head during a board room. I'll write it down. And then asked myself, does this need to be discussed right now is there a benefit of this being discussed, but the other board members right now or is that something I could put in a note to the CO after the board meeting to follow up on? And so I'll make a list of. Twenty things I'll maybe mentioned five of them in the Boardman, other fifteen. All right up in some follow with the elements of speaking, and kind of know being over in times of speech. Would that be your biggest advice to me in terms of my first see what would you advise someone? Just gained best definitely that and the other thing is, you know, your circle of competence. Right. And so if there is a point that is going to be super helpful, and you're the right person to make it then you certainly should. But if you're relevant or if it's something that someone else at the table knows a lot more than you maybe ask them question. Instead. I agree. I have to say because obviously boats these take a lot of time in terms of time on medication. I've had many different views on the show that some say, you've got to spend time with your Wednesday return, the fund of, say you can't afford to spend time with the loses because you're covering sentence on the dollas. How do you think about timeout location across the portfolio, and if up in some lessons crooning credible decade, the up, it's a conundrum for the reason? You said I mean there are companies in any venture portfolio. They're going to be delivering one hundred more return than another one that you might be working on end so from purely selfish point of view than I would have to short term selfish. You would tell yourself only spend time here and the other thing I would tell you is that the struggling ones, and I don't know the exact stats are, like half of venture backed startups are zero something like that. You're going to have some of those they can be quite taxing from a mental standpoint. You know, seeing that entrepreneurs face going through things like layoffs. Which the valley hasn't seen much of the best, five years, having to do the raw raw meeting with the sixty percent of the headcount that's left. Those things are hard. They are really hard and they're mentally taxing. And so that's even more of I guess, a selfish short-term perspective wanna hang out on the winters. Here's the challenge. You know, if you're going to be a successful venture capitalist for two or three decades, you're going to have a reputation and your reputations going to be a part of what allows you to win or not win investment opportunities in the future. And so you'd be surprised how many founders when they ask for references say, hey, let me talk to some of the CEO's that didn't work. I think it's become a question that they've been told they're supposed to ask, and your reputation might be built on those both positively it's as he said it can undermine one that I'm Dan. Get my head around idea have to maybe slightly above yourself to benchmark, and the incredible ship that you have around Jeep, especially on the investment decision making we touched on south bay. On south bay price on this tippety that markets rising in some of the analysis in terms of the decision making process, Joel show, human said, it's not about getting the deal through the polish of finding the truth together. What does the investment seizure, making process crank for you of benchmark and how to use a partnership to find the truth together, so imaging the vast majority investments? We make are very early stage and as a result, it's not the type of situation where you're going to have ten people dive into spreadsheets in present all these arguments. There's way more intuition at play in many cases, eighty percent of the weight might just be group decision about the competency or capability of founder and in many cases that's turned out to be exact right debt. And so we have the listeners may not know benchmark structure in a very unique way where our investment partners, all have equal economics. And I think that doesn't amazing job of speaking to the newer, members of our team that their voice matters. And so it's very Claburn live, and we will simply have discussion and sometimes a company might come from particular sector, where certain partners have more knowledge, and so you're going to allocate. Those inputs better in a recent book thinking in bets any do koetter instincts section where she said, one of the benefits of partnership or small group isn't you've come to know the weaknesses of everyone else. And I thought that was kind of interesting to bet that everyone of the partners, benchmark knows the type of opportunity that each of us might fall in love with for the wrong reasons. And so we can help each other in that way. I thought that was interesting way she had raise. And so we simply have a discussion and if a majority of the partnership wants to move for we move for, I absolutely with the times of anti-g can. And I thought that was a fascinating beast possible. And I say Kay in terms of the is e fall in love with maybe for the wrong reasons if you sell finalize, can you see that in yourself from what type of ills, days, it's a. Question for the other four, but I suspect it has something to do with network effects or user, generated content or those types of concepts are like emotionally appealing to me. So anyone walks in and users, those two phrases might have a problem. Funny. I teed off to. She mentioned. Varying carries is an incredible personalities you have within the ship in terms of Halton selection. One guests on the show. Is that before I'd rather be known? So being a palton pick the investment banker. So I was very interested by that. But how do you think about the potency? Let to answer benchmarking and really what you look for in the I don't know what to you boots really interesting comment, because it implies from my point of view, that whoever said it experienced seriously, the career of being a venture capitalist adventure capital firm, as opposed to just the idea of being a investor on boards because one of the only things I think that a firm needs to do properly to be able to have very successful over very long period of time is to have a way to do generational. Transition in have a way to bring people in help them develop into being incredible venture capitalist. And so it's something we. Been a ton of time on every single week. We're talking about it. I'm going to give you a list of five or six practitioner, although, I don't know that it's not ten youth, is something that I've spoken about quite a bit. I think venture capital ins towards youth. There's a hustle element. There's a curiosity element. There's a lot of these really big outcomes are started by people that are nineteen to twenty one. So there's a if I'm in the right networks, I'm closer to these people. Some of the things up like a Snapchat, too. You're not down in that generational element. You're just gonna miss it. And so I think there's a whole bunch of reasons. Why youth is important curiosity super important, we talk a lot about business judgment that ones, always weird to me, because I think we have an internal definition of it. But I don't know that the world does is something we just kinda feel. I think you need an investor mindset. Not everyone either likes to our decides that they wanna thank like an investor and I think it requires a combination of understanding the hissed. Of invest in a certain amount of skepticism. I don't think you can just be hide piper optimistic in polit- off. And then the last thing owed to you need to be passionate about being venture capitalist. I think twenty years ago, there were a lot more people on the planet that were passionate about it as an industry career choice. I think they're less today and frequently there are people that we find that meet those first four criteria, but they're just not interested in category. That seems see preemies strange. How does that revealed itself? Are they might just tell? And that changed overtime like I said, I think twenty years ago to anyone had an opportunity to join the top tier firm. They jump at. But I think today, there are people that just have other desires passions, I will tell you, there's another piece to it that I should mention. I think people on the outside may not realize how much selling goes into venture. Capital is probably the one thing that I didn't realize when I joined that I know lately now but I could argue you're spending eighty five or ninety percent of your time south. And so if you don't like selling, it's a bad career choice. Can I ask what did you find the most challenging elements of the role? Feed today, I would say for the past five years. The most challenging part for me is just been this abundance of capital. It's equally mystifying to our marks and just from reading the commentary Munger and Buffett if it just rates are negative, which they are, in many countries around the globe, the DCF model just has an NA or like error. It doesn't work. And so there's just so much. Kabq Yulia de the tampering right now because these massive amounts of capital that it raises, you know, strategic questions that have never been presented to boardrooms ever like in history of business. Now, I do agree at the final one before we move into the clarify, which is my favorite speaking of that Hamilton, Taneja, as she general continents, that Harry, it's actually thirty transformational shift to technology, interrupting in embracing parts of the economy, and that she, we would see a macro DASA because of that embracing every single Konomi that we know with tentacles g agree with that kind of study transformational, macro shift, or do you think actually nothing's invincible to macro cycles? I have a whole bunch reactions to that. My gut is what you just said that. There's no ways it's unavoidable, which was my opinion coming out of that. Wonderful conversation with our, I have two other thoughts of right? One anytime of venture capitalist opens their mouth. They're probably sending a message to founder they haven't met yet and saying. That it's going to be thirty years of wonderful glory, all roses, and no thorns is certainly better message than screaming the skies fall. And so I can understand why most venture capitalist would adopt the I believe in technology. I believe talking to be great. The second comment I would have is already mentioned in the best way to protect against downside is Tim joy every last bit of the upside, I've got no incentive to change my operating principles are the way I go about doing the job, just because I think one day, the cycle minded, and so I'm going to be operating, as if I believed, would he said, even if I don't. I love that about realization, I d want into my favorite album and they Bill being the quickfire rounds Icee statement and you give me your immediate slip out sixty seconds all last. That's on good Boca. Okay. So the favorite Bookham why what must we be reading? My favorite book is that was actually written in a long time ago at called complexity by Mitchell Waldrop, and it's about the rise of the Santa Fe institute, which, I've very recently joined the board of which super excited about. It's also a board to Bill Millard Mike mos- since it on who you may know the book was about complexity theory. And that's what Santa Fe's about another way of saying that it's multi variable non linear systems. And I read it when I was twenty five twenty six and it just had such a profound impact on how I see different models in systems and economies and opportunities and investments because most things in life are multi variable non linear systems, and it was so like. Shockingly impactful in my brain like no other book ever has been. Maybe it's because of youth albums that people listen to that same timeframe tend to stick more. But I have a pile of that book in my office. I have ever since I read it. I give it out. I had this one's don't keep possible, but even sheathed one could want to achieve in venture when you the Greer in the decade, benchmark, what makes it as he stabil-? I have a profound affection for the art of helping founders realize their dream and imagining with them, a future that we've been bad on and help make come true. I want said, if, if we lived in a completely socialist society, where all jobs had the exact same pay. I think it's still choose to do this now. It's a canceling. What did you do? Now that you wish you'd known at the start of your career in BC Bill that was pretty easy. So I had a meeting or my firm, benchmark had a meeting with leering Sergei, where were they said, will you invested one hundred and we should have said. Yes, I would tell myself that no idea agree question, and I struggled with this the other day when is a stretch stretch to fall when you're going for something that's twenty pre two stone. And it ends safety pre you tell yourself, I'm gonna still forty pre and it goes to forty five. I think what happens in those situations, at least for us is we start internally having as intensiveness quicker discussions. We possibly can about how much upside is really in the situation, and it goes back to where we were saying earlier about, is this, the kind of thing that, that could be fun maker. And we've made missed on that in the past, and I would say our biggest regrets in this goes back to Peter's tenant about price, a lot of our biggest regrets, are when we got to worried about price Q allow for regret invention because of the symmetry situation that I talked about. We do dwell on the decision errors led us to miss big winners. We don't do L on. On the decisions that led us to make a bad investment. Absolutely an ultimate one. When you buy benchmark in the decade, what are you most? Proud of I think, would I would say is defending partners, put together this crazy idea of this equal partnership. And also, we're structure, and very artisan way. We don't have analysts or associates running around the partners, do all the due diligence themselves. We don't have huge teams of PR people or marketing departments or anything like that. Because we just liked to maximize the time we spend out on the field and they put together the structure this equal partnership. And I don't think any of them I don't know if they knew at the time, it's amazingly helpful for generational change. Because it gives you the opportunity to go out. Get the very best candidate you possibly can because people end this happened to me when a perch me like the overwhelming sense of welcome, you get when someone's willing to say, hey, you deserve as much as we do is super powerful. And so I would say the thing I'm most. Out of it. We're moving towards our third generation of partners in their all wonderfully fed several on your show, and I just love the model endures. It's also one we're team stands out way above the individual and for people to come on here that that's something that's super meaningful to them as well. You know how I feel about the Nippon is on this thing on the ship. It's been such a compliment, but the final one that I have to spell nice recently publicly announced investment that you made and why you say cited yes, a little contrarian. We put some money in a company called good, exits online grocer. And there's really all mentioned two fundamental things that got us excited won the CEO, Bentley hall is someone if you spent an hour with, you know exactly why I was so compelled ease a perfect for the role east guy. Great leadership skills incredible. External presenter communicator. And in the second reason was, you know, having watched a bunch of different industries of all. And as we're seeing the restructuring of retailing, we believe that if you're gonna do some type of directed consumer approach, you have to have the perfect supply chain or the optimal supply chain for doing that. And we think that a purpose, built distribution center designed for direct to consumer, perhaps, as an alternative to something like an instant car where you're picking things out of a store, but it's early like we do things are so it's early. We'll see Bill have sad. I've wanted Steed it since the very upset over four years ago, I can't find enough for joining me. And it's been such a pleasure. Oh, no worse. It really enjoyed it. And I have to say and I really probably shouldn't say this, but of the episodes, I've done that probably has to be the one that's delivered one of the greatest moments of joy for me, such pleasure to build on the show. And if you'd like to see more from Bill, you can find him on Twitter at be girly. Likewise, it'd be wonderful to welcome, you behind the scenes here, you can do that on Instagram at H dubbing nineteen Ninety-six with TB's. It'd be great see that. But before we leave each day at the end of the day, you'll customers have to be in the center of everything you do. And that's why impulse coup is just so crucial being you'll real-time customer data platform in other words and Bosco is the fosters most efficient way to keep customer data in sync everywhere for marketing analysts is to customer support and particle empowers different teams to execute on that tape is independent Naples to understanding the customer illicitly but don't take my word for it. They have the lives of abbey and be Spotify jet dot com on more owners loving customers to find out more had an particle dot com. That's an part, cool dot com. And the only thing that I think is equally important is the customer itself is your. Yourself and he struggled sleep at night. I know I do. And it's not just the seven Espresso MARTINI to me that cools it. But if you do struggles asleep, you're not alone one in three adults in the US do not get enough sleep. 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Bill founder Peter Fenton Compaq Boston Spotify US Tam Bill Gurley Silicon Valley partner Bosco Zillow Sarajevo aecom CEO