35 Burst results for "Columbia University"

Federal Aid Saved Families During the Pandemic

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:27 min | Last week

Federal Aid Saved Families During the Pandemic

"The money and other resources. The federal government brought to bear to keep people afloat during pandemic was in essence of vast anti-poverty program. We'll get a sense later. Today of how well the pandemic relief worked. When the us census releases twenty twenty data on poverty other indicators show the programs kept hunger at bay in many households and democrats are pushing to extend some of those programs which do have costs. Marketplace's amanda teacher has more the government provided billions of dollars in pandemic aid. Emergency unemployment benefits stimulus checks and increase supplemental nutrition assistance benefits or food stamps. Without all that care about dairy from. I focus on children's says things would have been much worse while dairy points to the advanced child tax credit deposits up to three hundred dollars a month per kid. They put cash directly in the hands of families cash. That's been going toward things like groceries or rent. Democrats want to continue the child tax benefit the treasury department says it would cost taxpayers about one hundred ten billion dollars a year. Eric york is with the tax foundation. It becomes just very expensive to make it permanent. She says that may be why. Lawmakers are only proposing to extend it through twenty twenty-five according to columbia university social policy center child poverty dropped by more than forty percent after the first child tax deposit in july. I'm amanda feature for

Federal Government Amanda Eric York Government Treasury Department United States Tax Foundation Columbia University Social Pol
"columbia university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

02:09 min | 3 weeks ago

"columbia university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Systemic racism hasn't always been in the news. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic. Minute edna chun lecturer at columbia university explores this topic through higher education lens with many nationwide demonstrations about police brutality greater recognition of systemic. Racism has entered our national consciousness when professor joe fagin i introduced and developed the systemic racism framework through his research. The term was considered controversial on and off college campuses by contrast today. Systemic racism has become part of our national vocabulary ian a reckoning about race racial issues of always been a central campus concern arm research indicates that women and men of color as well as white women in higher education face far more mistreatment and process-based inequality than white men through in person interviews. We learned of persisting exclusionary practices in day to day campus situations. The racially charged rhetoric dominating our campuses and national landscape signals in urgent need to replace understated implicit bias and microaggressions language with a more direct terminology addressing a long-term material social and career consequences of these damaging practices within the context of higher education. We propose a continuum of racial and gender discrimination we call macro aggressions that ranges from various forms of subtle mistreatment to institutionalized process based discrimination. We suggest specific policy based recommendations for benthic change such as monitoring institutional processes for equitable outcomes and investing in sustained and systemic diversity education for faculty administrators staff and students. That was edna chun.

dr lynn Pascarella association of american colleg edna chun joe fagin columbia university
Could We Delete Our Memories One Day?

Kottke Ride Home

02:09 min | 3 weeks ago

Could We Delete Our Memories One Day?

"So a new movie debuted on. Hbo max earlier. This month from the creators of westworld and starring hugh jackman called reminiscence. It's about a world where scientists have created a way of relieving your memories and recovering lost. Ones it's been getting pretty bad reviews. And frankly i keep forgetting to check it out but it does have a very intriguing premise. In what if we could relive memories. What have we could change them or heck. What if we could delete memories altogether. I definitely have some that. I wish i could forget. In a recent installment of their gizeh asks series. Gizmodo spoke to a panel of researchers about whether such thing would ever actually be possible. Samuel shocker professor emeritus of neuroscience at columbia university says that the principal is kind of there but in practice it's more complicated quote the evidence from neuroscience right now suggests that a given memory is very sparsely encoded. What that means is that our cerebral cortex where most of these memories are stored has about fifteen billion nerve cells at a particular memory involve a change in activity of only a couple hundred of them. Finding those few hundred cells is very very complicated and quote. He points to a number of ongoing studies however that show what we're currently capable of in one. Scientists are able to identify a group of cells participating in one of a mouse as memories and then manipulate them enough to prove that the mouse forgot the memory. But shocker says doing that on a human scale to the sophisticated level. Most people think of when talking about deleting memories is probably not possible but in terms of similar therapies for trauma quote. A memory has four basic phases. It's initiated then consolidated then stored and then recalled in both animals like mice and monkeys and in humans. each of these phases have been shown to share a certain mechanism. Scientists are now focusing on those shared mechanisms to see if maladaptive memories can lose their anxiety provoking aura. You don't forget that you got mugged in front of a mailbox instead. The mailbox stops meaning what it used to mean. The memory is still there but it's emotional. Context has been

Samuel Shocker Hugh Jackman HBO Gizmodo Columbia University Shocker Trauma
CHD President and General Counsel Mary Holland on Covid Vaccine Injuries

One Life Radio Podcast

02:04 min | 3 weeks ago

CHD President and General Counsel Mary Holland on Covid Vaccine Injuries

"Mary holland. One of my favorite people. How you doing today mary. I'm grace could yeah. It's great. We're going to call him a mondays mondays with mary. It's gonna be regular well and there's so much to talk about my goodness let me introduce you for people that maybe are listening for the first time mary holland serves as president and general counsel of children's health defense. She left the faculty of new york university school of law where she surfers seventeen years most recently directing. Its graduate lawyering program. Mary received her master of arts and juris doctorate degrees from columbia university and her undergraduate degree from harvard. She has worked in international public and private law and mary is the co author a vaccine epidemic and the hp vaccine on trial seeking justice for a generation betrayed. You can find mary at children's health. Defense dot org. That's children's health. Defense dot org. We have a lot to cover today with our children's health defense. Update okay so there were an additional twenty seven thousand reported injuries from the covert vaccine in just one week so from last week to this week. So what kinds of what. Kind of injuries. Mary are being reported. And what about deaths bernadette all kinds of injuries are being reported and death the total deaths so far that have been reported and we know that's really a small faction of what the real number probably is over thirteen thousand and the number of total injuries. That have been reported or over six hundred thousand. I don't think this would be possible. Except for the fact that the government and the industry and the healthcare profession all have liability protection under emergency use authorization status It's really distressing thirty. Two percent of those deaths were within forty eight hours of having developed symptoms after the shot. So i it's it's extremely troubling bernadette It's just there. Were over five hundred fifty deaths last

Mary Holland Mary Children's Health Defense New York University School Of Columbia University Harvard HP Bernadette Government
Brianna Walker Brent, Treasury Department And Jennifer Bracelet discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Brianna Walker Brent, Treasury Department And Jennifer Bracelet discussed on AP News Radio

"Monthly payments for low income families from the expanded child tax credit are starting to arrive the treasury department estimates that over thirty five billion families are receiving payments averaging four hundred twenty three dollars in July as part of the expanded child tax credit part of president binds one point nine trillion dollar corona virus relief package it was great I immediately paid my rent which was late Brianna Walker Brent we do Hampshire is taking care of three children and took custody of two siblings last year it's going back into the day care it's going into the food it's going to the grocery store Jennifer bracelet share is the director of the daycare that Walker's children tend to not feeling quite so like they're living on the edge one study from the center on poverty and social policy at Columbia University estimates the payments could cut child poverty by forty five percent they're also a test of sorts president

Walker Columbia University Forty Five Percent Last Year July Three Children Two Siblings Nine Trillion Dollar Brianna Walker Brent Jennifer Four Hundred Twenty Three Doll Over Thirty Five Billion Famil Hampshire One Point One Study Virus
The Life of Florynce Kennedy

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:46 min | 2 months ago

The Life of Florynce Kennedy

"Florence rey kennedy or flow was born on february eleventh nineteen sixteen in kansas city missouri to wiley zella kennedy while he made his living as a pullman porter and leader started taxi. Company the kennedy family experienced poverty during the great depression and racism from the local ku klux klan after a house in a majority white neighborhood but flow nevertheless described her childhood as an incredibly happy one. Her parents were exceptionally supportive of their daughters flow. Once said my parents gave us a fantastic sense of security and were by the time the big. It's got around to telling us that we were nobody. We already knew. Somebody flow was an excellent student and graduated at the top of her class after high school. She and her sisters opened a hat shop together. In kansas city flow also started getting involved in local political protests. She helped organize a boycott against a local coca cola. Bottler who refused to hire black delivery drivers in nineteen forty two flows. Mothers ella died of cancer afterwards flow and her sister. Grace moved to new york city and rented an apartment together in harlem in nineteen forty. Four flu started at columbia university or she majored in pre law after graduation flow applied to columbia law school but was denied admission. According to the dean of the law. School the denial was a result of flow being a woman not because she was black flow wasn't buying it and threatened to sue at which point the admissions board changed. Its mind she was one of only eight women and the only black woman in her law school class

Florence Rey Kennedy Wiley Zella Kennedy Pullman Porter Kansas City Ku Klux Klan Missouri Kennedy Depression Coca Cola Ella Harlem Columbia Law School Columbia University New York City Grace Cancer FLU
How Pat Boone Offered His Life to Christ

The Eric Metaxas Show

08:19 min | 2 months ago

How Pat Boone Offered His Life to Christ

"My guest. Today is mr pat. Boone pat boone. My friend welcome to this program. Lets me it's radio so feel free to talk and listen pat. I gotta tell you. I got to tell my audience just to set them up for what we're gonna discuss. I had the privilege we were in dallas together at the are a couple of weeks ago. my daughter and i had the joy of spending some time with you At that dinner there was a special dinner and Then album and i might producer. Were in the room The next day. I think it was two days later when you got a very special award and that got me thinking about you and your career and i said i want to have you on this program to talk about your career. Talk about anything you want. But that evening was so special pat. I was sitting there watching. They had put together a beautiful video. Package introducing you and your career before they brought you up on the stage and to be reminded of all the things that god has used you to do over the years. It was overwhelming. I said i want my audience especially younger folks. Who don't know you to know about this stuff. And then when you gave your speech i thought this is getting more ridiculous because it was one of the most moving beautiful speeches pat. It was amazing what you said. So we're going to put that on my youtube channel my personal youtube channel so people can watch it but let's just start there pat. How do you. i mean that that was. That was an amazing evening. What was your response. Or what were you feeling that evening to get this lifetime. Legend award well. It's ila mixture of feelings. Erica of course Happy that i was given being given an award and singled out amongst a lot of other people who i feel sure more worthy but very emotional because as you heard me say and i won't say at all is my life was getting underway in my late teens. I was asking god. This was personal just between me and him to use my life and some way that that would please him that would serve his purpose. We're up in the attic. You were sixteen years old or something like that. Yeah yeah about sixteen. I had claimed this raw unfinished attic. Full of kinda junk. That's everybody's excuse at my penthouse. Because my brother he was younger than me. We'd been sharing this double bid and our modest home in nashville for years and of course we were. We loved each other. We were brothers but each of us would like to head the bed and the privacy to himself when you hit sixteen. You're a man you want your own room so you head up to the attic. I understand so. I asked mom and dad if i could have the attic. And it's well. It's just an attic and i said yeah but there's room and i can put caught up there and it'll be my place and nick can have the double bed here downstairs and in the bedroom. So that's what we did. And i will say that being up there alone lot of the time i could study up there had light. It was raw. It was nobody people would have felt. Sorry for me. I guess but i enjoyed it because it was mine and i was. I had the privacy. So i used some of that time as a young christian to talk to god and just say i. I don't know where this road. I'll look out the window up this curving road out the window of the advocate. It went up the hill and around and around the bend and it was like a an assembly assembly or a parable to me about my life. My life is going around a bend. I don't know where i'm going. But god please use me in some way that will serve you and will bless all the people. It was a simple prayer. And i didn't know what i was asking but but i met it and i repeated it and and then i'd come down and have breakfast and go to school and I just never forgot that. I had pledged to myself. That what i didn't know what i didn't tell you i didn't mention that night because i'm the oldest of four kids and i've been blessed than many ways beyond my brother and two sisters. I love him and they love me. And we're very close. But i was singled out and i asked my mama since i was the first born. Did you ever do when. I read about little samuel. And and and his mom who he couldn't even have a child and god miraculously gave her the child then she raised him to heaven and and gave him to god. I said. Did you ever do anything like that with me. And she teared up. She'd never told me she said yes. On when you were just an infant Do before the lord and said he's yours lord using for your purposes. She never told me that until i asked her. As a you know in my fifties. I never knew she had taken her. First born son and like hannah and samuel just raised me up and said take him lord. He's yours so with all of my failings and faults and mistakes all through the years and i made plenty of people who know me know about him. God is blessed in us and directed my life and i've had that sense that That he had a purpose for me. Well it's it's just overwhelming and again you know for for people especially younger people tuning in who don't know when i mentioned to my cousin in greece Who i guess he's just seventy this year that That i had become friendly with you. He couldn't believe it. He thought pat boone. What he's in greece. But i mean the whole world of certain generations knows you knows that you were a recording star hitting every every bell that could be wrong top number one hits everything movies everything and of course younger people. Today they would. They would have no idea about that. So i said i wanna go over your career because you talked about this about giving your life to god having no idea. Let's be honest what what lies ahead. And what lay ahead for you. You met the queen of england twice. You met everybody. We can possibly think of Elvis you're friendly with all these people. Every bob hope whoever it is it is a staggering career. That you've had. And i just wanna go backwards and let me just ask you said you know the queen of england so you met the queen of england twice it's hedge. It's an embarrassment. It was because i met her twice. The second time was when i was deeply deeply embarrassed. the first time i was in college at at columbia university had transferred from north texas state to columbia was having hit records and my career was taking off an astonishing way so in college. You're having hit records and your careers taken off. So what nineteen twenty twenty one. Twenty two to twenty one as as i launched the first ever of of musical variety show for a guy my age at twenty one on On abc television. And then and i'm still in college. I'm taking classes every weekday and saturdays to at columbia university and siring four kids hiring for kids. That's is that the most delicate way you could put it pat boone siren where kids these lovely women that are now some of them grandmothers. Okay so

PAT Mr Pat Boone Pat Boone Youtube Assembly Assembly Erica Dallas Samuel Nashville Nick Greece Pat Boone Hannah England Elvis Columbia University BOB North Texas Columbia Abc Television
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:02 min | 2 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Countries do nothing wrong on their own but the world capital market changes and suddenly. They can't borrow anymore. They cannot roll over their loans and then they are subject to rollover crisis they cannot renew the loans. there's no international credit and that causes massive that causes massive recessions. So i would say starting in two thousand eight. The general idea of having capital controls became much more popular in the technical term. Where people use is to say macroprudential policies and so that particular paper tries to tell a story because of this there being an externalities that people don't make the right choices because they don't really internalize how their own barring decisions affects the value of the collateral. If you were to give them a couple of control they would. You could induce them indirectly to make the right decision so that paper provides a theoretical support for macroprudential policies. And then because one thing is the policy makers to say oh we see all these flows another thing is. Can i find a welfare based arguments. Why desirable to go against free capital mobility so picketing along. This stephanie is That will use a warranty for us inside the country and so presumably that would use a risk of those assets and gives you more stability in your decision making processes. Is that the way to think about it. Yes it it. Greatly reduces latinity and people dislike volatility is very inefficient to have a lot of attila. The so i want to finish up another paper that you have Desa commodity super cycle matter paper investigates invisibly the role of the commodity price super psycho in explaining reenacting activity in developed and emerging economies that commodity price super cyclicity flying as a common pullman component in the market prices. Here that this plumbing components has they did do the issues of seen. come replace laura. Yeah okay so. I tell you how we went into this project because we went in with a prior that the super cyclist gonna be super important So there is this. Empirical regularity that of many small open economies that are way too small to influence global commodity prices. If you look how their business cycle correlates with commodity with world commodity prices very high. So you can get variance decomposition. You say half of the variance at business cycle frequencies of output in small country x. is due to variations in global commodity prices. Right in so we tried to think about. But what part of the global commodity prices in these short-run run fluctuations or. Is it really that. If the soybean price goes down on a country is completely invested in solely be in and the whole soybeans. And we know that there's these very long lasting movements in commodity prices is that what then gets reflected in causing long recessions so we the the contributions paper is to have a methodology to saad sharks to commodity prices into the long lasting ones which we call the super psycho and then shorter ones and actually if that the super cycle would be very very important and we at the end of the day. We don't get the answer. We went into the project with. We get.

stephanie laura
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:41 min | 2 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You should tell your expenditures towards not saving towards spending more and so you you stimulate demand that sort of the bread and butter of the central bank but the neo. Fisherman's just are doing is that. They are other type of movements. That are not of this transitory type and in particular. If you have a permanent increase or a permanent decrease in interest rate the effects are not the same as transitory one. So a since you're from chicago. I'm gonna gonna maybe illustrate you. The approach from the near fisher. So well you. I don't know if she were still they are in chicago robert. Lucas was a professor and he won the nobel prize in one thousand nine hundred six and so he has this. I think very nice so when you win the nobel prize you have to give a speech. And so one of the sentences he wrote in there was central bankers and even some monetary economists talk knowledgeably of using high interest rates to control inflation. But i know of no evidence from even one economy linking these variables in a useful way. So basically what is he he is saying he was in and then he showed some pictures and these were all long run pictures right so he was talking about the long run fisher effect. Put the neo fisher and talk about the long run fisher effect where he says if you have really high normally interest rates you're not gonna get low inflation in the long run. You're going to get inflation. So i think if you now try to say the same sentence but you change up with the down. His observations is totally describing what happened. In all these countries since they became inflation target is and once hit the zero lower bound and have held nominee interest rates at on zero for way longer than the shock lasted countries like north korea. North korea south korea and many countries that may be emerging markets. We could reread the robert. Lucas code as central bankers and even some monetary economists talk knowledgeably of using low interest rates to stimulate inflation. But i know of no evidence. From even one economy linking these variables in a useful way. And i would really say that there are at least fifty central banks in the world that have health rates at zero and they're waiting and waiting for inflation to go up. Yeah that makes a lot of sense. I have to say something intuitively active to a zero nominal interest rate for twenty five years in a country. That hasn't done too badly. You know so. But i think that the new fisher argument is that. Don't do it if you expect inflation to rise because you're never going to get it you're sort of stuck exactly yeah. I think that's a very nice way of saying it. Don't go for zero rates for a long time hoping to reach you. Two percent inflation target. That's that's that is more. What the perils of taylor rules say. What the new share and say if you then start tightening because you want to go back to normal. Don't think that you're gonna get the same negative effect in the short run as you get from transitory tightening. You're actually gonna get a very quick rian. Flation sir it's a really interesting thing to internalize and as you say. Most central banks around the world haven't done it right. There still have some expectations whilst.

fisher chicago Lucas North korea robert south korea taylor rian
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:17 min | 2 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Don't. I can see you. Okay okay okay okay. So let's just make this. If you feel that you cannot see me well. Let me know if it's racist. Okay so let me. Go back to the fisher. Effects is the idea that there's a relationship between the nominee interest rate the real interest rate and expected inflation. And what most people believe. Is that in the long run. What do i mean by long run. Maybe over a period of a thirty forty years monetary policy cannot do much to affect the real interested in an economy so if over long periods of time the gnome interest rate is very high. This will also reside in the inflation rate. Being really high supposed you. The is four percent in one country picks the nominee interest rate to six percent. That country's gonna have two percent inflation rate but another country also has this real interest rate of four percent but they pick a nominee interest rate of ten percent. They will have six percent inflation so in the long run. There's a one to one relationship. For every percentage points higher interest rates. You have one percentage point higher inflation in the long run and so this one for one movement between norm interest rates and inflation in the long run. That's called the long run fish. Effect and people in general have Accepted that that's not very controversial and with it goes idea that the real interest rate in the long run not in the short run but in the long run is really not affected by monetary policies. So the journal idea always that monetary policy might be very powerful in the short run but not in the long run if we take the long run episodes of thirty years. So that is why. The literature on the neo fisher effect. It can't just talk about the fisher effect. Put the word kneel in front because they are interested in a very specific question. And then i tell you why they got interested in that specific question but this bit specific question. They're interested in. is that suppose. The central bank raises the nominee interest rate permanently. So let's start with an example. Let's go to switzerland. They have the policy raid in. Switzerland is minos half a percent so minus fifty basis points. And so maybe you would think more normal level is plus two percent so and you would think that if she should go at least expectations if they go to plus two percent. That's a permanent move. You wouldn't think only are very briefly. They going to put the foot into the water and see how two percent is and then they go back to the unusual situation of minus fifty basis points. Right so we would think that. A normalization of interest rates from negative interest rates at a bunch of central banks have to something like more normal. That's why it's called normalization. Two percent is a permanent move way. Because that's because of moving from minus point five to to.

fisher Switzerland minos
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:59 min | 2 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Shown me see qasimi him. Mike yesterday's Tiffany schmidt go. Hey this principle economics at columbia university. She's also visits federal at the center for economic policy research The national beautifully economic age income. Stephanie thank you for having me yes. The thanks for doing this so i i want to talk about your. I guess the people that you have written a couple of people to the mountain Your and your talk and your research allowed the fisher effect and exiting liquidity. Clap as i mentioned stephanie via probably shared a common time in hiep log long time ago more doses of macroeconomics than you were doing stuff and most of this stuff has gone away. So i a booster shot so before we get into the neo. Officially fact could you talk a bit about what is what the fisher sectors originally. Yeah so yeah. I would be happy so i think especially since as i think. Different people have different opinions about it. So let me be very clear. So the we are thinking about monetary policy in. So that what. I'm talking about has to do with monetary economics and the fisher effect is is concerned with the idea that is there a systematic relationship between the nominal interest rate. Say the intr- the fans raid or the treasury rate some type of interest rate and the level of inflation and so this this idea in economics which is called the fisher effectiveness along run concept where people have three empirical work pretty much uncontroversial established that this is ray. Simple relationship that the interest rate is equal to the real interest rate plus expected inflation. That's called the fisher equation. Wait a second. I constantly see freezing. I don't know if this is me or you. You see freezing. Like i cannot see that the video that arrives on your end is right. So you have this connectivity issue or not. i don't. I can see you. Okay okay okay okay. So let's just make this..

qasimi Tiffany schmidt center for economic policy res columbia university Stephanie Mike stephanie treasury
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 2 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology..

What Ever Happened to Amelia Earhart?

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:57 min | 2 months ago

What Ever Happened to Amelia Earhart?

"If amelia earhart heddon so famously disappeared. She would still have been remembered as one of the pioneers of aviation and one of the most significant figures of the nineteen twenties and nineteen thirties. She grew up in abilene. Kansas and later moved to their parents to saint paul minnesota and then to chicago. She picked your high school in chicago. Based on their science labs she worked as a nurse in one thousand nine seventeen in toronto coming down at the spanish flu and then in nineteen nineteen enrolled in columbia university for a year. She initially intended to study medicine however her life changed forever on december twenty eighth nineteen twenty one in long beach california. She flew in an airplane for the first time with noted air racer. Frank hawks that ten minute ten dollar flight center on a course that would change history. She immediately knew that flying was what she wanted to do and she set out to learn how to fly. She took a series of odd jobs to save up for the one thousand dollars needed for her to take flying lessons. She arrived at the kenner airfield near long beach and was taught by another female aviation pioneer. Mary neta snook. Erhard began setting records almost immediately and nineteen twenty one. She purchased a used by plane in nineteen twenty two. She used it to fly to fourteen thousand feet setting a women's altitude record in nineteen twenty-three she became only the sixteenth woman in the united states to receive a pilot's license in nineteen twenty four. She briefly returned to columbia and then it was going to attend. Mit when her family's financial problems prevented her from further study. She moved to boston with her mother where she remained. Active in local aviation in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven however charles lindbergh captured the world's attention by becoming the first person to fly across the atlantic solo. The next year a team wanted to have a first woman fly across the atlantic they selected erhard as the right woman who can handle the media attention and had the necessary skills she accompanied pilot wilmer stoltz and co-pilot slash mechanic. Louis gordon on the flight in june nineteen twenty eight

Amelia Earhart Heddon Frank Hawks Chicago Kenner Airfield Mary Neta Snook Abilene Columbia University Kansas Minnesota Long Beach FLU Erhard Toronto California Charles Lindbergh Columbia
Lina Khan, Critic of Big Tech, to Lead Federal Trade Commission

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:42 min | 3 months ago

Lina Khan, Critic of Big Tech, to Lead Federal Trade Commission

"Yesterday the senate confirmed lena con to a seat on the federal trade commission. The thirty two year old columbia university professor has been a vocal critic of big tech companies and. She's advocated for sweeping changes to antitrust enforcement with her confirmation secured. President biden is designating her as ftc. Chair the post will allow her to pursue an aggressive antitrust and consumer protection agenda so for more on khan and how she could shape the ftc. Enjoy our legal affairs. Reporter brent kendall. Hey thanks for being here. Thanks for having me okay. So tell us about khan's background here. Where does she come from so she has been on the fast lane star track of the progressive movement in terms of antitrust which she was a reporter wrote pieces for different publications went to law school and wrote this law review article about amazon. The thesis which was that antitrust law just doesn't really work to restrain companies like amazon. And how they've built their business and so she kind of skyrocketed from there she's been a legal adviser for progressive group. That is advocated for a wholesale change in antitrust enforcement. She went and worked on the hill for this house antitrust subcommittee that did this big investigation of tech firms and was a big piece of that and this report the democratic staffer at the end of this investigation making all sorts of recommendations that that congress rain tech company and so this all comes at a time. You know we're sees risen up these ranks and then got this nomination for the ftc from president biden. Which will now put her in theory at least in a position to try to put some of her views into

FTC Lena Con President Biden Brent Kendall Khan Columbia University Senate Amazon Congress
The Life of Lynn Conway: Computer Scientist and Transgender Activist

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:35 min | 3 months ago

The Life of Lynn Conway: Computer Scientist and Transgender Activist

"Lynn conway was born on january. Second nineteen thirty eight in mount vernon new york initially assigned male at birth. She experienced a disconnect between her gender identity and assigned sex from a young age. Lynn new she identified as girl due to the limited knowledge around gender fauria in the nineteen forties and fifties. Lynn was raised as a boy. Lynn was a shy and reserved high school student. She excelled academically specifically in math and science. Her grades earned her spot at mit at the age of seventeen at mit. Lynn studied physics for two years before dropping out as a result of psychological distress with her gender identity. A few years later in nineteen sixty one linen rolled at columbia university. She earned her bachelor's and master's degrees in electrical engineering during this time. Lynn married a woman and the couple had two daughters together. Violet columbia limbs work caught the attention of professor who is a senior leader at ibm. He offered her a job on the ibm research team. That was covertly developing the world's fastest supercomputer. Lynn had secured her dream job. Then in nineteen sixty seven. Lind learned doctor named harry. Benjamin the leading researcher on transgender people and sex reassignment surgery after counseling and hormone treatments lynn decided to undergo gender reassignment surgery. To ease your transition at work lin planned for ibm to change her name on company records and transfer her to a different lab. No one would have to know but ibm corporate disagreed. They feared employees would be upset. If limb secret got out some instead of honoring their promise of finding her a new department. Ibm quietly fired her. On top of losing her job wins wife left her and banned her from having any contact with their daughters. Fourteen years would pass before. Lynn saw her children again despite being ostracized by her company and family. Lynn moved forward with the surgery and completed her transition in nineteen sixty eight.

Lynn Lynn Conway IBM Violet Columbia Mount Vernon MIT Columbia University New York Lind Benjamin Harry LIN
Bidens Antitrust Brain Trust

Reset

02:00 min | 4 months ago

Bidens Antitrust Brain Trust

"Joe biden has started filling up his administration with some big tech big critics and it raises questions. About what exactly biden is going to do in his white house when it comes to silicon valley because jason doray has been reporting on this. Hey jason teddy so over. The last week or so biden is moving to nominate two people who send a pretty surprising and big signal about where he is on silicon valley issues. Tell me about these. Two people who appear to be getting jobs in the biden administration. Sure so the first one is tim. Wu who is going to be in adviser to the president on the national economic council and he is advising on technology and competition. Okay so tim wu when the other person and the other person is lena khan who liked him. Also professor at columbia university and i'd reported in january. She was a front runner to get an ftc. Commissioner role and in the last week a bunch of outlets have stated that she fact will be nominated by president biden to fill one of the five ftc. Commissioner roles okay so so why should people care about these people getting these roles. These are two super prominent critics of the tech industry right. That's correct so in short. Both of these people have argued in different forms at different times extensively that big tech companies abused their monopoly. Power and need to be reined in tim wu. Let's start with him so he's a professor at columbia. What is his position. Contact policies specifically. I mean it sounds like his job is focused narrowly on this issue. Yes so one of the main roles he'll play in. This job is advising on tech policy and competition and his view is essentially been that google facebook amazon apple are too powerful and the government needs to do something about it.

Jason Doray Jason Teddy Biden Biden Administration Tim Wu Lena Khan Joe Biden President Biden FTC National Economic Council White House WU Columbia University TIM Columbia Amazon Google Facebook Apple
Why Black Entrepreneurship Surged During the Pandemic

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:04 min | 4 months ago

Why Black Entrepreneurship Surged During the Pandemic

"Is of course the one year anniversary of the murder of floyd in a year of protests and reckoning there have been signs of hope even during a pandemic that hit black americans particularly hard and closed many black owned businesses new data suggests that people in black communities started new businesses over the last year in cities like new york and atlanta the study from the national bureau of economic research says. Black americans were more likely than white americans to take steps toward entrepreneurship. during the pandemic marketplace's euler has more on. Why so the study found that. After a relief package is passed last year. There was a big surge in registered business formations in the following weeks. Catherine facia teaches business at boston university and helped write the study. She says that's despite the cares. Act not directly infusing. Any money into new businesses are passed not to pat is a lot of start up formation so it was very interesting for us to see that cares out had that ripple of fat another reason for the surgeon. Black entrepreneurship could be the americans. Now have a better understanding of historic inequality or he goes. Mom is an assistant professor of management at columbia university and a co author of the study. There's being clear intends in banks and government to make sure all the financial reports out this year. Which is wachner hurts. And andre perry says that speaks to a bigger lesson to be learned from this study about access to capital. He's a senior fellow at the brookings institution. If you really want to see the economy grow figure out two ways to invest in the under appreciated assets in our community in that happens to be black and brown communities it happens to be black and brown entrepreneurs he says black people represent about fourteen percent of the population in the us but only two percent of all businesses with more than one employee this investment and black businesses. He says shouldn't be a pandemic induced

Catherine Facia National Bureau Of Economic Re Floyd Boston University Wachner Andre Perry Atlanta New York Columbia University United States
Will the COVID Baby Boom Be a Baby Bust?

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 5 months ago

Will the COVID Baby Boom Be a Baby Bust?

"The baby boom that was expected after the more than yearlong coded lock down has failed to materialize just like they were baby booms nine months after a blizzard many health experts thought there would be a bump in babies born with couple staying home together during the pandemic without that much to do for entertainment but the reverse took place an AP analysis finds the U. S. birth rate in twenty twenty was down four point three percent from the year before and nine months after the lockdown started the drop was between six and ten percent Columbia University professor of family health Dr John Santelli says when there's a crisis he doesn't think people are thinking about reproduction the analysis was based on twenty four states that provided birth statistics I'm Jackie Quinn

Dr John Santelli AP Columbia University Jackie Quinn
The New Normal with Dr. Jennifer Ashton

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

02:49 min | 5 months ago

The New Normal with Dr. Jennifer Ashton

"Today we have the real privilege of being joined by practicing doctor for the last twenty years and the chief medical correspondent for abc news. Dr jennifer ashton. Dr ashton received her medical degree from columbia university's college of physicians and surgeons in two thousand and six. She became the first female medical contributor to the fox news channel and from two thousand nine to two thousand and eleven. She was the medical correspondent for cbs news network and since two thousand twelve. She's also been the senior medical contributor for good morning america and world news tonight. Abc news in october twenty seventeen. Abc announced dr ashton as chief medical correspondent and health editor during the pandemic. She's played a truly critical role in keeping americans informed. She's appeared on the abc network sometimes up to fourteen hours a day in order to bring viewers important medical information and she's widely considered one of the most trusted health personalities on television today. She's also the best selling author of six books including the self care solution and her recently published book the new normal a roadmap to resilience in the pandemic era. It's a real privilege for us. To have dr ashton on the show to talk about the coronavirus pandemic and what we can do to support our own physical and mental health during it. So dr ashton. Thanks so much for joining us today. How are you doing. thanks for having me you guys. It's really an honor and a pleasure to be with you. And i'm doing well awesome. Glad to hear that. That's great so. I want to play off the title of your book. The new normal. I'm in california forces here to without a lot of ups and downs estate. The definitely there's a sense with more and more people getting vaccinated people kind of stabilizing. There's this longing yearning to get back to the old normal and even kind of prickliness said any sort of restriction on a return to that former sort of equilibrium that people were used to and yet you're talking about the new normal that we just have to face. So why do we have to face and deal with a new normal. It is kinda wanna ask the naive question. Why can't we just go back to the hold normal. What's pushing us ended as a new normal. Well as you guys know. I'm a medical doctor. Not a psychologist but in medical school we do have to learn some psychiatry and some mental health and mental illness Unfortunately we learn enough but in speaking to a lot of mental health professionals. First of all your question is a really important one. Because we're not just seeing that people want to go back in time almost magically in the setting of a pandemic. We tend to want to do that in

Dr Ashton Dr Jennifer Ashton Columbia University's College Cbs News Network Abc Network Fox News Channel Abc News ABC America California
Happiness Report: World shows resilience in face of COVID19

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 6 months ago

Happiness Report: World shows resilience in face of COVID19

"The twenty twenty one a Wilder pulled on happiness around the world finds the coronavirus who's brought a year of fear anxiety loneliness on lockdown illness and death but is not crush people's spirits the study finds what emotions changed as the pandemic city in longer term satisfaction with life was less affected co author Columbia University economist Jeffrey Sachs says what we have found is that when people take the long view they've shown a lot of resilience in this past year surveys off his bones T. indicate on a one to ten scale how much social support they feel they have if something goes wrong the freedom to make their own life choices on more issues that affected the wellbeing of people living in the U. S. including racial tensions and growing income inequality between the richest and poorest residents I'm Charles through this month

Wilder Jeffrey Sachs Columbia University U. Charles
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:09 min | 7 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday's Who assistant professor of neuroscience at columbia university. his whistled focuses on learning memory and computation. Malcolm a great to be here. Yes thanks for doing this. I want to stop gun of people. Entitled dopamine neurons in court performance ever in singing birds and he said many behaviors are unknowns through by batching performance. Two ton of gore's yet make sense of performance. Evaluation remain poorly understood yet. This is always be Sort of a mystery right. You know we have the steep learning networks in the in the out of intelligence world and performance evaluation is is always a difficult thing in silicon.

Mike Malcolm yesterday Two ton columbia university gore
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 7 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods.

A seat at the table for workers

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:28 min | 7 months ago

A seat at the table for workers

"Are going to begin with trade. And we're going to do that because it's been awhile since the policy parts of what we buy from and sell to other countries has been the story in trade as opposed to the tariff parts of that part of our economy that dominated the past couple of years and our way in is a three hundred and eight page document out from the white house. This week called fittingly enough. The twenty twenty one trade policy agenda of the united states. It is as i said three hundred pages long. So the t. l. The are here is the biden administration intends to us trade policy to advance racial equity to fight climate change and to take on what it calls. China's coercive and unfair economic trade practices the core theme of the thing though is a worker centric approach to trade workers. The white house says are going to have see table. Marketplace's refinish your is on the trade desk today in a nutshell biden's new priorities mean free. Trade for free trade sake is out the window. It is a big contrast the elite and this president of the economic policy institute pre trump both democrats and republicans for a couple of decades when place trade policies. That were definitely not worker. Centric i would say more corporate centric. She says former. President trump was able to harness latent resentment around jobs industries that were lost over the years. And that's clearly something. The biden administration has tuned in on how that translates into policy over the next four years. Rufus york says president of the national foreign trade council in practice it plays out in enforceable rules on forced labour clear protection of the right to organize and bargain collectively that those need to be elements serve of trade agreements but the biden administration won't be in any rush to enter any new trade agreements according to sharyn o'halloran professor of political economy at columbia university. She says biden will try to shore up us. Competitiveness i as a way to protect workers. They're focusing on by american and precising use of american products and procurements developing infrastructure and so forth but being worker. Centric does not mean being protectionist. Halloran says the use of tariffs is likely to be much more surgical and you can expect a lot of talk of working with allies trade issues. A very clear break with the recent past in new york. I'm revenge sure for

Biden Administration White House President Trump Biden Rufus York National Foreign Trade Council Economic Policy Institute Democrats And Republicans Sharyn O'halloran United States China Columbia University Halloran New York
Climate-friendly jobs for unemployed oil and gas workers

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 7 months ago

Climate-friendly jobs for unemployed oil and gas workers

"An oil or gas well can keep releasing pollution long after its retired from use. When an oil and gas company walks away from a well that had been producing and does not plug it. In those can impose heavy environmental and climate costs. That's jason bard off director of the center on global energy policy at columbia university. He co authored. A recent report on inactive unplugged wells. The can leak methane which is a potent greenhouse gas into the air as well as other harmful air pollutants according to the epa. There are more than two million unplugged inactive wells in the united states board off says that together they emit as much carbon pollution as two million passenger vehicles per year. President biden has pledged to a program to plug many of these inactive. Wells boorda says this approach could create employment for oil and gas workers who lost jobs during the coronavirus pandemic. many workers have lost their jobs and are struggling and if they have a skill set that can be used to help the environment by plugging these wells. That can be dual. You're putting people back to work in a period of high unemployment until the economy is back on its feet and you're providing an environmental benefit.

Jason Bard Center On Global Energy Policy President Biden Wells Boorda Columbia University EPA United States
Indoor Dining Returns in New York

BBC World Service

03:49 min | 8 months ago

Indoor Dining Returns in New York

"Right a big day for pandemic street stricken restaurants in New York because a ban on indoor dining is being partially lifted. Hundreds of restaurants have gone out of business in the past year. Others Barely afloat. But as Tom Brooke reports the move to bring back indoor dining or being on a limited basis, it's not being welcomed by everyone. Chicken sizzles on a grill at Friedman's restaurant on New York's Upper West Side, the establishment is alive. But much of the restaurant industry in the city is moribund from Grand Eater is like the Gotham Bar and Grill, which may reopen to the more ordinary nearby Good stuff, Diner. More than 1000 restaurants have closed fallen victim to covert 19 so start indoor dining on Friday. 25% Governor Cuomo's decision this week to lift the ban on indoor dining up to 25% of capacity is seen as a bit of a lifesaver. Jonah Phillips is the owner of Friedman's restaurant group. We're excited, too. Get our guests back in the restaurant. I think something that we've lost. Is that excitement and energy that you felt when you walked to a restaurant that had guests, innit, eating and drinking and dining. It's fun without indoor dining restaurants in the city have relied on take out and delivery service to stay in business. They've also resorted to extraordinary steps to make outdoor dining and freezing temperatures feasible in some instances, creating huge bubble light structures protecting diners, AFIS it outdoors and eat. Some won't be eating indoors anytime soon, Even though Governor Cuomo has decreed they now can, among them. New Yorker Claire Wachtel, who were sipping tea is an outdoor space belonging to Friedman's on 72nd Street. I won't go into an indoor dining Until this is all over because I think you're relatively safe if you're outside, But if you're in the dining area, it's I'd be too scared to do it. Even the rescue workers are now eligible to get vaccinated and restaurants have implemented numerous safety measures. Some health experts caution that the return to indoor dining is premature. Go out to dinner. CASS is from Columbia University Medical Center opening Internet now, at least to me, while we're just first getting to the point of controlling the spread of this virus Does not seem like the right next step. While mindful off health concerns getting restaurants to flourish economically. It's what Andrew Ritchie from the New York City hospitality alliance really wants to him. That's the priority over the past year. We've lost more than 140,000 jobs in New York City's restaurant industry and indoor dining has been opened up throughout the rest of New York state at 50% indoor occupancy since June. Partial lifting of the indoor dining band is precarious. With infection rates increased. Governor Cuomo has stated it may be reimposed those still working in the hospitality business. No, it's going to be a long, hard slog before the restaurant industry in New York returns to anything like normal. Nikki Joyce is a waitress at tea and sympathy. A much loved British comfort food eatery in the city. Will it get back to where it wasp where you have people, you know, shoulder to shoulder for deeper bars. I just can't see. Unfortunately and sad, but I don't see that happening any time soon. Fervent hope is that Governor Cuomo's partial lifting of the indoor dining band this week will mark the start of the long road back. Away in New York once again boast, but it's home to one of the most lively on fairy restaurant scenes in the world. There you

Tom Brooke Friedman's Restaurant Governor Cuomo Gotham Bar And Grill Jonah Phillips New York Claire Wachtel Cuomo Friedman Andrew Ritchie New York City Hospitality Alli Columbia University Medical Ce Cass Nikki Joyce New York City
Democrats to Unveil Up to $3,600 Child Tax Credit as Part of Stimulus Bill

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

02:00 min | 8 months ago

Democrats to Unveil Up to $3,600 Child Tax Credit as Part of Stimulus Bill

"House committees are now hammering out the details of the nearly $2 Trillion Coburn relief package. Put forward by President Biden. Children are at the center of one of these pieces of the package. And with more on that I'm joined by ABC s Elizabeth Scholesy in Washington. Elizabeth Great to have you with us. As usual. This is expected to be direct cash payments to American families with kids. Hey, yeah, That's right. So great to be with you. This is a new proposals that we put forward today by Democrats in the House Ways and Means Committee, essentially calling for an expansion of the child tax credit, So the breaks out is essentially Asking for $3600 per child under the age of six and $3000 per child between the ages of six and 17 and the Democrats say this is holding true to Biden's promise to expand this chap this child tax credit. And to help alleviate poverty. No, there is research showing that this would help cut child poverty and half That's according to a Columbia University study, and this is part of a broader effort as we know of that nearly $2 trillion covert relief package, but certainly a Democratic priority here that have gotten some Republicans support. We saw similar opportunities will put forward by Senator Mitt Romney last week. So this is an interesting way to get more cash to families, especially lower income families and CBS interview yesterday, the president indicated he He doesn't really want to come off that 1.9 trillion mark, but is willing to negotiate with regard to income eligibility. That's exactly right. Joe Biden is holding true to the demand for $1400 stimulus checks. He says he will not go up go below that dollar amount, but he is willing to negotiate on who gets those checks. Currently, the proposal says, If you get more if you earn more than $75,000, you would start phasing out and you would not qualify their own individual That would be $150,000 per couple. So I didn't sound out open to maybe having that income threshold deal little bit lower. Notably those. Some Democrats are pushing back on that idea. We did hear from Senator Bernie Sanders and said anyone who got a stimulus check under President Trump. Should also get a check under President

President Biden Elizabeth Scholesy Elizabeth Great House Ways And Means Committee Coburn Senator Mitt Romney ABC Biden Washington Columbia University CBS Joe Biden
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:27 min | 10 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Right.

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:23 min | 10 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"More curious than a modern human. I mean look Look so so. So maybe you're thinking like the You know somebody like leonardo da vinci or during the renaissance in in europe right right. I mean it's. We're all taught that those people were potty mouths right and people knows no such thing as a scientist of science into loss if he was the same so a thinking person was interested in many many things by definition. And it's true that today we specialize.

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:56 min | 10 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Com so so we are back jack. Talking about curiosity and curiosity both in animals and humans could be considered S obey to reduce uncertainty so sort of a strategic behavior Looking forward and leading vesting into reducing certainty by being curious It might have some selection advantages For humans but also offer admirals much earlier album. Dc that all around us today. You have a paper maurice in paper in which you said lawns encode inflammation sampling based on decision on certain deterring natural behavior at atmos activity gathered information that of for doing or actions cova the mechanisms of active sampling array. So you mean by by sampling. You mean Here to go out and get inflammation to to understand or fight to cigarettes reduce uncertainty. Yes what i mean specifically by san is is is very mundane app. Which is the simple act of moving to look at something You know it's a. It's such a trivial thing. It's kind of like you know. An apple hosts from the tree. Okay we all take it for granted and we even study this movements of the is in the lab a lot but we kind of forgot but but but we've never asked. Why do people look to one thing or another or why does the monkey look to one one. Light versus another In that if you want to answer that question then that is exactly the question of information sampling because they looking at a light you sample some sort of photon versus other and in. They say how business brain make that selection. What what to look right. So that's what i call them. yes the neuroscience obviously. I don't know much about this. Jackie but noodles signs underneath this sweetie fascinating great. So the brain is touring Information presumably doing some analysis of historic data and And dedicated to make like you say. Selection decision to cyber further still doesn't accept the expectation of a probability right of some some inflammation game if that activity. And what what you're saying that that is that is done systematically by the by the grain. Yes i'm Okay yes. I'm saying that Or something has to be done systematically by debris and it's a mystery how it's done so you know if you think Mathematically if you if you were going to build a robot or machine that censors You have to build some sort of algorithm to control sensors and help the machine sample some sort of signals versus others You could in principle. We have a theoretical framework that we know about about how you would optimally control those sensors and that is beijing theory for proper ballistic in france. Right so so. So so so beijing theory tells us it's a very simple formula. It's i think it's one of the most powerful formula. We towns has. How'd you should so so given that we don't know anything for certain we have to assign probabilities to various hypotheses. So so the beijing theory says well you you taken observation in you update your beliefs about certain things and you should update those beliefs based on two things. So i is your previous believes because you always have some exam. Ex-ante hypothesis estimation if that's the first one that in and the uncertainty of those previous believes and the second is on how reliable the information is so some signals are more reliable than others for example. Like you know you might think that the weather forecast from one channel is more reliable than than another one in the in the form another. It's called likelihood.

atmos beijing Jackie apple france
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

07:46 min | 10 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"At scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info. Mike yesterday's professor jacqueline gottlieb who specific of neuroscience and defunct director of the research cluster curiosity at columbia university. Dr gottlieb studies the neural mechanisms of attention and the relationship inflammation processing including loaning decision making it. Curiosity beckham jackie. Thank them ill. They're happy to be yet. Thanks for doing this. On a weekend and silent to start with older peekers entitled intrinsically motivated ocular motor exploration guided by uncertainty reduction and conditioned reinforcement. In non human primates. Invite you say intelligent. Animals have a high degree of curiosity. The influence they decided to know but the of curiosity a poorly understood a key open question. You save proteins today in tune of valuation systems that drive curiosity so you as one of the cognitive emotional factors that motivate animals to seek inflammation. Ben this is not enforced by instrumental awards. So so that's a interesting Interesting idea so you say animals are curious and i think the ones that typically see appeared to be curious but but the the question is why are the curious even though the other snow sort of tactical rewards coming through them and perhaps even negative rewards cutting them by being curious weights. That's the question. Yes in so talk a bit about about that. I know that you have run some experiments in this area. Yes well. so that's before we get into experiments want to answer your question directly directly because they're actually is very good answer to it that i think when it's pointed out most people would agree with it but it's overlooked Has been overlooked way too long even in our field since i collagen signs and also i think in economics so the reason that animals absolutely need curiosity is the fact that the rewards in an environment are not given to them right so so we can start from the basic fact that all animals survive and we need primary reverts to buy food and safety and it. Absolutely you can describe in. And there's a long tradition in psychology neuroscience and You know just saying that we. All cognitive apparatus is geared to secure those reports that that are necessary and sufficient for our survival for the survival of the species. But the problem is that the rewards are given to us in the environment on a silver platter right so this is sometimes hard to imagine because in the daylights we live in artificial environments that we have made we as human civilization if made very rich in rewards right so we have safety. I'm sitting here in my house. It has heat and we have food That is plentiful in so so. It's a very rewarding environment but we can think for example. I mean think of the primitive on a big white big plane right. The person is living in caves in his hunting and Know the hominids can look out there and the rim near that many words available to him right so maybe apples on some three or some food. But they're hard to see. You might have to climb. They have to go through dangerous to get them There might be grass somewhere but the grass is not usable unless unless the person learns how to use it how to domesticate it how to grow it there might be some animal but that animal is not use it usable unless we the person learns how to domesticate so the whole point of this is that is that a reward rewards not only are heart together but they must be created and invented so learning is primary rato before being so before knowing that you know there might be some value in understanding how some wild grass grows do. Don't know what the value of that is in the future because you just don't know you cannot anticipate it so you must be have some mechanism to i be motivated to ask the question right. I think i think right so so curiosity so. That's the reason why we need curiosity. So so so. I i understand so fifty thousand years ago early homo sapiens. This this makes a lot of sense They have to explore the attack to be curious to sir widely right day could develop a portfolio of options so beak emancipation of radius Issues that would be dealing with in the future so so. Developing those auctions being curious was a necessary condition for survival. So it should add some selection advantages But as you say in the mortar on at least from an environmental perspective they don't need tat We have sort of control that uncertainty. Now right Things not uncertain from food perspective from a living condition perspective. So we don't don't necessarily have to be curious there But but going to animals than this assistant added crosses finding in monkeys and other admiral models. This process existed to right. It's not just a human thing. Yeah Yeah i think there is a big difference though so so so maybe this big okay so so. I emphasize the this kind of i would say what what i described. Is maybe curiosity with capital c. So i think. I described as high as former reality. Which is you. You really a process that craig's ample you know how does grass grow. That's pretty much a scientific question. Or how does firework right. Those scientific question than i think that maybe that's the highest form of curiosity That we do today. Scientific research a but but i think that they're smaller forms of curiosity. And i like i like to People people.

jacqueline gottlieb research cluster curiosity Dr gottlieb beckham jackie columbia university Mike Ben craig
"columbia university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

02:09 min | 10 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Systemic racism hasn't always been in the news. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic. Minute edna chun lecturer at columbia university explores this topic through higher education lens with many nationwide demonstrations about police brutality greater recognition of systemic. Racism has entered our national consciousness when professor joe fagin first introduced and developed the systemic racism framework through his research. The term was considered controversial on off college campuses by contrast today systemic. Racism has become part of our national vocabulary ian about race. Racial issues of always been a central campus concern. Our research indicates that women and men of color as well as white women in higher education face far more mistreatment and process-based inequality than white men through in person interviews. We learned of persisting exclusionary practices in day to day campus situations. The racially charged rhetoric dominating our campuses and national landscape signals in urgent need to replace understated implicit bias and microaggressions language with a more direct terminology addressing a long-term material social and career consequences of these damaging practices within the context of higher education. We propose a continuum of racial and gender discrimination we call macro accretions that ranges from various forms of subtle mistreatment to petition allies process-based discrimination. We suggest specific policy based recommendations for centric change such as monitoring institutional processes for equitable outcomes and investing into stained and systemic diversity education for faculty administrators staff and students. That was edna chun.

edna chun professor joe fagin dr lynn lecturer president columbia university
"columbia university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"We're celebrating a decade of the academic minute this week with one segment from each year I'm Dr Pascarella President of the Association of American colleges and universities in on this segment from Twenty Eleven Kyle Mang Phd Candidate at Columbia University told us why El Nino was responsible for civil wars around the globe. Historians have argued that various points in history changes in climate have led to increase in violence in some cases even to collapse civilizations. But these examples are drawn from hundreds or thousands of years ago. Could. This be the case today even after decades of unprecedented industrialization globalization and political reforms. It turns out that parts of the world are still very sensitive to changes in the global climate. In some recent work, my colleagues I examined the effects of El Nino a natural climate cycle to every three to seven years brings hotter drier weather too large parts of Tropical Asia Africa and South America. We found that when no Nina arrives to chance a civil war and affected tropical countries doubles. Over the second half of the twentieth century, we calculated the roughly one fifth of also awards could be attributed to O'Neill. Why We think anew can be stabilizing for many reasons, cross may fail. Food prices might rise unemployment, my increase diseases, my spread and tempers may flare. Obviously. There are deeper underlying reasons for any civil war poverty, long-term inequality and ethnic rivalries may all play a role? Anaemia may simply supply to trigger. WE'RE NOT HELPLESS AGAINST One. Major accomplishment in atmospheric science is our ability to forecast strong O'Neill's up two years in advance. We hope that by understanding the relationship between climate and conflict our societies and institutions can better prepare for future climate shifts and are consequences. That was Kyle Mang of Columbia University. You can find this other segments and more information about the professors at academic minute dot Org. Production support for the academic minute comes from a AC and you advancing liberal learning and research for the public. Good..

Kyle Mang O'Neill Columbia University Dr Pascarella Association of American colleg President South America Nina
"columbia university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Professor at the department of history at Columbia University and he joined us in studio to talk about cashmere Monon thanks for joining us thank you India is a secular nation technically but the prime minister mody has been pushing a Hindu nationalist agenda how does that the integration of cashmere which is majority Muslim fit into that historically speaking before this present region Chris mir was one of the demonstrations of India's secular constitution is a demonstration of the secular nature of India's democracy and it was in such certain ways but it was also a way in which Chris munity people were subjugated governed by New Delhi by the state I want to say that the rise of majoritarian politics throughout the world Turkey box non certainly and you know hungry and some might say United States dove tails with the kind of agenda that the BJP has in India and that majoritarian ism in India looks like in the majoritarian is somewhere Muslims have been lynched for under the suspicion of eating beef there are violence a lot of violence urban violence against Muslims who most recently after this election who refused to say gesturing around as a way of kind of a claiming these supremacy of lord around so in this way the majoritarian politics that we see you around the world is very much in control and India as well we've mentioned that there were celebrations in some parts of India about Kashmir's integration but we're also seeing protests against the integration can you help us understand those two sides thank you it's very important I mean India is a very large sums of the world's largest democracy I would submit however that a lot of times the amount of information that is available about cashmere two engines is very low and one can imagine if I could make an analogy here that is how many Americans know what is the status of native people on reservations in this country or even how many people know what is happening in Porto Rico and why the people of Puerto Rico are on the streets right now so a typical citizen would have a very a narrow and and perhaps romanticized view of Christian here that they may have gotten for movies or or from their politicians in that sense article three seventy was one of the planks of the B. J. P. as early as late eighties and into the nineties and this part of their political campaign was always to say that if a smear was couldn't could normalized they will be able to as in the Indian state will be able to settle quote unquote settle that territory well it's a political demand for self recognition our publicized and in that sense I think there I'm sure there are many many people who are very happy that this has happened this is a long held demand this is why because if he was voted into power on the other hand there a conscientious scholars in Indians who recognize that Chris near is under what we make called a severe military occupation there's been I think the word most associated with Chris mir is curfew you know if you're my generation if you were born anytime after nineteen seventy you would know that Chris Mary's have lived their lives under curfew they they have physical checkpoints any Indian troops can enter the house search them and search their possessions commuters can be taken away our our frequently tortured so that is actually the reality and it very well is that many ordinary Indian citizens are just not aware of that and finally what does this do to the relationship between India and Pakistan I think that in the inbox on are and have been you know in great military stress for for much of their existence and have gone through back active war and as you pointed out are nuclear powers I would suggest that you know the the way in which we can say that in the or the ending state is playing to their majority box on the state boxing service has been largely governed by its military has its own agenda where they've used crush me here as a way to mobilize of right wing politics in their own country there have obviously supplied weapons and terrorists to different parts of Christian here in order to Stoke certain things so they are certainly part of the problem and talks on a still not officially said anything as in there said that we're formulating a response but I would suggest that we think actually instead of with thing always thinking about and foregrounding the right the the actions of the states like Indian box than we think about the because many people who have been rendered speechless through this process and what will the Kashmiri people do I think that's really the key question because the because we demand for self determination is not a new demand has been going on since nineteen thirties it is it's part and parcel of anticolonial movement and because many people have not been heard at any stage of this entire twentieth century and even now in the twenty first century we find them muted and we find their voices silence and I feel most passionately that that this the voice that we should we should seek we should try to find that voice we should try to enable that boys Indian bugs on are kind of like playing the same playbook they have been playing over and over and over again and you know I can I can certainly pretty the box and will say we do not recognize India's right over because we are Christian media is you know our territory and India will say and because we use our territory and so on and so forth and both sets of governments will be very happy to take this belligerence to their vote banks into their supporters and and continue continue to kind of make their politics about that and I think in all of this drama the communities are the ones who are speechless anon Ahmad is an associate professor in the department of history at Columbia University thank you very the take.

Professor Columbia University
"columbia university" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Skullduggery

"At at columbia university it's called the yeah i love my job so i'm working for columbia world projects it's a presidential initiative meaning president bollinger who's the president of columbia university initiative at the university it's university wide and it's really an effort to bring research and scholarship to bear on huge social fundamental challenges that we're facing around the world and this is sort of the key part in partnership with folks who are trying to solve those problems on the ground in a way that actually allows you to measure impact and at the same time bring back that information into the university to enrich research and scholarship and it's extraordinary we're working through set of challenges we we did a big discussion on energy energy access there over a billion people around the world that don't have access to electricity we know through a tremendous wealth of research and scholarship on the connection between that and poverty on health on food security on economic stability this is a critical issue to human development and we brought people in and ask them from around the world who are working on this issue from different perspectives where could research scholarship actually lend tremendous value to your work possibly transform your ability to expand access we talked to professors across the university who said these are areas where we're working this is where we think we could have partners and do something that's transformative and we develop projects out of that we work through those we see whether or not we can fund them and we sensually alternately hope to implement them in now we're working on a piece of inequality that i think is early critical so you find that their ways to sort of operationalize these ideas so you're not just you know in the ivory tower with a lot of smart people exactly exactly that's the idea and it's really extraordinarily we've got we've got an amazing project right now that deals with food security that is about providing essentially predictive climate analysis for key agricultral areas around the world in middle income and lower income countries that.

columbia university bollinger president
"columbia university" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Before we get to this week's podcast wanna tell you about digital plus that's our premium membership product and it gets you digit a magazine we just finished our issue or last issue of the year and a steady stream of exclusive research about the industry you'll also be part of our digital plus slack community and exclusive member of events that we recently held a live podcast with lindsay nelson and we're doing another one in january with howard mit men ciro at the plea to report so you should join us so if you are not a member police sign up good a digital dot com you'll see to today plus tab there it is only three hundred ninety five dollars year but for you our podcast listeners we have a discount enter the code podcast at checkout and you will get twenty five percent off that is podcast again go to digitally dot com and go to the tab at the top says the today plus wh is more important than ever been companies that grew up with passerby readers grid if you don't have a consumer whose actively looking for your content it is very difficult to build and slurred his this would snapchat stood with advertising and storytelling it's clear that digital can be more than the thing that we think it is blocking visionary podcast i'm ryan marcy i'm joined today by emily bell the director of the towel center for digital journalism at columbia university hey prime might be in were recording this at the end of the year i was the same for we started that maybe was annus horribilis for digital journalism but maybe it was a very good year so it depends on on journalism aspect then then there's the business aspect let's start on the business aspect right r k there are great their star awesome but i'm trying to and not a good note right thanks so but we've got to start somewhere so let's start with the drumbeat of the there's been this drumbeat of bad news there's been you know lots of.

lindsay nelson ryan marcy columbia university emily bell director three hundred ninety five doll twenty five percent