7 Burst results for "Columbia Global"

"columbia global" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:00 min | 6 months ago

"columbia global" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In London And in New York this is WNYC good afternoon on Mayan Levinson It's the BBC NewsHour on 93.9 FM and AMA 20 Today at 5 on all things considered fans watching the Super Bowl tonight will also see a lot of ads for sports betting companies operators are now racing to get as many customers on their platform as quickly as possible And also in the program a Colorado couples dog fled when they suffered a serious car accident in a remote area Locals rallied to help them find and recover it using trail cameras and social media That's today at 5 here on WNYC At snow should be ending by around 5 o'clock the rest of the evening should be cloudy skies with a low of around 21 It's 32° and snowing at four 20 WNYC is supported by the Yale school of management executive education presenting idea to market and executive program for senior marketing leaders about creating consumer value in the product development life cycle Learn more by searching for Yale idea to market In Tunisia thousands of people have been protesting the setting up of a new judicial body which would give president Cai said the power to appoint judges of his choosing This is just the latest in a series of moves to concentrate power in his hands He dissolved parliament in July then he made himself the sole source of power He also declared a state of emergency all this he says is to root out a self serving corrupt elite that has impoverished the nation It was ever thus in Tunisia though there was a revolt in 2010 to introduce a new order This if you remember gave rise to the Arab Spring that roiled the region Yusuf sheriff is a political analyst and director of the Columbia global centers in Tunis does this move by the president come as a surprise He's been talking about this for a while now and it's on the same line of things that he's been doing since his power grab on July 25th And this is yet another independent authority that is taking under his direct rule and comment But the president has been doing this as you say since July he did say then that he was dissolving the institutions on the grounds of imminent peril Did he ever explain what this imminent peril was No he was quite vague about it The imminent peril according to him are the skirmishes between parliamentarians in parliament which is something you get even in Westminster and other places or the ongoing paralysis of the state apparatus The thing is all the moves he did since July 25th are giving him more and more popularity because what we've seen in the last ten years are a lot of problems that remain unsolved That's why he's so popular today even though he's dismantling the democratic system that Tunisia got in 2011 and even though his rebuilding and authoritarian system may be even more authoritarian than the one we had before 2011 But there have been people protesting as well against these moves haven't there There is an opposition but this opposition remains marginal If you see the protest numbers we're not talking about more than a few hundred few thousands to the maximum here and there it's not mobilizing the streets the way we've seen in for instance in 2010 2011 at least for a majority of people the system that prevailed before July 25th when he did his power grab is a system that didn't help them So they are not unhappy to see that being dismantled So do you think that he doesn't intend establishing an authoritarian system He's just trying to arrest the rod At this point I think his he genuinely thinks that he is reforming the system and that he's going to improve the lives of his constituency by the end of the day he's not a man of the military and he's not someone who has a lot of means Therefore whatever authoritarian system he will build it will be very weak with him at the head of it And this is what worries many observers today is that even though he is not necessarily the brutal bloody dictator that we use to in political science someone else can come and talk with him or replace him And that someone else will have a lot of prerogatives that the current president is putting in place What is the state of Tunisia What's life like for tunisians Indonesia there is a dire economic situation And therefore foremost tunisians what they want what they need is an improved economic situation So with him saying that all the economic problems are because of those who ruled until July 25th people tend to believe him and people tend to think that he's doing the right thing That's Yusuf sheriff of the Columbia global centers in Tunisia.

WNYC Mayan Levinson Tunisia president Cai Columbia global centers Yusuf sheriff Yale school of management parliament Super Bowl BBC Tunis Yale Colorado London New York paralysis Westminster Indonesia Yusuf
"columbia global" Discussed on Changes Big and Small

Changes Big and Small

08:47 min | 1 year ago

"columbia global" Discussed on Changes Big and Small

"Grave did not have a stone. All i knew was the row number and the plot number so i'm just bewildered and i'm also dismayed because this particular division is so poorly kept. I had walked by divisions that were absolutely splendid. And i get to this space. And i was just like. Oh my god this is decrepit. You know and and i couldn't figure out anything. This is not a small cemetery either so each division is actually quite large. And i thought to myself even if i had the time to look at each individual stone in here. They're in such bad shape. But ones that i could see some of them. You can barely see the writing on them. The etched names and things and i'm just like i can't do this so i stepped out of the division and i saw guards coming thankfully i stopped them and i said please help me. I don't understand how this works. I'm looking for this grave. I don't know if it has a stone. You know and i said this is the row in. This is the tomb number. Can you instruct me on how to find it. So that when i come back again i can find it. You know and so they each went in and on their own. They explain okay so this is row one dumb so this would be wrote to and the grave is in row two and then they individually walked it off and each of them individually came to a space with knowstone but with a little ceramic flower arrangement there. I had no way of knowing whether that meant anything or not but they said this is the space. So i took pictures of it and i w- it back and i just my heart is in my throat. I went back to home. And i emailed the friends just a handful of like four people and i say the these the photographs that i found. Why didn't you tell me there was no stone and i said so. The grave is still intact but they will not tell me win. The remains will be exumed. I found out that his concession as they call it was originally for six years. He died in nineteen seventy nine so you add six to that he should. He could have been exumed in the nineteen eighties. I'm coming in the two thousands and he still there but the person at the cemetery did say he is scheduled to be zoomed this year. They would not tell me when so then there's a race against time now right and so i tell the friends i give them all of this information and they're like oh my god so he still there so maybe we can save the great and could you inquire on our behalf what that would take and in speaking with them in each of them individually you know exchanging emails and then getting on the phone with a couple of them. I hear their stories. And i understand why this is so important to them and i feel like i've been given this charge to put all of this in context. My business is talking about the african american experience in paris sharing the african american history talking about contemporary life etc. This is my business. And i feel like now i've accidentally stumbled upon this story and this is something that i can do for the preservation of african american culture in paris and i hear the stories and the stories are pulling at my heart so it's not only that you know i can do something to sort of magnanimously but also these people are making this man not just a figure but a real person who had failings and real real life experiences real successes real just an incredible life in a very poignant and a lot of ways a very tragic life but in other ways of life that was full of things to celebrate and so i to make very long story short i petition the cemetery system to have these friends send the money to pay for his great. It was less than three hundred euros that was required and they allowed it because he was a painter really. That was the only reason that they paid any attention to this story was because he was a painter and i found out that the french government actually owns his work and that the pompidou centre. Which is the french national museum for. Modern art owns one of his works. And so whenever you tell french people about something like that. They pay attention so they allowed me to collect this money and pay and then i went back and i told the friends you know success and they said oh fantastic. We wanna play a stone there. Can you find out what this would require. And so i'm like okay. I inquired on their behalf again and found out that it would cost a few thousand euros to very modest but sturdy stone. Because i told him about how the stones crumbling in this division where he is. I said i'll cost a few thousand and they said well can you you know. Will you support us and like well. Okay they were willing to contribute. But they didn't have all the money required. And i said i will not raise money under my own next so i started the french nonprofit to raise the money for the stone. And we've been in existence. Ever since i started the blog for delaney to raise awareness of this whole story and when we did raise the money and be raised it in not too long time it was a few months and from the time i found out about this whole thing which was in september two thousand nine to the time the stone was laid. We laid this. Don't over the summer in two thousand ten and we had a graveside ceremony in october and the us embassy at a reception for us at the space that used to house the american consulate. And so that was just over a year's time and when all of that was done i felt like okay. Monique you have really done a good thing. You can stop blogging. You can go onto other things but buford. The lady was like no. There's still work to be done and so fast forward to today. I am still blogging about buford delaney once a week. Wow so in all of this time. There's so much detailed so much information that the story keeps keeps progressing and still has a whole has a hold on me a major hold. So that's my french nonprofit and then the us nonprofit because of buford delaney this the short story after all the years that i had blog about beaverton just tried to find ways to honor him and his memory including a major accomplishment. We got two commemorative plaques installed in mon parnasse area of paris where he lived we got two plaques installed in his honor and still. It wasn't enough. I felt like it's not enough. It's not enough. what else can i do. And it occurred to me. You must do a show. You must do a show of his work and so because of the blog and thanks to the blog i had met people who collect his work in paris in the paris area. I ask them if they would be willing to loan their works for a show and they were willing to do that. We put together an exhibition of over forty of his paintings and works on paper in a one man show. We did that at columbia global centers. The space is called read hall but it is owned by columbia university and we had that exhibition there in two thousand sixteen and i had to raise money for that and i needed to raise funds for that. I decided that i would start a us nonprofit to raise the money and mount so we were founded in two thousand fifteen. We did the show in two thousand sixteen and the wells. International foundation or with for short has never looked back either.

paris buford delaney us columbia university french national museum french government pompidou centre International foundation american consulate beaverton
"columbia global" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

06:06 min | 3 years ago

"columbia global" Discussed on Techdirt

"Particularly in European space and that. Thought, look you know, where's the US in all of this? We're not a part of this debate really at all. Yeah. Other than making noises. But yeah, but it's not really not really having much of an impact. Well, the, the, you know, in the at least when it comes to content, specifically, not not, you know, in, in kind of Chris Hughes, or, you know, the other, you know, the focus on on break-up competition. But at least when it comes to purely content policy, you know, it just it's highly politicized right now in the US. Yeah. Almost entirely politicized. Yeah. So, so what are the things this may be a good way to segue into the fact that we've got a couple of books that we need him like? So, so what, you know, the fact that it's possible for governments to engage in indirect control over, over internet, speech by, you know, doing some kinds of direct pressure on the companies by delegating obligations to the companies that they couldn't do, if they were imposing directly on citizens is, is an interesting problem that I dress in a book that I've just written partly partly. I wrote it on a texture, which is the splinters of our discontent, and I talked about different models for thinking about the government. You know, the fact that we have multiple stakeholders or groups of stink holders, including the companies, south, the governments and an individual speakers, and then and, and the press media organizations. All part of different triangle in the United States. We typically think of speech issues of being, you know, speakers or published against the government in Europe, it's quite often it certainly can be that, but it also is regulation of companies companies are companies overreaching in terms of what they say or what they do with private information sawn, and, in fact, that ecosystem that we live in now is more complex than these kind of binary paradigm would suggest that sort of that's a big chunk of what I write about. And then I David wants to talk about him spoke a little bit. Books will kind of speak to each other to be honest. We should get them together. You know, like the enter, so I write. So I my book is, it's a short book, and it's about, it's a really, it's really about how do we answer that, what I think of is the core question, which is who decides like who's who, who decides the rules who should be in charge? And in my book, I kind of lay out both the kind of bureaucratic and, and essentially governing nature of the platforms today. And, and then lay out how, how governments are pushing back and my I end up with proposals that are probably fairly similar to yours. Mike, which are focused on in a Multistakeholder approaches. But also on non viewpoint discrimination approaches, so poachers that get us to more transparency. And, and and forms of accountability without putting government in the in the in the place of actually deciding this, this content is okay in this content is not, which I think is, is extraordinarily extraordinarily dangerous, but is also the place where you know, much of the legislation in Europe has been has been heading. And. What are the names of both of these books? And where can they be found minus call up yuko? I. I did actually set the title minute ago. So you say your time, minus call. I want to reinforce it. So I go ahead. I cut you off there. Go ahead say, okay, mice called speech. Police the global struggle to govern the internet. It's, it's published by Columbia global reports, which is this imprinted published Tim Wu's book a few months ago on on competition and, you know, they do short books kind of a series. It's it was really a fun process to be honest. Right. And my, my book is called the splinters of artistic cat. And it's about in its subtitle is how to fix social media democracy without breaking. There we go. And, and people can find that can I find both of those on Amazon, because that's where everybody looks but just checking Amazon as this week's. Yeah. I you know, I, I really liked that subtitle Mike, because I think and this is at, at a very high level. I mean this isn't getting into the weeds of regulation, but, you know, so much of the discussion is around, you know, the dark dangers of the internet, and, you know, without being, you know, to, you know, naive about all this. I do think it's important for us to try to, to bring back some of that regulatory discussion around how do we promote and protect, you know, the good stuff the good stuff that's out there. Well, while dealing with some of those admitted harms and went when the discussion is completely framed around terrorist, content and hate speech and disinformation. It's very hard to, to kind of re restate the point that there's actually some good purposes online, as

United States Europe Chris Hughes Mike Tim Wu Amazon David yuko Columbia global
"columbia global" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"columbia global" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bloomberg's Chris Paul Mary. So Chris the Disney channel worked out well for them, correct? Yeah. Did for decades. But it wasn't. It was very similar in a way. It was originally you had to subscribe to the Disney channel it was like HBO Disney was selling movies to Showtime and other pay TV services. So it had to give up some of that revenue when it when it sold put it put stuff on its own service. And it took a while to catch on in in the lesson. Really? Was it offered a broad array of content not just for youngest kids, but he created content for older kids and teenagers. And that's when things really took off with those original shows, and I think Disney's learning from that lesson and you're gonna see a lot of wide variety of programming right from the start with this new streaming service and big spending. Now, I know you and your team I've been working really hard to try to get any details on this event. Tomorrow any details on what Disney is going to unveil. What are you expecting dizzy to show us tomorrow? What it's amazing that they just close the biggest acquisition of their history. Seventy billion dollar merger with FOX. But what everybody was the focus is this service that hasn't even launched. But people are gonna wanna know when is this launching how much is it going to cost per month? They'll want to know if there's any targets for many subscribers Disney is is anticipating although given their doubt that they'll put their stick their neck out in offer that the sense of how much the company is spending in how long those losses are going to continue. I've seen estimates that this won't even break even until twenty twenty four. So they'll be a lot of questions about the cost of all this. All right. Bloomberg's Chris Paul Mary. Thank you so much for stopping by will keep waiting for your new reporting on what's coming tomorrow. Well, even goes EEO, Kathy. Joyce says seven million electric cars on the roads by twenty twenty five adding that electrified transportation has reached an inflection point. She spoke with Bloomberg's Alix steel at the Columbia global energy summit in New York. We try to do the old Wayne Gretzky thing which is don't skate to where the puck is escape to where the puck is going to be. So what we do with charging? We skate. We try to get right ahead of the puck. So we work really closely with the car companies and say how many you gonna be deploying in the United States where are you going to be deploying them? And then we go and make sure that we build there. So that the people buy them and feel comfortable charging infrastructure is there. How does that? How do you do in business model kind of way? Well, we say we work really closely with the carmakers. And so sometimes like Nissan is a partner of ours. Where we they tell us where they're going to sell cars, and we have an incentive program for their drivers. So that when they buy e they get they get a bucket of kilowatt hours for a free charging, and it's an incentive for the dealers to get those cars into the market. So basic question who's responsible for driving? That is at the car companies. Is it going to be the current oil companies like BP that already have like normal fuel stations? Like do. They want to go into charging that utilities. For example. What's the driver? The driver. Overall. I think is a good technology. We're talking about innovation. I have never met a person that has driven an electric car that that doesn't just love it. So it's the pace of innovation. So that's sort of number one number two. We've got environmental imperatives, and again that are that are been around for a while reducing reducing all kinds of air pollution, including carbon pollution. So that's that's a big driver. I think the car companies see the nexus of those two things and they are pushing forward. I mean, the car companies have announced three hundred billion dollars. They're putting toward electrification of their platforms. And that's significant that's a significant amount of money. So and then what you see if the oil companies, the progressive oil companies, you're saying my goodness, we need to diversify and not just be the supplier of internal combustion engines, but companies like like total and shell and BP are are diversifying investing in electric -ation infrastructure. All right, Kathy. Zoe their ego with our own Alex Steele, coming up emarketer says.

Disney Chris Paul Mary Bloomberg EEO Kathy HBO FOX Joyce Wayne Gretzky Nissan New York Alex Steele United States BP partner three hundred billion dollars Seventy billion dollar
"columbia global" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:40 min | 3 years ago

"columbia global" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is Bloomberg best. I'm also, and I'm Ed Baxter. The global energy summit is underway. An ego CEO. Kathy's OI says seven million electric vehicles will be on the roads by twenty twenty-five, adding electrified transportation has reached an inflection point and Junzo spoke with Bloomberg's Alix steel at the Columbia global energy summit in New York. Jim Hackett spoke yesterday. And he said that they overestimated the arrival of ABC's, they're not ready yet. When it comes to EV's. What comes first is it happened to demand, or is it has to be you the fast charging stations. We try to deal Wayne Gretzky thing which is don't skate to where the puck is escape to where the puck is going to be. So what we do with charging as we we try to get right ahead of the puck. So we work really closely with the car companies say how many you can be deploying the United States where are you going to be deploying them? And then we go and make sure that we build there. So that the people buy them and feel comfortable the charging infrastructure is there. How does that? How do you do in business model kind of way while we say we work really closely with carmakers? And so sometimes Nissan is a partner of ours. Where we they tell us where they're going to sell cars, and we have an incentive program for their drivers. So that when they buy any they get they get a bucket of kilowatt hours for a free charging, and it's an incentive for the dealers to get those cars into the market. So basic question who's responsible for driving the car companies? Is it going to be the current oil companies like BP already have like normal? Fuel stations like today going to fast charging that utilities. For example. What's the driver? Well, look the driver overall. I think is a good technology. We're talking about innovation. I have never met a person that has driven an electric car that that doesn't just love it. So it's the pace of innovation. So that's sort of number one number two. We've got environmental imperatives, and again that are that are been around for a while reducing reducing all kinds of pollution including carbon pollution. So that's that's a big driver. I think the car companies see the nexus of those two things and they are pushing forward. I mean, the car companies have announced three hundred billion dollars. They're putting toward electrification of their platforms. And that's significant that's a significant amount of money. So then what you see the oil companies, the the I think that progressive oil companies are saying my goodness, we need to diversify and not just be the supplier of internal combustion engines the companies like like toe towel, and shall be p r are diversifying and invest. Writing in electric ation infrastructure. So do they need to basically build their own tesla did? Ego is here to help. You can't be everywhere. So is it going to be coming from them that come saying, we're gonna go build this in a partner with you? Or does it have to come from government level? Guys. You got to do this comfort different kind of opportunity for you for ego. We're seeing a confluence of market forces that include public policy pushes say that that the fact that by twenty twenty five there are going to be probably seven million electric vehicles on the roads in America there already more than a million in the United States have them right now are in California. Now, why are there so many in California, it's an innovative place technology early adopters, but it's also policy. Those policies are going to continue and as long as those policies continue to be in place, and the technology continues to be more widespread, but more companies offering these I mean goodness gracious in the next sort of six months, probably going to see a dozen more electric vehicle models that consumers can choose from all of that is a giant. Soon NAMI or I think the industry's reached a point of inflection. We are electrifying way need cost effective economic economic purchase cars, we need to go far long ranges, and they do and we need infrastructure to charge him. And that's where we go comes in. So do you still feel the state government of California say is helped you choose the federal government is at all a help to me. What happens if President Trump succeeds in sort of curbing, they clean emissions standards that really California wants to pursue look the tax incentives for buying vs is a really good policy, and there are proposals right now in Washington actually to actually increase that and make it extend extended. So that it's round for a longer period of time. What we really need to do is. Excel this transition to an electrified transportation sector. There are a lot of reasons to do that. And that that particular policy is a really really good one. That was easy. Go CEO. Kathy's OI coming up Martin Gilbert, chairman of Aberdeen. Investments? This is Bloomberg..

Bloomberg Jim Hackett California CEO Kathy United States partner Ed Baxter Wayne Gretzky ABC New York Nissan Junzo BP America Martin Gilbert chairman
"columbia global" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"columbia global" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Best. I'm Jim also, and I'm Ed Baxter. The global energy summit is underway and EV go CEO. Kathy's OI says seven million electric vehicles will be on the roads by twenty twenty-five, adding electrified transportation has reached an inflection point and June. Joy spoke with Bloomberg's Alix steel at the Columbia global energy summit in New York. Jim Hackett spoke yesterday. And he said that they overestimated the arrival of ABC's, they're not ready yet when it comes to ease. What comes first is. It has to be the demand is it has to be you fast charging stations. We try to deal Wayne Gretzky thing which is don't skate to where the puck is escape to where the puck is going to be. So what we do with charging as we we try to get right ahead of the puck. So we work really closely with the car companies and say how many you can be deploying in the United States where are you going to be deploying them? And then we go and make sure that we build there. So that the people will buy them and feel comfortable that they the charting. Russia's there. How does that? How do you do in business model kind of way? Well, we say we work really closely with the carmakers. And so sometimes like Nissan is a partner of ours. Where we they tell us where they're going to sell cars, and we have an incentive program for their drivers. So that when they buy e they get they get a bucket of kilowatt hours for a free charging, and it's an incentive for the dealers to get those cars into the market. So it'd basic question of who's responsible for driving. That is at the car companies is going to be the current oil companies like BP that already have normal fuel stations like today going too fast charging that utilities, for example. What's the driver? Well, look the driver overall. I think is a good technology. We're talking about innovation. I have never met a person that has driven an electric car that that doesn't just love it. So it's the pace of innovation. So that's sort of number one number two. We've got environmental imperatives, and again that are that are been around for a while reducing reducing all kinds of air pollution, including carbon pollution. So that's that's a big driver. I think the car companies. The next of those two things and they are pushing forward. I mean, the car companies have announced three hundred billion dollars that they're putting toward electrification of their platforms. And that's significant that's a significant amount of money. So an amendment you see if the oil companies, the I think that progressive oil companies are saying my goodness, we need to diversify and not just be the supplier of internal combustion engines, but companies like like total and shell and be p r are diversifying and investing in electric ation infrastructure. So they need to basically build their own like, tesla did no no. An ego is here to help. We can't be everywhere. So is it going to be coming from them that come basing? We're gonna go build this. And we're in a partner with you. Or does it have to come from government level saying guys you've got to do? This is a different kind of opportunity for you for ego. We're seeing a confluence of market forces that include public policy pushes I would say that that the fact that by twenty twenty five. There are going to be probably seven million electric vehicles on the roads in America there already more than a million in the United States have them right now are in California. Now, why are there so many in California, it's an innovative place technology early adopters, but it's also policy. Those policies are going to continue and as long as those policies continue to be in place, and the technology continues to be more widespread with more companies offering these I mean goodness gracious in the next sort of six months for probably going to see a dozen more electric vehicle models that consumers can choose from all of that is a giant sort of sue NAMI, or I think the industry's reached a point of inflection. We are electrifying way need cost effective economic economic purchase cars, we need them to go far long ranges, and they do and we need infrastructure to charge him. And that's where Vigo comes in a so do you still feel that the state government of California say helped you choose the federal government is at all? A help to me. What happens if President Trump succeeds sort of curbing, the clean emissions standards that really California wants to pursue look the tax incentives for buying a vis is a really good policy, and there are proposals right now in Washington actually to actually increase that and make it extend it so that it's around for a longer period of time what we really need to do is excel around this transition to an electrified transportation sector. There are a lot of reasons to do that. And that that particular policy is a really really good one. That was.

Jim Hackett United States California partner Wayne Gretzky Bloomberg Kathy EV Ed Baxter ABC New York Joy Russia CEO Nissan President Trump Vigo
"columbia global" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"columbia global" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Fourth in Washington and April the fourth as your listeners, probably remember and know the same date, and that Dr king was murdered and methods. Dr king the apostle of peace, these these gangsters criminals have decided that they're going to celebrate in Washington DC the establishment of this aggressive notarized structure on that day. So in opposition to that we are organizing that weekend on March thirtieth this mobilization, and we are putting the target on NATO and make it a link between NATO and Venezuela. We all know that for example, Columbia global partner of NATO, and we just thought yesterday that in the meetings with the. The neo-fascists from Brazil Boston narrow that the Trump has Trump administration has suggested that they may be a role for Ben as well. A nato. So we want people to understand the role of NATO is character is class interest anthem. We're making that connection on March the thirtieth. It'd be a week of activities for March thirty two of to four peace conference festival organized by the world without war a coalition. The world peace council would be having a an event on Sunday afternoon in in Washington DC after March that that by March thirty first so there's a series of activities culminating in an activity at an enabled the fourth at evening. This organized by the blast peace. That we're going to be launching our campaign against domestic repression. Also, if our listeners want to learn more about this how did they get in touch for the full schedule of of activities. They should go to the popular resistance dot org website. They can also go to the black alaso piece dot com website or the United National antiwar coalition to get more information on the series of activities being organized between March thirtieth and April the fourth John Barack oh, we're very pleased to be able to speak with you about this. You've just come back from Venezuela before we let you go. I wanted to ask you about Columbia joining NATO after all NATO was an anti-communist coalition of the United States in European armies that was formed during the Cold War. And now we see the United States recruiting Columbia and making an inroad here. In South America. That's that's quite a qualitative change, I think and I wanted to ask you about that. Well, this is part of what we were referring to a little bit earlier the NATO has gone beyond just focus on the not the Atlantic area. We've seen over the last year that case that NATO has been the primary instrument has been used by the US and western European powers to project power globally. Is was the instrument used that Libya? It's been instrument is now being used against Venezuela. Colombia is what they're calling global partner and Trump had just offered a possibility of Venezuela being a part of the global partnership. So the net quite members, but they also called global partners. So it reveals once again, Michael the true character of that of that structure that structure is an aggressive imperial at structure is being used to perpetuate and maintain the dominance of the colonial capitalists project western European project. So it's been it's been revealing an, and I think a gift for us to help people understand of the true nature and the interest behind NATO. A demo. It's always an inspiration to have you on lawn disorder. And we look forward to seeing you in DC and in some of these many actions. It's been a pleasure as always to be with you really up on it that you allow my voice on this very important show. Thank you so much where we're honored to be.

NATO Venezuela Washington Dr king partner United States world peace council Columbia Brazil Boston South America Trump United National Colombia Ben Libya John Barack Michael