35 Burst results for "Columbia University"

On this week's AP Religion Roundup, Pope Francis makes a historic trips to Africa, and psychedelic churches are pushing the boundaries of law and religion.

AP News Radio

02:01 min | 1 d ago

On this week's AP Religion Roundup, Pope Francis makes a historic trips to Africa, and psychedelic churches are pushing the boundaries of law and religion.

"On this week's AP religion roundup. Pope Francis makes a historic trip to Africa and psychedelic churches are pushing the boundaries of law and religion. Pope Francis made a plea for peace in South Sudan as he began a mission Friday to the world's youngest country. Francis cited years of war and clashes on the eve of his arrival that killed 27. The overwhelmingly Christian South Sudan gained independence from the majority Muslim sedan in 2011, along with Civil War, flooding and other calamities have displaced more than 2 million people there. The Pope's visit to South Sudan follows his visit to the Democratic Republic of Congo. A highlight of his Congo visit was a rally in Kinshasa, where Francis led 65,000 young people in a rousing denunciation of political corruption. Recent demand for a psychedelic tea called ayahuasca has led to the formation of hundreds of what many calls psychedelic churches across the U.S.. Growing numbers of people are flocking to churches like this one in Utah. And it's been used ceremonially. It's been used socially. It's been used as medicine. Doctor Selena sumaya is a researcher at Columbia University. She says the drug has been used in the Amazon basin for thousands of years. Federally, ayahuasca is still considered a schedule one substance, meaning that it has medicinal purpose, meaning that it is largely illegal. Church organizers argue a 2006 Supreme Court ruling protects them from prosecution. I had so much gratitude. Adherence like Lorenzo Gonzalez argue ayahuasca brings them closer to God. I can't wait for today's experience because I got all that evilness out of me and I want to see what joy I'm going to get next. It's popularity has increased in the west in part due to celebrities sharing their experiences with the substance. I'm Walter ratliff.

Pope Francis South Sudan Democratic Republic Of Congo Francis Selena Sumaya Kinshasa Africa Pope Amazon Basin Columbia University Lorenzo Gonzalez Utah U.S. Supreme Court Walter Ratliff
Trial begins for ex-New York doctor accused of sexual abuse

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Trial begins for ex-New York doctor accused of sexual abuse

"Federal prosecutors in New York began laying out their case Monday against Robert hadden a former gynecologist accused of sexually abusing scores of patients over nearly two decades, including the wife of former presidential candidate Andrew Yang. Prosecutors say Robert had and sexually abused patients from 1993 through at least 2012 while working at Columbia University Irving medical center and New York Presbyterian hospital, the institutions agreed to pay more than 236 million to settle claims by more than 200 former patients, the federal cases focused on only a few of those women, prosecutors say, hadn't used their trust to engage in abusive conduct, including inappropriate and unnecessary breast and pelvic exams. He already pleaded guilty to state charges in opening statements, his lawyer acknowledged had in hurt women, but asked the jury to acquit him of the federal charges of enticing them to cross state lines to be abused. Julie Walker, New York

Robert Hadden Andrew Yang Columbia University Irving Med New York Presbyterian Hospital New York Robert Julie Walker
Trial begins in NY against sexual 'predator in a white coat'

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | 3 weeks ago

Trial begins in NY against sexual 'predator in a white coat'

"A gynecologist accused of sexually abusing dozens of patients, including the wife of former presidential candidate Andrew Yang, goes on trial today. Federal prosecutors in New York depict the doctor Robert haddon as a sexual predator in a white coat, the indictment said he abused 7 female patients and one minor that he delivered at birth while working as a medical doctor at Columbia University and New York Presbyterian, starting in 1993 through at least 2012, according to prosecutors having conducted inappropriate and unnecessary breast and pelvic exams raised in appropriate and irrelevant sexual topics while speaking with them and asked the women questions about their sexual activities. They call it abusive conduct under the guise of legitimate medical care. Last year the hospitals agreed to pay more than a $165 million to a 147 of haddon's former patients. Julie Walker, New York

Andrew Yang Robert Haddon Columbia University And New Yo New York Haddon Julie Walker
Paul Kengor Discusses Communist Antonio Gramsci

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:39 min | Last month

Paul Kengor Discusses Communist Antonio Gramsci

"I want to talk about before we get to your latest book. Will you explain why and it's the person even most educated conservatives have never heard of, which is shocking. Why is Antonio Graham street this crippled Italian communist, perhaps the most important thinker when it comes to modernizing Karl Marx's thinking? Yeah, in fact, my friend Sam Greg, who I quoted earlier calls gramsci the most influential socialist ever. And he was an Italian Marxist. So he was prior to the Frankfurt school. In fact, he wasn't part of the Frankfurt school. He was thrown in jail by Mussolini and Graham's prison notebooks are really kind of the seminal work on Marxism applied to culture. And by the way, Seb, the editor of the American of the Columbia University press published prison notebooks of gramsci, was a fellow by the name of Joseph Buttigieg. Joseph Buttigieg, who is the father of Pete and in fact, in fact Pete is acknowledged and thanked in the book by his father. Pete's father, Joe, who's a Notre-Dame. Did this at Notre-Dame was the founder of the Internet and president of the international Graham chief society. And when he died for more than a year, there was a eulogy in memoriam page on the opening URL of American socialists. So Pete Buttigieg's father is worshiped by the communists of America.

Antonio Graham Frankfurt School Sam Greg Joseph Buttigieg Gramsci Karl Marx Pete Mussolini SEB Graham Columbia University International Graham Chief Soc Notre JOE Pete Buttigieg America
Liberal, Or Left

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:14 min | 4 months ago

Liberal, Or Left

"So mom, tell me your three, four core beliefs. Or ask her, I have a column of 32 questions to ask if to find out if someone's liberal or left. Ask her if she thinks Columbia University having a black graduation and a black dormitory is part of her liberalism. Just ask her that. Okay. And let me know what happens. Hey, mom, you think I'm in give birth mom? You think an 18 year old should be able to decide to have a surgeon cut off her breast because she says she's a boy, mom. What do you think about that mom? You think kids are not born male or female? That's the position of the American medical association, mom. What do you think of that? Of course, if you really want to get into the weeds, hey mom, how come I put only invaded Ukraine under democratic presidents and not under Trump? Boy, would I like to hear a Democrats answer on that one? Well, I really would. I'm not even interested in arguing with them. I would just like to know how they confront reality.

Columbia University American Medical Association Ukraine
Zupic Pacini, Christina T And Columbus discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Zupic Pacini, Christina T And Columbus discussed on AP News Radio

"Italian Americans celebrate Columbus day at the annual parade in New York City The sites and sounds of Italy on display along Fifth Avenue green white and red flag spline People cheering bands playing endowed those zupic pacini marching Tremendous mojo on a beautiful sunny day New York or Christina T says it's her first time attending the parade But people are really friendly Meanwhile elsewhere like at Columbia University indigenous peoples day was celebrated honoring the past present and future of native peoples throughout the U.S. Julie Walker New York

Zupic Pacini Christina T Columbus New York City Italy Columbia University Indigenous New York Julie Walker U.S.
Italian Americans celebrate Columbus Day at the annual parade through New York

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Italian Americans celebrate Columbus Day at the annual parade through New York

"Italian Americans celebrate Columbus day at the annual parade in New York City The sites and sounds of Italy on display along Fifth Avenue green white and red flag spline People cheering bands playing endowed those zupic pacini marching Tremendous mojo on a beautiful sunny day New York or Christina T says it's her first time attending the parade But people are really friendly Meanwhile elsewhere like at Columbia University indigenous peoples day was celebrated honoring the past present and future of native peoples throughout the U.S. Julie Walker New York

Zupic Pacini Christina T Columbus New York City Italy Columbia University Indigenous New York Julie Walker U.S.
 NYC hospitals to pay $165M to women abused by gynecologist

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

NYC hospitals to pay $165M to women abused by gynecologist

"In the sexual abuse case of a New York City gynecologist two New York hospitals have agreed to pay more than $165 million to 147 former patients who have accused a former gynecologist of sexual abuse and misconduct Robert haddon surrendered his medical license after being convicted in 2016 on sex related charges He currently awaits trial on charges of sexually abusing dozens of young and unsuspecting female patients for over two decades Columbia University Irving medical center and New York Presbyterian had already reached a settlement to establish a $71 million compensation fund last

Robert Haddon New York City New York Columbia University Irving Med New York Presbyterian
Who Can Speak Freely on University Campuses?

The Officer Tatum Show

01:49 min | 4 months ago

Who Can Speak Freely on University Campuses?

"However, I want to go to the list of the most absurd universities that you probably don't want to see in your kids too if you want them to have an open mind and have the freedom of speech. Skidmore, I have never heard of skidmore university. You just give more college as a private college. They're amongst the top 5 words. Georgetown university, I think it's rinsler, polytechnic, I could be saying it wrong, it's a private university. University of Pennsylvania and Columbia university. And so kids from Colombia university has something to say about them being ranked last, obviously there was a mixed emotions when they were interviewed on campus. But one of them said, I think everyone here is very open minded and so I'm not sure are really sure where this is coming from. And in the article we read, it says, however, Rihanna, a senior at Avi Lee school, said, of course, people think they can't say things. I think people think they might be judged by the majority. If you go through the statistics and you look at the biases, right? I mean, you would think that people on campus that are afraid to speak would be generally anybody who wants to speak out. However, there's a disproportionate representation of conservatives. That are afraid to speak out. According to statistical data from fire dot org, it says that conservative students are most likely to feel they can not express their opinions freely with 42% reporting that they often feel uncomfortable speaking freely compared to 13% of liberal students.

Skidmore University Columbia University Skidmore Avi Lee School Georgetown University University Of Pennsylvania Rihanna
"columbia university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:19 min | 5 months ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Will sustain. The fact that Jane foley of rabobank can't dismiss the prospect of Sterling kidding, parity, tells you a lot about this moment we're in right now with dollar strength. That was Jane Farley of rabbit bank, just moments ago. Live from London. This is Bloomberg and here's the price action. We're down about 1% on the S&P 500 yields were much higher. They fade, unchanged on a ten year, three 45, 53. The dollar stronger. You're a dollar negative four tenths of 1%, 99, 60 watt on Euro dollar. I'm going to keep promoting this next week, fed decides today. The show's coming together will catch up with Matt laszlo Deutsche Bank. He's looking for 5% fed funds, something close to that next year. We'll also catch up with rich clarita, the former vice chair Tom. And we've got to work out at the moment it's our currency your problem, when it's to become our problem. Exactly in the historic scale of that is something that doctor clarita has worked on as a former dean of economics at Columbia University, always affiliated with Columbia University out of Notre-Dame and of course, most importantly, out of Yale University, Jose Antonio ocampo joins us now. Minister of finance and public credit for his Columbia were thrilled that he could join us at this morning. There is so much to talk about minister, but I have to go larger after reach back to Stanford in 1998 to use through the prism of Columbia economics and foreign exchange. See, anything like an international upset that we witnessed in 1998 and frankly before that in 1992. Well, thank you. Delighted to be with you. Let me say on that, I don't think the same kind of crisis. The 1998 was very much an emerging market crisis. This is a global crisis about the slowdown, particularly the inflation and the increase in interest rate, which is affecting all very heavily. A very importantly, sir, I look at the caps, the limitation of price increase. We see it on India and their challenges with rice here in the United Kingdom we see it. And indeed, Columbia and others talk about it. Given a more global economy, the speed of information, the transfer of finance, can perhaps be effective in 2023. But let me say that the major problem that we're getting from the global economy is the inflation, but particularly the effect it has had on interest rates. So both domestic interest rates in Colombia as well as the interest rate in double capital markets are very high and that the effect of course inflation is hard to fight due to the international dimensions of inflation. So for a specific country, it is very tough to fight that deflation which you can say is a supply inflation rather than man inflation. Central banks are good at managing the demand inflation, but less so in the margin supply inflation. There's a great concern that when the fed hikes rates by as much as the market is currently pricing administer, that it will create some real problems for the rest of the world. And I wonder from your Colombia, whether you're taking a look at the dollar market and saying, we can not raise money in that right now at affordable rates. Is that really the situation as you look at your financing needs looking out? Yes, private capital markets are very expensive for emerging economies today. Including a fourth Colombia. So for the time being, our international financing is coming from multilateral development banks and official institutions but so far we have not gone this year into the private capital markets. We hope things normalize somewhat in the near future and we'll go back to the market. We expect them to raise about $100 billion in the private capital markets next year. What does it mean for things to stabilize minister? Does it mean that the dollar stabilizes? Does it mean that the fed stops raising rates? Does it mean that inflation stops accelerating? Well, it really means that the long-term interest rates of the U.S. start to fall. They were falling actually before the recent announcement of the fed that they would likely increase interest rates again in the next meeting. But before that, they were falling and also the risk markings for emerging markets were also falling. But the situation has changed, again, but we hope the at one point when the inflation stabilizes in the United States, the interest rates of the U.S. particularly long-term interest rate, which are the relevant for us, start to fall. Doctor Campo, you have been one of the great voices of Columbia through a time in the stereotype in America, is of true civil unrest in Colombia. You've moved beyond that with a new government in your participation as well. Can you describe the stability in Colombia and what it means for your tourism, so many people have gone to Carnegie and the rest of it describe the tourism future for Columbia after decades of real unrest. Well, let me say that the peace process that took place 5 years ago has been fairly successful in generating peace in several parts of the country. The current government is involved in other negotiations that we will be successful. And let's say they return to peace in many parts of the country, has generated effectively what you say actually a boom of tourism, we hope that it will come back when the economy is fully recovered because tourism in the world is still a bit depressed, let's say, although it's recovering and in Colombia, we will hope to have a boom of tourism. The minister we appreciate your time today is lucky to catch up with you. We're lucky to catch up with you. How's the Antonio el Campo there? Minister talking to some of the problems we've got in a world right now. You forget that in EMP, they've done a lot of work already on the right side before the fed even got started. Yeah, their rates up in the 8, 9% level, raising rates to offset some of the impact from those higher dollar costs. I was really struck by the fact that he said he's going to rely on some of the international agencies for financing rather than Tapping the dollar market right now because things are just too expensive. I know Damien sass on his team are working 24/7 on his Damien does this better than anybody out there linking foreign exchange into the bond dynamics of emerging markets, but it drives forward as Lisa mentioned, John. This is not a normal IMF meeting coming up here. There's nothing left. Four, 5, 6 weeks. I can't even tell you what it's going to be, but it's going to be important conversations for our international audience. I can tell you we might be there. We might be there. We might be there. Have we ever come in together? Seth castle. From Morgan Stanley too. Are you thinking about staggering? Well you're considering

Colombia Columbia Jane foley Jane Farley rabbit bank Matt laszlo fed Columbia University out of Not Jose Antonio ocampo Deutsche Bank clarita Bloomberg Yale University Columbia University America
Joe Biden's Student Loan Forgiveness Scheme Is a Pandering Scheme

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:45 min | 5 months ago

Joe Biden's Student Loan Forgiveness Scheme Is a Pandering Scheme

"Joe Biden's college loan forgiveness scheme is a pandering scheme. And as Debbie was just commenting, it's pandering to the one constituency the Democrats can still count on. They can't count on working class people. They can count on Hispanics, but they can count on the predominantly white. College student population. And in fact, they can count on the irresponsible segment of that population to be leaning democratic. And so they're like, listen, what can I help you out? We're gonna take some money out of the pockets of some plumbers and some foreman and some truck drivers and put it in your pocket. So this is a redistribution scheme, but it's redistributing from the working class to the irresponsible non working class. There was an article in The Wall Street Journal several months ago. I actually covered it on the podcast. It was talking about the film graduates of Columbia University. So film graduates at Columbia University took out federal student loans, and they had a median debt, the median, of course, is the midpoint. The middle student, if you have a hundred students, the student in the middle had a median debt of a $181,000. By the way, this means that half of the students at Columbia who took on loans had that even more than that. So they have this huge debt and two years after earning their master's degrees, half of these borrowers were making less than $30,000 a year. So these people were taking on this debt that they have no reasonable prospect to pay off. Why? Because their degrees turn out to be largely worthless.

Joe Biden Debbie Columbia University The Wall Street Journal Columbia
What the Reactions to Clarence Thomas Post-Roe Reveal About White Libs

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 7 months ago

What the Reactions to Clarence Thomas Post-Roe Reveal About White Libs

"What the reactions to clarence Thomas post roe reveal about white liberals I said wait a minute where did this come from Columbia University Sociology department Which is like the sociology department you know the university of Beijing or the university of Moscow And they say here soon after the court handed down its decision in row that is the Dobbs case Some pro choice advocates began hurling outrageous and overtly racist remarks of the justice By Musa our carbide and Paul F Lars fell There were 6 Supreme Court Justices who voted to overturn roe versus wade they said The majority opinion was authored by justice Sam Alito But in the aftermath of the ruling there has been an intense and particular focus on a different justice Clarence Thomas soon after the court handed down its decision some pro choice advocates began hurling outrageous and overtly racist remarks In Thomas's direction including liberal evocations of the N word on Twitter Often to the acclaim of some other left aligned whites

Clarence Thomas Post Roe Columbia University Sociology University Of Beijing University Of Moscow Paul F Lars Justice Sam Alito Dobbs Musa Wade Supreme Court Clarence Thomas Thomas Twitter
Abortion ruling exposes deep chasm over the issue in the US

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 8 months ago

Abortion ruling exposes deep chasm over the issue in the US

"The Supreme Court's move do overturn roe V wade is laying bare a deep national divide over abortion Outside the high court Lydia Taylor celebrated I've been working in rain for the past like 5 years for this day Now she wants to push for all states to ban abortion as she cried tears of joy nearby It's terrifying Ansley Cole is scared Because what are they going to come for next Columbia University professor Terry mcgovern says a lot of rights are now at risk Contraception I think certainly gay marriage and protections for same sex relationship And others based on the right to privacy This decision is the seismic shift in how we understand or how scotus is understood the constitution Sagar Meghani Washington

Roe V Wade Lydia Taylor Ansley Cole Terry Mcgovern Supreme Court Columbia University Washington
Pete Hegseth: Progressives Were Welcomed Marxists for Decades

The Dan Bongino Show

01:46 min | 8 months ago

Pete Hegseth: Progressives Were Welcomed Marxists for Decades

"Peter I watched you on Fox and Friends this morning discussing that exact point That the leftists who started this school reformation project or whoever the whatever euphemisms they like to call this cultural corruption They wrote openly about they were not hiding this It wasn't in any way cryptic They wrote about it You document it It's right there They told you what they wanted to do And we just dropped the ball on this over the course of decades It's true And they actually the progressive's member progressive is a term we use to a political ideology today It was a political movement in the early 20th century They looked reasonable even patriotic when compared to some of the anarchists that were committing political assassinations and communists at the time So they were tolerated In fact even welcomed later on Marxist who landed at Columbia University at the most preeminent teachers college and what did they push at that teacher's college in Columbia critical theory critical theory is premised on the deconstruction of the west of the western structures We know it today as critical race theory and critical gender theory but Hemingway once said things happen gradually until they happen suddenly And then COVID-19 when the classroom came into our homes and parents were mortified by the gender pronouns being talked to 7 year olds in the 1619 Project that was the suddenly aspect to the hundred years that preceded it where they took control of every I'm not kidding Dan and you know this Every aspect of the educational industrial complex teachers colleges unions of course we know that curriculum now today testing and standards So if you want to become a teacher in 99% of schools you have to go through that pipeline and pay homage to the progressive view of the world

FOX Peter Columbia University Hemingway Columbia DAN
Virus Outbreak Nurses-Nurses intro and wrap

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 8 months ago

Virus Outbreak Nurses-Nurses intro and wrap

"The front lines of the pandemic are inspiring a new crop of nurses Danny Burgos used to have a different New York dream before graduating from the Columbia University school of nursing Try not to roll your eyes when I repeat that yes I used to be a Broadway actor After the show in Pittsburgh he was in was shut down by the pandemic Burgos saw a photo of a nurse taking off their N95 mask with the imprint of the mask on their face And that struck me I was like this is someone who at who is now actually putting their physical body in front of something for someone Judy wolf at the Columbia school of nursing says there's a lot of Danny Burgos is out there in the middle of the pandemic Colombia had its biggest nursing application class ever What these students symbolize or represent for us is hope Burgo says at least not going to make his Broadway dream come true I'm going to make another one come true here I'm Ed

Danny Burgos Columbia University School Of Judy Wolf Burgos Columbia School Of Nursing Pittsburgh New York Burgo Colombia
The Plot to Subvert the Western Judeo-Christian Tradition of the US

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:52 min | 9 months ago

The Plot to Subvert the Western Judeo-Christian Tradition of the US

"Folks, welcome back. We're talking to the authors of battle for the American mind uprooting a century of miseducation, Pete hegseth and David Goodwin. So we're talking about what amounts to a conspiracy to subvert the western judeo Christian tradition baked into the heart of the United States of America. And there's no denying it. People like Dewey, they were on a crusade, and they have up till now, succeeded. Yes, they have. And you know what? They didn't know what the destination would be, per se. They just knew where the destination was away from. So it was always progress away from the western Christian paideia, the biblical roots of our and free thinking roots of the nexus of Athens and Jerusalem. They wanted to move away from that. That was progress. So you say conspiracy, that's not a wrong term. We use plot or heist because they passed it off to the next group of radical thinkers who carried the ball down the field based on how much God and other basic values have been stripped away. So enter the Frankfurt school, enter critical theory, which where did it land? A hundred blocks from here at Columbia University at the teacher's college. And these are marxists who fled Hitler while our boys are fighting over in Europe and World War II. And they are greeted with open arms with their radical views soon to infuse into the teacher's college. And within a couple of decades, one third of teachers in America at elite schools had been taught by the critical theorists of the Frankfurt school. So how do you get critical race theory in your zoom classroom? It is in the curriculum and the pedagogy of how the entire educational industrial complex works. And when you unravel it all, it goes back to those early efforts and each step which we lay out the unions, which used to be conservative teacher associations that ended up scripture to teachers to use in the classroom, captured by the unions. Well, then the unions create the Department of Education in a giveaway to Jimmy

Pete Hegseth David Goodwin Frankfurt School Dewey America Athens Jerusalem Columbia University Hitler Europe Department Of Education Jimmy
Mask mandates return to US college campuses as cases rise

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 10 months ago

Mask mandates return to US college campuses as cases rise

"Mask mask mask mask mandates mandates mandates mandates are are are are returning returning returning returning to to to to college college college college campuses campuses campuses campuses at at at at some some some some schools schools schools schools the the the the masks masks masks masks are are are are back back back back on on on on online online online online classes classes classes classes are are are are back back back back and and and and large large large large gatherings gatherings gatherings gatherings are are are are being being being being scaled scaled scaled scaled back back back back sickness sickness sickness sickness is is is is so so so so rampant rampant rampant rampant right right right right now now now now so so so so many many many many people people people people I I I I know know know know are are are are getting getting getting getting sick sick sick sick Gabrielle Gabrielle Gabrielle Gabrielle Perera Perera Perera Perera goes goes goes goes to to to to Columbia Columbia Columbia Columbia University University University University in in in in New New New New York York York York case case case case numbers numbers numbers numbers dropped dropped dropped dropped following following following following a a a a winter winter winter winter surge surge surge surge but but but but the the the the BA BA BA BA to to to to sub sub sub sub variant variant variant variant has has has has been been been been spreading spreading spreading spreading rapidly rapidly rapidly rapidly every every every every time time time time I I I I think think think think and and and and all all all all the the the the distances distances distances distances by by by by summer summer summer summer bane bane bane bane is is is is also also also also a a a a student student student student at at at at Columbia Columbia Columbia Columbia she's she's she's she's wearing wearing wearing wearing a a a a mask mask mask mask people people people people do do do do but but but but you you you you know know know know and and and and keep keep keep keep in in in in mind mind mind mind on on on on student student student student Neeraj Neeraj Neeraj Neeraj Sood Sood Sood Sood hanker hanker hanker hanker thinks thinks thinks thinks the the the the mask mask mask mask mandate mandate mandate mandate should should should should go go go go away away away away yeah yeah yeah yeah I I I I probably probably probably probably have have have have like like like like around around around around nine nine nine nine nine nine nine nine percent percent percent percent vaccination vaccination vaccination vaccination rate rate rate rate so so so so I I I I think think think think at at at at this this this this point point point point we we we we just just just just kind kind kind kind of of of of move move move move on on on on with with with with the the the the the the the the pandemic pandemic pandemic pandemic and and and and three three three three dozen dozen dozen dozen democratic democratic democratic democratic going going going going back back back back over over over over to to to to the the the the past past past past two two two two years years years years because because because because of of of of a a a a surgeon surgeon surgeon surgeon virus virus virus virus cases cases cases cases Washington Washington Washington Washington DC's DC's DC's DC's Howard Howard Howard Howard University University University University is is is is moving moving moving moving to to to to remote remote remote remote learning learning learning learning I'm I'm I'm I'm at at at at Donahue Donahue Donahue Donahue

College College College Colleg Gabrielle Gabrielle Gabrielle Columbia Columbia Columbia Col Columbia New New New New York York York Neeraj Neeraj Neeraj Neeraj So Washington Washington Washingt Howard Howard Howard Howard Un Washington Donahue Donahue
What Did Dennis Prager Do During the Height of the Cold War?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:36 min | 11 months ago

What Did Dennis Prager Do During the Height of the Cold War?

"Tell us what you did as a young man during the height of the Cold War. I was in my very early 20s. I was a graduate student at Columbia University at the school of international affairs. And it had a number of affiliated Institutes, Russian institute, Middle East institute, East Asian institute, African institute. I was a member of Middle East and Russian. I studied Russian and on a visit to Israel, my third year in college, so it's even before that. I was asked by someone I knew in Israel and Israeli friend. Would I be prepared to be sent into the Soviet Union to smuggle in religious items to Jews? Because they were not allowed to have them by Christians were not. And to bring out smuggle out the names of Jews who wanted to leave. And they thought that I would be the ideal candidate being an American, so I'd be somewhat protected by my passport. And knowing Hebrew and Russian, so I was sent for a month, and it was obviously a tense month. That was a followed most of the time. Where did you travel in Russia in the Soviet Union? Moscow, what was called then Leningrad, which is back again to St. Petersburg, and then Baku Azerbaijan. The first westerner to visit the synagogue there in decades. It was literally literally underground. And the stories I'm not going to get into now, but obviously there were life form what the effect that it had to see a young western Jew. Who knew the religion and who could, I was always called up to do something to show my knowledge of the liturgy, because they had been told that the Jews of the Soviet Union were told that Judaism is dead. And they shouldn't even bother thinking about it because Jews outside of Russia are outside of the Soviet Union, no longer practice it and have assimilated. And here I am 21 years old and I'm able to lead the prayers and read from the

Institutes, Russian Institute East Asian Institute African Institute School Of International Affair Soviet Union Middle East Institute Israel Columbia University Middle East Leningrad Baku Russia Azerbaijan St. Petersburg Moscow
New space telescope reaches final stop million miles out

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

New space telescope reaches final stop million miles out

"The the the the world's world's world's world's biggest biggest biggest biggest most most most most powerful powerful powerful powerful space space space space telescope telescope telescope telescope arrived arrived arrived arrived at at at at its its its its observation observation observation observation post post post post one one one one million million million million miles miles miles miles from from from from earth earth earth earth the the the James James James Webb Webb Webb space space space telescope telescope telescope lifted lifted lifted off off off last last last month month month the the the mirrors mirrors mirrors on on on the the the ten ten ten billion billion billion dollar dollar dollar observatory observatory observatory still still still must must must be be be aligned aligned aligned before before before science science science observations observations observations can can can begin begin begin in in in June June June Klaus Klaus Klaus pada pada pada Payton Payton Payton with with with the the the space space space telescope telescope telescope science science science institute institute institute says says says this this this telescope telescope telescope could could could answer answer answer a a a lot lot lot of of of questions questions questions are are are we we we alone alone alone in in in the the the universe universe universe where where where we we we come come come from from from where where where do do do we we we go go go to to to the the the universe universe universe is is is so so so huge huge huge need need need think think think that that that out out out there there there somewhere somewhere somewhere there there there will will will be be be life life life but but but we we we don't don't don't know know know we we we have have have to to to build build build large large large instruments instruments instruments to to to tell tell tell astronomy astronomy astronomy professor professor professor David David David Helfand Helfand Helfand at at at Columbia Columbia Columbia University University University says says says the the the James James James Webb Webb Webb telescope telescope telescope is is is different different different than than than the the the Hubble Hubble Hubble telescope telescope telescope the the the James James James Webb Webb Webb telescope telescope telescope is is is optimized optimized optimized to to to see see see in in in the the the infrared infrared infrared part part part of of of the the the spectrum spectrum spectrum which which which gives gives gives us us us a a a whole whole whole different different different set set set of of of information information information about about about the the the universe universe universe the the the telescope telescope telescope will will will also also also scanned scanned scanned for for for possible possible possible signs signs signs of of of life life life I I I met met met Donahue Donahue Donahue

Earth Earth Earth Earth James James James Webb Webb We Klaus Klaus Klaus Pada Pada Pa Payton Payton Space Space Space Telescope Te Professor Professor David Davi Helfand Helfand Columbia Columbia Columbia Uni Donahue Donahue Donahue
"columbia university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"Of it was dispelled the notion that when it came to asia that economically everybody was aware by the nineteen nineties. That china was taking off. Southeast asia was taking off. India was even beginning to take off after the nineteen ninety-one liberation of economy and yet when it came to culture that somehow it was only ancient that there was no innovated of quality to asia at all and for me it was kind of a philosophical question and that is that why do we say that is if there's no creativity in india or in other parts of visual and then we have to their for begin to look at it examine it gear fully get the white curator rights collars and begin to present it and it was from that idea that i'm very proud that we had a role to play. I don't want to say single handedly. I've had wonderful colleagues and curator's many of them based in asia. Why was able to work. With and to develop major major exhibitions that then travel all over oliver maratha all over the world. So it's kind of something. I feel that. I had of an opportunity and i feel blessed to have had that opportunity to make a difference in that arena. There is no doubt about thought an as we close out your book. Aptly points out that we have seven point. Seven billion humans on this planet and the novell corona virus is a perfect metaphor for the necessity and challenges. That face us as a planet at global vaccine equity is something we have to accomplish we have to in order to survive. You know as a planet and like i said you did not have a crystal ball and yet your book is so timely as we close out. What would you like to leave for our listeners. To think about when. I say that the bottom line is thought be better seek about our place in on this planet. In relation to the seven point seven billion people who inhabit this planet. So we have to think about our sense of interdependence. We doubt losing our sense of independence. The have to think about ourselves in the global arena. We doubt losing our local rudeness. This means what brett old president johnson used to say that you have to chew gum and walk at the same time you have to and it's not an easy thing but remind yourself whatever you do in your life. How does it's a fact other people. How does it affect people were not part of your your Milia how can we make a difference in our local way that would affect the planet in a global way so all of the royal religions in the in the world has decided idea that the world is one. Would we have completely forgotten that idea. And it's not idealistic dream yet to live it. You have to live it every day. just beautiful words to leave our listeners and we really cannot thank you enough for joining us today. Dr vishakha desai author of walled as family. A journey of multi rooted beginnings. And as i stated i will have the link in the podcast notes and be prepared be prepared to be changed and transformed. This book has earned its place on my nightstand and is really a source of great strength and inspiration. So thank you so much. Thank you so nya and thank you all for listening and enjoyed the bulk. thank you..

asia oliver maratha india Southeast asia china brett Dr vishakha desai johnson
"columbia university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"Welcome back to another episode of a deysi woman. Podcast i am your host sonia. Go klay and the voices. I am seeking may have never been heard before but their stories deserve to be told. What is they see woman. She's a dynamic fearless and strong woman. She is your mother your grandmother your daughter your sister. She is every one of us who is on an endless pursuit of self empowerment and fulfillment. I am stone. Go klay and i am a daisy woman. Hello and welcome to another edition of a woman. Podcast i am your host sonia. Go play and today. We are so honored to be joined by they. Cy the shotgun. Decide is a senior adviser for global affairs to president of columbia university chair of the committee on global thought and senior research scholar and global studies at columbia university school of international and public affairs. Dr desai's served. As president and ceo of the prestigious asia society a global organization dedicated to strengthening partnerships among people of asia and the us from two thousand four through two thousand twelve as president. She set the direction. For the society's diverse sets of program ranging from policy initiative and national educational programs took groundbreaking exhibitions and performing arts programs. Duck chris i hold a b a in political science from bombay university and an m a and phd in asian art history from the university of michigan in two thousand twelve in recognition of her leadership in the museum field. President barack obama appointed her to serve on the national museums and library services board in may of two thousand twenty one duck desai's book woulld a spam. Only a journey of multi rooted belongings was released by columbia university. Press in this critically acclaimed narrative ducker aside uses for life experiences to explore the significance of living globally and it's urgency for current moment. Doctor decide welcome to the show. I am delighted to be here. Thank you well. Eighty such a distinct honor to have you here. And when i reached out for this interview request i hadn't been aware that you had recently released a book and the book is wold as family. A journey of multi rooted belongings. And of course. I proceeded to read the book in preparation for this interview and i cannot possibly expressed adequately the impression that has been left upon me and i shared this with you before we started recording. But i will have the link to the book and the podcast notes and it is a transformational book. And i think it will impact each and every south asian woman who reads this but any woman truly because it is absolutely remarkable about how candidate you are about your life's journey which is just absolutely remarkable and inspiring for so many reason but i have to say as well that as we dive into questions there is. The question came to mind. Did she have a crystal ball. Because it correlates so ingeniously uncannily to what we are seeing with the global pandemic. And so if you want to speak to that. Because i do know that in reading the book up at the end of it you sort of elaborate upon the fact that cova did present itself sort of as you were finishing this project up and it ties in so inextricably inextricably perfectly to some of the motifs and themes that you cover so any comments on that before we jump in first of all sonya. Thank you for asking the question. And i have to say that when i started writing this book and even conceived of the book it was as if it was different lifetime ago and it was at the time when trump presidency was in idear. It was at a time when everything global was under attack as if if you were globally minded you had to be anti-national and it was really with that idea that why are people so anti-global what's the problem. What's the problem with the word. What's the problem with how it's perceived and it's also because i've worked with young people all the time. Teach at columbia. I work with younger people on various boards. And it was right you to meet. The younger people really had a very different impression. The world lived in their palm in their cell phone. They could connect to anybody anywhere either. Twin guitar or through connections. And what have you so they were living in this local national global world. At the same time mayan experience was that it was possible not to seek global as anti senechal to local or national so. The book was written nine okay. How did they get to feel this way. Hadn't i actually get so passionate about the global consciousness that we all need to have so the book is it by is really a memoir in a way to really try to excavate how and why did i become so passionate about my place in the world and the world in my life. The only way to do it was to actually tell my story and to my story was really a way to recapture that the book is finished. I've come up with the title. The title is based on the phrase. That's literally three thousand years old. And i said gosh you know maybe it's too simple. Some of my friends were saying. It sounds too idealistic. The world support. What do you mean the world is. Family sounds too simplistic. Then it happens. And i said oh my god. This is exactly the title that i need to use that those philosophers the vedic thinkers three thousand years ago. Had it right. What they said in that trays was to say only. Those affair limited mind sake of their blood relatives as their family. Those of the magnanimous spirit or expansive. Mind no must treat the whole world as family. And i thought wow what does that really mean what it means is what did we learn in a family me learning the family that we're part of a unit and we're part as an individual so we are independent in relation to the interdependence of the unit of the family. We understand that we also understand. Where does it mean for family for those of us association decide. We know what it means. Is you show up. Important event you show up difficult times you show up. It also means that if in a functional family at least that you have to learn to give up something sometimes for the sake of the unity of the family. You can't hold onto grudges. Then you fall apart and it occurred to me that our court problem and kovic really expose that is that our global family is pretty dysfunctional..

sonia committee on global thought an columbia university school of Dr desai prestigious asia society Duck chris bombay university columbia university national museums and library s desai university of michigan wold President barack obama cova asia sonya us columbia us association kovic
"columbia university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Systemic racism hasn't always been in the news. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic. Minute edna chun lecturer at columbia university explores this topic through higher education lens with many nationwide demonstrations about police brutality greater recognition of systemic. Racism has entered our national consciousness when professor joe fagin i introduced and developed the systemic racism framework through his research. The term was considered controversial on and off college campuses by contrast today. Systemic racism has become part of our national vocabulary ian a reckoning about race racial issues of always been a central campus concern arm research indicates that women and men of color as well as white women in higher education face far more mistreatment and process-based inequality than white men through in person interviews. We learned of persisting exclusionary practices in day to day campus situations. The racially charged rhetoric dominating our campuses and national landscape signals in urgent need to replace understated implicit bias and microaggressions language with a more direct terminology addressing a long-term material social and career consequences of these damaging practices within the context of higher education. We propose a continuum of racial and gender discrimination we call macro aggressions that ranges from various forms of subtle mistreatment to institutionalized process based discrimination. We suggest specific policy based recommendations for benthic change such as monitoring institutional processes for equitable outcomes and investing in sustained and systemic diversity education for faculty administrators staff and students. That was edna chun.

dr lynn Pascarella association of american colleg edna chun joe fagin columbia university
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Actually <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Laughter> short run <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> fluctuations in <Silence> commodity prices. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> don't know we look at a notch <Speech_Female> number of emerging countries <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> so sharks <Silence> that <SpeakerChange> matter <Speech_Male> <Music> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is that the thing <Speech_Male> about the shelves <Speech_Male> actually <Silence> have a more <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> pronounced. <Speech_Music_Female> If i <Speech_Music_Female> hear <Silence> here enough <Speech_Music_Female> <Laughter> not <Speech_Female> to <Silence> say <SpeakerChange> again you <Speech_Male> froze. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> was wondering so <Speech_Male> what you're finding. <Speech_Male> Is that the shots <Speech_Male> are more important <Speech_Male> <Silence> than sort <SpeakerChange> of the plans. <Silence> <Speech_Female> Yeah <Speech_Female> exactly the <Speech_Female> chartrand sharks more <Speech_Female> important than the trend <Speech_Female> and so <Speech_Female> you know. The laos <Speech_Female> super cycle <Speech_Female> in commodity prices <Speech_Female> started basically <Speech_Female> when japan. <Speech_Female> When you're when china <Speech_Female> joined <Speech_Female> wto <Speech_Female> when china <Speech_Female> into the world market <Speech_Female> in his serious <Speech_Female> manner <Speech_Female> in the <SpeakerChange> early two <Silence> thousands <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> we had. <SpeakerChange> Yeah <Laughter> we had thought <Speech_Female> that the <Speech_Female> fortunes of <Speech_Female> emerging markets <Speech_Female> where more tied to <Speech_Female> firm and components. And <Speech_Female> we find no. It's actually <Speech_Female> the transitory <Speech_Female> one. There is a very <Speech_Female> pronounced super <Speech_Female> cycle. And if you just <Speech_Female> want to look at <Speech_Female> what is important <Speech_Female> to explaining world <Speech_Female> commodity prices <Speech_Female> themselves. <Speech_Female> Yes the super <Speech_Female> cycle and sharks <Speech_Female> to the super cycle is very <Speech_Female> important <Speech_Female> but why <Speech_Female> commodity prices <Speech_Female> drive the business <Speech_Female> cycles of <Speech_Female> ecuador. Whatever <Speech_Female> they <Speech_Female> are important but then <Speech_Female> not. We <Speech_Female> had gone into this <Speech_Female> project. Expecting <Speech_Female> this is the <Speech_Female> main reason <Speech_Female> why commodity <Speech_Female> prices are so <Speech_Female> correllated <SpeakerChange> with local. <Silence> Gp's but <Speech_Male> no <Speech_Male> other words <Speech_Male> you cannot trade <Silence> the super cycle <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> you could get <SpeakerChange> out <Silence> in the shark. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Explain <Speech_Female> what <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> i mean. <Speech_Male> If a <Speech_Male> super cycle <Silence> is predictable <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> presumably <SpeakerChange> you'll get <Silence> traded <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> then you're <Speech_Male> taking enormous <Speech_Male> amount of <Speech_Male> Sort of <Silence> continuous risks. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> you essentially <Speech_Male> get liked <Speech_Male> in <SpeakerChange> those discontinuities <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> okay. <Speech_Female> I mean <Speech_Female> the way we find <Speech_Female> the super cycle <Speech_Female> is <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> if there is <Speech_Female> a shock <Speech_Female> and then <Speech_Female> we ask. If you now <Speech_Female> want to forecast <Speech_Female> you think <Speech_Female> that level change <Speech_Female> is going to reverse <Speech_Female> itself on not <Speech_Female> so it's like a permanent <Speech_Female> change <Speech_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Female> And is that <Speech_Female> very important <Speech_Female> and we don't find <Speech_Female> it so for example <Speech_Female> with oil prices <Silence> <SpeakerChange> prices <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> have been <Speech_Female> a valid <Speech_Female> but you know <Speech_Female> as oil seems to <Speech_Female> be going slowly <Speech_Female> but surely out of the door. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> There are permanent <Speech_Female> negative <Speech_Female> store prices. <Speech_Female> We were wondering if that <Speech_Female> type of shock <Speech_Female> is very important for <Speech_Female> economic activity <Speech_Female> and yes it <Speech_Female> is important but it's <Speech_Female> there are the commodity <Speech_Female> price shocks that <Speech_Male> equally. Important <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> excellent <Speech_Male> in stephanie. <Speech_Male> Thanks <SpeakerChange> so much. For <Silence> spending time bitney <Speech_Female> not <Speech_Female> Thank you very <Speech_Female> much you. It was <Speech_Female> really an honor <Speech_Female> to be invited to <Speech_Female> talk with <Speech_Female> you. And <Silence> thank you. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> much <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> by <Speech_Female> my. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> This is <Speech_Male> a scientific sense. <Speech_Male> Podcast <Speech_Male> providing unscripted <Speech_Male> conversations <Speech_Male> with leading <Speech_Male> academics and <Speech_Male> researchers <Speech_Male> on a righty <Speech_Male> of topics topics. <Speech_Male> If you like <Speech_Male> to sponsor <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> podcast <Speech_Male> please reach <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> out to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in <Speech_Male> four. At <Speech_Male> scientific <Speech_Music_Male> sense <SpeakerChange> dot <Speech_Music_Male> com.

china ecuador japan stephanie
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Countries do nothing wrong on their own but the world capital market changes and suddenly. They can't borrow anymore. They cannot roll over their loans and then they are subject to rollover crisis they cannot renew the loans. there's no international credit and that causes massive that causes massive recessions. So i would say starting in two thousand eight. The general idea of having capital controls became much more popular in the technical term. Where people use is to say macroprudential policies and so that particular paper tries to tell a story because of this there being an externalities that people don't make the right choices because they don't really internalize how their own barring decisions affects the value of the collateral. If you were to give them a couple of control they would. You could induce them indirectly to make the right decision so that paper provides a theoretical support for macroprudential policies. And then because one thing is the policy makers to say oh we see all these flows another thing is. Can i find a welfare based arguments. Why desirable to go against free capital mobility so picketing along. This stephanie is That will use a warranty for us inside the country and so presumably that would use a risk of those assets and gives you more stability in your decision making processes. Is that the way to think about it. Yes it it. Greatly reduces latinity and people dislike volatility is very inefficient to have a lot of attila. The so i want to finish up another paper that you have Desa commodity super cycle matter paper investigates invisibly the role of the commodity price super psycho in explaining reenacting activity in developed and emerging economies that commodity price super cyclicity flying as a common pullman component in the market prices. Here that this plumbing components has they did do the issues of seen. come replace laura. Yeah okay so. I tell you how we went into this project because we went in with a prior that the super cyclist gonna be super important So there is this. Empirical regularity that of many small open economies that are way too small to influence global commodity prices. If you look how their business cycle correlates with commodity with world commodity prices very high. So you can get variance decomposition. You say half of the variance at business cycle frequencies of output in small country x. is due to variations in global commodity prices. Right in so we tried to think about. But what part of the global commodity prices in these short-run run fluctuations or. Is it really that. If the soybean price goes down on a country is completely invested in solely be in and the whole soybeans. And we know that there's these very long lasting movements in commodity prices is that what then gets reflected in causing long recessions so we the the contributions paper is to have a methodology to saad sharks to commodity prices into the long lasting ones which we call the super psycho and then shorter ones and actually if that the super cycle would be very very important and we at the end of the day. We don't get the answer. We went into the project with. We get.

stephanie laura
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Exchanging Together touch on couple of your working papers. And one of them is entitled montopoli libria in opened economies bit collateral constrains. You say that. Douglas established the existence of multiple equilibria in infinite korean open economy models which the value of the known tradeable Endowments serves as collateral in this environment. Economy display self-fulfilling financial crises in which this mystic views what the bag collateral induce agents duty leverage. Explain that yes so. So if i put it into plain english you know so Suppose collateral constraint means you have a limit to how much you can borrow right and so in that literature what the interest is the value of collateral is not something written in stone is not ten cows but it depends on macroeconomic variables and in particular depends off on prize. So here in that particular example that you read out it depends on the real exchange rate or the price of non-tradeable goods which is an endogenous variable. And what happens is suppose to become very pessimistic. You thank you. Collateral depends a lot on non-tradable or the on the real exchange rate and people start expecting that the non-tradable go to become very cheap so you collateral is mainly non-tradeable goods and so then you say man. I'm not going to be able to burrow. This is what i think's going to happen. So let me not borrow so much internationally. Because i expect my collateral to be low in forcing me to do that so then. There's a feedback loop in those economies. That when you borrow very little from abroad aggregate demand domestically is very low but all these tradable producers have their goods already ready willing to sell and now disraeli. Ray low because people didn't borough and so they have no purchasing power so yes they expectation said fulfilling non-tradeable. Prices will fall a lot. And so you have the what is called self-fulfilling the leverage crisis because people believe that the collateral values going to be low. They take an action. They don't borrow very much. Because they don't beauvoir borough very much. Demand is low and newmont is low than the price is low and so that expectation is fulfilled. You sit some valuation mistake sort of failure rate so if we can that you the incredible and government appropriately than this one happened. Exactly it did. I mean so actually. The official technical term for the type of phenomenon is i think you call it valuation and failure which is a very good description. The former terms pecuniary externalities. So that you are not taking into account that with your own action you influenced the price. So what is interesting about that literature. Rising literature took off a little bit. That is Also make a little bit a big trend comment. I told you before. That was the speed change in monetary policy towards inflation targeting in the ninety s. There was also a big change in how policy-makers say at the imf in emerging markets looked at capital controls. Since you're such a freedman frequent included prescription so the mantra the mantra used to be international. Capitals should be allowed to flow freely into india freely out of india freely freely out of columbia freely into all of the emerging markets. Because this is great. This is efficient capitalist of flow to most if patient location that used to be the doctrine and then in after the financial crisis the pendulum in policy circles changed a bit. They thought maybe this idea of free. Couple mobility is not so great. Because we see that sometimes when.

montopoli libria Douglas Ray freedman imf india columbia
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You should tell your expenditures towards not saving towards spending more and so you you stimulate demand that sort of the bread and butter of the central bank but the neo. Fisherman's just are doing is that. They are other type of movements. That are not of this transitory type and in particular. If you have a permanent increase or a permanent decrease in interest rate the effects are not the same as transitory one. So a since you're from chicago. I'm gonna gonna maybe illustrate you. The approach from the near fisher. So well you. I don't know if she were still they are in chicago robert. Lucas was a professor and he won the nobel prize in one thousand nine hundred six and so he has this. I think very nice so when you win the nobel prize you have to give a speech. And so one of the sentences he wrote in there was central bankers and even some monetary economists talk knowledgeably of using high interest rates to control inflation. But i know of no evidence from even one economy linking these variables in a useful way. So basically what is he he is saying he was in and then he showed some pictures and these were all long run pictures right so he was talking about the long run fisher effect. Put the neo fisher and talk about the long run fisher effect where he says if you have really high normally interest rates you're not gonna get low inflation in the long run. You're going to get inflation. So i think if you now try to say the same sentence but you change up with the down. His observations is totally describing what happened. In all these countries since they became inflation target is and once hit the zero lower bound and have held nominee interest rates at on zero for way longer than the shock lasted countries like north korea. North korea south korea and many countries that may be emerging markets. We could reread the robert. Lucas code as central bankers and even some monetary economists talk knowledgeably of using low interest rates to stimulate inflation. But i know of no evidence. From even one economy linking these variables in a useful way. And i would really say that there are at least fifty central banks in the world that have health rates at zero and they're waiting and waiting for inflation to go up. Yeah that makes a lot of sense. I have to say something intuitively active to a zero nominal interest rate for twenty five years in a country. That hasn't done too badly. You know so. But i think that the new fisher argument is that. Don't do it if you expect inflation to rise because you're never going to get it you're sort of stuck exactly yeah. I think that's a very nice way of saying it. Don't go for zero rates for a long time hoping to reach you. Two percent inflation target. That's that's that is more. What the perils of taylor rules say. What the new share and say if you then start tightening because you want to go back to normal. Don't think that you're gonna get the same negative effect in the short run as you get from transitory tightening. You're actually gonna get a very quick rian. Flation sir it's a really interesting thing to internalize and as you say. Most central banks around the world haven't done it right. There still have some expectations whilst.

fisher chicago Lucas North korea robert south korea taylor rian
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"And you think. I don't believe in this. I think is a completely efficient. Labor market or labor is not so important anymore and other thing if you have a central bank that constantly says i know what i'm doing i have an inflation target of two percent. My strategy of going to two percent is to keep the no interest rate at zero because my belief is if i'm very easy i have very accommodative stance. I'm going to bring inflation up. And if you keep looking. As i said mr macabre keeps hoping something will take up. And you look and look and for seven years of that monetary policy stance. Inflation doesn't go up. you have a problem. Issa central bank. The market is going to say the second. You keep telling us a story that you're keeping the no interest rate is zero that will generate inflation. That's your strategy. And then we ask you show us the inflation and it's constantly below two percent in basically could mean that the central bank loses credibility right and that's also not that we want. We want that. The monetary authority of a country gives us a narrative that we that the agents believe in japan is a very interesting case so so one question would be what happened to japan. Last twenty five years. Did our people happy. It added aggregate utility declined sufficiently badly that the country is in a in a bad shape. Events is to those are not really then perhaps is seeing a novel. Industry does not. Lsu inflation is necessarily bad thing. Okay so let's let's first look at the good things you know. Sometimes people say growth. In japan were slow but one one has to qualify that a little bit average growth in rio. Gdp per capita was the same as it was historically in any postwar developed country but there was a level effect usually when you have a recession in the recovery from the recession. For a couple of years you have much higher growth so that you come back to the old pass. Suppose you have a catholic this going up for gp the recession. You go down if you just keep growing at the same rate you historically grew you're going to be like parallel below it. You're gonna have not a gross effect but allegedly effect until this level effect. Is that what you can see. In the data so the gross rate for japan. You totally right average. Gdp growth per person is not different but there was this one of level effect and you can of course in japan unemployment is is very low but there was a little uptick instead of two on average for about fifteen years. It was between four and five. This has very low numbers so low inflation..

mr macabre Issa central bank japan Lsu rio
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Inflation coming. So they tightened. And so you see them or you can see it in a cost away that new fiduciary what interpreted say. Okay this was the signal that we normalize meaning. We are going permanently to normal levels of the norm interest rate and zero being not nominee. Maybe two percent being normal and then you would see immediately that there's a rian flation of the economy. So let me repeat something. I said at the beginning near fish and do not think that any type of raising of the interest rate has to bring inflation up. Nana it has to be as you said commitment that this is expected to be not transitory that this is expected to be sort of permanent. I want to push on one direction. I don't know much about this. Logistic your get your perspective on this so labor and legitimate. Your wagers is sort of an important aspect here in the market. You know be continuously drive down the human resource aspect of products right beer. Artificial intelligence demartin of production for the next unit is going to be nearly zero in a software robotics world so people won't be won't have labor. Let's say in the future and so ages become sort of a is one factor in economics. In which case inflation is not a not not necessarily a sign of the economy expanded in some ways. Would you think what do you think that they are now. Okay so i think the fact that technological progress implies that a lot of things that were done by humans can no longer be done by. Humans doesn't necessarily mean that the wage goes down so let's go back to the plow. We started with the plow with one person behind inox right. And then i mean have you ever seen in modern harvesting machine or a modern plow. They look bigger. Oh war tank ride and so they go twenty four hours with a. Gps system over not minding who's landed is because everybody contract and so did that mean that the which it fell and people don't make any money anymore..

Nana
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Inflation has become much more much less volatile and the average inflation rate has become much lower for central bank. Came with another. I think surprising problem if you typically ask those central banks house inflation targeting working for you. How are things going. Most central banks are under shooting target. So especially since two thousand eight if you talked to central bankers you just look at house. Inflation performance you go to south korea and european countries in the us many countries on all. Actually you know we're doing very well but for some reason. Inflation is below our target. And and that so so one of the things we did in pay your even just been habibie wrote a paper. In two thousand one twenty years ago called the perils of taylor roots in which we showed that this mechanism of saying if my inflation rate is above mine fishing target. I raise the number rate and if my inflation rate is below my inflation target. I lower the nominee interest rate. That's usual mechanism. That's called the taylor. Rule that thing at some point hits lower bound because the zero interest rate is a ball. And if you want to explain why. But suppose i just take it as given and but we showed. Is that there once you hit zero. It could be that long. Run inflation expectations become an code. People just rational to think that it's no longer to send but instead this may be a very slight deflation so it's not a story of becoming bigger and bigger and bigger deflation is just like what you saw in japan. It is rational for them. To think we're gonna be at minus the real interest rate if the real interest rate on safe assets. Just half a percent is rational to believe that the inflation rate will be just slightly negative. And so this is what we have seen so we saw stuck in some sort of local minimum. So this this assume said there's a ciro lower bound. Yeah that exists but there's no technical reason it has to exist. Right banks could charge. I think in switzerland they upcharging negative interest rates Do delete dale. I dunno okay so this has to excess weight for this. This sort of situation due to happen. Yes so let's first go step by step makes plain white makes sense. That allure bans exist. Let's first go to a super simple economy without bangs and where they cash so they establish what does the normally interest rate on one hundred dollar. Bill you don't by mistake. Put it in your pocket into the laundry machine. You destroy it one.

habibie taylor south korea us japan switzerland dale Bill
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Don't. I can see you. Okay okay okay okay. So let's just make this. If you feel that you cannot see me well. Let me know if it's racist. Okay so let me. Go back to the fisher. Effects is the idea that there's a relationship between the nominee interest rate the real interest rate and expected inflation. And what most people believe. Is that in the long run. What do i mean by long run. Maybe over a period of a thirty forty years monetary policy cannot do much to affect the real interested in an economy so if over long periods of time the gnome interest rate is very high. This will also reside in the inflation rate. Being really high supposed you. The is four percent in one country picks the nominee interest rate to six percent. That country's gonna have two percent inflation rate but another country also has this real interest rate of four percent but they pick a nominee interest rate of ten percent. They will have six percent inflation so in the long run. There's a one to one relationship. For every percentage points higher interest rates. You have one percentage point higher inflation in the long run and so this one for one movement between norm interest rates and inflation in the long run. That's called the long run fish. Effect and people in general have Accepted that that's not very controversial and with it goes idea that the real interest rate in the long run not in the short run but in the long run is really not affected by monetary policies. So the journal idea always that monetary policy might be very powerful in the short run but not in the long run if we take the long run episodes of thirty years. So that is why. The literature on the neo fisher effect. It can't just talk about the fisher effect. Put the word kneel in front because they are interested in a very specific question. And then i tell you why they got interested in that specific question but this bit specific question. They're interested in. is that suppose. The central bank raises the nominee interest rate permanently. So let's start with an example. Let's go to switzerland. They have the policy raid in. Switzerland is minos half a percent so minus fifty basis points. And so maybe you would think more normal level is plus two percent so and you would think that if she should go at least expectations if they go to plus two percent. That's a permanent move. You wouldn't think only are very briefly. They going to put the foot into the water and see how two percent is and then they go back to the unusual situation of minus fifty basis points. Right so we would think that. A normalization of interest rates from negative interest rates at a bunch of central banks have to something like more normal. That's why it's called normalization. Two percent is a permanent move way. Because that's because of moving from minus point five to to.

fisher Switzerland minos
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Shown me see qasimi him. Mike yesterday's Tiffany schmidt go. Hey this principle economics at columbia university. She's also visits federal at the center for economic policy research The national beautifully economic age income. Stephanie thank you for having me yes. The thanks for doing this so i i want to talk about your. I guess the people that you have written a couple of people to the mountain Your and your talk and your research allowed the fisher effect and exiting liquidity. Clap as i mentioned stephanie via probably shared a common time in hiep log long time ago more doses of macroeconomics than you were doing stuff and most of this stuff has gone away. So i a booster shot so before we get into the neo. Officially fact could you talk a bit about what is what the fisher sectors originally. Yeah so yeah. I would be happy so i think especially since as i think. Different people have different opinions about it. So let me be very clear. So the we are thinking about monetary policy in. So that what. I'm talking about has to do with monetary economics and the fisher effect is is concerned with the idea that is there a systematic relationship between the nominal interest rate. Say the intr- the fans raid or the treasury rate some type of interest rate and the level of inflation and so this this idea in economics which is called the fisher effectiveness along run concept where people have three empirical work pretty much uncontroversial established that this is ray. Simple relationship that the interest rate is equal to the real interest rate plus expected inflation. That's called the fisher equation. Wait a second. I constantly see freezing. I don't know if this is me or you. You see freezing. Like i cannot see that the video that arrives on your end is right. So you have this connectivity issue or not. i don't. I can see you. Okay okay okay okay. So let's just make this..

qasimi Tiffany schmidt center for economic policy res columbia university Stephanie Mike stephanie treasury
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology..

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Tight and our Tightening up process Or by practice. And we're talking about the procedure experiment. You got the dopamine neurons. Change their tuning. According to coach context in singing birds. You said to take the mistakes practicing alone provides opportunities for learning which we discussed the fuss paper but you say but self devaluation audience. Directed performance could distract from ongoing execution. So so was find here. La- right so this was a like interesting. What motivated this project. So so as i was mentioning earlier. Yeah as you said you know. we found. We found air signal in dopamine neurons. That seemed to be in parking for practice. And then when i was when i was spending my musician fence about this company. They told me that they treat mistakes that they make ready differently during practice and performance. Right so so vendor practicing the song a lot of attention to their mistakes because they want to learn from their mistakes but when they have practiced their song and now you know it's a big day bad on stage performing to an audience and then they make a mistake then they want to. They don't want to pay a lot of attention to those sticks. They might want to brush those mistakes under the carpet because the show must go on it yet. They wouldn't that be sort of an audience feedback issue here do so if i use the audience reaction as a proxy for weeks then that would that have sort of external stimulus coming back to me right. Yes exactly and that is in fact something looking at in the future. So that's like the next action the indian about you know. What does the audience actually do. But many of these mistakes the audience might not even might not even realize their mistakes right and and even if they do you might not want to obsess over those mistakes because that might that might genuinely affect your ongoing performance and so a lot of farmers telling me that if they start to about mistakes they made then you know they in the rest of the song as well.

indian
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"A question about the function of dopamine right. So what. I told you so. Far at least in the earlier experiment is that we already knew that. Dopamine was in wand in this reward prediction so whenever you got food or juice that was unexpected you had an increase in on so scientists knew that dopamine was involved in reward based trial no money. The question we wanted to ask was how does other kinds of learning so for example a talking about learning to play the piano or learning to play tennis on learning to speak. We don't do these tanks. Fuck primary awards like food juice. You don't learn how to speak better for jussi awards. You don't learn how to play tennis. Better for food rewards. That sort of naturally learned to sequences that i learned by comparing ongoing performance to some internal standards and so the question we were interested in is does dopamine also player all in the natural learning of such behaviors that had nothing to do with immediate food or juice awards and zebra finch. The songs. the song bird is a great system to answer this because zebra finches learn how to sing. Not for food or jussawai they. They haven't internal template. Which is the father song which they remember and they are trying to achieve that song. So they're trying to make a copy of that song by learning how to sing. And so so that's so that's sort of the question and coming back to what you would asking in terms of what we actually did. Okay so so. What did you have to do. So we had to record from these specific dopamine on start. The had hypothesized might encode what we to call a performance prediction reward. We had to recount from these nuance while the birds singing but the also had to do something else. We had to fool the birds into thinking that they made a mistake. Yeah right because you're looking at very young goods. It's not clear whether they're making a mistake or not. And so what. We decided that we would study adult birds that have been learned the song but we would fool them into thinking that they made a mistake and the way we did that was be used. A technique called the started auditory feedback. So the idea is simple. So let's say the bird. Has you know syllables. Abcd for example. That sounds like that's that's why the tons. And luckily did is we take a part of a different syllable. So for example you can take the first part of syllable that sounds like And played over celebrity using a speaker so now the world thinking along and thinking. Jaguar antigua antigua quiet. But what he's actually hearing is jaguars To karachi clients depending on whether or not we started syllable which we so does that. Make so and so so the the feedback so it has to be sort of instant feedback. Wait for the to recognize that the sounded just made. Yeah exactly so what we do. Is that while the singing. We are recording the birdsong and we have a computer that is analyzing the birdsong. In real time and v know exactly when syllable d is going to happen and just before that it was a crime and if it's heads if it stains we leave it so half the time we started off the time we don't end. The bird has no way of knowing whether it's going to be distracted right. Okay and so okay. Those you have sort of a control egg have a distorted cigna going back and so So so what you find..

Jaguar first part tons antigua jaguars half jussi karachi
"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"columbia university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods.