35 Burst results for "Columbia University"

Covid-19 has killed at least 1 million people around the globe

All Things Considered

03:40 min | 2 d ago

Covid-19 has killed at least 1 million people around the globe

"Today, the world reached a new threshold of misery in the corona virus pandemic. At least one million people have now died of covert 19. That's according to a tally maintained by Johns Hopkins University. Joining us now is NPR Global health correspondent Narrate Eisenman Henery High, So one million lives gone. I mean, it's incredible to think we're reaching this death toll in less than a year. Yeah, it's been just over nine months since the first death was reported in Wuhan, China, and just looking at these numbers. We're seeing that half of these deaths were just in four countries, right? Right, the United States, Brazil, India and Mexico and with the exception of India, these countries are not among the most populous in the world. But in the case of the United States, which has the highest number of deaths that more than 200 for 1000 in Brazil, with more than 140,000 deaths Both of their president's expressed a lot of skepticism about the threat from the virus. The responses were chaotic and deaths surged in July and August and started to come down a bit but are now rising again. Of these four countries also don't just rank highest on total deaths over the entirety of the pandemic in the past week, they've also had the highest number of new deaths. And are there any new hot spots emerging at this point? In Argentina. The daily death toll has been climbing for months and has now really swerved up. European countries like Spain that saw a lot of death a while back, are seeing another upswing. Now you mention India is a special case. Why is that? Yes, it's the world's second most populous nation. So for a country of that size, India's 95,000 deaths isn't relatively speaking. All that high, which is all the more surprising since India is seeing a huge amount of infection, But among people who are contracting the virus there, the share who are dying doesn't seem to be as high is in some other countries. Monica Gandhi is an infectious disease specialist at University of California, San Francisco, she says. One theory is that people in India tend to dress with thes flowing fabrics. So even though it's hard to social distance people could do one thing during all of this, which is pick up their cloth from there. You know outfit and put it over their mouth and nose. If it reduces the amount of hours you get into that you get less sick. I think it could be driving down the severity of infection. That's so interesting. Yeah. You get a lower dose of the virus. Maybe you're more likely to survive. Another theory. Maybe people in India have been more exposed to previous current viruses, which gives them some immunity. Well, speaking of immunity, I mean as more and more people have gotten infected, does that Offer any hope in terms of seeing a slowdown in new cases or even knew deaths, Monica Gandhi says. Quite possibly, this is what's called Herd immunity, of course, and Gandhi stresses it should not be pursued as a strategy, because if you're reaching herd immunity through widespread infections, as opposed to vaccinations Along the way, A lot of people will still die. Rather, she says. Her immunity is a potential helpful effect. We may notice in the coming months. Then again, it is going to get colder in the coming months, at least in the Northern Hemisphere as winter approaches, So do you think that's going to make the pandemic worse? Well, one researcher Jeffrey Shaming of Columbia University, says evidence does suggest the Corona virus transmits better in cold climates. People spend more time indoors, the virus will have more opportunities. To move from person to person and be more neatly transmissible. That works against us.

India Monica Gandhi Johns Hopkins University United States Eisenman Henery High Npr Global Health Brazil Wuhan Northern Hemisphere Spain Argentina Jeffrey Shaming China Researcher San Francisco President Trump Columbia University University Of California Mexico
Ex-Columbia University Gynecologist Accused Of Abusing Dozens Of Patients Is Indicted

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

01:13 min | 3 weeks ago

Ex-Columbia University Gynecologist Accused Of Abusing Dozens Of Patients Is Indicted

"Doctor accused of sexually abusing dozens of patients over the course of almost 20 years, is named in an indictment handed up by a federal grand jury in Manhattan. We get details of WCBS reporter Kevin your income. Robert had and is a former Columbia University gynecologist who in 2016 struck a plea deal with the Manhattan D A s office, gave up his medical license and avoided jail time amid allegations of sexual abuse among his victim's Evelyn Yang, the wife of Andrew Yang, who ran for president. She called his punishment. A slap on the wrist will now hadn't stands to lose a lot more. The allegation set forth in the indictment. Show that hadn't acted. As a predator in a white coat. Audrey Strauss is the acting U. S attorney for the Southern District of New York. She says he victimized women from 1993 to 2012. He also targeted girls used the cover. Of conducting medical examinations. To engage in sexual abuse that he passed off. As normal. Medically necessary. The Manhattan Da's office reopened the case in February. You got plenty of criticism for the deal it cut that office did help federal prosecutors in this case.

Manhattan Audrey Strauss Evelyn Yang Manhattan D Andrew Yang Reporter Kevin Columbia University Robert President Trump Attorney U. S
Celebrating #BlackJewishUnity Week with the National Urban League

People of the Pod

21:28 min | 3 weeks ago

Celebrating #BlackJewishUnity Week with the National Urban League

"Next week, two of the world's foremost human relations organizations the National Urban League and J. C. will unite against surging levels of Anti Semitism and racism to declare black Jewish unity week. Together, we will strengthen ties between our nations black and Jewish communities and combat all forms of hate. To discuss the importance of this event and to talk about the challenges of fighting racism I'm joined now by Clint Oda, the National Urban League Senior Vice President for Policy Advocacy and the Executive Director of the Urban League's Washington Bureau Clint, thank you so much for joining us. It's a pleasure to be with you. Now this special week, this black Jewish unity week is not happening in vacuum. It's happening because of rising antisemitism and racism in this country my listeners here plenty about antisemitism. So I just wanted to start by asking you this. It's been a Helluva summer. How are you? I would describe myself as weathered a little bit. We've been going through this quite some time this summer at least the notoriety of these police incidents are is much higher than it has been in the past. So we're we're hanging in there. We don't have a choice. Because this work is so important. And it really does reinvigorate me to see that we've got allies in this fight and we've always had allies in this fight but to see them step up in the way that they have his really reinvigorated me and I'm very excited to keep the fight going. I'm sure that our listeners are familiar with the name, the Urban League because it is etched into the annals of history of this country and anyone who knows anything about the civil rights movement will know the names of the Urban League of the ACP Snick we can go deeper also start really getting to the deep cuts. Tell us a little bit about. What the Urban League has been up to lately and what you've been up to especially over the summer in the wake of the George Floyd killing and other events in recent months while we're one, hundred, ten year old civil rights and Economic Empowerment Organization and we have been working on I'd like to say ending systemic racism for the past one. Hundred Years. we've been doing that through our programs such as making. Housing more Ford audible teaching people how to purchase homes how to stay in homes. We've been helping people to get work meaningful work they can sustain them and their families. We've been working the traditional voting rights area and civil rights area for the entirety of our existence but social justice is taken on a real importance in our work right now as as well as doing all this work in the midst of a pandemic So that's so interesting what you say about systemic racism and then specifically citing home-buying and things like that. You didn't mention education, but I think there's a pretty robust education. Portfolio at the National Urban League as well. Absolutely I think if you look at AJC's goals and National Urban League goals, you'll see mirror images of each other. That's been the real cool thing about this that this partnership and all of these things that people are talking about and I'll show my millennial miss. All of the things that people are are posting on instagram talking about explaining what systemic racism is and why you know wealth divides between black and white communities are so important and underpin. So many elements of of racial injustice today all of those things are things that the National Urban League is. Working on absolutely and I can't say that when I started about a year and a half ago I spent the previous ten years working in the United States Senate including four vice presidential nominee Senator Kamala Harris. I believe crazy how these things happen working for her and the agenda that she pursued is so consistent with the work that I'm doing today. One of the first things we did when we walked into the place is lead a resolution condemning hate antisemitism anti racism xenophobia homophobia. It's as important to her as it was to me and so coming here was just a natural extension of that but. As I was saying just the Times in which we live are so unique and perilous parallels between the early nineteen sixties which I'm sure we'll talk more about and today are really really compelling. It's almost like we're back in the sixties again, I want to go there right now because this week is going to be all about black Jewish. Relations and the story of black Jewish relations is not a new odd. We might be writing a new chapter, but there's a whole book that comes before us here. So what's one element clint of the Black Jewish relationship that has meant a lot to you personally. I would probably say the religious and spiritual aspect of the relationship. Growing up as a as a young kid in the deep South. There were a lot of Jewish people around although they were president. We didn't know it I grew up Protestant Christian and a great story is on Sundays. We were always able to use the parking lot of the temple across the street and it used to just puzzled me is to how generous the temple folks could be. Given that they must have services on Sunday to. Eat of the temple was empty or they were just being generous over time and as I moved out of south, then went to law school and live here on the East Coast I. got a much greater appreciation, not only for the religion. My Wife, for instance, used to teach at a Jewish day camp in new Rochelle New York but just meeting. So many friends of the Jewish faith drawing those connections between my own faith and their own and. Also learning the rich history of black Jewish communities especially in the era of civil rights as a lawyer was a big fan is that really don't have you could come up with a Thurgood Marshall and no understanding of the work at the end of Lacey P., Legal Defense Fund was complete without understanding the role that Jack Greenberg played and lots of other Jewish folks in philanthropy in spirituality and pursue the nonviolence movement just a wonderful partnership over the years. As a religious person myself that resonates with me a lot as it happens our listeners probably talk about this before for college I went to a joint program between Columbia University and the Jewish illogical seminary and actually not migration at the graduation of the class ahead of me which attended representative John Lewis spoke, and of course, John Lewis all of our listeners will remember passed away this summer I think he actually was an ordain ministered and he told a story that I'm sure you've heard before because I've heard until it multiple times of preaching to his chickens in Troy. Alabama and that had a certain resonance in this audience of basically all Jews including some we're going on into the rabbit. Those ties between our communities where were not everyone is a person of faith but certainly, there is deep faith and religious history kind of threaded throughout our communities I think those are really really powerful things to focus on. And I hope over time you take a look at surveys of religion in the country in other pugh has done some study in this area religion is trending down a little bit. Don't always necessarily consider themselves religious if you look at community surveys and so it's really important to reinvigorate this relationship and put it on a firm spiritual pudding in Judeo Christian tradition is so rich in the African American community and there's just so much there to really build on. I'm really looking forward to getting that history more prominently understood and remembered in our communities. So when we're talking about black Jewish unity right and we're talking about building black Jewish unity they're really two levels to it, and this is something that we talk about with a lot of our advocacy work. At AJC, there's the grassroots and there's the grass tops right. I want to ask you about both. Let's start with the grass tops right at the high profile level at the celebrity role model level, the politician level what do you think? Needs to happen there to demonstrate the Jewish people and black people should work together and are stronger together. The grass tops may be one of the more important roles in unity and understanding. We are a celebrity driven culture for better or for worse and ideas have a lot more resonance and a lot more acceptance when someone that you know and admire to saying the same thing. So grass tops to that extent are the key in moving opinion. Notions like reparations notions like black lives matter notions like social justice have mood and pretty quickly I think because athletes because celebrity on television and other artists have been saying the same thing and in a short period of time we've seen. Opinions shift in this country not just age not just religion not just race, but everything seems to be moving in the right direction from a popular standpoint. The grass roots which we're going to talk about next is where you really determine how sustainable this movement is. Right. Yeah. So tell us about that I mean in our neighborhoods and our schools in our churches, our synagogues mosques, how can we strengthen those relations? Sure. I've seen a lot of encouraging evidence that we can do this at grassroots level. This is a very human. Very, empathetic movement when we're talking about grassroots, we've seen some of these grassroots efforts come up in. Pittsburgh for instance and New Jersey. And in Brooklyn where when horrible acts of hate murder violence take place the communities come together and they usually come together I with religion. It's the pastors it's the churchgoers. It's the temple goers that really give me some hope that we aren't just a moment, but that we're in a movement. So I think in many ways, the church and the faith community are are in central piece of grassroots. That's kind of what I'm seeing sort of on the ground right now I think black Jewish unity week can drive those grassroots even deeper because understanding the tragedy of the moment is not nearly as important as understanding these deep historical ties right in our faith and our families and what we want from each other in shared history sometimes things that aren't so great sometimes shared history of oppression. Lutely, and for our listeners WHO WANNA learn more about black Jewish unity week, they should go to AJC, dot org, slash black, Jewish unity, or text black Jewish unity all one word to five to eight, eight nine not to keep hitting the faith note here you know we're we're a pretty secular organization in JC but I love what you said about the houses of worship I live on the upper west side of Manhattan which is this incredible. Kind of Jewish bastion historic whatever and if you go twenty blocks down for me in twenty blocks up for me, you probably are GonNa pass by twenty synagogues total and we're also steps away, I mean. We're a mile two miles away from Harlem and the two neighborhoods are very different and that's something that's worth exploring as well. Why that is how that happened etcetera, the strengths and the challenges of both communities, but I was in synagogue on. Chabad after the shooting in Muncie and Lo and behold there in the front row, was a a delegation from church in Harlem that wanted to come in and to be there and to show solidarity, and they got up and spoke after services, and then fast forward to this summer were all obviously in lockdown. But the rabbi of the synagogue made kind of Zoom appearance at that churches services after the killing of George Floyd talk about solidarity with. The black community in the wake of the killings of and Taylor George Floyd and so many of the challenges of injustice that are being faced right now and I think you're right that the grassroots level it. So often does start in those kinds of houses of worship, our religious leaders reaching out one to the other in something that you said, really struck me about the proximity of Latte community and Jewish community in relatively small plot of land. As a policy Wonk I'm sure you appreciate this but either just for the benefit of your listening audience, blacks and Jews were both subject to the same kinds of redlining restrictions in many ways throughout much of the United States where banks would identify areas and they would say this is a desirable area in this is a less desirable area, and so you know Jewish and black families were often circumscribed by these lending lines that still have an ongoing lingering vestige today. If you look at housing segregation patterns certainly in the African. American community they are just as bad as they were in the nineteen sixties things like bike homeownership, which is at a low point especially because pandemic in or closures any fictions Is Worse than it was in the late nineteen sixties. So some of these things we were still wrestling with they seem twins dental, but they're not incidental at all. But again, it's this proximity you know that gives me hope and hope that even outside of crisis, we can expand and strengthen these relationships crises great reasons to get together but it's the more sustainable relationships happened over time outside of the crisis built on shared values and shared interests. So once again, this Jewish unity week has the potential to to be a real game changer. Well, so talk A. Little bit more about that. What do you hope is going to come out of this week if you believe that the basis of a better relationships and greater understanding comes from exposure than my hope is that we can use this week to focus on our rich history on our shared cultural values and to help understand things that we may not understand about each other but to be able to come together in a safe place and talk about those things, this has been tried in lots of different ways you know with lots of different impetus over the years. But in this country, as you know until you can make a sort of a holiday of it until hallmark starts to sell. It really difficult to have something that is stained and that you can go back to know every year. and. So that's the thing that excites me the most I know how excited I was to leave the south. And to meet people of different faiths including the Jewish faith and and get to know them get to count them among in my close friends. I would like that for everyone and so that when issues come up in our communities as we saw in Brooklyn I think earlier this year there was a really terrible assault in Brooklyn by a woman African American woman and if we had a built in long standing. Unbreakable trust between our communities. We can weather the storms we can come together and mutual condemnation, mutual understanding and mutual healing. It's not enough just to condemn something, but it's more important. I think to learn from it and make sure that it doesn't happen doesn't happen again and then five years hence, we can be sending each other black Jewish unity. We cards produced by hallmark absolutely creating whole new language in a around. It, it could be it could be urban slang and Yiddish expressions that. Unless you're in the know you don't you don't know. I'm hopeful hallmark if you're listening. Might be onto something big year. We'll see we'll see what's things we can pull their. I want to close by asking you for a few tips for our listeners actually the few months ago we had an amazing friend of AJC on the podcast named Eric. Ward. The Executive Director of the Western states center. We were talking about racism and I asked him what he thought as a professional opponent of racism and as a black man, what he thought American Jews should be doing to fight racism. His answer was pretty surprising to me actually because he said the best way for us to fight racism was to fight antisemitism since in his work he's bound that white supremacist racism is always based on a foundation of Antisemitism. So I I'm just interested in your reaction to that I, I think I'm citing him basically correctly I'm interested in your assessment of. That and second I want to give you a chance to answer the question from square one. Also, you know what would you like to see Clinton? What would you like to see American Jews doing proactively now to be effective allies in the fight against racism and I WANNA go back to Eric's point. Let me see if I can make this one I. I've only recently come to understand the difference between anti-racism. An anti-discrimination has a lawyer I've grown up understanding that if you want to fix racism, you have to attack it as a matter of non-discrimination don't discriminate against people in hiring don't discriminate against kids in school, and sometimes that anti-discrimination is in the form of color blindness. So whatever the remedy is, it can't be race specific right because the constitution doesn't allow such a thing but let's let's just come up with big broad sweeping solutions that african-americans might incidentally benefit from. You know by virtue of maybe being lower middle income people, we're going to come up with solutions that will work for everybody including African Americans. I've now come to understand that that's just not cutting. It goes great disparities that you talk about the at the beginning their persistent for a reason it's like trying to perform surgery with your eyes close, but you may be able to route around and feel where the patient is but your ability to be precise with a scalpel. And and fix the problem identified at problems impossible. If you don't open your eyes that has been the character of how we approach race in this country for decades. I've now come to understand and have really been encouraging others to join me in. This is becoming an anti-racist. It saying I may not have owned slaves I may have never committed an act of racism or discrimination. Even if that's true. You have to personally get involved to fix these problems. It's not enough to say, well, you know we have laws to address those issues. Laws had been very inexact and very unhelpful. In many ways you've got to get in there, roll up your sleeves and say, okay, is lack of capital in the black community a problem I need to figure out how to get more capital into black communities are educational disparities problem. Okay. I need to figure out how do we improve schools whether it's funding whether it's through pedagogy whatever we need to do, but we need to come up with solutions that actually help. Like people. And not just. Continue to perpetuate these gaps in Hustle meeting well in educational opportunities and health and civic engagement. That's my biggest message to the community, the An anti races. Just. As you know, we should all be fighting against anti-semitism. It's not enough to turn your back and say, well, you know they're not talking about, knee they are talking about you. And it's when we get to the point where those protests and in the halls of Congress where we're trying to make change we see people who look like you see people who would like me and seek people or Asian and and people who are all different walks of life saying we are here because we care and black lives matter and we've got to change the way this country works. I want to dive in and ask a million more questions and and talk so much more about where you just this conversation we are unfortunately out of time. So I hope that this will be an effective way to wet our listeners appetites for the week ahead, I should just add that in addition to his impressive titles at the National Urban. League clint wears another half. It's one of my favorite. Hats it's the hat organizational podcast host and Clinton is one of the hosts of for the movement the National Urban League podcast which people should check out and especially check out for this next episode where my colleague Dan Elbaum will be a guest on the show. We will link to the podcast in our show notes, Clinton let me just say once more. Thank you so much for joining us this week. She said thank you for letting me be here.

National Urban League AJC George Floyd Bureau Clint Brooklyn Clinton Executive Director Clint Oda Instagram Washington United States Senate Harlem National Urban Senator Kamala Harris J. C. John Lewis African American Community Pittsburgh
Where Did COVID Come From?

The Naked Scientists

03:48 min | Last month

Where Did COVID Come From?

"So if the corona vars did I get into humans somewhere far south of John as this evidence suggests, why did know a notice? One possible answer is that these spillovers from animals to humans a more common than you might think and they're often difficult to detect. This was certainly the conclusion of Maury Miller from Columbia University who worked with Sangley she from the Wuhan Institute of Technology to test people in rural China for an entirely different current of ours. We went to a place in Yunan where she had found a bat that cause potential harm to humans, and what we found was that three percent of the population that lived near the bats that were infected with these viruses had already been infected. So still over is quite common occurrence. So this isn't the coronavirus. Pandemic. This is brandon. Other one. It is a separate corroded virus. It is not close at all. There are many many corona viruses that bats carry only one percent of them are estimated to cause any kind of disease in humans and what had been believed prior to this was that it always had to go through a secondary animal and Ben get transmitted to humans Shenley she was the first person to discover that Bat Corona viruses could be potentially transmitted directly to humans and we were able to prove that. Yes, indeed. That was so. Why on Earth did you suspect it might infect humans then. That is the work that Shengli she does. So she has collected genetic sequences for various corona viruses that bats carry. This particular one had a spike that is able to directly infect humans. And who did you go out and test? This was Yunan province. And we just tested all kinds of community members, farmers, foresters. And when we found three percent positively, there was no particular demographic profile that had higher risk because we know in general hunters have a higher risk they kill the animals, the animals can scratch them, but they were no higher risk than anybody else in that community. How is that possible? Exactly. So bats are really everywhere. They often live in the rubes of houses people go into caves whereabouts live to collect Bat Guano because it is a very valued fertilizer for crops. There's all kinds of mechanisms of exposure and bats are fairly revered in China. So everybody knows where they are and respects them and thinks nothing of them. Is kind of scary. I mean in in United Province. Why wasn't there a pandemic that began? With this particular corona virus, it appears to not have caused noteworthy disease. This particular are covid nineteen. So many of the cases where a symptomatic. So wouldn't notice. We wouldn't notice that anyone was infected because everyone feels fine. When we start to notice it is when there is an increase in deaths particularly among the elderly from pneumonia but ammonia is a leading cause of death among the elderly particularly in rural areas. So people may not have noticed that there was excess deaths.

China Yunan Shengli Wuhan Institute Of Technology Pandemic Maury Miller John Shenley Columbia University United Province BEN
New York City's Columbia University Taking Medical School Founder’s Name Off Campus Dorm Due To Slave-Owning Past

This American Life

00:39 sec | Last month

New York City's Columbia University Taking Medical School Founder’s Name Off Campus Dorm Due To Slave-Owning Past

"Columbia University is taking the name of its medical school's founder off a campus dormitory because he owned slaves and once advertised a reward for the return of one who ran away. Colombia President Lee Bollinger told students and faculty and a letter yesterday that the university was not erasing Samuel Bards contributions to the school but that it became clear amid a global reckoning on racism and racist legacies that having a dorm name for him was not appropriate. Bard, who lived from 17 42 to 18 21 was a pioneer in obstetrics helped developed treatment for diphtheria and served as the personal physician to President George Washington.

President Lee Bollinger Columbia University President George Washington Samuel Bards Bard Colombia Founder
What Caused Californias Blackouts?

The Energy Gang

05:09 min | Last month

What Caused Californias Blackouts?

"What caused California's outages last week, short-term blackouts role the cross and overheated California as the grid operator said, there was not enough power to meet demand. This wasn't supposed to happen again not after the Enron scandal not after nineteen years of reforms we have a very different grid now and renewable skeptics including president trump are seizing on the. Incident what really happened then coal power in the US plunged thirty percent in just the first half of the year. What about Asia that's for eighty percent of gets burn. Now, what hope is there for a cold decline there and last the case for clean energy transition just keeps making itself when you look at new research on air pollution and combine it with cheap renewables turns out the health benefits alone pay for our energy changeover joining me to talk about these topics are my co hosts, Jigger Shah and Melissa Lot Jigger. Is the president of generate capital. Speaking of health benefits. How is your health today jigger? I'm feeling a lot better with the cool air of Deep Creek Lake in Maryland yeah, you have a new background behind you deep creek lake That's where you're vacationing. Yeah. You know it's still in Maryland. So I'm not violating quarantine issues with schools I mean it's crazy right? You can't actually leave the state you have to quarantine for fourteen days if you leave the state before your kid can go to school. Dr Melissa Lot is back with us. She's an Austin Texas. She's our guest co hosts in a senior research scholar at the center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University. How are you? You seem to be enjoying the conversation you're still back for a third week in a row. Scared me off yet. So let's get now I seriously enjoying this a lot also will enjoy hearing. Catherine back at the live event next week. So that will be fun but things are good here in Austin it's it's hot. I will admit to being very jealous of one of my colleagues Kirsten Smith who's up in Vancouver right now the pictures they just made me so jealous but it's good here in Austin. Well, it's brutal there in California for sure with wildfires raging in the north AH pandemic still gripping the stay in now blackouts last week It's a really dismal situation there in the state so you may have all heard about the blackouts in California. Last week. Now let's be clear. We're not talking about. Days or even a week without power like thousands of people who went through this in the Midwest last week after the show or the folks on Long Island after the recent tropical storm this was something else these were small-scale our blackouts the grid operator calls based on moment inability to meet demand. It's been super hot all across the West. So California couldn't just call an Oregon or Arizona to import power and the problem struck at the same time each day as the sun sank down below the horizon m solar power generation stopped or slowed. So that took several gigawatts along with it even with an intense large-scale. Heatwave was this. The Best California can do the state has dramatically built out new capacity much of it renewable since the energy crisis in two thousand one but it's been closing a lot of gas plants. What role did both play? Let's start off with the perspective of the California Grid Operator let's clip from Severin Bornstein who is on the case Oh board of directors. He's also a faculty director at the Energy Institute at the UC Berkeley Haas business school. Here he is talking on air talk from KPCC we have gone down the road of putting more and more renewables on the grid and have not taken as. As we need to the constraints on those renewables the fact that they can disappear. Well, they do disappear on the sun goes down the solar but that the wind can suddenly stopped blowing, which is what happened Saturday and caused what we thought was going to be an okay but close night actually require rolling blackouts. So we really need to look in a much more refined way at what can. We count on from these renewables and figure out how we can fill in when they're not there. So this is a slightly technical version of what people like president trump are claiming on twitter that Democrats are using energy green energy to bring down the grid and your way of life. Now, to be clear severin born scene is not claiming that but I think he's channeling an argument that lot of. People who are skeptical of renewables are making, which is the more nose we put on the grid, the more these blackouts or going to happen So let's talk about the actual nuance of what happened in California Melissa to the best of our understanding what did happen. Yes. So to what we understand right now and to just for a moment back up and say we're going to it's going to be. A while before we know exactly what happened we need to do a full postmortem of this to understand really what went wrong wear for this type of situation to occur.

California Dr Melissa Lot Severin Bornstein President Trump Melissa Lot Jigger Austin United States Enron Jigger Shah Deep Creek Lake Maryland Asia Creek Lake That Energy Institute Midwest Kirsten Smith
COVID-19 Impact and Recovery

This Week in Photo

06:15 min | Last month

COVID-19 Impact and Recovery

"All right gentlemen welcome to the show. This has been a long time in the making this particular episode as you both know, we've been dialoguing over the the you know through email after the first covid type production I put together, which was in a Web webinar format. We decided to do this when Moore's a prerecorded livestream instead of doing the Webinar format because. There's a ton of things that we need to talk about and I just think this format makes more sense to get the information out. So I would think both you guys for coming on the show and covering this with me from the standpoint of having much more knowledge about it than I do. So which is which is important. Marcucci when it started just with some some introductions, obviously I did the brief introduction in the open there. But just a more personal introduction mark. Let's start with you who is Mark Fujio, and Why are you on the show today? Let's talk about that and then we'll go to you vincent. Okay. So I. Talk about how we've been friends for a decade if you want. Okay. Yeah. So Yeah I. was going to lead into that the I've been involved in all sorts of different You're leading edge technologies. I've lived in Santa Clara in the Silicon Valley for twenty nine years Known Frederick for about ten years and helped get him out of adobe and into a startup storage company named Robo and You know along at That's when I started listening to the this week in barrage podcast hosted by Vincent. So I've been listening to that show for man. Over over ten years, I think even longer than I've known you Frederick. So. I've had quite an interest in urology Personally last November and a dark Moon it you new moon you know night had an accident coming home where I ran into an Amazon. and. Which I wasn't expecting to be there and shorts long story short. You know I tour the complete tear their quadriceps tendon on my left leg. So I spent basically three months into brace. And then than three months sheltering in place. So, during some of your initial cooeperation obviously had a lot more time to pay attention to things and I remember seeing in sort of late November early December, a little bit of a blurb of news about in new virus coming out of China. So Fast forward So the whole incident about the Chinese doctor who had was fighting it. Got Suppressed and who ultimately died, and then you know what we turned into January. This year just exploded as a story and the US and I don't think anybody can go anywhere and a gathering you know A. Virtual. With the friends or family without covy becoming a major topic of discussion. So I very much enjoyed the the seminar you did you know a couple months ago Frederick and. Be Able to put you in Vincent together to Have a follow up. Survey and that is that is that. That's perfect and that that that. Discussion on Cova we did that you mentioned back in the day that will link to that in the description for this episode, but that was designed to be I think the title of it was. Something around demystifying covid nineteen hundred photographers, but it was turns out photographers are actually human so it doesn't does. It back then it. Doesn't really matter but I wanted to definitely follow up on that since we've done that. So much stuff since we did that. Webinar. So much stuff. Vincent that you're intimate with. In the rest of the world obviously is to a degree intimate with has happened both on the understanding of the virus side of things all the way through to disinformation and the politicization of. The whole mask wearing thing and you're not American if you wear a mask and now you are American if you wear a mask and you know all all this stuff has been happening. So I don't want to make this political but I do want to touch on the politics of that before we before we dive in then can you tell us a little bit about yourself and the podcast this week in virology? Well I am a Professor Virology at Columbia University, which is in New, York. I've been working on viruses for over forty years. I've been doing research on them. I wrote a textbook. I have taught many virology courses and twelve years ago I started a podcast. Decided to call it this week. Envir- Allergy I was inspired by Leo LaPorte. Chipper. Who probably inspired you as well I would guess, absolutely. Father. We have done this for twelve years and at the beginning of this year we noticed this outbreak in China we started covering it and I think almost every episode from the beginning of Twenty twenty now has been about the virus and the disease SARS covy to in Covid nineteen. And you know we have always talked about the threats of new viruses emerging. but they weren't taken seriously enough and we've had big outbreaks. You know we've had big ebola outbreaks. We've had Sika outbreaks, influenza outbreaks, many other viruses, but. I hate to say we were not ready for this. This all could have been avoided quite sadly. So now I am full on in educating people trying to counter the misinformation our listeners have gone way way up. It's just great. We're getting mentioned by Malcolm. Glad. Well, we got in USA Today The New York Times this week. But I think more people need to listen because we really tell it like it is and so that's the story.

Vincent Frederick China Moore Professor Virology Edge Technologies New York Times Mark Fujio Santa Clara Leo Laporte United States Covid Cova Adobe Malcolm Silicon Valley Columbia University Robo York
"columbia university" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

Arrowhead Pride

08:26 min | Last month

"columbia university" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

"Among individual teams because people are picking it up in the community, they're bringing it into the team setting where in some cases, it's just impossible to to observe physical distance seen some things are impossible to do with masks on and none of those things completely eliminate the risk of exposure but it makes sense that the other teams are not infected because it's baseball and people are standing. You know usually when they're on the field on distance from each other but I. Always think about the line of scrimmage with football not only are people like tackling and blocking and and and actually be very physically close to each other. But even before the ball snapped people are leading up very close to each other expressing their respiratory droplets at each other and usually of trash talking going on, you know creating potentially more of those respiratory droplets than you would if you are normally speaking. So there are a lot of opportunities in football to have A. Not, not a in individual cases like prolonged contact, but cumulatively you you might be exposed to those droplets a lot over the course of a game every time people line up along the line of scrimmage. So I think that the the game of football itself is inherently a higher risk and there's no way to completely mitigate that risk right? All right. So to sort of wrap this up here in and please correct me if I'm wrong as I've gotten I, think all the takeaways from here. Fans completely not going to be a safe option right now I know the chiefs right now I believe at this juncture they're still gonNA try to l l limited fans from what you're saying that you probably will see this go no fans throughout the league because that's going to be safest and then I guess just to bring it back full circle the timetable on this thing, the NFL is going to give it its go. You don't feel optimistic about it being able to get this thing done. We'll. We'll see how that goes fair to think that one years time from today. So let's say August seventh twenty, twenty one there's a little bit more normal of a season or just a much better chance for that or is this a type of thing that? Depending on how this vaccine goes will affect the NFL and really everything for the for the foreseeable future. Yeah. I think that I hope certainly just in general not even as a football fan. But I wrote I August of next year we are getting back to a more normal situation and we have a better chance at having a normal football season Personally we have set we put pause on our season tickets is something the seahawks allowed us to do to not give up our season tickets that said not even use them for this year we are allowing the seahawks to sell them to other people. For this season only because again, I'm not convinced that it will be seen at all to have fans and stadiums even with physical distancing and even though it's outdoors. There there is still a, you know a non zero risk of transmission especially when you have people who are yelling even with a mask and. Yelling, speaking loudly singing. These activities are known to produce more. Droplets into the environment and thought is again a very good way to to spread the virus among crowds of people. So I think that the season is certainly not going to be normal I. Hope that by next season, there's a vaccine that's not only safe ineffective, but is eventually widely adopted enough by people that we can. At least start approaching herd immunity and and it will be safe to to go back and start competing with each other for Guinness Book of. Records loud. I know I said I'd close it but I think what occurred to me just quickly here. They're almost as this intrinsic worry that I have that the NFL season even if fans can't go to the actual stadiums, we know football culture in America I'd imagine there's going to be people flocking to bars and restaurants to try to mimic that type of experience I. Wonder if there's a risk there of just watching the game where you may see a little bit. Of a spike or a boost in in corona virus cases, I think that that's a huge risk and we've already seen that I made in my personal opinion bars being open indoors are one of the single biggest factors why cases have climbs because in a bar, you're really doing of all of the things that you shouldn't be doing your potentially getting in an enclosed face. The, large number of people who are not wearing masks because you can't drink with a mask on who may not be observing physical distancing as well as they should because they're drinking alcohol and losing some of their inhibitions. And potentially who are yelling, and if there's a dancefloor might be dancing like increasing their respiration rate, all of those things increase of the number of respiratory droplets in the environments and will increase your exposure risk and bars I mean if we want to have anything open and I like going to bars. Team Football But if we want to have anything open schools, NFL, anything I think we really need to have a serious conversation about closing bars indoor dining in particular because those do seem to be very productive environments for a mass exposures. Good tips. WHERE'S THE BEST PLACE TO GET CONCRETE GIF IQ data and updates I know that this is become a little bit of political thing. So people are just looking for the straight up facts. To to find those. Yeah. This is a tough one because I used to say the CDC but unfortunately, some of the guidance from the CDC has better. Overly politicized and not not all of the guidance is necessarily the most up-to-date evidence based Roy place to get information but I hate to say this because it sounds. It sounds bad but. I honestly get a lot of scientific information from twitter and. And following people like me? I'm viral gist and I can tell you all about the virus and some of these things about what we know about virus transmission, for example, and how to apply those to the real world. But I have learned personally so much from following epidemiologists. I'm infection prevention folks of ide-. Physicians people on twitter who are really doing an excellent job communicating and twitter for the most part been pretty good about verifying up people who have this. Expertise I mean I never thought that I would be personally twitter verified person but they verified me and they verified a number of my colleagues who can be trusted and again it's not perfect. switcher handles just so people haven't. It's Angie Underscore Rasmussen. Okay. Great. That's a resource for people to find I feel like the data we can. We can trust here as we tried to find some kind of normalcy. As you have stated here, it's going to be a while. Yeah, it really is. I mean we're in this for the long haul and I hate to I hate to be the bearer of that bad news especially because they think that this really could have been avoided the way that some other countries successfully contained this virus, but it is what it is and this is the situation that we're living in. So I I really am trying to encourage people to limit their expectations about you. Know how quickly a vaccine is going to get us to the end of the fact that is really i. think what's going to get us to the end of this and we just need to sort of be united and understand his struggle that we're going through as a nation and take care of each other support each other and try to do the best that we can say to stick the rest of this pandemic out. She's a scientist from Columbia University unfortunately, hanging out with Russell Wilson, but we do appreciate the time today. My pleasure. Thanks so much paid..

NFL Football twitter football seahawks CDC chiefs Russell Wilson scientist Underscore Rasmussen Roy America Columbia University
"columbia university" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

Arrowhead Pride

08:20 min | Last month

"columbia university" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

"DOT COM and we're pleased this morning to be joined by Dr. Angela. Rasmusen. Of Columbia University an expert scientists on the forefront of fighting Kovin in our country. This is now a issue that is finding its way to the. NFL. So we're very very pleased to be joined by this morning Dr. Thanks so much for having me paid I think the first question I have is a general one and I I like to cast a wide net. Where would you say in this time line because timeline is always a hot word we hear about with Kobe. In this time line where at as a country as we get to a approach, maybe perhaps some normalcy here. Well I think we're still some months away from that unfortunately, I think we had a chance to have that happen sooner when we all stayed home in the spring and and did effectively flattened the curve as a as the maxine was at that time but unfortunately, we reopened far too quickly and now we are in a situation that's far worse nationwide than it was in the spring with widespread community transmission. I don't see another stay home order reading put into effect. So. That means that we are going to have probably higher levels of community transmission even if we can convince people to take as many precautions as possible So really what we are doing now is effectively waiting for a vaccine and I think the earliest we probably will see a vaccine that will be available to some people will probably be towards the end of this year possibly the early part of next year. So we are still an and actually I should say once we do get A. Vaccine. It's not. There's not going to be enough of IT available for everybody all at once and there will be some people who won't take it, and that is all going to be played out probably over the course of some more months. So we're still quite a ways away from going back to quote unquote normal I think you might have answered it in the first question, but it leads me into my second and that is is restarting the national football league a good idea in your mind. So I'M A. Huge. seahawks fan and season ticket holder and as much as I wish that we could start the NFL back up again I don't think that it safe even with no fans present and I know that we. At centurylink field have often competed with you guys for being in. Crowds in the NFL So. Having a bunch of cheese fans or seahawks fans all screaming at the top of their lungs in a crowded stadium is an incredibly unsafe super spreader event waiting to happen. So no fans. But even without fans, it's really difficult to see how the NFL will be able to safely restart football I'm just the nature of football is is a game where you're you're putting players at risk they're engaging activities that are known to be high risk such as shouting. Being in close physical proximity with each other not necessarily be able to wear masks and I realized that there has been discussions about face shields potentially for comments and things like that but It's just really football teams are large also one of the other risk factors being in a crowd so I can I just can't see how people will be able to stand on the sidelines, for example, in close proximity all day the tension shouting producing large numbers of respiratory droplets even when they're not playing there, there's certainly a higher risk situation and we've seen that. In the NBA, they have been fairly successful at putting people in a bubble, but the nature of football is such that people will have to be traveling to to other stadiums and they really can't be in a bubble. The way the NBA has we've seen Major League baseball, which doesn't have a bubble be plagued with with numerous outbreaks on various teams and I think that's probably what we're likely to see with the NFL as well. I obviously, on behalf of chiefs fans, I do have to apologize that you guys are only the number two loud a stadium in the world. But no more seriously from from a success stamp on you you mentioned was something I was interested in in the NBA and the MLS in the Nhl they are in what would be the equivalent of this bubble with the NFL's created with daily testing and I've seen it in Kansas City is individual bubbles thirty two bubbles. But at the same time, the number one problem that I've been garnering from people that are in the building and things that you're. Hearing social media. The quotes of Andy Reid is that when the players leave the bubble that is going to be the most important aspect of this and is the problem I just too many people just not enough guaranteed that everyone is going to be perfectly fine or is it a scenario where even in a perfect world where the guys just went home and came back and went home came back you still would be bringing that potential risk into the world. Yeah I mean the problem it's actually a lot of people. I. Think are sort of confused by that's when talking about reopening schools but there's not much difference between reopening at school and reopened in NFL team the issue with both is the amount of transmission in the community, and even though you might be in a bubble and you might be completely adhering to the rules which not everybody does people are. Still, going to be going home to their families those families are within our part of the community as well, and there's just many opportunities even within a bubble in which everybody is is completely following the protocols to be exposed to people who are not in that bubble and who are part of the community, and when there's a lot of virus being transmitted around in the community, it's really difficult to eliminate that risk. Right, and so there's just that super unknown factor. So I I guess what you eventually get here is this suggestion that. Is. Your prediction higher percentage wise that the league will eventually have to shut it down after trying to attempt this or or where do you stand on that? How do you see this going? I mean I, I'm a data driven person. So certainly as a football fan, I hope that they can open up and since they are going to and have game safely and not have the same problems that Major League baseball has had but I'm very skeptical of that that that's possible Perhaps, if we have increased our testing capacity to the point that we can start actually isolating people effectively who are new cases detected them early and isolating them. Lowering community transmission will make it safer for football to proceed but I think that there is a very strong possibility that they may have to shut it down or at least shutdown. Certain teams is one of the major problems in this and I'm sure you've been on the pulse of this as a sports fan as well where you saw outbreak with the Miami Marlins and then the opponent they were playing, they weren't really impacted and I think that might. Be, a product of it being baseball football. When you have the line of scrimmage, it's just players all over each other. So if you have a team, for example, like the Miami Marlins, let's assume they're playing football isn't it based upon how this virus goes? Almost a guarantee that you're gonNA pass through the other team in the game of football that seems very likely to me and the thing is with baseball. You know it's not surprising that there have been so many outbreaks..

NFL football baseball NBA Major League Miami Marlins Kovin centurylink field Dr. Angela seahawks Columbia University Andy Reid chiefs Nhl Kansas City
How the U.S. Army Lost the War for Twitch

theScore Esports Podcasts

07:18 min | 2 months ago

How the U.S. Army Lost the War for Twitch

"Wait, the US army has sports teams, and they do. It's kind of weird, but they haven't. Eastwards team called the US Army East sports and they've been around since November, two thousand eighteen. They have been kind of low key, but they have been around the US armed forces have been using E. Sports gaming recruitment platform for years America's Army, a series of video games, developed and published by the US army since two thousand and two, meanwhile in East Sports, the US Air Force sponsored Illeg, and the Austin Major and if you don't remember a uniform air, force sergeant came out to give doodle. doodle the MVP trophies at the Boston Major, but not everyone has been super comfortable with the US armed forces presence in East sports and gaming over the years. There has been criticism of the US Army sports team much like there's criticism of any recruitment material that the US army puts out, and if you don't believe me, just take a look at the response to their initial tweets, many people view the aiming of military recruitment material at younger people as problematic. You've got young impressionable people. Being told that playing a life of video games has somehow prepare them for an actual armed conflict whether you support the existence of a military or not. That doesn't make a lot of sense. That army sports doesn't just promote an unrealistic image of what being in the military is actually like, but they're also targeting their message at people who may not have the skills to be in the army are more receptive to the message because they're playing video games about shooting now. That doesn't mean that everyone is against recruitment just that there are some serious ethical questions about aiming recruiting material at gamers. Gamers, but what happened next is when things really went off the rails for US Army's sports on July first day after that cringe woo, tweet people decided to make a game of speed speechwriting getting banned from the US Army's discord server mostly by linking with article that lists US war crimes and on July eighth sports twitter guy. Rod Slash Breslau shared a video of activists and political consultant Jordan. Going into the US army twitch chat and typing. What's your favorite war crime? Then a link that appear article about US war-crimes before getting ban shortly after cool. Nice really chill guy. Have, a nice time getting banned my dude, the streamer at the time was Joshua's strontium, eight twelve year army veteran, and between his reaction and getting banned, people started to see if they can get on the army's bad side to chat was quickly inundated with more people asking about US war crimes, and quickly getting banned themselves and the US Army wasn't the only branch of the armed forces to get ban happy on twitch all went over to the US news twitch channel, and the whole war crimes stick their two leading to him getting band, and of course more people getting banned for doing it as well, and in the middle of all, this all reported that the US army was posting links. Chat that they said. We're links to give away to win an xbox elite series to controller, and allegedly they actually led to recruitment for them when I reached to the US Army for more information on what happened, and if they were aware that the links, they were sending outlet recruitment forums, they said that the giveaways are in fact real and they've given away ten controllers, setups and chairs over the last year. We have a standard form that is used for all activities, but each action has a marketing code associated with it to ensure this emissions are connected to the correct event or giveaway. The team is exploring options to customize giveaway pages to provide more external clarity KOTOK. Kotok Nathan Grayson reported on July sixteenth that twitch has intervened and forced the US army to remove their giveaway links now I wanNA take a second to say that I think most people who are posting about US war crimes, and getting banned in twitch chat were doing it because they were questioning the morality of recruiting gamers on twitch. I have to imagine that a lot of people getting in on this just want to get in on a big trolling campaign, but many people do feel strongly about this many myself included feel very uncomfortable with the US armed forces, trying to use twitter as an arm to recruit gamers, and some people even feel like these twitch bands. Unconstitutional Warriors Tonight First Amendment, Institute at Columbia University representing Jordan. Wool say that banning him and others from the US Army and navy twitter chats was unconstitutional and a violation of their rights to free speech. The Army and Navy eastwards teams banning of users based on their speech about war crimes as unconstitutional when the government intentionally opens a space to the public at large for expressive activity, it has created a public forum under the First Amendment and cannot constitutionally speakers from that forum based on a viewpoint, these principles apply with full force in the digital spear, including on social media platforms as courts have emphasized in recent cases, basically the US Army and navy twitch channels are a government backed open forum which. Which means a banning US citizens for discussing war-crimes is unconstitutional and violates their right to free speech now when I reach out to the US army, I asked for their comment on the accusation that banning all and others from their twitch channel was unconstitutional, and here's what they told me. The team members did not ban the users because of viewpoints they banned him for behavior intended to harass the great and intimidate which violates the twitch community guidelines. Since the team started on twitch, the had specific chat rules on the page that clearly states harassing behavior will not be tolerated. Those chat rules include not harassing people, not spamming or otherwise disrupting the stream, and not pushing personal agendas quote again with respect to. The US, army sports team social media pages were being spammed with. What's your favorite war-crime memes and questions? The East sports team blocked the term warcrimes in its twitter channel after discovering the trend was meant to troll and harassed the team twitch members used creative spelling to continue related posts, following the guidelines and policies set by the US army eastwards team band users from his account due to concern. Concern over posted content and website links that were considered harassing and degrading nature, and when I reached out to the US Navy, they give me a pretty similar answer. We moderate channel in accordance with our posted channel rules which are available to everyone who chooses to participate in the chat. We strive to allow for maximum freedom of discussion in our chat and seek to only those who break the. The posted rules or engage in personal attacks against our streamers or their family. We have a system whereby offenders given several chances to correct infractions prior to being banned, and our moderators will engage with those who violate the rules to inform them of which channel rules they have broken. This is done in an attempt to to allow for maximum amount of free, civil and open discourse if someone feels. Feels like they have been unfairly man. They have every contact moderator for an explanation and possible unbanning now the warriors of the night. Institute already have a response lined up for that. They say quote Mr. All speech does not constitute harassment under the terms of service which define harassment to mean any content or activities that attempts to intimidate the great abuse or creates a hostile environment for other. Mr Olsen messages drew attention to prior us. Military actions in the context of the army and navy is use of twitch a recruiting tool. His messages were quintessential political speech which lie at the core the First Amendment, so it seems like the US. Army may have really fucked up here. Which is why they're taking a break when I, so they told me the team is reviewing ways to customize its giveaway submission forms and provide more clarity for each of its giveaways. The team has streaming to review internal policies and procedures as well. Well as platform, specific policies to ensure guidelines for participating in this are clear before streaming

Us Army United States Army Us Navy Us Air Force Twitter America's Army East Sports E. Sports Boston Rod Slash Breslau MVP Nathan Grayson Harassment Consultant Joshua Columbia University Representi
The danger of herd immunity in solving the COVID-19 problem

Morning Edition

03:41 min | 2 months ago

The danger of herd immunity in solving the COVID-19 problem

"Herd immunity, and it's a concept some leaders and scientists have considered when it comes to responding to this pandemic. NPR's Jeff Broomfield reports on what exactly this idea is and why it presents troubles. The thinking goes like this. Sooner or later, the pandemic cast stand and Debbie shredder gets it like everyone wants a way out psychologically right, because no one's ever coped with something of this scale, and it's not like a crisis like a hurricane or 9 11 where it's like, time bound or geographically bound. This is like everyone everywhere for indefinitely right now appeals to people, right? Treaters of researcher at the University of Edinburgh Medical School in the UK, and it turns out there is a theoretical way it could end. If enough people get sick and recover and they become immune to the corona virus. Then the pandemic fizzles. Those who haven't gotten it yet are safe. The technical name for this is herd immunity in its purest form. It's like Darwinian self selection, right? We let the virus go. Whoever is going to die, I will die. That's life and then whoever makes it we'll have hopefully some form of immunity. Several governments tried with the idea of the beginning of the pandemic, including the U. K, But in the end, most decided it would cost too many lives. There was one exception Sweden. They kept businesses open and let people make their own choices. At one point, Swedish officials said Stockholm would returned immunity by the end of May, but they have not reached it by the end of May. They just lost a lot of lives and also took an economic it shredder says. Herd immunity works as a math problem, but at an individual level Swedes stayed home. People don't want to catch Cove it nobody wants to be part of the herd to stay that way. But could nations eventually reach herd immunity more slowly? Probably not, says Jeffrey Shaymen of Columbia University. So example, I like to think about it. South Korea. They're getting 50 cases a day right now. They will hold on for another 1000 days, which is almost three years that have 50,000 cases, which is 30.1% of their population. Most experts think herd immunity take somewhere between 50 to 80% of the population, even in the U. S. Even it's 60,000 cases a day. It'll take at least into 2021 possibly years more to reach those levels. And there's another looming problem. People may be able to get the Corona virus more than once, shame and has studied other Corona viruses that cause common colds, and he found people could be re infected. Some of them were 48 weeks separated from the previous infection, which is rapid and that might have been a relapse. But others we clearly know are different. They were 8 to 11 months apart. Greta Bauer is an epidemiologist at Western University in Ontario, she says this fall and winter maybe the time we find out about re infections, and if Covitz survivors get even mildly sick, the second time around Corona virus will keep circulating. If that were the situation, then there's no potential to develop a level of herd immunity sufficient to stop the infection. I corresponded with 16 different scientists, and almost all believed that achieving herd immunity as a practical matter was virtually impossible. Without a vaccine with the vaccine. It will be a lot easier to control the virus, but it will likely still exist in pockets around the world. So what's going to happen again? Researcher devilish reader I think it's going to be with us play forever. At this point, I think I mean at a global scale, it's going to be with us, and it's how we decide to live with it. There are ways to live with it. Test the sick, isolate them until they're better and everybody where a mask and keep their distance.

Researcher Jeffrey Shaymen Debbie Shredder Greta Bauer NPR Jeff Broomfield University Of Edinburgh Medica Catch Cove Stockholm Sweden South Korea Columbia University Relapse UK Western University Ontario Covitz
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:51 min | 2 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"The pancreas the ovaries once. You know that you have a region of interest. You have an area of interest. You can use twenty other. Marois is bread scans, and ultra sounds to wound down and find that humor, but even that is lead. What I'm saying is even finding that to eight. On Roy Hudd who is at Institute of systems biology at Seattle He is being a proponent of this for ten years, and is conducting now of one million patient project, which is measuring something like fifty thousand lights from the blood Sierra Leone patients, and it leads to true artificial intelligence. We can keep slicing and dicing than refined or the common commonly perturbed partways for various diseases, like Alzheimer's or cancer or diabetes that occurred years before the actual clinical disease appears, and for the idea is to fixing it there, and then is much, but that's the prevention I'm talking about that by detecting. Detecting disease earlier mean doesn't mean when it's just smaller than what we're doing now. No, even before the disease is clinically apparent, we should be able to detect and prevent it from becoming disease right right, and so in the long run I think what you're suggesting is some sort of a multi more continuous martling, so things that are you know designed to bed sheets into showers into into other things that you use on a daily basis can raise red flags, if explains If you complains inflammation, that might be useful. But what tactically You know I always wondered. Why can't be blood test You know for for Cancer Diagnostics. But it is something like that already right that is that the cancer seek product from Johns Hopkins I was about to say that can't seek is a brilliant also in the same. Genre. They're using genetic mutations in sixteen founder genes that have been very common via suceeded answer. And they're combining it with. A protein, the protein markers of cancer and then with pet scans and you think this. Screaming cancer seek. So using this, they looked at ten thousand healthywomen. They've found twenty six dances. Seventeen would early and twenty four already cured. Right Right and. And so from an economic perspective is that. Is that.

Roy Hudd Cancer Diagnostics Marois Seattle Alzheimer founder Institute of systems
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:36 min | 2 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"By nineteen eighty-four I had started by in seventy seven by treating acute myeloid leukemia by one, thousand, nine, hundred four was way clear to me that in my lifetime the diseases so vicious and complex they will be no solution for it, and unfortunately I was right because. You want people find it hard to believe, but in nineteen seventy seven. I was treating acute myeloid. You keep me up. With a combination of two drugs popularly called seven and three. You're just seven days of one three days of another and today. I'm still doing the same twenty twenty it is. It is an embarrassment. It is unconscionable. It is heartbreaking the number of conversations I have with my patients, the same side Vic, same dreadful results all wooden over. And so it is very clear that cancer is such a complicated disease. It's not a disease, a single g notice. The tissue or organ, nor debut on system or the micro environment or the NGO genetic factors. It's simply ease of the whole body essentially. It's a systemic disease and this and it's gone stanley changing because every time a cancer cell divides, it can make DNA being errors, which leads to more mutations which leads to further metabolic and. proliferative changes in the characteristics of the cells with Aubrey Cancer. There are.

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:31 min | 2 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Luke James: Not 'Chi' About Singing

Ask Me Another

05:24 min | 3 months ago

Luke James: Not 'Chi' About Singing

"Everybody welcome to the show. Yeah. After new years. Twenty two hundred eighty. Downsize you getting rid of some stuff? You getting rid of stuff. That's usually my wife stuff that I want. To tell her that you're getting rid of it. Most of the time I don't most of the time what I say is. Do we need this thing? I say in a very high pitch? Yes, and does she look at and go ways? What are you doing? You know that's precious. We need that. I'm GONNA fix that. She says I'm going to fix that Oh we need this. I'm going fix that. Yeah, and then just slowly. You just move it further and further out of the room until it's in the basement, and then once everybody's forgotten about because garbage. I'm just trying to get rid of stuff in my inbox. I am trying to unsubscribe from every store and yes, you're nodding your head because you have too many emails. Can we agree that it's easier to get a divorce than unsubscribe from a mailing list Oh my God. Why is that so hard? I bought a bath mat. You from you once. You know we're not in a real relationship. Okay, but every time you're like I gotta get out of here. There's an exit interview super desperate. Why are you leasing? Why are you leaving, too? Many messages is by content relevant. Do you not recall signing up I? Recall I recall. Our special guest is singer actor model Luke. Luke James for beyond say technically I'm opening for him so technically I've opened for beyond say. And you guys by third degree have seen beyond say in a bar in Brooklyn so. Well done everybody Luke. James is very impressive, but I think the most impressive thing about him is that he looks fantastic in a bucket hat. You can't do that. Not everyone can do that if I put on a bucket hat I looked like a Combo of blossom and a sad fishermen all right. They should call bucket hats, what they are good for the really really young or very very old. People have described Luke James's music as the perfect music to make out to. You know what I like hearing when I make out. Applause. Just a slow sarcastic clap. That's it. I'm ready to French people. During this I say okay I'm ready to. And I say people because I usually have a few possibilities lined up. Just don't WANNA I don't WanNa. Cut off any up. Sometimes. Things just change, and you never know so. We have four brilliant contestants their backstage right now, determining how many self help books one needs to read before they can consider themselves helped. And one of them will be our big winner and the other three combine other book. Let's play some games, everybody. Our first contestants will play a game about cities original names I call it. Where in the world is Carmen San Miguel? I up Sarah Sand Cooler. YOU'RE A lab technician at the Columbia University Medical Center. I am all right. You recently moved your lab from Rochester to Columbia. So and you were saying you were finding really weird things. People left behind I was so. We're moving into moved into temporary lab space, which people apparently sort of took an excuse to just abandon all the stuff they didn't want which included refrigerator doors filled with human is. Humanize. So what do you do with leftover is? Call the Bio Hazardous Waste Disposal People. Yeah, and they show up and they take them away. Yes, thankfully. To well. That's good. Where are they? All right so when you ring in, we'll hear this. Your opponent is Paul Alexander from. Toronto Ontario where you are a criminal defense lawyer. That is true. Paul, you are in the Guinness Book of World Records. Yeah Okay, how why? I'm in a band and our band somehow got involved in what is now in the Guinness Book of world, records as the longest ever concert by multiple artists. Okay, so wait a second. So what did you have to fulfil well? There were eighteen and a quarter days of continuous music. Each band had a one hour set. There could be no more than five minutes between bands, and I think no more than thirty seconds between songs in a band set, and you had to go a certain number of songs before there could be a repeat. What time did your Ben? Play we got the six PM slot on the last day. That's the best. And, we're the people in the audience. Yeah, it was crammed. I mean the was the size of this stage, so it was going to be crammed even if it's not just the members of the band that sounds

Luke James Wanna Lab Technician World Records Paul Alexander Columbia University Medical Ce Carmen San Miguel Brooklyn Toronto Rochester Columbia Ontario
The tech behind MTA's fight against coronavirus

The 3:59

08:18 min | 3 months ago

The tech behind MTA's fight against coronavirus

"Cases of covid nineteen are turning down. The threat of the coronavirus continues to loom over the city. I'm Rod Chang and this is your daily charge. With me as chairman and CEO of the MTA PAT Foy at thanks for joining me x-ray Ranch, Nasr meals, but more than a week since the city reopened phase one. What has ridership been like? Ridership has actually been a pleasant surprise. We knew we would get an increase comparing yesterday Monday of the fifteenth two two weeks ago before we increased service and the governor listed. Announced a phase, one ridership on subways and buses has gone up a total of three hundred eighty thousand customers. That's about two hundred, seven, thousand on subways, one, hundred, seventy, five, thousand, more or less on buses, three hundred eighty thousand people per day is the size of a pretty. medium-sized, transits. So we're we're pleased by that. We expect ridership to continue to grow obviously the summer months, and this is going to be unusual summer for new. York City and and the suburbs. And what ridership will do this summer is is unknown, but we expect continue to build and especially after after Labor Day assuming that you know New York City are phase. Two of the governors are newer Polish. So you mentioned those numbers. Nearly nine hundred thousand daily riders. That is you know off the highs of the pre coronavirus air where we're talking about millions rights so. Curious. There are still a lot of people out there concerned that they might get infected that there might be a second wave. For folks out there. Who still hesitant like what do you tell people to reassure them that? The Newark Transit System is safe to travel in. Here's what I on a couple of things one is i. tell him that I got on the seven eleven I. Think it was out of Port Washington this morning. There was plenty plenty of seats the car smelled and little clean and every customer as far as I can tell and every employee winning the at a bass, the same was true when I go to Penn Station and got on the two or three, and then connected with the one at chambers. Appear to me, every customer was wearing a mask mass for really important. The Governor is made wearing masks on public transit a state law. Employees and customers required to wear backs. We did a physical study about ten days ago, which indicated that subway riders ninety two percent ask appliance. We're updating that study this week. In the latest data, point is ninety five percent that's incredibly or the latest research from around the world, including a report a couple of days ago from Cambridge in ranch universities in the UK. Indicates. That masks are really important. The subways mass transit does not appear to have two vectors and creating the and Derek. In any part of the world. We believe that's true also in New, York nursing homes. Obviously meat packing plants and people's homes have been significant tributaries. Obviously, the public health doctors empty epidemiologist will figure that out to your point about mass, and how important they are curious how you are encouraging riders to continue where I, just I ask because I've gone out of the last couple of weekends, at noticed of among my soaks here in Long Island where I live fewer and fewer people are wearing masks granted. They're not riding. The subway were riding a train, but how do you? Encourage. There's no way to enforce it. But how do you encourage writers to continue to wear masks and to be more vigilant when it comes to social distancing question? Plan, so we've been distributing mask in the subway. Stations are starting last the last Monday June eighth when phase one started. We're continuing that we've got a robust messaging and communications campaign on subway cars on subway platforms on the website will be doing was starting a digital campaign on that, so the the mass message has been robustly communicated. We're GONNA continue to do that. We've got employees. Employees Platform controllers wear finders way finders were also suggesting to customers who don't have a mask. Go upstairs and get one. You need to be wearing it again on transit law Allah railroad and the subways by anecdotal experience, everybody's wearing them and the minded five percent data point on subway mask. Compliance I think is really important in addition to that since the pandemic started right the. The first case was reported in New York March. First or second, we started disinfecting our subway stations subway cars buses metro north railroad that continues talk in a second about a couple of innovations that we're really excited about, but every station is being disinfected, not cleaned disinfected twice a day. Subway cars multiple times a day. Bosses won't Allen Railroad. metro-north cars saint same thing we are. are running a pilot right now on New York City Transit, subway, cars and buses, involving ultraviolet C light We did pilot prior to that with Dr David, Brenner at the earning, medical, center Columbia, University and Dr Bernard confirmed for the first time that ultraviolet C. Wider Radic fates, the coded the COVID nineteen virus. That's really important finding We are working with antimicrobials on and. Applaud Anti microbials. All of our subway cars, two and a half three times at this point. For verification from independent labs and the regulators, but it appears to be the case that there's a great deal of promise with respect to the ability of the Anti. Eradicate the COVID, seen virus and to do that for day weeks, and perhaps months and the UV light in particular. I really wanted because I find that fascinating. In terms of what you've found. It seems like there's some progress there. How how a widely is that being deployed because you sent that sort of a trial? Is that something that's being deployed into every car right now is limited tested to running. It's a pilot. We ran a demonstration of two or three weeks ago and the company that we're working with them. There are many vendors out there you and your viewers, undoubtedly no, then all tra- violet light is an established technology that's used in hospital settings, emergency rooms, operating rooms for for decades right, so the a virus and bacteria radicalization qualities of ultraviolet C light it well not we're running a pilot with the three stanchions. Temporary stanchions put an age subway car. There are two devices per stanchion. I'd say the size of a hardcover book. The operator has to confirm that there's nobody on the on the train neither employee or a customer. The ultraviolet light is is activated. Anne will disinfect disinfect car We're doing the same pilot on on buses, and we are really encouraged by the progress and really encouraged by Dr Printers finding. Up to and to your point about. Distance. There is a at that you guys introduced today. The capacity tracker APP for the L. A. Double are clearly selfish reasons. I'm interested because I'm a daily eligible are writer. Tell me a little about that how it works. It's a really cool innovation brought by fillings, the president along our era will fisher. WHO's is? A innovation officer and just the Long Island Railroad Sports. It uses sensors on the ninety percent of course seek. That is electric. And it will help customers it so long island railroad train by by the way. Apple store or glue for a free, you can download it and. I go to the APP couple times a day and now going more, but he gives customers data that if you're getting on the four fifty

New York City Writer Chairman And Ceo Rod Chang York City Long Island Railroad Sports Penn Station Long Island Allah Railroad York Pat Foy Newark Nasr UK New York Port Washington
The Fed begins purchases of up to $250 billion in individual corporate bonds

Marketplace

01:56 min | 3 months ago

The Fed begins purchases of up to $250 billion in individual corporate bonds

"Right so as promised what the fed is doing and it is doing a lot among the latest the central bank started buying corporate bonds today that is not new was announced a couple months ago but it's a big deal as the fed does what it can to backstop companies and their employees market place Nancy Marshall cancer explains how it's gonna work when a company wants to borrow money it can issue corporate bonds the buyers of those bonds are lending those companies money now the fed is going to buy a broad cross section of corporate bonds if they meet certain standards they must been rated as investment grade that is less risky as of March before the coronavirus lockdown started Christopher Whalen is chair of Whalen global advisors you're the fed is trying to be helpful because they are really uncertain about what's going to happen later this year when one says the fed wants to be sure companies have all the money they need to whether the pandemic the fed is also making this program anonymous just buying up corporate bonds without anybody asking it to that avoids any stigma from companies requesting fed help Catherine judges are Columbia University law professor there's always a concern that if you're looking to the federal reserve as opposed to the market for financing that you might be revealing something about how desperate you are for financing the thinking is if companies have all the financing they need at reasonable rates with the fed buying their bonds they won't need to lay off more workers Frank no tap is chief economist at CoreLogic the purpose is to help these companies remain good employers in the marketplace stand on their feet not lay people off and hopefully bring people back into the into the work force and if a company isn't able to stay on its feet and defaults on the bonds the fed bought chairman Jay Powell can turn into an emergency fund set up by the treasury department to backstop the

FED Christopher Whalen Whalen Global Advisors Professor Chief Economist Corelogic Jay Powell Treasury Department Nancy Marshall Catherine Columbia University Chairman
Returning to Work on the New York Subway? Here’s What You Need to Know

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:59 sec | 3 months ago

Returning to Work on the New York Subway? Here’s What You Need to Know

"As the city of New York gets back to work starts to and people start to get back on subway cars the MTA is taking extra steps up cleaning the trains down to a science at several yards like this one in corona queens dreams go through what looks like a giant car wash now a pilot program is looking at the logistics of using UV C. light to kill viruses and germs inside a train and a New York City transit chief mechanical officer John Santa Maria says the services would get wiped down and then the lights would go on to pile it will help us determine how to best set up the fleet on a shot by shot basis to figure out the most efficient way to go through this process on a nightly basis so far they've figured out how to use it on a whole train in thirty minutes the plan is to make that happen system wide as soon as possible a Columbia University study determined the light is effective at killing the sars COB to virus infected so intense people need to clear out of the car while it's in use you can't see the light but a separate flashing light indicates that it's on Sonia Rincon ten ten wins in corona queens

New York MTA John Santa Maria Sonia Rincon Corona Queens Officer Columbia University
Coronavirus spread by asymptomatic people 'appears to be rare,' WHO official says

Brian Lehrer

02:46 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus spread by asymptomatic people 'appears to be rare,' WHO official says

"Development the World Health Organization said yesterday that spread from a symptomatic individuals is very rare but this morning in case you haven't heard yet they walked it back so joining me now to discuss areas covered nineteen news is doctor Ashman Bresson epidemiologist at Columbia University and CEO of fountain house a community based mental and public health organization doctor son welcome back to WNYC thank you for joining us again hi Brian thanks for having can you clear up first to the best of your ability there's a symptomatic spread confusion that the WHL seems to have slowed I think our believe previously was you don't have to be symptomatic to spread the virus then yesterday they said no that's not really true then this morning they walked that back do you ever handle yet on what's going on here yeah it's an unfortunate miscommunication on the part of W. H. O. and it just goes to show you how important really clear actionable information is during a crisis and during a pandemic I think what's clear is that W. H. O. was leaning on a limited set of studies that mainly from China but a few of their quote unquote member states which basically showed that the most severely ill people symptomatic people were the ones meeting most of ours which makes perfect sense because if you're more severely ill you've got more of the virus circulating in your body and you're more prone to shed that virus in your in your respiratory secretions in your mucous membranes and all that so there's part of that that's correct but what where they cared even making a somewhat maybe overstating her or making a more definitive statement than they should have talking about something absolutely and really what they were saying is a relic what they were saying is what they should have said something like you know symptomatic people the more severely ill are more likely to transmit that doesn't mean that a symptomatic increase symptomatic people do not transmit and you know for example pre symptomatic transmission and one study in Singapore was forty eight percent pre symptomatic transmission and one study in China with sixty three percent so either the individual studies that the W. show really just doesn't have enough data to be making statements like that came to the sowing confusion and I think that's why you saw them walk it back this

World Health Organization Columbia University CEO Wnyc W. H. O. China Singapore Ashman Bresson Brian
How the Pandemic Has Changed the Way We Sleep

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

03:43 min | 4 months ago

How the Pandemic Has Changed the Way We Sleep

"According to preliminary results of a study of sixteen hundred people from sixty countries, forty six percents of people reported poor sleep during the pandemic. That's up from just twenty five percent before the pandemic insomnia and vivid weird dreams, both caused by the increased stress of the time we're living through has been evident anecdotally and as indicated by a fourteen percent uptick in sleep. Medication Prescriptions Melatonin sales in over the counter supplement for the natural hormone that induces sleepiness are up forty four percents. Philip Musket a professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center said he's avoiding prescribing medications to patients preferring to offer sleep hygiene tips. He's seen that actually staying asleep is the biggest problem for most people and says some of the primary factors causing that is that people are lacking in structure and exercise. Stain active can help you sleep more soundly and boost your immune system Dr Musk's also advises sticking to a regular sleep schedule and avoiding naps during the day. The good news according to Kathy Goldstein physician at the University of Michigan and an associate professor of neurology at the Schools Sleep Disorders Center is that what most people are experiencing is acute insomnia or quitting the Wall Street Journal having difficulty for or staying asleep a few times a week for three months or less and quotes, the third of people will experience acute insomnia at some point in their lives usually caused by some stressor. stressor in their life like say a pandemic the key doctor. Goldstein says though is not letting the issue. Become a chronic one quote. It's important to avoid associating your bed or bedroom with a place where you were awake. Experts recommend that if you can't fall asleep or wake up in the middle of the night and are unable to go back to sleep after twenty minutes get out of bed and do something, relaxing and quotes. Natasha Bouillon a Phoenix based family physician at one medical, says most people's sleep problems right now either stem from a lack of normal schedule or general anxiety about the pandemic. Some tips she recommends mindfulness through meditation, exercise or cognitive behavioral therapy. To maintain a consistent sleep schedule, turn devices off an hour before going to sleep and make your sleeping space a device free zone, consider even ditching your smartphones alarm and getting an actual alarm clock, as for anyone, experiencing vivid dreams or nightmares Melinda Jackson, a senior lecturer at the Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health at Monash University in Melbourne, says quote. During Times of stress, there's a release of narrow chemicals that can trigger these vivid dreams and nightmares in some people end quotes. And, Dearly Barrett a dream researcher at Harvard Medical School notes that waking up frequently throughout the night can also cause people to remember their dreams better. Contribute to the sense that your dreams are more vivid than usual. guardless of how? Your sleep has been disrupted. Or why here are a few more sleep? Hygiene tips to leave with quoting the Wall Street Journal eat at regular times than snacking day. Avoid, napping or compensating for poor night of sleep by going to bed, unusually early limit caffeine and avoid alcohol avoid electronic devices one to two hours before going to sleep, but if you do use a blue light filter and try to look at content that is not stressful. Get Bright Light in the morning. Try to find a workspace that isn't in your bedroom and stop working at a specific our and make time for relaxing activities end quote.

Schools Sleep Disorders Center Philip Musket Wall Street Journal Natasha Bouillon Kathy Goldstein Melatonin Columbia University Medical Ce Associate Professor Of Neurolo Professor Of Psychiatry Harvard Medical School Dr Musk University Of Michigan Dearly Barrett Caffeine Phoenix Melinda Jackson Family Physician
A conversation about race, privilege and making space

Unreserved

05:33 min | 4 months ago

A conversation about race, privilege and making space

"Watch a dot. Say Nin, hello, and welcome this unreserved on CBC Radio One I'm Rosanna dare child. In October of two thousand and eighteen I moderated, a panel called inside outside at six degrees held at the art gallery of Ontario. It's an event that invites authors, academics, politicians, and big thinkers together to discuss pressing issues. And Right, now there is one issue that has captured the world's attention. The death of George Floyd a forty six year, old, black man and in Minneapolis police officer now charged with second degree murder. His death was witnessed around the world and sparked support for the black lives matter movement with protests from Merika to Australia. We are at a turning point in our history, so we thought it was a perfect time to revisit this conversation. Today on unreserved. We're talking about power, privilege and asking. How willing are we to make meaningful change? Joining me on stage, our Alexis McGill Johnson of the perception institute. Is Your allure author speaker and Internet yeller not to know bed. National Inuit leader and president of new tap read Cana Tommy and Sassy assassin professor of Sociology at Columbia University. Okay so I'm afternoon. We're going to have a conversation around place. Power Privilege, who hasn't who doesn't and perhaps more importantly how we are shifting to create new spaces. I want to start with of course are beautiful panelists here? I want to ask you first of all to tell US share with us. Where you come from because as my elders teach, you cannot know where you're going until you know where you've come from. or at least that's what my mother would say when she sent me to the store. my first question to each of the panelists are what is the place that you come from? Perhaps we'll start with me. Thank you very much I guess I'm still trying to figure that one out. I. I thought I came from Canada. I was the young person and I'm not quite sure if that's the right. Way To think about where I'm from now. Nuts. which is. A region in new one of our four regions northern Labrador and we very recently got self-government, two thousand and five. But I grew up. There I also grew up in the United States I I grew up. Kind of between a lot of different worlds so I, Can i? Also say that I'm a global citizen as well so I am the national leader I am in Okinawa proud indigenous person. But it doesn't. Then, take back any of the other parts of me, that exist as well and I'm I'm comfortable insertive in that space, and I think that is sometimes confusing to the rest of the world that I have not indigenous ancestry as well that my mother is none dishes. That's fine and getting the acceptance from. Canada and North America that I can be indigenous, but I can also have non indigenous parts. That is a part of this power dynamic that I hope that we can discuss this afternoon about assertiveness in. Indigenous. Without the. The qualifiers that indigenous people put on us. And if we don't fit into those myriad of boxes than we somehow lose all of our rights altogether. And we will get into that because that is an interesting place of privilege to. TRY TO KICK doors. Down into so that we're GONNA. Wait to Alexa. So, we're my from. Kind of like to say I'm from a period of time. I was I was born in Nineteen, seventy two, which is important to me as a social identity really. but it's important for me. Because it was, it was halfway I was born kind of right in the middle of a post wave, second wave, feminism, and the Black Power Movement and my parents, both particularly my mother lived at the intersection of both of those movements growing up. She was incredibly active as a woman is. She, she had US marching in in our Shakey's an Afro puffs as as children I'm pretty sure I learned the words to. We shall overcome before I learned the US pledge of allegiance. My choice of professional careers always been trying to to understand interrogate these these. Frameworks power and Privilege Ed. I studied political science. Which I think is a study of power. But have found myself now consistently in these rooms, as one of few one of only, if not the only woman woman of Color, and so I've been this bridge I think kind of connecting. Connecting the dots in a lot of different iterations from a cultural perspective where I've worked with a number of artists and democratic organizations, organizing young people to the current work that we do have perception which is around translating the science of our brains and bodies understand difference in how we connect to each other in those ways.

United States Canada CBC George Floyd Shakey Black Power Movement Minneapolis Ontario Second Degree Murder Alexis Mcgill Johnson Australia Alexa Perception Institute Officer North America National Inuit Labrador Okinawa Columbia University Professor Of Sociology
President Trump Sides With Churches Asserting A Right To Reopen

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:49 min | 4 months ago

President Trump Sides With Churches Asserting A Right To Reopen

"Afternoon president trump is demanding that the nation's governors re open houses of worship he considers them essential the governors need to do the right thing and allow these very important essential places of faith to open right now for this weekend trump says if the governors do not re open houses of worship he will over ride down the Washington post's Bob Costa moderator of Washington week talked about this earlier with WTOP's with Dimitri's Otis had a Memorial Day weekend this is part of the president's push to re open the nation despite what his critics say in the states that he's moving too fast in some areas he believes the economy is central to his own reelection campaign and he's eager to see the country re open and this is partly a plate of his political base evangelical conservative voters who have expressed to the White House and others their desire to head back to church in places of worship the people you check in with you they say that the president can somehow override the governor's though it's going to be a complicated constitutional question a legal question governors have wide power over their own state about what's allowed to reopen if the governor had to stay at home order which includes blocking congregations are gatherings at places of worship in churches it's hard to see how the president even as the commander in chief could override that governor but it's going to be something that could be mired in the courts so give me for a slightly longer wind up here before you take the pitch we had the study in the lancet it shows hydroxy chloride Quinn doesn't help covert nineteen patients we know the president just finished a regiment of that drug and zinc there was Columbia University reporting social distancing even one or two weeks before we started doing it would have saved tens of thousands of lives the president pointed to what he considers the school's liberal bent even saying it was a political hit

Donald Trump Wtop Dimitri Otis President Trump White House Columbia University Washington Bob Costa
Trump says he won't wear a mask in front of cameras

KCBS 24 Hour News

02:47 min | 4 months ago

Trump says he won't wear a mask in front of cameras

"Trump says he tested negative yesterday morning for corona virus exposure which is why he chose not to wear a mask for most of his tour of a Ford plant in Michigan now producing ventilators CBS news correspondent we Jiang reports on the president's decision to taunt the media instead of respecting as C. E. O.'s request to follow the rules and the law sources at board tells CBS news officials did everything they could to get president trump to wear a mask which she actually did for a portion of the tour captured by somebody who was there at the visit quickly took a political turn no surprise since Michigan is a critical battleground state that will play a key role in the president's reelection campaign of president trump flaunted a face mask to show he had the option of wearing one I think I look better in the mass I really can't explain why he chose not to put it on even though Ford's company policy is for everyone to do so before this back area but I didn't want to give the press the pleasure of seeing it Michigan's Attorney General said it's also the state law if he fails to wear a mask he's going to be asked not to return to any enclosed facilities inside our state the president has been at war with Michigan Democrats threatening to withhold federal funding and accusing officials of engaging in voter fraud we're not going to go to voting by mail voting by mail is rocked with fraud and abuse earlier the president tried to discredit a new study from Columbia University that found about thirty six thousand American lives could have been saved if federal social distancing guidelines were implemented just one week before they went into effect on March fifteenth Columbia is that institution that's a very liberal but in early March president trump was downplaying the threat most of those people are gonna be fine medical experts say a lack of testing then and now continues to plague the U. S. a new study by the university of Minnesota calls it a mass and says the national testing plan is critical if schools and workplaces are to re open safely doctor Sheesh John is the director of the Harvard global health institute is every state can't figure out the whole thing by itself and you need federal got a guidance and a true national strategy for having enough trust and then making sure the right kind of people are being tested president trump says the U. S. is outperforming every country when it comes to testing as he tries to reassure Americans who are going back to work he said if there's a second wave of infections which health officials warn is very likely he will not shut down the country

Donald Trump Michigan Jiang President Trump C. E. O. Ford Columbia University Director Harvard Global Health Institut CBS Attorney University Of Minnesota
"columbia university" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

03:31 min | 7 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Columbia University big private school in Manhattan it is canceling two days of classes this week because a person at the school is under quarantine from corona virus exposure the university's president announced just before I got on the end of this announcement came out so believe me no one else is telling me about this with me I am writing this evening to notify everyone that because a member of our community has been quarantined as a result of exposure to the corona virus we have had Columbia University have decided to suspend classes on Monday and Tuesday Florida gets better the president of Columbia University notes that the person under quarantine has not yet been diagnosed with the deadly virus they did not say if it was student or staff member this section is intended to prevent the virus from spreading yet but the person if they've quarantine hasn't hasn't been diagnosed with the with the virus and to make everything spookier they're not saying if it's a student or member of the faculty I think it's gotten insane psychology today magazine nailed it psychology today magazine says the biggest risk to your health is to your mind believing all of these stories the risk to your mind is more significant than your wrist to your loss that's what they say well what is the World Health Organization say they have advised us against using paper money they claim that the crown of viruses just as likely to remain on cash as on any other surface it comes as a global total of infection surpasses one hundred thousand people with the death toll having reached at least three thousand six hundred now this is the first hit in China in the middle of January it is spread by bats they believe viruses like this are spread by bats but there is no record of anybody being eaten by a bat instead there are bats near open air animal food markets in China they kill foxes deer raccoon and then they sell it in these open markets in China meanwhile bats have been known to swoop down pick a little meat offer those bones by some of those animals and that's where we get the virus from in the city called Poulin who hawk it gets better but we didn't hear about until like three weeks ago we didn't hear about it until the workers in China refused to go to war that doesn't happen you refused to go to work in China you get shocked do your fees to go to work in China you disappear through re education camps where torture for twenty years until he gets more therefore they're not going to work they're really scared they're terrified of how does that impact us you the older iPhones made China the minute that the supply chain of products from China hits us all of a sudden we got a problem we started asking questions OMG there's a virus I'm not changing anything about canceling her vacation I'm not going to stop going on airplanes all wash my hands a lot Gee I always wash my hands.

Manhattan Columbia University
"columbia university" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:46 min | 7 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Ninety five masks are actually not recommended for the average person by the CDC partly because human coronavirus is often a smaller particle than those masks can block hospitals instead use a bright blue ultraviolet light when they want to kill viruses in large areas but it can cause skin cancer and cataracts if you're exposed to it but Columbia University Medical Center just put out a research paper that found if you use just the right slice of bright blue UV light it will still kill viruses but not causing cancer and cataracts the researchers suggested mounting such UV lights in the ceiling at places like schools hospitals airports are in planes could really knock down flu virus among us and more importantly other viruses including new and emerging like the coronavirus they won't help with the current outbreak but the color of public spaces may one day be know what's next at C. net CBS news radio and CBS news radio dot com I'm Gayle king with Anthony Mason the call originated nine year old little girl is leading a colorful campaign to make classrooms more inclusive across the country her name is Melanie order cheese in fourth grade and she noticed that many of her classmates routinely referred to as skin color when drawing with crayons but that didn't sit right with Alan Meg Oliver shows is how she's inspiring change Meg I can't wait to hear this story you could say Belen water is thinking outside the crayon box it's an example of how one small thought can lead to a big idea of acceptance and inclusion the chef nine year old bell and Woodard says no one will be for coloring well I'm done but last year in her third grade.

CDC Columbia University Medical Ce Gayle king Anthony Mason Alan Meg Oliver Woodard flu CBS Melanie Belen
"columbia university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"We're in their place. Oh, these folks now control the highest office of the land. Donald Trump supporters are older less educated less prosperous. Not exactly true. And they're dying early. Their life spans are decreasing and many dying from alcoholism, drug overdoses liver disease. Or simply a broken heart caused by economic despair. So there you go you're racist. And you're gonna die early. If you if you back Trump he didn't actually cite evidence by that. There was a study however, put out in September. From Columbia University found counties with higher death rates did tend to vote Republican in two thousand sixteen. Trump's actually trying to stop the deaths by trying to stop the opioid crisis. He's trying really hard to do that. And. Who who else is trying to help him with it? Nobody nothing zero zilch. I'm just aggrevated as hell, man. You know, what he should have done has gotten actual members from the Obama era and all the Obama Democrats who loved them people who loved and supported him and show look at these guys live ten times longer. Await it's actually true. By the way, what this clown. Hank Johnson back a couple of years ago, twenty sixteen compared Jewish Israeli settlers to termites, which is exactly what Farrakhan did. Yeah. That's a whole district. Trump is Hitler and the Republican party. You back Trump. You are Nazi. Sick sick. We'll get your calls coming up seven forty nine. Don't go anywhere, Kansas T, AM seven ninety Tucson's. Most stimulating talk the morning ritual with Gary Lewis, so it's an uneasy time in the market and you're sitting back saying, but wait a second. The economy is good jobs are through the roof. Unemployment is low wages are up. What is going on? Why is the market fluctuating? Are you? Are you confident your four what you have a 4._0._1._K Abbott IRA? What are your investments your portfolio? Are you calling your financial adviser and getting the answers that you're looking for do you trust the person listen to your money? It's not personal business. Right. It's your money. If you have these investments, maybe you want a second.

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"columbia university" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"At Columbia University and tomorrow is national coffee day, many chains and local coffee shops are offering free coffee or discounts. Bloomberg money watch at twenty six and fifty six past every hour. I'm Jeff Bellinger, fourteen. Ten win wins news time four twenty seven. Connect with the experts at investors Bank with strong relationships and customized solutions, they're here to help businesses in New York and New Jersey move forward. Investors Bank banking in your best interest member FDIC, if you love puzzle games that are sick of crushing candy play the heat popular mobile game. Best fiends this game is ridiculously button with consistence by that a five star ratings is a puzzle game. You can't miss out on some fastens of puzzles collect tons of characters and play weekly events. Best feeds update every month. So you'll never get bored. Crushing candy is. So twenty fifteen so pick up your phone. Download the apple app store or Google play for free. Now. Let's friends without the our best teams and no an ad from dad. All right. Save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive take these off, right? What is this? Wow. Where did you get this? I'm talking to you with the hair. Yeah. Where did you get this? Good stuff. That's not the near that solid stuff. Progressive can't save you from becoming your parents, but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto. Progressive casualty insurance company affiliates in other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations. Heroin makes promises, but all it really does take heroin take your job your house, your family, maybe even your life use heroin wants, and you can get hooked. Visit curb the crisis dot com to find a treatment center near you. That's curb the crisis dot com..

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"columbia university" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Raising money for the cook Cuomo. To get reelected Thank you thank you bye manga Lucci gonna tank show me but as I'm high. Atop Madison Square Garden would read a Cosby we were hermetically sealed in to these studios yesterday which prevented us from getting hit by, that Hsu NAMI and getting drenched like. So many of you but because of the fifty thousand powerful. Watched shot you're listening to it's all courtesy of dot com we have to go into, court where a, Belgian teacher professor at. Columbia University is going through civil litigation he is a co defendant with Columbia University because a former Columbia finance researcher is accusing him of. Having made many unwanted. Sexual advances torture torpedoing her research when he wouldn't she would not succumb to his demands And destroying her chance, for tenure when she rejected him time. And time. Again and. The. Defense of this Belgian professor is, is that this is really based on US anti discrimination laws a. Totally biased against white privileged males he said Rita, that the laws in the United States has screwed up and totally biased against privileged white males he, also suggested that in this current legal environment people. In my position. Meaning SE professor should simply not. Work with women anymore that's the most outrageous comments so don't mix men and women can't handle themselves far. Too risky because if all of a sudden he he's basing this on what he believes is his personal situation if you say no, in this case to her research findings. If you say no to making her Tenured professor then. Immediately she can turn around and say oh, this is all based on the fact that I would not succumb to the many times that, he, wanted, to, date, me that he wanted to touch me that he wanted to make love to. Me and now this is all part of, a vendetta a blood feud retaliation that's destroying my career well if you look at some of the. Emails that, came out about this guy first of all telling his buddies that yeah I basically in this climate. I was advised by the Columbia attorney this is, what he's saying that in this climate I basically shouldn't work with women which. Is unbelievable in any profession. And and teachers is a lot of them obviously at Columbia that's. The most ridiculous thing I've ever heard and then also in the emails to Curtis he goes on. And describes this woman, as an evil b. I t. c., h. blank blank blank, blank blank blank Clearly saying oh, she's out to get me because. I may privilege white male I mean this, is ridiculous let's, find out from many listeners out there the. Basis of this civil litigation remember no criminal, charges were ever filed against him into at thirty million dollars civil lawsuit in which Columbia University, as, progressive, as, liberal Right Escape it because Defendants do you believe what? He is saying because if this defense succeeds, in civil litigation there are a number, of very, wealthy very prominent very successful white men who have been charged with all types of sexual harassment Is there is such a thing as a privilege white male defense one eight hundred eight four eight WABC, that's one eight hundred eight four eight hundred to..

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"columbia university" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Skullduggery

"At at columbia university it's called the yeah i love my job so i'm working for columbia world projects it's a presidential initiative meaning president bollinger who's the president of columbia university initiative at the university it's university wide and it's really an effort to bring research and scholarship to bear on huge social fundamental challenges that we're facing around the world and this is sort of the key part in partnership with folks who are trying to solve those problems on the ground in a way that actually allows you to measure impact and at the same time bring back that information into the university to enrich research and scholarship and it's extraordinary we're working through set of challenges we we did a big discussion on energy energy access there over a billion people around the world that don't have access to electricity we know through a tremendous wealth of research and scholarship on the connection between that and poverty on health on food security on economic stability this is a critical issue to human development and we brought people in and ask them from around the world who are working on this issue from different perspectives where could research scholarship actually lend tremendous value to your work possibly transform your ability to expand access we talked to professors across the university who said these are areas where we're working this is where we think we could have partners and do something that's transformative and we develop projects out of that we work through those we see whether or not we can fund them and we sensually alternately hope to implement them in now we're working on a piece of inequality that i think is early critical so you find that their ways to sort of operationalize these ideas so you're not just you know in the ivory tower with a lot of smart people exactly exactly that's the idea and it's really extraordinarily we've got we've got an amazing project right now that deals with food security that is about providing essentially predictive climate analysis for key agricultral areas around the world in middle income and lower income countries that.

columbia university bollinger president
"columbia university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Giving intercity kids that freedom at columbia university he teaches teachers and you can get a sense of his lesson plan in his book called for white folks who teaching the hood and the rest of y'all to lesson number one hip hop you see you we're talking about young people who traditionally underperforming schools who are not engaged in the teaching learning process who are sort of least likely to answer questions or ask questions they enter into schools where they are very very passive and schools oftentimes work towards getting to be more engaged and sometimes say i don't understand why these young people are engaged or why they aren't motivated or why they're so apathetic on once they're in school the reality is that the same people who are apathetic and disengaging school outside of school engage in a number of practices where the express the type of brilliance that schools claim that they want so if i go into a hip hop cipher for example there is engagement there's laughter there's joy there is celebration there is a memorization of information rather quickly there is the opportunity to be able to sort of work together with someone else to show them that they care and that they are valued and so what we sometimes demonize young people for lacking in school actually becomes expressed in spaces outside of school and so the argument becomes rather than demonize young people for not expressing those forms of burlington school how can we transform the culture of school to allow the form of brilliant set exists outside of school to be welcome in the classroom you know it it requires a shift in how teachers teach mainly a class is not supposed to be completely quiet you know maybe young person doesn't have to walk in the hallway with their shoulder against the wall like i saw on a school last week you know maybe the metal detectors at the door and the bars on the window make them feel as though you think of them as criminals and because you think of the massage stay enact behaviors.

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"columbia university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Grad student at columbia university back then the school wanted to tear the ballroom down to build lab space for its hospital they've been eyeing it for years but now the audubon was inside a newly created empowerment zone and building anything there was suddenly much cheaper but locals weren't having this is a part of new york city history it's part of african american history so having this site raced struck people as really wrong but they were fighting a tide of redevelopment for years upper manhattan had been plagued by poverty and crime by the nineties it was changing and the empowerment zone was seen as a tool to hasten that change it included block grants local hiring requirements and tax incentives today the neighborhood his transformed restaurants in coffee bars in yoga places that you know in nineteen ninetythree you just could not even imagine it but that's happened all over new york from brooklyn to queens to the lower east side none of which we are in the empowerment zone tim weaver of the university of albany has written a book on the subject he says the zone definitely sped up harlem's gentrification but that the new wealth trickled up not down he says the problem with poor neighborhoods is not the taxes are too high but cutting taxes is always popular because of this the opportunity sign is really a zombie policy that's been staggering on fidelis despite it's more of an performance he says the new opportunities own program will be even less effective than the nineties empowerment zones because it doesn't include local hiring requirements or direct cash grants steve glickman of economic innovation group helped design the new program there's no easy intricately question around jet vacation but stays in cities can create any number of additional requirements in their communities to ensure it works in the way they wanted to he understands that cutting taxes for investors may not be the most direct way to help the poor.

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"columbia university" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Before we get to this week's podcast wanna tell you about digital plus that's our premium membership product and it gets you digit a magazine we just finished our issue or last issue of the year and a steady stream of exclusive research about the industry you'll also be part of our digital plus slack community and exclusive member of events that we recently held a live podcast with lindsay nelson and we're doing another one in january with howard mit men ciro at the plea to report so you should join us so if you are not a member police sign up good a digital dot com you'll see to today plus tab there it is only three hundred ninety five dollars year but for you our podcast listeners we have a discount enter the code podcast at checkout and you will get twenty five percent off that is podcast again go to digitally dot com and go to the tab at the top says the today plus wh is more important than ever been companies that grew up with passerby readers grid if you don't have a consumer whose actively looking for your content it is very difficult to build and slurred his this would snapchat stood with advertising and storytelling it's clear that digital can be more than the thing that we think it is blocking visionary podcast i'm ryan marcy i'm joined today by emily bell the director of the towel center for digital journalism at columbia university hey prime might be in were recording this at the end of the year i was the same for we started that maybe was annus horribilis for digital journalism but maybe it was a very good year so it depends on on journalism aspect then then there's the business aspect let's start on the business aspect right r k there are great their star awesome but i'm trying to and not a good note right thanks so but we've got to start somewhere so let's start with the drumbeat of the there's been this drumbeat of bad news there's been you know lots of.

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"columbia university" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Review you see this columbia university football jeep of the football jameson doorman every year the football team is a cupcake if you give you a guaranteed if you're university and you want to win a game pay colombian put on your schedule adam colombia him is like having a division two team come in anna people at columbia love that the the faculty and the administration of columbia university the love the fact that the football teams horrible because it schroeder's that colombia is a member of the academic club of intellectual pursuits should not some jock haven well there's a pr the columbia football team keeps winning in some fans are not happy about it and it made the new york times that's how we know quick what is the mascot of the columbia football team does anybody no i mean we got a football fans galore here and nobody tsa columbia lions you know you know where colombia's right you know which one it is no no no no no way way at what we are we're we're all the drug deals go down where way up there i mean ever westside hugh what just walked across the street from campus whatever you want big tower up there colombian durn was this is where i come at desired went to make his speech and he described he said there there aren't any homosexuals in iran in the students all started laughing and art when he resides all do you know some did you told me where they live in the way when the columbia lions football team snapped its infamous forty four game losing streak on october eight nineteen eighty eight michael rosenthal was among thousands in the stands was stood and cheered we won any thirty years later this group is forging its best football season in recent memory there six an oh after their weekend went over dartmouth and some people at columbia are not happy they are they are not happy about this there's a there's a woman here by the name of love jill levy a class made new jersey fundraising insulted when my husband told me.

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"columbia university" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Did you see this columbia university football jeep the football team as a doorman every year the football team is a cupcake if you give you a guaranteed if your university and you want to win a game pay colombia to put on your schedule adam colombia him is like having a division twoway team come in anna people at columbia love that the the faculty and the administration of columbia university love the fact that the football teams horrible because it shows that colombia is a member of the academic club of intellectual pursuits not sanjak haven while there's of problem the columbia football team keeps winning in some fans are not happy about it and it may the new york times that's how we know quick what is the mascot of the columbia football team does anybody no i mean we have football fans galore here and nobody tsa columbia lions you know you know where colombia's right you know which one it is no no no no no way way at what we are where we're all the drug deals go down where way up there i mean ever west side what just walk across the street from campus whatever you one big tower up there columbia durn who was this is where i come at dini's i went to make his speech and he described he said there there aren't any homosexuals in iran in the students started laughing and argument he resides all do you know some did you told me where they live in the way when the columbia lions football team snapped its infamous forty four game losing streak in october eight nineteen eighty eight michael rosenthal was among thousands in a stanza stood and cheered we won anyway thirty years later described is forging its best football season in recent memory her six in all after their weekend went over dartmouth and some people at columbia are not happy they are they are not happy about this there's a there's a woman here by the name of volume jill levy a class made new jersey fundraising insulted when my husband told me colombia had beaten pam.

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"columbia university" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"See this columbia university football jeep the football team is a doorman every year the football team is a cupcake if you if you a guarantee and if you're university and you want to win a game pay colombian a put on your schedule come on beer game is like having a division two team come in anna people what columbia love that the the faculty and the administration of columbia university the love the fact that the football teams horrible because it schroeder's that colombia is a member of the academic club of intellectual pursuits and not some jacques haven well there's a problem the columbia football gm keeps winning in some fans are not happy about it and it made the new york times that's how we know quick what is the mascot of the columbia football team does anybody no i mean we have football fans galore here and nobody it's the columbia lions you know you know where colombia's right you know which one it is no no no no no old way way at what we we're we're all the drug deals go down way way up there i mean ever westside hugh what just walked across the street from campus whatever you want big tower up there colombia durn who was this is where i come at dini's i went to make his speech and he described he said there there aren't any homosexuals in iran in the students started laughing and opt meeting these ads all issued do you know some did you told me where they live in the way when the columbia lions football team snapped its infamous forty four game losing streak in october eight nineteen eighty eight michael rosenthal was among thousands in a stanza stood and cheered we won any way thirty years later this group is forging its best football season in recent memory in six an old after their weekend win over dartmouth and some people at columbia are not happy they are they are not happy about this there's a there's a woman here by the name of volume jill levy a class made new jersey fundraising insulted when my husband told me colombia had beaten pam i said that's.

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