6 Burst results for "Commander rochefort"

"commander rochefort" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

10:27 min | 3 months ago

"commander rochefort" Discussed on Toure Show

"What is your favourite gun. That's a loaded question but don't cheer my favourite gun. That's very strange question. But it's funny. It's one of those strange questions. I actually have an answer to your an expert in all sorts of things. I am actually a gun collector and i collect a whole series of what i call clone weapons. These are weapons. I would have carried or did carry. When i was operating in the middle east so i have very you know. They're all special operations configured rifles. And i also have a collection of special operation sniper rifles so my favorite. It's like asking what your favorite child is but there you know there are. There are weapons that have different different capabilities. And the ones you know. There are highly collectible weapons and firearms and then there are those that you you really would practice on and i would say the one that i'm that is probably the most collectible In my inventory is a special operations issue naval special warfare issue so it was kind that were issued to the seal team. Full kit except for the suppressor in except for the silencer and that say It's called the mark levin mud zero and it's a sniper rifle That was standard issue throughout the entire afghan war Semiautomatic looks like an ar fifteen. But it's a much bigger bullet and it's very very rare that they have the actual kit. Kit is the actual case exactly as its issue to a seal team member everything. That's inside it. With the exception of the suppressor because the suppressor is a completely different ball of wax that you have to apply to the government to get and so the optics in there. You know the documentation right down to the toolkit and cleaning rod and everything including all the paperwork so it is a government issue weapon that i happen to get on the open market. They only have a couple of these every once in a while high. Did you get as a soldier. Not very high. I mean you know high relative because there are in most services. There are two branches right. There's officer which is when you go to university and you get a commission in your know battlefield leader and you go from like lieutenant into general and then enlisted. Enlisted is when you start from private or seaman and you work up to sergeant major but within the navy. We actually have three differentiated sections. We have officers. we have enlisted. And then we have chiefs and the navy has this category chief because it required people who were technical experts on ships or systems and who would be the corporate knowledge of ship right officers. Come and go right. They rise up and rank they go off to other commands enlisted people that come and go left and right but chiefs are usually the lifers and those three ranks from e seven eight and nine which is chief senior chief and master chief. They are in the navy. God's word when they make chief they have an entire two-month initiation process or you're educated and then you have a special highly interesting ceremony where they initiate you into the brotherhood of chief. So there's a creed for the chiefs. We wear khaki uniform like the officers but a different hat. Insignia that specifies. A chief you and i was a senior chief petty officer out of the three. So have chief senior chief master chief. My dad was a master chief which is as high as you can go. In the enlisted ranks. My brother was a senior chief of dr atomic. Submarines my dad worked in boiler systems. Back starting back in the fifties so we have a few chiefs in our family but being a chief is a global brotherhood. And i mean. I am obligated. You know someone who is a chief and can prove to me that he's a navy chief and he asked me a question straight up. I am obligated to give him a straight up answer and this is where sort of my claim to fame. Came came in When i was at msnbc I was the terrorism. Analyst is still him and they brought me on as a military member former military member to talk about how donald trump was insulting the gold star families and i was on camera with name Steve cortez who is a conservative talker and he insulted zero khan and And his wife in front of me. And i went to a place that you generally do not see right. I went right back to the very moment that i was still in the navy and a senior chief petty officer and i turned on him and i gave him the full blast of what any poured dumb stupid soldier. Who came across me and did a mistake would get and i just chewed him out on national tv and the funny thing is. There's this little technique we use when we're really angry. We put our left hand on our hip and our right hand comes out into a flat. Palmed like i'm gonna slap you and bends at the elbow and that's called the blade hand and that means you're really angry and you are serving it to him right. I didn't even know i was doing that. I had chiefs around the world right to me and said you did it right. You were blade handing that. I was like what and they were here like. Yes right right on chief. You went full senior chief on that guy and i said well i just was not going to allow a family that had sacrificed their son for us to be insulted in front of me. And so the chief world for anyone who knows chiefs or was in the navy. It's different from like sergeant majors. I mean all chiefs are revered and feared and we have our own little spaces on ships in that commands called the goat locker because in the old days navy. They all had like those little wispy beards at the chin kung fu beards and they would live in a place near where the goats were stored. Right the old goats locker so all spaces for chiefs where you were what. You can't come into you just can't walk into it. You have to have permission officers have to have permission to come into. It is called the goat locker. I even have a goat locker in my house. So are you also a spy. Well i'm naval intelligence. I was as a matter of fact. And i us naval intelligence euphemistically to sort of stay away from where i really was. But now that. I'm i'm out and about everyone knows I was a naval cryptology. A codebreaker that's what cryptology is is the study of breaking codes and the cryptologic field is the field that since oh really formally organized just before world war two where we studied. Let me give it to you. I can't tell you what we do in the modern world. But i'm gonna tell you what we did in world war two so if you watch the battle of midway movie the old one not the new one You will understand that. We intercept japanese communications for example back then that were being broadcast or put out by morse code we would intercept that and those messages could in plain voice and so we would understand it. So we'd have a japanese linguist. Listen to it and then if it was encoded it was sent in morse code or some other machine And then cryptology would actually work that code backwards and break the code. Which of course would come out into japanese and then cryptologic linguist which is like what i was would translate and interpret and determine the intelligence value of that. So that's how it was done. That's how we actually won the battle of midway a team of Communications intercept operators were collecting japanese naval codes and a brilliant team including led by a guy who used to play poker with japan's naval commander yamamoto when he was a liaison officer in japan. Who was fluent japanese name Commander rochefort Actually broke the code of the japanese navy. Prior to midway the j twenty five coat and they could they could read the japanese orders so whether go and they said the japanese fleet which has now disappeared is northwest of midway island. They are going to invade midway with an amphibious fleet. And there are six japanese aircraft carriers out there and they don't know where we are and so we snuck up on them knowing precisely where they were bombed them and sank five out of six of the japanese carrier. Can you talk about. Can you name some of the battles that we might have heard of that. You've been a party. Yeah there's a few you know. I you know in my world and this goes back to the words spy by the way we use it euphemistically because anyone who's an intelligence collector technically buying and i am on the board of the international spy museum in washington. So yes some of the operations. That i was involved in you might have known about I was in beirut in one thousand nine hundred eighty three before the marine barracks bombing killed two hundred and forty three marines. I was there for the as a matter of fact i arrived that the day before the american embassy was bombed and they killed all of the cia staff in that bombing. Nine cia officers. And that day. I mean i was nineteen years old and i became one of the only five people still left in the country..

chiefs navy chief petty officer officer japanese navy cia cryptologic mark levin beirut washington japan donald trump american embassy Commander rochefort Analyst Steve cortez khan
"commander rochefort" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

13:06 min | 1 year ago

"commander rochefort" Discussed on Toure Show

"Donald Trump has been under. KGB surveillance since one thousand nine hundred. Seventy seven Cynthia's married to Yvonne Yvonne. `As father was the reporting person to check intelligence with Donald Trump all of this is passed onto the KGB which goes into a dough ca ca or older Donald J trump from nineteen seventy seven until suddenly donald trump meets the foreign minister of Russia in New York City and wants to go to Moscow to propose building a trump tower Moscow in the Soviet Union. So now that guy that's on his typewriter reports that back to Moscow. While Moscow's foreign ministry gets a copy and the other ministry that has the KGB gets a copy and they go get to meet Donald Trump file. This guy we've been collecting thing against them since nineteen seventy seven look at this guy narcissistic greedy manipulable. And now what you do. Is You assign a small team of two. Were three intelligence officers to do it. Young baby spies like Vladimir. Putin Malcolm Nancy's a thirty six year veteran of the navy who ascended to the highest levels and fought in combat in multiple countries and learned all about counterterrorism tactic. Spying everything this is super soldier super spy Super Super Man Ish. He's brilliant. He's tough he's deeply patriotic and he's written a book about the way. Trump has betrayed America and the way Russia has lord called the plot to betray America. We talk about being a soldier being a fighter and what it is that Russia has over trump. It's not which think it's Malcolm Nance on tour show Malcolm. What is your favorite gun? That's a loaded question but cheer my favorite gun. That's the very strange question. But it's funny. It's one of those strange questions. I actually have an answer to well. You're an expert in all sorts of things. I am actually a gun collector and I collect A whole series of what I call clone. Weapons these are weapons. I would've carried or did carry when I was operating in the Middle East so I have very. Oh you know they're all special operations configured rifles and I also have a collection of special operations sniper rifles. So my favorite it. It's like asking what your favorite child is but there there are. There are weapons that have different different capabilities. This and the ones there are highly collectible weapons and firearms and then there are those that you you really would practice on and and I would say the the one that I'm that is probably the most collectible In my inventory is a A special operations issue naval special warfare issue so it was kind that were issued to the seal team. Full Kit except for the suppressor in for the silencer and say it's called the Mark Levin mud zero and it's a sniper rifle That was standard issue throughout the entire Afghan Afghan war Semiautomatic looks like an ar fifteen but it's a much bigger bullet and it's very very rare her that they have the actual kit. The kit is the actual case exactly as it's issued to a seal team member everything thing that's inside it with the exception of the suppressor because the suppressor is a completely different ball of wax that you have to apply to the government to get and so the optics in there you know the documentation right down to the tool kit and the cleaning rod and everything including all the paperwork so it is a government issue weapon that I happen to get on the open market. They only have a couple of these every once in a while. How high did you get as a soldier? Not Very High highest relative because there are in most services. There are two branches right. There's officer which is when you go to university and you get a commission in your. Oh you know battlefield leader and you go from like Lieutenant to General and then enlisted enlisted when you start from private or seaman and you. WORKUP workup to sergeant major. But within the Navy we actually have three differentiated sections. We have officers. We have enlisted. And then we have chiefs and the navy has this category chief because it required people who were technical experts on ships or systems and who would be the corporate knowledge of a ship right officers come and go right they rise up and ranked they go off to other commands a an enlisted people that come and go left and right but she's are usually the life I and those three ranks from e seven eight and nine nine which is chief senior chief and master chief. They are in the navy. God's we're I mean they have when they make achieve. They have an entire two-month initiation process where you're educated and then you have a special highly interesting thank ceremony where they initiate you into the Brotherhood of chief. So there's a creed for the chiefs. We Wear Khaki uniforms like the officers but with a different hat. Insignia that specifies your chief and you and I was a senior chief petty officer out of the three so you have chief senior chief master chief. My Dad was a master chief which is as high as you can go. In the enlisted ranks My brother was a senior chief of Dr Atomic. Submarines of Marines my dad worked in boiler systems. Back starting back in the fifties So we have a few chiefs in our family but being being a chief is a global brotherhood. And I mean I am obligated. You know if someone who is a chief and can prove to me that he's a navy chief and he asked me a question straight up. I am obligated to give him a straight up answer and this is where sort of my claim to fame came came in When I was at MSNBC you know? I was. The terrorism analyst is still in and they brought me on as a military member former military member to talk about how Donald Trump was insulting the gold. All Star families and I was on camera with a guy named Steve Cortez who is a conservative talker and he insulted Khan and his wife in front of me and I went to a place that you generally we do not see right. I went right back to the very moment that I was still in the navy and a senior chief petty officer and I turned turned on him and I gave him the full blast of what any poured dumb stupid soldier who came across me and did a mistake would get and I just chewed him out on national TV and the funny thing is. There's this little technique we use when we're really angry. We put our left hand on our hip and in our right hand comes out into a flat palmed like I'm going to slap you and bends at the elbow and that's called the blade hand and that that means you're really angry and you are serving it to him right. I didn't even know I was doing that. I had chiefs around the world old right to me and said you did it right. You were blade handing back. What and they will heal? Yes right right on achieve. You went full senior chief on that guy and I said well I just was not going to allow a family that had sacrificed their son for us to it. Be Insulted in front of me. And so the chief world for anyone who knows chiefs or was in the navy. It's different from like sergeant majors teachers. I mean all chiefs are revered and feared and we have our own little spaces on ships and that commands called the goat locker because in the old days navy they all had like those little wispy beards. You know at the Chin like kung-fu beards. And they would live in a place near where the goats were stored the the old goats locker so all spaces for chiefs where you you can't come into you just can't walk into it right. You have to have permission officers have to have permission to come into it. is called the goat locker. I even have a goat locker in my house. So are you also a spy. Well I'm naval intelligence elegance. I was as a matter of fact and I use naval intelligence sort of euphemistically to sort of stay away from where I really was. But now that I'm out and about everyone one knows I was in naval cryptology. St- which is a code breaker. That's what cryptology is is the study of breaking codes and the cryptologic field is the field old. That since Oh really formally organized just before World War Two where we studied. Let me give it to you. I can't tell you what we do in the modern world. But I'm GonNa tell you what we did in World War Two so if you watch the battle of midway movie the old one not the new one you will understand that we we intercept Japanese communications for example back then that were being broadcast or put out by Morse Code we would intercept that and those messages this could be in plain voice and so we would understand it. So we'd have a Japanese linguist listen to it and then if it was encoded it was sent and unlike Morse code or some other machine And then cryptology would actually work that code backwards and break the code. Which of course would come out into Japanese and then cryptologic linguist which is like what I was would translate and interpret and determined termine the intelligence value of that? So that's how it was done. That's how we actually won the battle of midway a team of communications. Intercept operators were collecting Japanese. He's naval codes and a brilliant team including led by a guy who used to play poker with Japan's Naval Commander Yamamoto when he was liaison officer in Japan. who was fluent Japanese named Commander Rochefort actually broke the code of the Japanese Navy prior to Midway Jan Twenty twenty five code and they could they could read the Japanese orders so where they're going and they said the Japanese fleet which has now disappeared is north west of Midway Island. They are going to invade midway with an amphibious fleet. And there are six Japanese aircraft raff carriers out there and they don't know where we are and so we snuck up on them knowing precisely where they were bombed them and sank guy. I believe five about a six of the Japanese carrier. Can you talk about or can you name some of the battles that we might have heard of that. You've been a part of. Yeah there's a few in my world and this goes back to the word spy by the way we use it euphemistically because anyone who's an intelligence collector. Her technically is spying and I am on the board of the international spy museum in Washington. So yes some of the operations that I was involved in you might have known about I was in Beirut in one thousand nine hundred eighty three before the marine barracks bombing killed two hundred forty three marines. I was there the as a matter of fact I arrived the day before the American embassy was bombed and they killed all of the CIA staff in that bombing nine CIA officers. I and that day I mean I was nineteen years old and I became one of the only five people still left in the country that could speak Arabic and me and a couple of marine cryptology were. US intelligence collection capability in Lebanon. That day you know uh-huh and you're like good morning. We don't know what's going on in this country. Everybody got killed now. You guys need to start a collecting and getting US information so ya. Yeah Beirut of the first American Embassy bombing in the second American embassy bombing all the hostages that were taken in Lebanon seventy-six Western hostages. I I collected against tried to isolate and find them. Twa Eight forty-seven hijacking. I was deeply deeply involved in that that loss that resulted in the loss of a navy. Sailor you know Robert Dean Steve Them Then Going on the war the mini wars we had with Iran on in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight..

navy Donald J trump chiefs Moscow Russia KGB Putin Malcolm Nancy Middle East Beirut Vladimir Malcolm Nance US Soviet Union New York City MSNBC American embassy CIA
"commander rochefort" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:17 min | 2 years ago

"commander rochefort" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Stimulating talk. It is the dark secret place. Bryan suits in here. And we're talking about operation long jump there. There were several high profile assassination plots famous assassination plots during World War Two. The most successful was the American operation to shoot down Admiral sorta Oku Yamamoto's transport aircraft actually a bomber in World War Two and the US army. Air corps sent a sent a team of American pe- thirty eight to just happened to be where the aircraft was as it came into a came in for a landing because we're talking about intercepted or broken coats here, the German attempt to assassinate the big three Stalin Churchill and Roosevelt in December of nineteen forty-three came as a result of. Of a broken coat normally when you break the enemy's code, you don't inform the enemy, you don't tell them, Ohio. Ha I broke your coat because you're getting too much good raw intelligence, the British found this out early on a World War Two because the British did to brilliant things. They broke the enigma code because the polls got that encryption machine the 'nigma machine, they broke the German code, or they couldn't tell the Germans said they broke the code. So in other words, when they knew of an impending target civilian town of of German bombers, they couldn't evacuate the town. And this was one of the horrifying decisions that Winston Churchill had to make when he was told hours beforehand that the town of Coventry would be terror bombed. He could not inform the people of Coventry. To leave. And as a result, the coun- was bombed and burn dozens and dozens died, but Churchill couldn't do that. Or else the bigger picture would have been that the Germans figured out that the code was broken. And in the meantime, the Germans had a huge array of agents in England, the British turns them. They actually turned all the German agents and begin feeding them distant formation to send back to Berlin. And only a handful of people knew that they were actually running German agents. They were called the double cross committee, and it was Roman numeral for twenty. It was ex- ex- the double cross committee new of of this intelligence and these turn German spies same with the United States. We had broken the Japanese naval code after Pearl Harbor supposedly. But before midway in that six month, period, we broke the Japanese naval code, the g the genius Lieutenant Commander Rochefort who did it was the precursor to the NSA, and we couldn't tell the Japanese that we had broken their code. We had to just miraculously have three aircraft carriers in place to defeat the Japanese. Midway, and the Japanese were so arrogant, they never entertained the possibility that maybe they're code was compromised. This is a simple operational matter. They should have said, oh, you know, what just you factor out that possibility let's just change the code. But they did not they were that arrogant. So then along comes this intelligence that Admiral Yamamoto will absolutely positively be visiting some of the bases in the in the south central Pacific. And that NEW GUINEA would be one of them rebuttal a bunch of them. He would be island hopping and visiting different Japanese forward bases. And we -absolutely positively found out where he was going to be. And so the trick. There was how do we make it look random? How do we make it look like a whole bunch of p thirty eight just happened to be where Yamamoto was coming in for his final landing. Well, we did it we convinced the Japanese enough that it was simply a random attack and Yamamoto's twin engine bomber was sent smoking into the jungle Yamamoto was debt the genius who who thought of Pearl Harbor, the the tactical mastermind that was Yamamoto was now debt and not one person in the Japanese high command said, you know, what once is happenstance. They happen to have three carriers that we thought were sunk or they weren't sunken. They happen to be the right place to defeat us at midway. Now, all of a sudden. Our number one naval genius goes flaming into the jungle because a bunch of p thirty eight has happened to be there. Maybe twice as is happenstance. Let's not wait for a third time. Because that's not a coincidence. That's enemy action. They didn't do that Japanese didn't do that. So here's the Germans. It's nineteen forty-three and supposedly they broken the American able code, and they discover that this operation conference called Eureka is going to be happening in Tehran in allied occupied Iran in December of nineteen forty-three. Well, the deal is the German commando auto score Zini had just freed Mussalini with this daring raid into the Italian Alps to rescue misleading and bring him back to Berlin. Just because Hitler didn't wanna look like he did know his friends were. So they were so excited by this. And they looked at the conditions. And they said look we have hundreds of agents on the ground there already. We can if we wanted get guys in there or a one time attack. You might be a suicide operation, but that's what these guys sign up for. And we can get these guys in Red Army uniforms. We can get him in British uniforms. We can get him dressed as American secret service guys with suits and ties, but we can penetrate that embassy all we gotta do is get to that embassy. Getting to Tehran is not the issue parachuting in without being detected is not the issue. We can do all those things getting into that embassy. And then getting out that's the issue either way fast forward to nineteen seventy nine and does this sound familiar with the desert one and the the fledgling delta force attempting to spring American hostages out of the US embassy in Tehran getting into Iran wasn't the issue getting to Tehran. Also, not the issue. It was. Getting into the embassy and getting out. So here it is nineteen forty three. The Germans are faced with the same problem. But they're the conditions on the ground are far different for them. Because most of the Iranian people are actually very sympathetic to the Germans, I mean, hell the Germans had just dropped parachutists paratroops onto Mosul. The Germans had just seized the oilfields in Iraq. And if they'd sent a bigger force. They probably would have kept it through throughout the war. Because at the time the Germans were pushing the British to the Nile and had that turned out differently. The Germans would have owned the Middle East from Morocco to the Iranian border. And so those are the conditions on the ground that a German could probably get help from the average Iranian certainly the average Iranian policemen Arabian, military guy. Remember, we were occupying Iran, and in fact, general Norman Schwarzkopf dad, the former. Chief of the New Jersey state police, he was in charge of the Iranian internal police the John Dr Murray, so the Germans looked at everything. And they said, you know, what we have the conditions this might actually work. So what really happened is could turned World War Two. What really happened? We'll be back right after this operation long jump that that never occurred. And why when we come back Brian suits in here until eleven KFI AM, six forty more stimulating talk. Michael.

Admiral Yamamoto Winston Churchill Oku Yamamoto Iran Tehran United States Berlin Coventry Bryan US army Ohio jungle Yamamoto England Pearl Harbor Air corps Lieutenant Commander Rochefort Norman Schwarzkopf Red Army
"commander rochefort" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

11:04 min | 2 years ago

"commander rochefort" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"You've been injured, call the Barnes firm now. Personal attorney responsible for the. Station. Forty four stimulating talk. It is the dirt secret place, Brian soutenir, and we're talking about operation long jump. There were several high profile assassination plots famous assassination plots during World War Two. The most successful was the American operation to shoot down Admiral e sorta coup Yamamoto's transport aircraft actually a bomber in World War Two and the US army. Air corps sent a sent a team of American pe- thirty eight to just happen to be where the aircraft was as it came into a la- came in for a landing because we're talking about intercepted or broken codes here, the German attempt to assassinate the big three Stalin Churchill and Roosevelt in December of nineteen forty three. Came as a result of a broken code. Normally when you break the enemy's code, you don't inform the enemy, you don't tell them, Ohio. Ha I broke your coat because you're getting too much good raw intelligence, the British found this out early on a World War Two. Because the British did to brilliant things. They broke the enigma code because the polls got that encryption machine the machine they broke the German code, or they couldn't tell the Germans that they broke the code. So in other words, when they knew of an impending target civilian town of of German bombers, they couldn't evacuate the town. And this was one of the horrifying decisions that Winston Churchill had to make when he was told hours beforehand that the town of Coventry would be terror bombed. He could not inform the people of Coventry. To leave. And as a result. The town was burned dozens and dozens died, but Churchill couldn't do that. Or else the bigger picture would have been that the Germans figured out that the code was broken. And in the meantime, the Germans had a huge array of agents in England, the British turns them. They actually turned all the German agents and begin feeding them disinformation to send back to Berlin. And only a handful of people knew that they were actually running German agents. They were called the double cross committee, and it was Roman numeral for twenty. It was ex- the double cross committee new of of this intelligence and these turn German spies same of the United States. We had broken the Japanese naval code after Pearl Harbor supposedly. But before midway in that six month, period, we broke the Japanese naval code, the g the genius Lieutenant Commander Rochefort who did it was the precursor to the NSA, and we couldn't tell the Japanese that we have broken their code. We had to just miraculously have three aircraft carriers in place to defeat the Japanese admit. And the Japanese were so arrogant, they never entertained the possibility that maybe they're code was compromised. This is a simple operational matter. They should have said, oh, you know, what just to factor out that possibility? Let's just change the code. But they did not they were that arrogant. So then along comes this intelligence that Admiral Yamamoto will absolutely positively be visiting some of the bases in the in the south central Pacific. And that NEW GUINEA would be one of them rebel a bunch of them. He would be island hopping and visiting different Japanese forward basis, and we absolutely positively found out where he was going to be. And so the trick. There was how do we make it look random? How do we make it look like a whole bunch of p thirty eight just happened to be where Yamamoto was coming in for his final landing. Well, we did it we convinced the Japanese enough that it was simply a random attack and Yamamoto's twin engine bomber was sent smoking into the jungle Yamamoto was debt the genius who who thought of Pearl Harbor, the the tactical mastermind that was Yamamoto was now dead and not one person in the Japanese high command said, you know, what once happenstance they happen to have three carriers that we thought were sunk or they weren't sunken. They happen to be the right place to defeat us at midway. Now, all of a sudden. Our number one naval genius goes flaming into the jungle because a bunch of p thirty eight happened to be there. Maybe twice as is happenstance. Let's not wait for a third time. Because that's not a coincidence. That's enemy action. They didn't do that Japanese didn't do that. So here's the Germans. It's nineteen forty-three and supposedly they've broken the American naval code, and they discover that this operation a conference called Eureka is going to be happening in Tehran in allied occupied Iran in December of nineteen forty-three. Well, the deal is the German commando auto score Zini had just freed Mussalini with this daring raid into the Italian Alps to rescue misleading and bring him back to Berlin. Just because Hitler didn't wanna look like he did know his friends were. So they were so excited by this. And they looked at the conditions. And they said look we have hundreds of agents on the ground there already. We can if we wanted get guys in there for a one time attack might be a suicide operation, but that's what these guys sign up for. And we can get these guys in Red Army uniforms. We can get him in British uniforms. We can get him dressed as American secret service guys with suits and ties, but we can't penetrate that embassy all we gotta do is get to that embassy. Getting to Tehran is not the issue parachuting in without being detected is not the issue. We can do all those things getting into that embassy. And then getting out that's the issue by the way fast forward to nineteen Seventy-nine. And does this sound familiar with the desert one and the the fledgling delta force attempting to spring American hostages out of the US embassy in Tehran getting into Iran wasn't the issue getting to Tehran. Also, not the issue. It was. Getting into the embassy and getting out. So here it is nine hundred forty three. The Germans are faced with the same problem. But they're the conditions on the ground are far different for them. Because most of the Iranian people are actually very sympathetic to the Germans the Germans had just dropped parachutists paratroops onto Mosul. The Germans had just seized the oilfields in Iraq. And if they'd sent a bigger force. They probably would have kept it through throughout the war. Because at the time the Germans were pushing the British to the Nile and had that turned out differently. The Germans would have owned the Middle East from Morocco. To the Iranian border. And so those were the conditions on the ground that a German could probably get help from the average Iranian certainly the average Iranian policemen Arabian, military guy. Remember, we were occupying Iran, and in fact, general Norman Schwarzkopf dad, the former chief of the New Jersey state police he was in charge of the Iranian internal police the gendarmerie. So the Germans looked at everything. And they said, you know, what we have the conditions this might actually work. So what really happened is could have turned World War Two. What really happened? We'll be back right of this operation long jump that that never occurred. And why when we come back dark secret place Brian Simpson here KFI AM, six forty more stimulating talk Michael Japan with a news flash. Flood warnings for parts of entira county near the recent burn zones are to last until ten forty five tonight. Another fifteen minutes and flash flood warnings still up until ten forty five for parts of the burn zones. LA county mud flows of already closed a stretch of PCH through at least tomorrow with several cars have buried in mud. Closer stretches from Las Pozas road Ventura County to install canyon road near Malibu. Heavy rain is now moved south flash. Flood warnings have been posted until twelve forty five in the morning tomorrow for Long Beach, Rancho Palos Verdes and Carson along with the harbor area. A last ditch effort to avert plan strike by Elliott school district teachers except for Monday when teacher's union reps are set to me with district officials for a final bargaining session. We're gonna do everything we can to try to avert a strike. But it depends on what Monday looks like. I mean, frankly, if Monday, it looks like the last twenty months, we're not going to subject our bargaining team to just sitting in a room and being disrespected Billy president, Alex Caputo, Paul says the union needs to see a real offer that addresses all of their issues. Have no new contract deal is reached teachers are ready to go on strike Thursday. Police officer who was shot and killed during a. Traffic. Stop has been remembered at his funeral Modesto Newman police chief Randy Richardson, tearfully thanked corP row. Neil sing from. Thank you. Thank you for being the man that we all want to be. Thank you for being the provider. That we all strive to be Andres lined the streets of Newman as the officers flag draped casket passed through the small town in the central valley yesterday corP sing was killed December twenty six allegedly by a man who is an illegal immigrant. Vice president Pence has held a meeting to try and find a way to end the government shutdown ABC's. Karen Travers, says pens had an hour and a half long meeting with congressional leadership staff joined by acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney. Senior adviser, Jared Kushner and homeland security secretary Kirsten Nielsen no lawmakers were expected to attend president. Trump tweeted this morning that ending the shutdown quote would be easy to do if Democrats would approve what he called real border security, which he says includes a wall funding for a wall as a non-starter for Democrats traffic from your helpful socal Honda traffic center. Crashing Calabasas.

Admiral Yamamoto Winston Churchill Tehran United States Iran Berlin Coventry Ohio US army Brian soutenir Barnes attorney England jungle Yamamoto Pearl Harbor Air corps Red Army Calabasas
"commander rochefort" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

09:10 min | 2 years ago

"commander rochefort" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Weekend takes over. I'll be back for super hyper local Sunday tomorrow. Well, protection of intelligence is of military intelligence and enemy information is absolutely key. And critical and two stories just came to light through the BBC this week of two women who kept their secret in World War, Two working with British intelligence and one woman working at Bletchley park the world famous Bletchley park where they decoded German enigma code machine. Coated military communications came to light. And just to set the stage for you. To extraordinary decisions illustrate how important it is to keep from the enemy that the fact that you broken their code one of them is the the famous night in nineteen forty one when Bletchley park were the British Alan turing had his the world's basically one of the world's first automatic computers that didn't need manual settings. And all that. Well, they decoded German message for the target that night, the lift off was going to terror bomb, the city of Coventry and the intelligence which was called ultra was given to prime minister Winston Churchill that the target was known, and that very likely Coventry would be hit by many dozens of German bombers, what should we do and Churchill was faced with a almost impossible decision. A Hobbs choice. If you will. That if he sent fighters to intercept the bombers, then the Germans because they can't be that dumb would probably suspect that the code had been broken. They they would probably be told by German intelligence that it was impossible. And in fact, treasonous to even suggest that because the machine was nearly perfect would probably perfect. So intercepting the bombers was not an option, but not intercepting them. How was that a better choice? Well, Churchill knew that possibly hundreds of people would die in the bombing. Coventry certainly would suffer tremendous damage from fire, and and and the bombs itself and the whole thing, but he made the calculation that if I don't if I do something the risk of the Germans suspecting that we've broken their code could probably endanger, many, thousands possibly hundreds of thousands of lives because what the British new early in the war when they when they got a copy of it and egg machine and began decoding it was that they were literally saving untold thousands of lives by breaking the German killed. But it would only work if they shut up about it. So everybody who worked at Bletchley park was absolutely sworn to secrecy or the rest of their lives. So that that was that's one case of a very very hard decision to be made in intelligence. Here's another more personal one. In nineteen forty three. A US navy intelligence officer who was one of the watch commanders in the intelligence central command room in Pearl Harbor was at sea with the US sculpting, a submarine and a famously, you know, we had broken the Japanese naval code. During World War Two early on in World War Two. The Lieutenant Commander Rochefort went on to to lead a naval intelligence, which became the national security agency was a brilliant B's a bit of intelligence work by by Lieutenant Commander and commander John Rochon to break, the Japanese code, but the Japanese it's no good. Like, I say, it's no good. If the enemy finds out you've broken they're code because they're just simply going to come up with a new code. So anyone who had access to what was also called the ultra intelligence was sworn mortally to secrecy. So in. November of nineteen Seventy-three. Commander John Rockwell part me John Cromwell when I say Rockwell John Cromwell was at sea on the US sculptor. They they were at sea to experiment. With a new tactic where decoded intelligence would be sent to groups of three submarines, and they would attack in a way that the German wolf packs attacked in nineteen forty and forty one forty two against allied convoys. So an intelligence officer was sent to see with a bunch of submarines John Cromwell was on the US's sculpting. So the US is sculptor is detected and attacked in November of nineteen forty three by the Japanese destroyer Yamaguchi MO. North of the truck atoll, very, very important Japanese airbase and out for hours and hours and hours. They play cat and mouse, the Japanese destroyer winds up dropping fifty depth charges. Sculptor is mortally wounded there are dead. Enlisted man, all the officers except John Cromwell commander. John Cromwell are dead. The the ship is surfaced and the men jump off abandoned ship leaving behind the dead. And some of the wounded who refused to be evacuated. But. Commander. John Cromwell said I can't go I know too much. And he stayed on the sculpture when he was last seen by some of the enlisted men gripping some of the railings inside the conning tower with all he had and commander John Cromwell fearing being tortured and giving up what he knew mainly the the main secret being we've broken your code. John Cromwell went to the bottom with the US sculpting. In extraordinary selfless act that that illustrates how important keeping this kind of intelligence is for his amazing bravery his commander recommended him for the medal of honor. His son was was the recipient of the medal of honor in nineteen forty six is son went on to a very successful naval career, John Cromwell is a legend in naval intelligence, and the NSA, etc. Case. Oh, so here's a modern day story. This is a different kind of bravery. And this is an extraordinary story. Margaret Wilson is ninety five she trained as a wireless operator before being transferred to Bletchley park to work for British intelligence in one thousand forty two she's ninety five and she told the BBC last week. That's all I can tell you a secret is a secret. This amazing woman has kept her secret that she even worked at Bletchley park all of her life ever since nineteen forty two. Here's a little bit of of her. She was recognized by British intelligence, and the the British government in two thousand thirteen when official thanks were sent to those who worked at Bletchley park. When we come back up play for you. What this woman went through and all of the relatives that she kept in the dark about what she did during World War Two is this woman is an extraordinary Britain that and more coming up right after this one more time replaced Brian suits in here until eleven KFI AM, six forty or stimulating talk. Muckleshoot pay with the news. Prosecutors say Lee founder and CEO of a nonprofit charter school in Korea town's going to plead guilty to stealing two and a half million dollars in taxpayer funds at a plea deal. Baleka McFarland will admit using the money to pay for things like first class air travel, fine, dining and luxury goods county department of public health issuing a cold weather alert for the valley local mountain areas because of wind chill temperatures expected to get below thirty two degrees in the valley. The alert will be in effect tomorrow and again Wednesday and Thursday the mountain areas the alert will be in effect from Monday through Thursday. US military says the number of active duty troops deployed to the border with Mexico is down to about twenty six hundred twelve hundred or in California at its peak for the mission. There were about fifty eight hundred troops into the border as a caravan of migrants from Central America move toward the US border. We'll check out your forecast in that big problem on the five next..

John Cromwell Bletchley park US Commander Coventry Winston Churchill BBC Commander Rochefort officer John Rockwell commander founder and CEO John Rochon California Central America British government Baleka McFarland
"commander rochefort" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:50 min | 2 years ago

"commander rochefort" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Coast-to-coast weekend takes over. I'll be back for super hyper local Sunday tomorrow. Well, protection of intelligence is of military intelligence and enemy information is absolutely key. And critical and two stories just came to light through the BBC this week of two women who kept their secret of World War, Two working with British intelligence and one woman working at Bletchley park the world famous Bletchley park were they decoded German enigma code machine. Coated military communications came to light. And just to set the stage for you. To extraordinary decisions illustrate how important it is to keep from the enemy that the fact that you broken their code one of them is the the famous night in one thousand nine hundred forty one when Bletchley park were the the British Alan turing had his the world's basically one of the world's first automatic computers that didn't need manual settings. And all that. Well, they decoded a German message for the target that night, the Luftwaffe's was going to terror bomb the city of Coventry and the intelligence which was called Alterra was given to prime minister Winston Churchill that the target was known, and that very likely Coventry would be hit by many dozens of German bombers, what should we do and Churchill was faced with a almost impossible decision. A Hobbs choice. If you will. That if he sent fighters to intercept the bombers, then the Germans because they can't be that dumb would probably suspect that the code had been broken. They they would probably be told by German intelligence that it was impossible. And in fact, treasonous to even suggest that because the machine was nearly perfect would probably perfect. So intercepting the bombers was not an option, but not intercepting them. How was that a better choice? Well, Churchill knew that possibly hundreds of people would die in the bombing. Coventry certainly would suffer tremendous damage from fire, and and the bombs itself and the whole thing, but he made the calculation that if I don't if I do something the risk of the Germans suspecting that we've broken their code could probably endanger, many, thousands possibly hundreds of thousands of lives because what the British new early in the war when they when they got a copy of it and egg machine and began decoding it was that they were literally saving untold thousands of lives by breaking the German kill. But it would only work if they shut up about it. So everybody who worked at Bletchley park was absolutely sworn to secrecy or the rest of their lives. So that that was that's one case of a very very hard decision to be made in intelligence. Here's another more personal one. In nineteen forty-three, a US navy intelligence officer who was one of the watch commanders in the intelligence central command room, and Pearl Harbor was at sea with the US sculpting, a submarine and a famously, you know, we had broken the Japanese naval code. During World War Two early on in World War Two. The Lieutenant Commander Rochefort went on to to lead a naval intelligence, which became the national security agency was a brilliant be a bit of intelligence work by by Lieutenant Commander and commander John Rochon to break, the Japanese code, but the Japanese it's no good. Like, you say, it's no good. If the enemy finds that you've broken they're covered because they're just simply going to come up with a new code. So anyone who had access to what was also called the the ultra intelligence was sworn mortally to secrecy. So in. November of nineteen Seventy-three. Commander John Rockwell, pardon me, John Cromwell when I say Rockwell John Cromwell was at sea on the USS sculptor. They they were at sea to experiment. With a new tactic where decoded intelligence would be sent to groups of three submarines, and they would attack in a way that the German wolf packs attacked in nineteen forty and forty one forty two against allied convoys. So an intelligence officer was sent to see with a bunch of submarines John Cromwell was on the US sculpt. And so the US sculpting is detected and attacked in November of nineteen forty three by the Japanese destroyer Yamaguchi MO. North of the truck atoll, very, very important Japanese airbase and out for hours and hours and hours. They play cat and mouse, the Japanese destroyer winds up dropping fifty depth charges. Sculptor is mortally wounded there are dead. Enlisted man, all the officers except John Cromwell commander. John Cromwell are dead. The the ship is surfaced and the men jump off abandoned ship leaving behind the dead. And some of the wounded who refused to be evacuated. But. Commander. John Cromwell said I can't go I know too much. And he stayed on the sculpture when he was last seen by some of the enlisted men gripping some of the railings inside the conning tower with all he had and commander John Cromwell fearing being tortured and giving up what he knew mainly the the main secret being we've broken your code. John Cromwell went to the bottom with the US sculpting. Extrordinary selfless act that that ilustrovana important. Keeping this kind of intelligence is for his amazing bravery his commander recommended him for the medal of honor. His son was the recipient of the medal of honor in nineteen forty six is son went on to a very successful naval career, John Cromwell is a legend in naval intelligence, and the NSA, etc. Okay. So so here's a modern day story. This is a different kind of bravery. And this is an extraordinary story. Margaret Wilson is ninety five she trained as a wireless operator before being transferred to Bletchley park to work for British intelligence in one thousand forty two she's ninety five and she told the BBC last week. That's all I can tell you a secret is a secret. This amazing woman has kept her secret that she even worked at Bletchley park all of her life ever since nineteen forty two. Here's a little bit of of her. She was recognized by British intelligence, and the the British government in two thousand thirteen when official thanks were sent to those who worked at Bletchley park. When we come back. I'll play for you. What this woman went through and all of the relatives that she kept in the dark about what she did during World War Two is this woman is an extraordinary Britain that and more coming up right after this time replaced Brian suits in here until eleven KFI AM, six forty or stimulating talk. Muckleshoot pay with the news van is a teacher at Birmingham communities. Charter high school has been arrested after report the teacher engaged in inappropriate conduct. Scott Silva, apparently faces several counts of sexual battery and child annoyance to people have been found dead after fire tore through an apartment unit on south Bill. First avenue near the West Chester area of LA. Investigators say it looks like both people have been shot took police helicopters to track down a missing police dog from the -tario police department corral, a Belgian Mellon wa was on the loose for about three hours. Today's.

John Cromwell Bletchley park Commander US Coventry Winston Churchill BBC Commander Rochefort John Rockwell officer commander John Rochon Pearl Harbor Scott Silva Birmingham communities Luftwaffe Charter high school