37 Burst results for "Colson"

"colson" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:50 min | 17 hrs ago

"colson" Discussed on The Book Review

"What's the great appeal of a. Hey story colson. Whitehead joins us to talk about his new novel. Harlem shuffle. why write a novel about the novelist. Thomas mon- holum. Tony will be here to talk about the magician. Alexander alter will tell us what's new in publishing us plus my colleagues and will talk about what we're reading. This is the book review podcast from the new york times. It's temper seventeenth. I'm pamela paul. Colson whitehead joins us now from manhattan. His latest novel is harlem shuffle. Welcome back to the podcast. And i think this is your third time here are. The ones are so disastrous. That's right that's right. We'll fix things. Well this is actually really different novel from the two. Most recent ones that you're coming off of it is like the other two. I guess you would call it. Historical the underground railroad. Of course you jump around in time but you start in the nineteenth century with the knuckle boys. You are into the twentieth century. And then in this book harlem shuffle. You are in the nineteen sixties. Were you consciously moving forward in time continuing in this vein of historical fiction. No i mean. I'm in two thousand and four had basically on my good ideas for books. Some still implement fitting. Give a list somewhere getting shorter. But i I decided to commit to the underground railroad had years before. 'cause like okay. I'm going to do it open pretty off. At that summer. I came across the story of the doozer school which became the model for the nickel boys. And thought you know that is a book. And they're probably and around. That time. I was staring off into space as i often do and was thinking how much i love. Ocean's eleven heist movies could have a novel when actually got around to writing it. I was knocker writer Eighteen fifty or so take the sixty s and had a great time today. What was going on in your life in two thousand and four. That made this setup. Fertile moment i been fiction for years. I was teaching a lot paying the bills. There's some folks who can teach and write the same time..

Thomas mon holum pamela paul Colson whitehead colson Whitehead Alexander the new york times Tony manhattan doozer school
Fresh update on "colson" discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

00:42 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "colson" discussed on The Book Review

"It's about being a hustler. Heroin addict in new york and the south in the fifties forties. I read in college and member. Just how he would describe third street. Which is where. I grew up as this hub of heroin traffic. 'cause like city workers would come from downtown. Get off the window. Third street station score and then head back downtown. And he's a lot of of great criminal slang so i'm so memoirs newspapers and furniture pamphlets. You're not a patrick. Modiano where you're sort of consistently working in the same register in the same themes often the variation of the same story book after book after book. I mean you've done speculative historical fiction coming of age zombie novel street historical fiction book in your mind. Is there something that makes each of your books A colson whitehead novel for me. There's a hook of yet gets in keeps insisting on itself so what is the overall was a real train then years. That's i keep coming back. this idea. That sounds cool. So i mean a newspaper report or watching. Tv and my own book in that twenty twenty story and the stays with me and crying in germany and so i think there's that i keep coming back to certain things you know the city american history technology will not lately humor. You know if. I can get some weird jokes in any happy. So there's not one thing but there's a handful of things. I keep pretending to third not all in the same book of a definitely been recurring sewer talking about high stories in the beginning. We're talking about books and also of course movies. And i imagine it's hard to think about heist book without maybe thinking. What would this be like onscreen and this book was written. I believe crimea me. If i'm wrong after the underground railroad was optioned for tv and then adopted as a series. Did that experience. Infiltrate your writing. Do you see things possibly as adaptations now. Symbols more readily i can see his former tv.

Modiano Colson Whitehead Patrick New York Germany Crimea
"colson" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:37 min | 2 d ago

"colson" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with colson. Whitehead his new novel harlem. Shuffle is set in harlem between nineteen fifty nine and sixty four. It's a crime novel mount morris park which is no called. Marcus garvey park is a place where bodies are buried in the novel. Like if you if you've killed somebody that's the place to hide the body And a lot of our listeners. Who aren't familiar with harlem. Might know mount morris park. Now marcus garvey park from the quest of documentary about the nineteen sixty nine harlem cultural festival. Cassatt festival was held in mount morris. Park so what do you know was it really. Is this part of like the parks. Laura or is it really true. Their bodies are buried there. What's the story Yeah not buried but dumped and so yes yes so. I went to newspapers for what's happening in the city..

Marcus garvey park colson Whitehead harlem Cassatt mount morris Laura
Fresh update on "colson" discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

00:47 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "colson" discussed on The Book Review

"What's the great appeal of a. Hey story colson. Whitehead joins us to talk about his new novel. Harlem shuffle. why write a novel about the novelist. Thomas mon- holum. Tony will be here to talk about the magician. Alexander alter will tell us what's new in publishing us plus my colleagues and will talk about what we're reading. This is the book review podcast from the new york times. It's temper seventeenth. I'm pamela paul. Colson whitehead joins us now from manhattan. His latest novel is harlem shuffle. Welcome back to the podcast. And i think this is your third time here are. The ones are so disastrous. That's right that's right. We'll fix things. Well this is actually really different novel from the two. Most recent ones that you're coming off of it is like the other two. I guess you would call it. Historical the underground railroad. Of course you jump around in time but you start in the nineteenth century with the knuckle boys. You are into the twentieth century. And then in this book harlem shuffle. You are in the nineteen sixties. Were you consciously moving forward in time continuing in this vein of historical fiction. No i mean. I'm in two thousand and four had basically on my good ideas for books. Some still implement fitting. Give a list somewhere getting shorter. But i I decided to commit to the underground railroad had years before. 'cause like okay. I'm going to do it open pretty off. At that summer. I came across the story of the doozer school which became the model for the nickel boys. And thought you know that is a book. And they're probably and around. That time. I was staring off into space as i often do and was thinking how much i love. Ocean's eleven heist movies could have a novel when actually got around to writing it. I was knocker writer Eighteen fifty or so take the sixty s and had a great time today. What was going on in your life in two thousand and four. That made this setup. Fertile moment i been fiction for years. I was teaching a lot paying the bills. There's some folks who can teach and write the same time..

Thomas Mon Holum Pamela Paul Colson Whitehead Colson Whitehead Alexander The New York Times Tony Manhattan Doozer School
Pharmacy and Audiology

Course and Career Chat

01:00 min | Last month

Pharmacy and Audiology

"Hi aaron welcome to colson career hat. Thank you so much being with us today. my pleasure. Thank you so much for having me. Sorry i always liked to go right back to the start. I have a five year old for a long time. He's wanted to be a football of that him. Get for what he'd like to do when he gets old up but just recently actually he's been talking about creating an app so potentially he's down software engineering powerful something like that. What did you want to be when you were five years old. I going back to that time. When i was five years old. I actually really liked being gotten or being around sort of insects and crazy collies and collecting them off to the are very much of going outside and doing a lot of things outside and just being around natsha. When i was five years old. I really wanted to be some kind of biologist or something related to animal insects and things like that.

Colson Aaron Football
"colson" Discussed on RunPod

RunPod

02:19 min | 3 months ago

"colson" Discussed on RunPod

"I think it depends on. What sort of renew. Like if i'm going on an easy ruined i get it the minute off. If i'm going on a room where one of quickly. I get it just right at the end when i've really kind of hit pace that's i i like it. I get it from what i've stopped running. And i thought i thought that was a really hard run when i was doing but never finished. I feel so good and actually it wasn't that bad and i'm really into again tomorrow and finally. Why do you love running so much. I think the reason. I probably like renting. Sorry much is because it's one thing that i can do in my day. It's purely for me. Like all of the benefits are for me whether it makes me feel bad. Whatever makes me fitter and healthier. It's all for me and if anything that you can do for yourself is something that's worth doing gray answer listen. Thank you so much and board of being the fact that no on your youtube channel on my youtube channel. So if you just type in colson smith border being the fat kid should komo hopefully really recommend you watch it as well and also just so inspiring and also feud late to get more of fakes of colson. And you haven't listened to the episode already. I recommend you listen to the previous episode. He was on with. Jackie shepherd and ben price basically i. I think it's the three of us ganging up on jack. So it's basically data. He can listen to all jackson running knowledge and he's still not been out. We still working on that man. Benef- stopped going out together now. After i abandoned him in a house and estate in the middle of solve that cause us going to slow he ban per jack of alec. I hope to see a startling sin. And good luck with everything. Good luck with this documentary. And i really hope to catch up with you in the parison at some point because of the epa. Thank you so much for coming back onto run put. I don't know if i need to. I need to give you like another run. Padron club mike certificate or something just to suck of renewed my membership bernudo well done. Thanks for having me..

tomorrow youtube jackson Jackie shepherd ben price colson one thing jack colson smith three of alec Padron club one
"colson" Discussed on RunPod

RunPod

04:06 min | 3 months ago

"colson" Discussed on RunPod

"I'll be doing london there. We go very. we're running together. I have all been so lovely chatting to you again. Thank you so much can i. Can i ask you a few little quickfire questions. I mean you might updated answers since. I asked you some time. Okay so which trainers are you running in. I mean. I know you've just said you have a million pairs. My is khokar own. As and i run in the march freeze i see. I don't think you set that. Last time i think didn't last time i was in essex. Yeah now i'm full team. How would you feel about changing trainers because this is always quite scary for people going. Oh i don't know if. I should change because if it triggers an injury. Or if i don't like it well actually. I have have used to find for this really. Because when i got injured i got a message on instagram of someone who followed me because they listened to our episode on room pod previously and this was a podiatrist who went to see called lindsay and she was absolutely brilliant. And i go off so now that kind of now i've got. I'm not too worried about changing between my trainers. Because as long as i knew the field and as long as i know that i've got them in i'm always all right by kind of kind of stuck to. I was huckleberry he's which will stable shoe and then when they discontinued. It was my worst nightmare but this march they brought out was kind of like their new stable shoe ryan so i found that that out fairly even coverage an after my first few runs out do you think is probably the best i've ever run. Wow let's say some and the orthotics did it to get used to them. Probably probably about four weeks four weeks of my toes aching and sometimes now after a long run my big my big toe. My big rights ho aches little bit over..

london lindsay four weeks instagram about four weeks khokar first few this march million pairs essex
"colson" Discussed on RunPod

RunPod

04:13 min | 3 months ago

"colson" Discussed on RunPod

"It was something that kind of just happened. I it at first it was deliberate. Like i kind of knew that if i run i would lose weight and it didn't take very for the running to become more important than the losing weight it did but one of the effects of being in the public i guess is the everyone can kind of see what you're doing on weight loss was one of those things that everyone could kind of see so hot this attention around me about the loss weight fruit running and everybody wanted me to kind of tell my story and i was really reluctant to do so forever because for me it was just the way i'd changed my life and it was a way that i was kind of living my life and i didn't want to be the guy to preach about. Why don and all this kind of stuff. But it got to a point where i'd kind of sat down saddam. We've been actually ben price. My may and said. Is there a way that i can take control of this situation because if not the story just being told follow me and i didn't like it when the newspaper would run a story and they would basically makeup Wouldn't be true because almost felt a responsibility for someone else who was in my position to help them out. So i kind of sets a ben. Do you think. I've i've got to make a film like i filmed a little bit along. Long journey is so. I went and spoke to a direct call. Tim royal who actually is one of the directors car. He works on madeline casualty as well. So he's a very talented man. And i knew that he made documentaries new. That's what his passion was. And i said this is what. I wanna do on the reason i want to do. It is touted Now donor if i'm ever going to show it to anyone because there's not much anxiety making for me. I just feel like. I want to see it myself to go. Fat play colson. You've done it like move on now but as soon as we made the film kind of set the tim you know i do wanna get out because if it can you know if it can give a little bit of inspiration of evasion of can even. Just help one of person for me. It's worth doing. So that's how that's how it came about. It instantly is going to be great. I mean if you've got tim directing and you've got ben interview and helping you and obviously you've got.

Tim royal one Fat play colson one of those things one of the directors price madeline
"colson" Discussed on RunPod

RunPod

05:09 min | 3 months ago

"colson" Discussed on RunPod

"Hello there welcome to yet another gathering of the run third run up on club leader jennifer o'connor here with a guest. This week has been on before love so much once. It's come back on quite frankly at last time though. He did come on with to the people so he was really bad linked to beheira tool for them. He was on last time with his fellow. Podcasters from the sofa cinema club. Jack p shepherd and bandra price but this time he is braving tolo. Welcome to run pod colson smith. Hello funk's having me back on. second time. i know. I like it. I feel look. I feel like for like i might go for the hat trick. Well next time. I still haven't been invited on your podcast on. We're gonna have to get you on to talk about. I mean he's talking about running than is talking about films though isn't it. I listen to you guys. But i haven't running as you knew because sometimes i'm running and then there was one time you you broke up run port and i was message you i was. I couldn't believe that. I was running along and then heard my name mentioned. I actually stopped running task. But it's really nice to have you back home. And i think what's really brilliant about your running journey is that you may have a more extreme story than everyone than the many other people. But your story is so relatable. That youtube locked dine and you decided to make a change. Yeah for me. It's it's weird. 'cause lockdown was such a challenging time was always going to be so difficult but when i look back on it now i found running and i know there's so many people who have spoken to who have found running in lockdown and have really kept to of it and for me. I'm just grateful for that. Because otherwise i don't know if i'd be running like don't think howard have the book like have got it now softening the also. I think you possibly wouldn't have had the same time and you wouldn't have been able to commit as easily because you're shedules all over the place and you don't know necessarily what you do in one week to the other dot. The i kind of found in lockdown when everything stopped it was the first time from me being ten years old where a had no responsibilities have no work so i was just sat and i kind fault right will is important for me and i realized that the most important person in my life was actually me so i kind of change. My perot reason bill of routine around me rather than building a routine around life and work and make your job everybody else's half pay and i think it was in.

jennifer o'connor youtube Jack p shepherd one week This week second time colson smith one time first time ten years old third run bandra price funk beheira
With ‘The Underground Railroad,’ Barry Jenkins looks squarely at Black trauma

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

With ‘The Underground Railroad,’ Barry Jenkins looks squarely at Black trauma

"Underground railroad was a network of abolitionists routes to free slaves. But what if it was an actual railroad with a train chugging toward freedom? That's the premise of Colson Whitehead's Pulitzer Prize winning novel, now adapted by Barry Jenkins into a 10 episode miniseries. This isn't a straightforward, inspirational narrative like Harriet. This combines the brutality of roots with the social commentary of watchman and a hint of magical realism like the Polaroids. Press to some ADO is empathetic as the lead Joe Edger tennis sinister as the villain, slave catcher and child star chased Dillon is his precocious psychic. I still have eight episodes to go. But judging by the first two were in for a powerful train ride by a master conductor. I'm Toby Toby film critic Jason Fraley, giving the underground railroad for five stars. So far, dolphin

Colson Whitehead Barry Jenkins Pulitzer Prize Harriet Dillon Tennis Toby Toby Jason Fraley
'The Underground Railroad’: Oscar Winner Barry Jenkins Returns With Limited Series

The Takeaway

01:19 min | 4 months ago

'The Underground Railroad’: Oscar Winner Barry Jenkins Returns With Limited Series

"Miniseries adaptation of the Colson Whitehead novel, The Underground Railroad premieres on Amazon Prime Both the book and the Serie Center around Cora and enslaved woman who escapes from a plantation in Georgia and travels through a literal underground train system in search of freedom. And while the series does depict the traumatic reality of slavery, early reviews have lauded it for not sensationalizing the violence shown on screen as well as for emphasizing the humanity of the enslaved characters. Much of the project success can be credited to Barry Jenkins Theosophy are winning filmmaker behind Moonlight and If Beale Street could talk here he is on the take away back in 2018 talking about his plans for the underground railroad. Most clearly I can say about it is, you know the hero's journey, and I remember as a kid, you know, hearing about the underground railroad for the first time and really literally imagining to two trains. Running underground. And so I think that reading Coulson's book kind of reactivated the childhood kind of off, you know, around just like the power the ingenuity, you know of black folks to create this path to freedom, and I thought the best way to tell that was to go on the four hero's journey. So I was really happy to partner with Amazon and find a place where we could tell the story on the course of 89 10 hours.

Colson Whitehead Serie Center Barry Jenkins Cora Georgia Coulson Amazon
A Conversation With Dr. Abdul-Ghaaliq Lalkhen on the Anatomy of Pain

The Nocturnists

01:44 min | 5 months ago

A Conversation With Dr. Abdul-Ghaaliq Lalkhen on the Anatomy of Pain

"I am sitting. Here with dr abdul lukin adult. Thank you so much for coming onto the nocturne to talk about your book. Thank you very much for having ma'am late zip pitching to be here this afternoon. I loved this book. Thank you for writing it. I think it's going to be such a rich conversation. Tell us a little bit about your path to anesthesiology pain. Medicine are grew up Surrounded by doctors and my dad's gp He stays a midwife. He's old assist as a gp. Her children all doctors. And then we have a solid justin psychiatrist in the family. So i followed in the family tradition and i'm into medical school most fun course. I did at medical. School was the first six months where you could choose to do. Something in the humanities. And i did a six month. Colson comparative religion. And i have to say that that was probably the best most challenging aspect of going to medical school. But i think what i liked the most is that you could just help people at very basic level and when i finished medical school it was quite turbulent time in south africa which is where i'm from originally so we were transitioning from the apartheid government. President mandela just been freed to this was the early ninety s There was a real effort to change the way that had been done from the past. Where really if you had a particular color skin. Then you were given the jobs in the hospitals in the city where you up that was near the beach in a few whatever slightly different color dhaka shea. You got into other places

Dr Abdul Lukin Colson Justin Apartheid Government President Mandela South Africa Dhaka
What's happening in the markets right now?

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

02:15 min | 6 months ago

What's happening in the markets right now?

"Kyle west gray. And jake taylor a joining me for investing mosman group here in q. One it's always great to speak with you and even better to speak to all you have the same time so welcome to the show. Gin's thanks for having us guys. Thanks so i'm sure the audience really going to enjoy this station. And what you guys see in the financial markets right now. Toby whereas and i wrote a book of fairy long time ago now. It's almost a decade since it came out and that's pretty good explanation of sort of the underlying process which is like the screen basically and then under a few things on top of that. I think the most interesting thing in the market at the moment is kathy would and ach. Etf's you might remember. In the early dot com days those funchal janus and the head break performances go great flows like a of flaws as a result and they were focused on smaller quid. Take names said janus had these gripe flows into these very illiquid stocks and they degrade performance as a result and it was probably van driving up. The performance of those stocks has been a similar argument made about ach that they tend to focus on smaller. Non-profitable take stokes and Sorta gigantically big of the last few years. It's now sort of a third or fourth biggest. Ats show out there that flows now that go into these small illiquid tech stocks of they control prices of these textbooks. Had this little wobble of the last few days colson redemptions for them which may cause them to do some selling as well they also have been exposure tasteless I just think that that's the driver of the market at the moment is potentially getting some redemptions having to sell out of some of those stocks which will push an the names and a very sort of beholden to what tesla Much big stuff. But it's still quite volatile. Hasn't made a great deal of money and so there's some risks that creates Cascade selling an odd gets coordinated. And then i didn't know what that does to the rest of the market. That seems to me that there's a lot of money in tessler knocked is fairly new money. Little be sensitive to what happens

Kyle West Gray Jake Taylor Mosman Group GIN Toby Janus Kathy Stokes Tesla Cascade Tessler
Communications (Journalism, Public Relations, Advertising and Media) - Choosing a more general degree

Course and Career Chat

00:26 sec | 7 months ago

Communications (Journalism, Public Relations, Advertising and Media) - Choosing a more general degree

"I feel really lucky that i was able to have that experience. I went to the army. T open day when i was in year. Twelve just with the idea that i was like. I'm going to do the bachelor of communication journalism like. That's what i was going to do. And then they started talking about this concourse. Smells like that. Sound so good like. That's that's a little bit more. What i want to like. Have a bit of a taste of other

Five Years Five Alex Today Last Week Dante TEN Five Year Old Joki Colson Korea Andrew Army
Communications (Journalism, Public Relations, Advertising and Media) - Teacher advice

Course and Career Chat

00:29 sec | 7 months ago

Communications (Journalism, Public Relations, Advertising and Media) - Teacher advice

"To do. At that stage. I was really lucky earlier on in high school. I was really passionate about english nouns riding a lot. I'm going to have a really good teacher in like he arrived. Say to me. Like if i serious about writing and that kind of thing to arm. It i should do communications at our my take or journalism at mit. She's like if you wanna go into that field. Rit's the place to be so kind of stuck with me

Five Years Five Alex Today Last Week Dante TEN Five Year Old Joki Colson Korea Andrew MIT RIT
What Is Love? God Is

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

03:54 min | 7 months ago

What Is Love? God Is

"Let's talk about love. This might be the most bastardized word in english language. The most misused the most misunderstood the most misapplied manipulated word that we have whether it's abusing lost in love or jealousy in love or tolerance in love. We confuse it and get it wrong a lot. And it's not just the secular world. It gets it wrong. We christians get it wrong. The church can sometimes get it wrong. We can idolize certain types of love and it's really important that we get this right. What love really is particularly as christians because we are constantly told by non christians that what we believe is not actually loving that it is not loving to believe in john fourteen six for example that she is the way the truth the life and that no one comes to the father except through him. We are told that it's not loving to believe in romans. Three twenty three for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of god. That it's hateful colson. What god called. Sin to call truth what god calls truth to share the gospel to do mission work to be a christian in any way that his counter cultural year told often today lease is hateful. The only type of christianity that is acceptable to much of the world. Today is the one that looks downs so much like the world that own indistinguishable so we have the same views on abortion as everyone else on marriage on sexuality on gender on morality on politics on media and entertainment on truth as longest christians look and sound just like everyone else are considered acceptable in lami. But anything any doctor any practice that just outside of what secularism approves of many considered to be hateful and wrong. I'd not everyone who doesn't share our faith of course believes this way By the way but increasingly it seems many do. Our responsibility is not to be considered lobbying by the world but rather to conform ourselves. To god's definition of love his definitions. I should say of love. Upper sean poor eight says god is love their people in an outside of the church that is their. This is their favorite verse. Almost everyone knows this verse. first john. four eight god is love. God's very essence is love everything he does is therefore love. Everything he says is love every decree every law every action. Every non action is defined by motivated by characterized by love. Love is everything that god is in everything. Love truly is can be found in god that means if we get wrong. What love actually. Is we get wrong. Who got actually is and we get wrong. Who got is we get wrong. What love to know. God is to know true love in those who don't know god can have glimpses of forms of love because it's a gift of what we call common grace. He's given to someone who is not a christian for example of course can love their friends while loves their family. Love their spouse their kids their country. We are made in the image of god which means that we are all made with the capacity to love passionately. Selflessly even the triune. God is in constant communion father son holy spirit all embody log self sufficient in their love and we made in the image of the triune god also long for this kind of eternal love in fellowship. We were not made to be an isolation we were made for love to receive and to give love

Lami Colson Upper Sean First John John
interview With Mo O'Connell And Mary Tynan

The Plastic Podcasts

05:16 min | 8 months ago

interview With Mo O'Connell And Mary Tynan

"I'm doug danny and you're listening to the plastic podcasts tales of the irish diaspora way going in reverse order here today. The plastic podcasts. Not so much plastic as elastic with two women artists who returned to and from britain. Maureen o'connell or mo is an award-winning writer actor and director based in dublin. At her film spa weekend is currently garnering laurels at festivals around the globe. Meanwhile actor writer director. Mary tynan speaks to us from galway. She has founded notes from xanadu which she describes as probably the world's first online art center and hosts everything from music to talks to theater and stitch and bitch sessions. I'm in the middle of the curiously named storm kristoff when we talk so my first question is a wild and windswept how you doing doing great state all right I suppose for the benefit of both business. If you'd like to say hello with your names. And that way they can tell who's speaking turn or names maritime. And i'm doug just in case there was any confusion so but if we can go back to The the the first thing would be that you both left ireland in order to go to england and specifically london So if i can ask her festival. Mary you You you were born in england but raised in galway essentially. Yes s one in west london very west london he from apple and let while in essex's while and then moved to in front of us john and i basically went back on al twenties and spent most of my adult life. That north london westbound east london every avalanche from southeast asia whenever south river. What about you and wake up in in the for vici- back to dublin and went to radha in two thousand nine and and then detroit there. Federated is in twelve in the state of years in london turn years maybe and they came back to ireland in two thousand fifteen the end of twenty fifteen and then start doing research for a nine hundred sixty short film. I want to make twenty sixteen seventeen Rebellion so and then so you can across to be paul colson. Rawda first of all. Yes a mary. What brought you across the back across london. This dispose opportunities really I i came over at a time when i was just before the boom started. Not there wasn't really any any work here and I just i left london anyway. I'd always kind of wanted to live. Erin i'm in times of doing things like acting and stuff like that. I'm just i just general Opportunity i just like. I did really really love land. Always i just felt like it was as those targeted program is and at its best. A cities like a gigantic playground. And bam. what. I like about london. It was just you could wacko sorts of places. You could visit those places. You could gross the british museum. You could go sit by the river. Everything you could think of was that and Yeah i just thought it was. It was a better place on. Especially since i've mostly been single also. It's at a place for single parents live. But did you still have one foot in galway Well i had family goalie. Yeah i had like. I'm at my parents sam wealth. My mom died while ago but nutria times walked without minister and now that children is also i did have thought but miam- neither of my parents originally from goal i so i can go away the such. I wouldn't have had my cousins or anything like that. Yeah mobile humor. And this is the first three years three. Get note that well. Because i had so intense and we were told me off to work and stuff because it was intense. You'd be too tired. i kind of had to work. I worked in irish for in second year at help pay bills and things like this was a nice relief from radha as in is right Being this crazy irish far people killing each other like all the time. Just an honest is very funny. Irish pub and then go back and throughout the next scrapes that exploit rates contrast and but i. I don't want an acting that. Mary saying but i do think that difficult being an actor because you take a job that is at lopate so that you can remain free to audition if you get

London Doug Danny Maureen O'connell Mary Tynan Galway Kristoff Dublin Paul Colson Rawda England Ireland Radha South River MO West London Britain North London Doug Federated Confusion
America Is in a Dark, Deeply Divided Place: Inauguration Day 2021

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:54 min | 8 months ago

America Is in a Dark, Deeply Divided Place: Inauguration Day 2021

"In july eighteen. Sixty four some fourteen thousand confederate troops to just six miles within sight of the us capitol dome for president lincoln. It was a rude shock after all. This was a year after the union. Victory at the battle of gettysburg and the confederacy seen near defeat. Just the nicotine. Seventeen thousand union troops dispatched by ulysses s grant arrived and pushed the confederates back. Well today joe biden. Sworn in as the forty six president of the united states twenty thousand national guardsmen will defend the same capital this time from enraged citizens. It's impossible to understand how we've reached this point unless we look beyond the last few weeks even beyond the election to pre existing conditions such as our decades-long thinning out of civil society. The most recent lawlessness at the capitol reflects an escalating lawlessness that spans political parties religious affiliations age brackets social classes. And so we're faced with. The question will a militarized america. Be the new normal. Will the armed troops protecting the citadel of democracy today be patrolling the streets of writing cities tomorrow will the blatant failures of our institutions and our leaders continued to fester to this explosive level of distrust chuck. Colson often said that unless people are governed by their conscience they will be governed by the constable when people were unable to govern themselves. They then face a choice. Between order or continued chaos. Most often people will choose order which inevitably means the loss of freedoms the freedom to peaceably. Assemble is impossible to maintain when assemblies frequently turned into riots. looting or sedition. The freedom of speech seems particularly vulnerable today when big tech world so much power and decides like twitter facebook and instagram. Already have to crack down on political speech they deem offensive or dangerous and just last week representative alexandria. Ocasio cortez spoke openly about forming a committee to rein in our media environment. That's something that should anyone who has ever read any dystopia novel ever and our second amendment freedoms are most vulnerable. When used as cover by mass shooters are insurrectionist. Perhaps the most consistent refrain from america's founders is that our national experiment would ultimately prove unsustainable unless there was a virtuous citizenry. our constitution simply cannot ever knows who refused to govern themselves. John adams our second president said it most clearly quote. Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It's wholly inadequate to the government of any other and yet americans are becoming increasingly. Immoral and irreligious are shocking. Lack of conscience on display in rising numbers of both deaths from despair by that. I mean addiction self harm and suicide and acts of desperation meaning violent acts riots and even self mutilation pursuit of identity or sexual pleasure. Look we pump poison ideas into our hearts and minds and then call it entertainment. We pump lies into our children and then call it education. The result is that america finds itself in such a dark deeply divided. Play place that alexander solzhenitsyn accurately described in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight speech at harvard. We have he said quote very little defense against the abyss of human decadence such as the misuse of liberty for moral violence against young people such as motion pictures full of pornography crime and horror even the strict. This laws sits alternates in might add even twenty thousand national guard. Troops will ultimately be powerless. Defend people against such moral corrosion but the situation is dire. But it's not without hope as chuck. Colson often said despair as a sin. Christ is risen from the dead and god and his gracious goodness has revealed to us what is true and what is good. He's given us his word and through prayer. He makes himself available to

Ulysses S Grant America President Lincoln National Guardsmen Ocasio Cortez Gettysburg Joe Biden Colson Chuck Instagram Alexandria John Adams Twitter Facebook Alexander Solzhenitsyn Harvard
"colson" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

05:08 min | 9 months ago

"colson" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"These questions are based on breakpoint commentaries and podcasts. That we've aired recently short courses we've held and articles and columns that we've posted if you want to submit a question you can do so at. Ask the colson center at colson center dot org and you can also leave a comment on social media for us john as you might imagine with.

colson center john
"colson" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"colson" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Of our history that draws us closer to the humor. The of those who lived through those times and by doing so they give us a deeper understanding of race in America now, there's our moderator. Rakiya Adams. So we look forward to this conversation. I thought I might start out by telling you what we plan to do will start off with readings by Colson and you will have a conversation for a few minutes and at the end will save some time for questions from the audience. So I thought we'd start with a short reading from both authors. If you don't mind certainly thanks so much for having me. This is the very first page section of the book and I wanted to have a sort of an overture of slavery. So this six-page section. I'm going to be the first page is the life story of a jari or as a grandmother. The first time Caesar approached Cora about running North she said no, this was her grandmother talking whores grandmother had never seen the ocean before that bright afternoon in the palm of WETA and the water dazzled after her time and the force dungeon the dungeon stored them until the ships arrived dahomeyan Raiders kidnapped the men first then back to her Village the next moon for the women and children marching them in Shane's to the see two by two. As you stared into the black doorway a jury thought she be reunited with her father down there in the dark the survivors from our village told her that when her father couldn't keep the pace of the Long March the slavers stove in his head and left his body by the trail. Her mother had died years before Coors grandmother was sold a few times and attract to the Fort passed between slave for glass beads. It was hard to say how much they paid for her and WETA as she was part of a bulk purchase 88 human Souls 460 crates of rum and Gunpowder the price of life upon after the standard haggling in Coast English able-bodied men and childbearing women fetched more than juveniles making an individual accounting difficult. The ship was out of Liverpool and made two previous stops along the Gold Coast the captain staggered his purchases rather than find himself with cargo of singular culture and disposition who New Age kind of what brand of mutiny his captives might cook.

America WETA Shane Cora Colson Rakiya Adams Gold Coast Coors Coast English Liverpool Raiders Caesar
The First Step Act, Chuck Colson, and the Churchs Work of Restoration

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:08 min | 1 year ago

The First Step Act, Chuck Colson, and the Churchs Work of Restoration

"I'm old enough to remember that time way back in two thousand, eighteen when Democrats and Republicans worked together. Really it happened and resulted in a major bipartisan criminal justice reform bill called the first step act which sought to reduce the number of people in overcrowded federal prisons and improve conditions for those behind bars. When he endorsed the bill President Trump said this we're all better off when former inmates can receive and re enter society as law abiding productive citizens at last month's Republican National. Convention Ivanka trump called the first step act the most significant criminal justice reform of our generation? I don't think that's an overstatement. A major feature of this bill is that it reduces mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenders, especially low level nonviolent offenders, and for those already serving time for crack cocaine related offenses the reductions were retro active in just its first year. First Step Act has literally changed thousands of lives according to a recent report from the United States sentencing commission the sense is. More than seven thousand Federal Prisoners Dean able to safely return to their communities were reduced as the libertarian publication reason rightly noted the first step to act as a modest but very real first step towards comprehensive criminal justice reform and I'd add that as part of the legacy of Chuck Colson and the very good work of prison fellowship, this bills and example of the Church's work of restoration. God us. Chuck Colson to transform the way that many political leaders especially conservative political leaders thought. About criminal justice while imprisoned chuck learn just how empty and even counterproductive the lock them up and throw away the key rhetoric that he wants espoused really was the call that God then placed on Chuck's life was to bring the Gospel to prisoners and their families through prison fellowship but that quickly expanded to include prison in criminal justice reform. He quickly realized that being tough on crime was pointless unless we were first smart about crime being smart about crime lead Chuck to campaign against. The three strikes and you're outlaws that swept the US during the nineteen nineties he knew that such laws would only lead to overcrowded prisons, unaffordable system building and maintenance, and eventually the court ordered releases of thousands of prisoners because of political pressures instead of Prudential Wisdom, we've seen some of that even recently God use Chuck Solid, conservative Christian and law and order credentials to advance this new message people who may not have given other activists. The time of day respectfully listened to him many. Hearts and minds were changed not just because of Chuck Colson Passion or is incredible ability to articulate. But because he took people with him back into prison to see for themselves, what he saw to borrow modern fraiche chuck move the Overton Window in other words that acceptable range of policies politically acceptable to the mainstream population and so decades later years after Chuck Olson's death at a time of deep and painful political division. The first apt act garnered bipartisan support, Chuck's legacy of giving people. The moral permission and the intellectual justification to do the right thing in this area is something that Christians should seek to emulate in every aspect of life and culture. Of course if we're going to do this, we have to I know what the right thing is, and then we have to learn to talk about issues in ways that might be heard about a year ago that vision drove us to launch. What would you say a video resource designed to help Christians Converse on our? Culture's most challenging questions. Now, our personal stories might not be as dramatic as Chuck Colson was, but we can still strive for the same humility

Chuck Colson Chuck Chuck Solid Chuck Olson President Trump United States Crack Cocaine Prudential Wisdom
Heading into the Election, What Would You Say About the Tough Issues of 2020?

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:51 min | 1 year ago

Heading into the Election, What Would You Say About the Tough Issues of 2020?

"Year ago the Colson Center launched an ambitious project that would equip Christians with answers to our cultures toughest questions, the kind of questions that tend to generate more heat than light whenever they come up the kind that many Christians tend to shy away from with this resource we hope to see Christians running into those conversations about God, Morality Truth and culture not running away from them. While the what would you say project is a reality. It's a video series with each video answering a single difficult question with answers that are trustworthy, credible, understandable, most importantly sharable among the questions we've tackled just in this past year our. Science and religion opposed to one another as critical theory biblical. When does life began? Does ripe justify abortion does the existence of intersex people proved that there are more than two genders how about this one was Jesus is socialist or does porn improve relationships to the Crusades? Prove that Christianity is a violent religion. You know all those easy questions that Christians get these videos can be found at either what would you say dot org or by going to the? What would you say channel on Youtube while they're you can hit the subscribe button and join over twenty three thousand other people who have joined are what would you say? So for these videos have been viewed over a million times now over the next twelve weeks or so with the election season in full gear, we've planned to set videos to tackle the various political and policy questions and issues that are front and center on everyone's minds. These videos will not only equip Christians for conversations about the presidential campaign and the place of faith in elections in the Public Square. But also about those issues that are central to state and local ballots, including abortion restrictions, education economics, race, and civic responsibility. For example, to videos already available address questions that many young people have about economics questions that have led this emerging generation to lean more socialist direction these videos are is. The answer and this capitalism only benefit the rich and over the next few weeks, we're going to release videos at tackled two questions having to do with the political side of abortion i. what happens when someone says I don't like abortion, but I don't think it should be illegal for everyone and according to a recent study. There's a significant number of Americans who think that abortion is wrong but are reticent to make any legal changes to its status including to even to horrific practices such as later term abortions. This is an issue on the Colorado ballot this year shamefully my state is. One of only nine that remain in which later term abortion is allowed. In fact, our states most famous late-term abortionists kills over two hundred so-called viable fetuses a year. That's why by the way we've scheduled, what would you say video on the issue of late-term abortions and early October and other series of what would you say videos? We'll tackle questions about voting. Why should Christians vote what if I don't like any of the candidates? Should I vote anyway and of course, how should we respond to that old line I'm not gonNA vote my vote won't make a difference anyway each what would You say video is short and it's sharable only about four or five minutes long. It's animated and interesting well researched solidly grounded in Scripture and based and a Christian worldview each what would you say video will leave you with three or four memorable points to help you weighed confidently into these tough conversations and to help you prepare for the craziness of the next several weeks we've created a downloadable full-color what would you say booklet based on the videos and entitled Your Guide for talking about the tough issues of two thousand twenty this resource walks you through hot button issues such as abortion. Critical theory whether Christians should avoid politics. My voting is just the beginning of our civic responsibilities. This booklets available with any donation to breakpoint in the Colson Center. Simply come to breakpoint dot org slash September at breakpoint dot org slash September. Your gift will help us continue to produce what would you say videos and quipping Christians with the answers they need for our cultures, toughest questions and whenever you give while send you the what would you say guide to talking about the tough issues in twenty

Colson Center Youtube Jesus Public Square Colorado
How American Think About Abortion, and What Pro-lifers Must Learn

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:52 min | 1 year ago

How American Think About Abortion, and What Pro-lifers Must Learn

"It is the job of every Christian, not just some to oppose evils like abortion and protect goods like pre-born human lot. Here's how you can do it too for the Colson Center. I'm John Stonestreet. This is break point. Recently political scientists Michael J. New describe the results of what's being called quote the largest known indepth interview study of American attitudes on abortion he described them as nuanced a better term would be complicated and maybe not at all coherent this new study out of Notre Dame, which is entitled how Americans understand abortion not only attempted to determine what Americans believe about abortion but why they believe it and which factors influence those believes anyone who opposes. Abortion anyone committed to protecting the pre-born has much to learn from these results. For example, I find it fascinating that according to the study most Americans are simply not quote particularly knowledgeable about the details of abortion those of US neck deep in this issue might find it unbelievable that anyone could be unfamiliar with basic facts about fetal development or about public policy or about what Roe v Wade actually did to America or were state abortion laws currently. Stand, but many people are, and that makes the task of education especially when it comes to the science and politics of abortion a priority for pro-lifers and fact, the data suggests that many Americans would be shocked if they could learn how permissive our nation's abortion laws actually are another lesson to learn from this Notre Dame study is that we must do a better job publicizing the life affirming work done by thousands of pregnancy help centers in. The US much of the support for legal abortion is based on fear that children born after unintended pregnancies will be neglected and that women would be adversely impacted by carrying in unintended pregnancy to term in other words. Apparently, people are simply still unaware that these very old arguments which date back to even before Roe v Wade itself in other words who will care for these women and children have substantially been answered in incredible ways by pro-lifers. Everywhere. Easing the concerns about whether help is available for women, our children and unexpected crisis pregnancies will be essential to any effective pro-life apologetic. The most important lesson from the study however is just how deeply moral relativism is shaping the abortion debate a large percentage of Americans dislike abortion, but they're also uncomfortable with making abortion illegal. This is incredible. Even those who think that abortion should be legal. Think that there's something wrong with it and yet they simply cannot imagine any alternative to the status quo successful pro-life outreach to this group suggests new is the key to creating a durable pro-life majority that can restore legal protection to the unborn in other words in addition to the beautiful and brilliant work of caring for children for women and crisis the kind of work the pro-life moving has. Excelled in for decades, we still have to know how to make the case for life and by we I, mean you and I mean me, we need to know the science surrounding abortion so that they can know that the science is on the side of life we need to know how embryology and ultrasounds have only strengthened the case for the humanity of the fetus. The case is so. Incredibly strong in fact but as this study reveals, we can't assume that Americans know that and if they do know it, we can't assume they can connect the dots to the immorality of taking innocent pre-born lies. The case that abortion is wrong has to be made alongside the case that abortion should be illegal and not just the quote unquote pro-life professionals after all if the Supreme Court ever. Does manage to overturn Roe v Wade and of course, we pray that it does the status and safety of preborn children will be decided on a state by state basis local law matters when it comes to abortion as much even more. So the national law and that law is a moral teacher many Americans think abortion should be legal simply because it is and that's why pro-abortion forces oppose. Any and every restriction on abortion whatsoever as if it's an outrageous infringement on the rights of women in other words, they must not allow a pro-life foot in the door. So those of us who care about the unborn must help people know what they should know about abortion so that they can make the connections they currently aren't making.

United States America ROE Wade John Stonestreet Colson Center Michael J. Supreme Court
Join Us in Prayer for Our Nation

The BreakPoint Podcast

05:08 min | 1 year ago

Join Us in Prayer for Our Nation

"To join us for the call center. I'm John. Stonestreet, this is great for. Christians should be among those most deeply concerned about the divided state of our nation left versus right mass. No mass reopened versus stay at home virtual school versus in person raised politics police abortion religious liberty not to mention the remainder of what certain to be brutal presidential campaign. The issues we face range from essential to non-essential on essential matters, we should mourn deception and vowed to fight. For the truth on non essential matters we should mourn and hope to overcome division God's people can neither stay on the sidelines nor run away from the struggle instead knowing there is no hope other than Christ. We must ask onto mercifully powerfully mobilize us is people to advance that which is true and good if Christians are to speak with clarity courage and confidence and to be the. Of Truth and love and a world of Noise Echo Chambers, then we'll need to be prepared but even perfectly crafted arguments cannot replace Shut Colson would say the church being the Church speaking cannot replace being and to be the people that God calls us to be right now, we must rely on prayer. That's why each and every Wednesday morning between all the twelfth of November, the fourth, and that's the morning after the twenty twenty election the Colson center will be hosting a national prayer time the a Webinar we want you to join US each and every week to pray first and foremost for God's mercy. But that he would revive his church that he would bring about a renewal of righteousness that he would empower us to courageously offer protection for the most vulnerable to champion reconciliation across our deepest divides and that he would. Allow us to be instruments in the sustaining of religious freedom and the recovery of the family in our nation. Each prayer time will feature a devotional challenge and a prayer by Christian leaders such as Oz Ganesh Johnny Eric's Totta focus on the family President Jim Daly Woodside Bible Pastor Chris Brooks and watermark pastor Todd Wagner as well as at Stecher from the Billy Graham Center and the Heritage Foundation President Keiko James Now due to the limited capacity of zoom there will be limited live spots each week available to everyone who registers However, each weeks recording will be sent to anyone who registers so come to breakpoint dot org for more details and Fiji's Paul tells us that we don't wrestle against flesh and blood but against the rulers, the authorities, the cosmic powers over this present darkness against the spiritual forces of evil in heavenly places when people see us their enemies, it's difficult to remember that they aren't our enemies. So what we need to do as Paul Instructs this put on the former of God Faith Truth Righteousness Peace Salvation the word of God. And he says praying at all times in the spirit with all prayer and supplication keeping alert with all perseverance making supplication for all the Saints, and the Book of acts the earliest church activity we read off is prayer thousands of people from completely different backgrounds came together in one mind one art in prayer with one accord. That's what acts chapter one, verse fourteen and Chapter Two versus forty. Two seven says than what happened with the Holy Spirit moved in the world was never the same in fact, every spiritual revolution in history. With some kind of unified persevering prayer the very first outpouring of the holy. Spirit. In acts to the great awakenings, the businessman's revival and the Welsh revival story after story, you read the same thing people prayed God's spirit moved on the other hand every Christian history who was able to persevere and righteousness. Temptation or persecution without seeing revival in their lifetime they also did that through prayer. Our prayer of course cannot force God's hand but are only way forward is to seek his will together are purse can't control God. But we can invite him to change our hearts and minds including our own gods always working in our lives whether we realize it or not. But something powerful and world changing happens when people pray for God's spirit to move. The, Great Jonathan Edwards urged his fellow pastors to quote be much in prayer and fasting both in secret and with one another it is God's will. He said that the prayers of his saints shall be great and the principal means of carrying on the designs of Christ's kingdom in the world. When God has something to accomplish for his church, it is with his will that there should precede it the extraordinary prayer of his people Paul even tells us to pray for all things at all times for sesame chapter five specifically for our leaders both spiritual and secular as what the

Holy Spirit Paul Saints Stonestreet Colson United States Colson Center Noise Echo Chambers President Trump Billy Graham Center Jonathan Edwards Jim Daly Stecher Fiji Heritage Foundation Principal Keiko James Todd Wagner Woodside Bible
Mariko B. Ryan - The Opposite of Fear is Freedom

The Flow Artists Podcast

05:38 min | 1 year ago

Mariko B. Ryan - The Opposite of Fear is Freedom

"Wondering if you could just stop by. Giving us a little bit of your background and might tell us about where you grew up. Sure. Thank you for having made by view if I may start with something slightly different, and then kind of Wolf into your question, it feels right this point knowing that you're gonNA have USTRALIAN lesson, and possibly some New Zealand looseness, listeners and Mahdi listeners live in Australia. To greet them out traditional way so if you don't mind to do that and they go into Chris Hayes. Yeah let me to buy a native. The Mahato Hawk of the cut th-wa. They not cut the auto thin lot further fatwa unlike a made Tina yet to. while. The Tate Ottawa. Took it. So I've just greeted them and let them know who I am. Tribal is speaking that I'm from the northern. Off said Ottawa, and what we, the in the region that we call tied, took it so I have placed myself now in a location. For your listeners. Thank you for that. We did I grow up now this this will take me out of my tribal in grew up in Oakland. I was a child of parents and grandparents who had been part of the Ibanez Ation Price Ace that occurred during the fifties and sixties so the government. Made some economic policy decisions, which made that many of my relations hedge leave tribal areas to find week. I'm a child of those. Generations brought up in Oakland end lift or conceivable years to Levin L appliances in new. Zealand as well which I think was a very positive thing to do to get out of a US associate like this. And experienced the region's. Pivotal years because they caused mess cultural disconnection. And, they enabled the government to grab huge tracts of land, making it impossible for many Erie tune in my family and my upbringing. was part of the impact where we could go what we call home to travel lanes, but we no longer had lanes the so we couldn't retuned to love. And sorts so that whole part of my life now I look at it. In terms of what historical periods did I grow up and? What was my experienced during that time had an impact Mian tombs of going forward as a young. Girl in thin woman unto the swilled. And what have I been able to extract? From the things that we'd lost by being why from l.? A. And I gained, so they were really interesting. Innovation Spring, curious in my growing up is. My Molly side. But we were really fortunate as well because my father and grandmother who lived close by maintained connections very strongly with a tribal areas, so we travel back and forth as whichever back and forth Tortuga liens constantly I remember vividly. It would take us more than twelve hours driving to get what is now about a five hour drive. And the roads were pretty rough, but it gave me a really sound connection to my roots, and we didn't become strangest to tribal land and to our entities. So in that respect. We were very fortunate. That wasn't the case for many of my relations who? Lived and different eras around the country, and many moved over to Australia and been have been unable to reconnect. Yes so, that's that's that Christian. Beautiful and sorry sounds like it was a real priority and our real conscious choice feel family that, even though they might have been physically moving away from these tribal lands that really wanted to maintain that connection, and as a what astray leading girl I'm really love to hear more about like what that looks like in your family life. It looks different now than it did when I was a child so when I was a child, I remember my my father, my my parents and his relations. Attending what will we code land meetings and Oakland so we're in a very politically charged time, so they were very conscious of the. Bureaucratic. Colson wheels that had been put in place to land off them. And they had to fight a beer credit in cool system in order to hold on to name, so there were several land to meetings are record as a child where people would get together and figure out how they were going to respond to a very complicated legal system that was biased against them. And so I remember very much being a part of that in an although I, was more likely to be outside playing with the other children I do recall many times sitting inside the Ramos Waylon this name. To what was being seed in also hearing? On natives because? Switching, languages constantly throughout the conversation which I said do it in a book. It's a kind of a reflection of my neighbors of how the language switching was to so fluid.

Oakland Chris Hayes Ottawa Zealand Australia Ibanez Wolf New Zealand Tina Erie Levin L Molly
A New Declaration of Dependence On God

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:50 min | 1 year ago

A New Declaration of Dependence On God

"This, fourth of July we find our nation more divided than perhaps at any other time since the civil war. That's what happens when a nation abandoned God and Rejects Truth Colson Center I'm John Stonestreet. This break point. On July Fourth, two thousand and four Chuck Colson breakpoint commentary was entitled a New Declaration of dependence reading through it again recently I was struck by just how prophetic his words were as a student of history chuck not only understood the founding principles of our nation, as expressed in the declaration of independence, but he understood on what those principles were grounded. So what happens chuck ass when the foundations are rejected? What happens when religion? Truth and public virtue are all made non essential. What happens when citizens want the benefits of the American experiment without taking seriously what it requires of us will here's Jet Colson from July second, two thousand four. Fourth Celebrates our liberty and national independence. I get through every time I hear. The cannons blast that rousing finale of the eighteen twelve overture, and I got a lump in my throat whenever I join in singing America America. God shed His grace on the. Indeed God has blessed America this nation dedicated to the proposition that all men are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights has endured two hundred twenty eight years. America's the oldest constitutional republic on Earth. But all is not well in our land. When Thomas Jefferson Penn, the immortal words of the Declaration of Independence, he deliberately appealed the creator, or he acknowledged an overriding obligation to nature and nature's got, and he understood that ordered. Liberty is not just a subjective preference, but a divinely ordained condition for which human beings are designed. But. Over the last few decades, legions of skeptics have mounted a massive assault on these self evident Ruth's in prestigious schools in the halls of government, and especially in the Supreme Court. God is banished from public compensation. If a public schoolteacher introduce Jefferson's ideas and language into the classroom today, she likely be called on the carpet, possibly disciplined. This assault on God in public cultures severely damages our democracy. If God is thrown out of our history, we lose our basis for believing that individuals have rights and dignity in an empty universe. We have no meaning no value without God. There are no inalienable rights and no certain proof that liberty is better than tyranny or that life better than death. Everything's a matter of opinion and power. The references to God, the Declaration of Independence provide a foundation for moral argument within civil society and moral truths pervade our founding documents from beginning to end without God is the source of all these moral principles. The Public Square would quickly revert to the law of the jungle. Brutish power would prevail the week. The unborn, the elderly, the gravely ill could be quietly terminated. Much as I enjoy the anthems and fireworks more than that is called for on this July fourth. We need to confess our moral failures in our national sins, repenting of allies of. Killing innocent babies and the elderly. Renewal begins on our knees. It's there. We hear soul searching questions from God himself asking how long will you defend the unjust and show partiality to the wicked rescue the weekend needy deliver them from the hand of the wicked. Our nation's founding document declared independence from Britain. But with equal fervor declared dependence upon God expressing firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence. The signers committed the American experiment. Do their maker the spirit of seventeen seventy six was reverence and trust. So as we mark this solemn occasion, let us seek a rebirth of true liberty, which is possible, only when governed by divine law for without God, we could never have liberty and justice for

Chuck Colson America Thomas Jefferson Penn Assault Declaration Of Independence Jet Colson Public Square John Stonestreet Providence Britain Supreme Court Ruth
A Statue Falls as Britain Confronts Its Racist History

The World

04:33 min | 1 year ago

A Statue Falls as Britain Confronts Its Racist History

"Most of the recent global protests have been peaceful with some exceptions a London street fight this weekend led to multiple arrests and police injuries police in Bristol England are also investigating property damage dramatic scenes there over the weekend powered by anger over Bristol's history with the trans Atlantic slave trade the world's Orla Barry reports from London the statue of slave trader Edward Colston stood in the city center of Bristol four hundred and fifteen years on the plaque the remains are the words a memorial of one of the most virtuous and wise sons of Bristol hello thanks someone painted in white spray paint black lives matter this was the moment the colts and stuff she was pulled off its pedestal on Sunday the demonstration posed with windy in the figure's neck a reminder of the final moments of George fill its life was killed in police custody in Minneapolis for this protester it wasn't just about a monument in Bristol coming down today hopefully signifies change hopefully we send a message not just to everyone in the UK or the USA worldwide we need worldwide difference it call just come here this call in America in the second World Wide Testors rolled the eighteen foot bronze statue through the streets of the city local police stood by and watched you know I wonder why we just we made a very tactical decision to stop the the side of the street recent tactics was to take place today police say they've launched an investigation into what happened and the British home secretary Priti Patel welcome to that decision his wife had cheated please follow up on thoughts and make sure that justice is taken undertaken with those individuals that are responsible for such this orderly a mole this behavior for years the statue has been a source of controversy in Bristol one of England's most progressive cities trade redwood Colson was born in the city and made his fortune to the royal African company historians say the company sold close to one hundred thousand people from West Africa to the Americas in the sixteen hundreds Colston nature donated much of his wealth to local schools and charities but David on the show got from the university of Manchester says people in political power didn't care where the money came from that's a cult of Colston was created for political and religious reasons in the eighteen nineties because the people around Bristol that didn't really worry the fact that cold snap in the slave trade he's not the greatest philanthropists in the city really to do with the attempts by Bristol's a political dimension to meet to reinforce that power and that privilege is bigotry a spokesman for the British prime minister says Boris Johnson sees the statues removal as a criminal act others say it erases history but all the sugar dismisses that line of criticism this is not an attack on the street this is what happens statues are removed they replaced that put in museums that taken off pedestals go to Germany outside of Berlin there is a museum full full of statues the the the singularly status none they were removed after the second World War because they reminded everybody of the Prussian militarism that it led to two world wars one is stuck to now lies at the bottom of Bristol harbour Colson's presence is still very visible in the city it's the way the Coldstream name dominates our skyline in particular in the central crystal was Martin is an artist and one of the driving forces behind the counter in Colston campaign we has been fighting to have the statue removed in that is the Colston tower there's you know the whole district Costa nothing you except St century she says it's time to remove Colson's name from streets and buildings across Bristol today an empty plane still stands in the city center and questions are now being asked about who should replace the statute Martin says it's time to pay tribute to those whose voices are rarely acknowledged I think they should be a monument to African ancestors knowledge and that can change so the total wealth of the city there's lots of things that can be done to put forth our history in the sky along which honors usually those without phone service the mayor of Bristol Marvin Rees who is black says he doesn't support social disorder but he called the colts in statute and affront to humanity one day he said it should be fished out of the harbor and put into a

London
Protesters in England topple statue of slave trader into harbor

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Protesters in England topple statue of slave trader into harbor

"In the UK a statue of slave trader Edward Colston was torn down and thrown into Bristol harbour by protesters the bronze statue was erected in eighteen ninety five more than one hundred fifty years after Colson's death in eighty eight years after Britain abolished the slave trade Colson played a key role in the royal African company of seventeenth century slave trader responsible for transporting around eighty thousand indentured people to the

UK Edward Colston Bristol Harbour Colson Britain
"colson" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"colson" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"Most of US had taken that first step of inviting Jesus into our lives but Tashiro that Jesus is actually inviting us into his life for the Colson Center. I'm John Stonestreet. This is Greg. Point one of the most important effects of embracing a deliberate self conscious Christian worldview and losing the sacred secular distinction that so many Christians have absorbed from the world around us is seen the depth the breadth and the width of the Lordship of Jesus Christ over every area of life. Once we see life in this way our understanding of serving Jesus will be radically reshaped in light of the unassailable undefeatable and advancing Kingdom of God wants Chuck Colson embrace that vision of the Christian life. He poured it into every single breakpoint commentary. Each and every day desperate to help Christians think clearly about cultural issues and trends from a Christian worldview and during the last decade of his Life Colston decided that the best way he could advance. This vision would be replication. That's why he invited Christian study within through what is now called the Colson fellows program inviting Christians to take a deep dive into Christian worldview over a ten month course of study trained and mentor by top Christian Authors and Thinkers. He saw class after class of Christians. Becoming the kind of culture shaping leaders that could look at the world around them effectively analyze critique and discern what was happening and become catalyst of cultural influence and change for Jesus. Christ what makes the Colson fellows program so different and so vital is that it's not just an exercise in learning new things as important as that is commission. Colson fellows are well commissioned because their training includes I teaching project a three. You're planning process and a self inventory on who God has made them to be. They're able to apply Christian worldview in real world practical ways. Here's how the program works. Those accepted learn how to articulate and defend Biblical truth in the marketplace of ideas through intensive instruction on world view and cultural analysis. They read Christian classics and the Best Contemporary Writers. Many of whom they interact with on frequent Webinars Colson Center Faculty include folks such as Oz Guinness. Johnny Ericsson Todd Dr Glenn Sunshine J Warner Wallace Jennifer Marshall. Scott clues endure and in what might be the best part Colson. Fellows study together and either one of forty five regional cohorts around the country or for those with no local cohort available through one of our online cohorts so we have doctors and business professionals learning alongside academics and lawyers who are also learning alongside pastors and Educators. The Cross pollination of applied faith is rich indeed those who complete the program join a network of more than fifteen commission. Colson fellows who studied with us and are living out a deeper faith in a broken world. This network includes people like Coulson fellow. Kristen wagoner one of the leading religious freedom attorneys in the nation who represented masterpiece cake shop owner Jack Phillips before the Supreme Court affect my interview with Kristen about religious freedom in this age of Corona Virus Airs. Today on the break point. Podcast Colson fellows program director. Michael Craven likes to say that. It's people study with the Colson fellows. Many have this moment of conversion serious-minded Christians who've been walking with Lord for many years. Discover more clearly some even for the first that they're a part of a much larger story. One that certainly includes but goes beyond our personal salvation in Jesus Christ. Christians often say I have invited Jesus into my life but the reality is Jesus invites all of us into his life his purpose his restoring work in the world. He created to life his life. We're invited to join him in his work of making all things new. Now if you're stirred.

Colson Center Colson Chuck Colson Jesus US John Stonestreet Kristen wagoner Greg Johnny Ericsson Todd Dr Glenn program director Oz Guinness Coulson Michael Craven Scott Lord Jack Phillips Supreme Court Jennifer Marshall Warner Wallace
"colson" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

12:08 min | 1 year ago

"colson" Discussed on The Book Review

"Of the podcast that we never missing episode in fact until now we haven't missed a single episode in fifteen years so it was not an easy decision for us to suspend new recordings of the podcast during the cloven nineteen crisis on the bright side. This is an opportunity for us to revisit. Some of our favorite episodes from the archives. Some of my personal favorites are with authors whose work I've been enjoying reader for years. This episode which dropped on August Twelfth. Two thousand sixteen features to such writers. Colson. Whitehead talking about the underground railroad and Jeffrey toobin talking about American heiress his book about Patty. Hearst both authors at interviewed before in fact that year I interviewed Colson on three separate occasions about the underground railroad once memorably.

Colson Jeffrey toobin Hearst Whitehead Patty
"colson" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"colson" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"His washing him bosses to listen and act Colson center on Johnston street this is break point as I said in a break point commentary last month gene editing technologies such as crisper and what's being called prime editing are existential threats we have no idea what our attempts to play god with the human genome will unleash on humanity yet we insist on charging ahead despite our imperfect knowledge with unbounded confidence in our abilities coming from a concerned non scientists like me concerns like that can be dismissed as alarmist but what if the concern comes from the director of the National Institute of health turns out that Francis Collins is also concerned in a recent article in discover magazine entitled we must never allow our technology to eclipse our humanity Collins call for a moratorium of at least five years on heritable human gene editing heritable gene editing technologies like prime editing end edit genes that can be passed on to future generations along with any unintended endangers mutations that differs from non heritable gene editing which can be used to treat people with life threatening disorders such as sickle cell disease HIV infections cancer muscular dystrophy the proponents of prime editing talk about the possibility of making quote any kind of DNA change that anyone wants at just about any site in the human genome thus according to Francis Collins scientists and leaders around the globe have an obligation to consider the appropriate use if any of heritable human gene editing this involves scrutinizing the safety of such experiments including the risk of unintended mutations as well as a clear eyed analysis of actual medical need anticipating some objections the NIH director then added that the current arguments that the benefits outweigh the risks are surprisingly on compelling and finally Collins and says that we must weigh the profound social ethical and moral issues associated with modifying the germ line in ways that could change the human species for ever that's good to hear someone as prominent as the director of the national institutes of health voice many of the same concern is that we have at break point but as Wesley J. Smith has pointed out in National Review it's still probably not enough Smith notes that when it comes to the rapid development of the most powerful technologies ever invented crisper germ line gene editing artificial life three parent embryos cloning well the trump administration has been and I'm quoting Smith here derelict for the most part while in I. H. director Colin statement should be applauded it's an exception as Smith states almost leaders higher up the food chain engage that question and more amplified media venues then discover Collins propose moratorium will never happen in some ways as I recently pointed out the Communist Party of China by sentencing doctor he to three years imprisonment for experimenting on fetuses using crisper has demonstrated more commitment to reining in scientific breasts then our own government of course given their track record it be silly to think that Beijing cares at all about human dignity or the sanctity of human life their reaction was almost certainly because doctor he's transgressions portrayed that country in an especially bad light in our country scientists differ from doctor he in only one respect they're a lot more subtle about what they're doing the doctor he was simply put we need much more evidence that those higher up the food chain in this administration care about the issue and are willing to make it a priority for that to happen we have to let them know it's a priority for us gene editing what Smith has called biotech anarchy is among the greatest threats to the sanctity and dignity of human life that we currently face I'll say it again it's an existential threat it's time for Christians and threw them our leaders to treat it like one eight point on Johnston street I'm Jim Tesco with your money now some retailers to market their goods on Amazon aren't always thrilled with the E. commerce giant at a house judiciary antitrust subcommittee hearing today the CEO of phone accessory maker pop sockets complained that Amazon sometimes a strong arm his company to lower its prices and also said the tech giant failed to remove fake products U. S. stocks sell to a narrow range but ultimately ended on the plus side again today give me the key indexes more fresh closing highs the Dow Jones industrials moved up fifty points will Smith Robert Downey junior big time movie stars about their respective new films look to be facing different faiths this opening weekend bad boys for life coming twenty five years after the original buddy cop film bad boys and again starring Smith and Martin Lawrence is seen bringing in a respectable forty million dollars over the four day holiday weekend but Downey's new talk to the animals flick do little is projected to well do little industry analysts see just the twenty two to twenty five million dollar opening taken that's not great that's your money now Fisher investments we do things differently another money managers don't understand why because our way works great for us but it may not work for your clients that's why Fisher investments as a fiduciary obligated to put clients first is the highest standard for a financial adviser so what do you provide cookie cutter portfolios like the rest of us no cookie cutter portfolios here Fisher investments Taylor's portfolios to meet each client's goals and needs but you do sell investments that are new high commissions right and.

Colson center
"colson" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"colson" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Railroad won the national book award and the pulitzer prize selected by oprah winfrey which i'm sure boosted sales a lot gave it a much bigger profile as you've finished and published published this book. Did it feel like a completely different experience because of where your career is not so much because of the success of the underground railroad <hes> you know it seemed see michael once in a lifetime kind of convergence of <hes> <hes> me doing what i set out to do and and other people getting it and then <hes> and was quite lovely but you know nine books in books that let's say people didn't appreciate underappreciated and books that people sort of got and then whether it goes well or crackly last time <hes> you always have to start with a blank page and you know i switch genres a lot and i'm always trying to figure out different ways of telling stories and so that challenge is always there. I'm writing a short realistic book about something. That actually happened because of is fantastic. This book is a nonfiction fiction book about poker and so <hes> i was in a good mood for a year and then <hes> you get back to work and it's as crappy as ever was your last book. The underground railroad is is being produced as a t._v. Series on amazon <hes>. Do you have any role in that. <hes> no i had a few you know talks with with barry jenkins a director <hes> but my attitude is <hes> once i wouldn't want to write it again and then i wonder things. I want to work on stuff. I you know look look new books like nickel boys so it's really cool. They're they're starting to shoot in august <hes> next month and we like ten episodes and i can <hes> we're to see what they do with it. Are you nervous about seeing your work adapted. Well <hes>. I think in general at adaptations are terrible. We'll so <hes> having someone like barry. Jenkins <hes> makes me feel very comfortable in an excited and you know it's one thing to write in different scenes on the page another thing to put him on on screen and so we've talked about some of his solutions for making dynamic <hes> for the screen and they're very smart and it's definitely i can never come up with a totally different medium and so <hes>. I'm pretty excited so you don't want to be drawn into writing. Screenplays plays next <hes> periodically. I'm like i teach semester. Can i buy the blockbuster screenplay now. Get twenty pages in and i'm like this sucks by a novel. You know it's it's hard work. <hes> mike do some things like i can't write screenplays apparently so <hes> stay in my lane is my my motto all right well congratulations on the book call some whitehead. It's been great to have you back. Thanks so much. Thank you see next time. Colson whitehead's new novel is the nickel. Oh boy is white had won the national book award and the pulitzer prize for his previous novel the underground railroad coming up. We hear from travis reader. He's a bio uh-huh ethicist who struggled with opioid dependence after a motorcycle accident shattered his foot now. He's an advocate for opioid use reform. His new book is titled in in pain. This is fresh air weekend. This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor squarespace.

barry jenkins national book award pulitzer prize Railroad oprah winfrey Colson whitehead michael squarespace amazon director mike travis
"colson" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"colson" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"The it's time to enlist in one of the best Christian worldview programs around tell you about it next on break point from the Colson center for Christian worldview. Here's Eric Metaxas with breakpoint. Before he became a radio host before he started a prison fellowship. And before he worked in the Nixon White House, Chuck Colson was a United States. Marine Chuck took the marines can-do attitude into everything he did, including his design of a culture. Enroll view thinking course called the Colson fellows program in effect. If you complete this tough nine month long program, you will step out on the cultural stage as a worldview marine. How does it work? Well, I'm glad you asked every year people from around the country apply for the program, and we pick over one hundred of them who are eager to learn how to articulate and defend biblical truth in the marketplace of ideas. We spend the next nine months putting them through worldview and culture bootcamp, they study Christian classics and the best of contemporary writers. They watch films and debates deepening their understanding of culture and learning to identify the worldview messages in everything they read or watch Colson. Fellows also take part in by monthly webinars with Christian. Worldview. Speakers like John Stonestreet Oz, Guinness Shaun McDowell and Johnny Ericsson Todd, three times you will join other fellows in weaken residencies in Colorado Springs, Orlando in Washington, DC to meet one another and learn directly from great worldview teachers, and you'll develop your own plan that will allow you to use your gifts and what you've learned for the benefit of others. So who becomes a Colson, fellow professors, homemakers, filmmakers, teachers, lawmakers businessmen, university presidents college students, ministers they come from all over the world. People like my friend, Mike Lindsay president of Gordon college and Gabe Lyons, and other friend, author and founder of Q ideas. Christians come from as far away as New Zealand to join the program after completing the program. Darren HOA businessman in Shanghai designed a workplace initiative to help other expatriots integrate their vocation and faith to better serve their organizations. And in the process, be a witness for Christ in China and page Fisher. Culture manager at a pediatric rehab center also became a Colson. Fellow page recently told us that the Colson fellows program has helped me to reignite my passion for a world that desperately needs hope. My church has really come behind me recently in his allowing me the opportunity to teach virtual access beginning with the topic of gender. Another Colson, fellows Chuck Lee says the program, deepened reshaped and expanded my vision of how I could use my work as a coach and mentor to help young teenagers. The curriculum is comprehensive. The instructors truly outstanding and the Colson fellows themselves a terrific group across the board. Yes, the Colson fellows program is demanding, but God will use it to prepare you for frontline kingdom work. This was Chuck Colson. Great goal in the final years of his life to teach people how to think Christian Lee about our fallen world and to use their gifts to begin repairing the damage in their own neighborhoods and communities. If you are interested in learning more about the Colson fellows program, please. Visit Colson, fellows dot org. I encourage you to check it out. If you think you have what it takes, please fill out an application form by the way to make the program even more accessible and affordable. We now actually have regional Colson fellows programs in about ten cities around the country as a worldview marine, you'll have a role in building up in healing our broken culture. So I really do hope you'll apply with nine months. YouTube for Christ in his kingdom will become one of the few, the proud well, actually, the humble, the Colson fellows for breakpoint. This is Eric Metaxas.

Colson Chuck Colson Colson center Eric Metaxas marines Chuck Christian Lee Nixon White House United States Mike Lindsay Darren HOA Chuck Lee China Shanghai Gordon college John Stonestreet Oz DC New Zealand Gabe Lyons Colorado Springs
"colson" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"colson" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"The worldview training outstanding teaching in great fellowship all prepare Colson, Fellows for Kingdom work. Edgar weeds did it, How you stay tuned to BreakPoint them from the Colson Center for Christian Worldview. Here's Eric Metaxas with BreakPoint. Not far from Guatemala City is Central America's biggest landfill known as the dump, their some six thousand five hundred children wake up each morning beneath cardboard in corrugated metal. There's no running water in their first job of the day is to scavenge for food in anything They can resell. They are the survivors of nearly four decades of a civil war that destroyed farming villages into this nightmare stepped Edgar Wheats who in 2016 became the first Latin American to become a Colson fellow. His participation in the Colson Fellows program gave him the world you Foundation. He needed to begin a ministry for these children. Orphans kids with mental or physical disabilities. The abused in the abandoned, the desperate and defeated. Edgar had already spent 25 years working in the scavenger community. But in 2016 He says, the Lord put it in my heart to launch generation to generation network. I understood from the Lord that this is my new and expanded personal. Calling generation degeneration provides education health care and community support services to the poorest of the poor. Among those Edgar has influenced is Bill son Ramirez a 24-year-old man who has mobilize, seventy volunteers to serve 1500 children. Edgar calls him a young leader of the next generation. The content of the Colson Fellows program gave Edgar all the necessary elements for this new ministry from the Christian worldview perspective. This was very important. Edgar says, since I don't have formal training in theology, Colson Fellows develop a personal three-year plan using their unique gifts to pursue Christian worldview in their communities generation degeneration network became Edgar is project. He has also passed on his worldview training to ten other partner ministries. The world often ignores these desperately poor children or sees them as not worth helping, But Edgar knows these children are made in the image of God and were called to serve them as we would. Jesus himself. I hope Edgar. Story will inspire you to consider becoming a Colson fellow yourself were, you will spent nine months in a structured study program about worldview. You'll share ideas, experiences and fellowship in an online form, and you'll the 10-3 weekend residencies in Phoenix, Colorado Springs and the DC area with worldview leaders like Glenn Sunshine Johnny Eriksson to`dhA, Sean McDowell, And Jim daily. If you think you don't have time for such a programme, No, that the Colson Fellows program is specially designed for busy people. At the end of nine months. You'll know how to explain in contrast the Christian worldview to other world views in a winsome way And like Edgar you'll develop a program that allows you to share your worldview training with others, Chuck Colson who founded this program did. So as he put it to equip serious Christians to think seriously about all of life's issues and to become change agents to strengthen the church. And in turn the culture for generations to come. The Colson Fellows program is an intense but deeply rewarding. Since But once he completed, you will be on the front lines of Christian ministry in influence. The program has a quipped some 1200 people to influence areas of law, family, the arts and sciences, medicine and government. Please come to Colson, Fellows dot org to learn more applications are due on May 31st for the nine-month programme, beginning in August. I'll be there and I hope you will be to learning how Godkin use you Redeem your own community and put together an action plan for Kingdom work For BreakPoint This is Erkmen taxes. John.

Edgar Wheats Colson Center for Christian Wo Chuck Colson Colson Edgar Guatemala City Eric Metaxas America partner John Bill son Ramirez Glenn Sunshine Phoenix Colorado Springs Sean McDowell Johnny Eriksson DC nine months
"colson" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"colson" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"Recruiting if you don't he's got to look out for colson come nba draft time this is the senior year and he will have a chance to be drafted but he's not going to put him back on the floor early jeopardize his draft status so there's going to be no rushing him back i would love to see him back on the floor it would be great if notre dame gets him back mix the tournament and then he like balls out negative sweet sixteen that will be an awesome story there's no guarantee of that there is a very real possibility that colson has played his last game in college and with that has has unfortunately ruined his shot at being in all america i guess to that i'd say this the difference in college basketball college football is that you're never really cold out of it because of the conference tournament in the automatic bid and so i'm i'm completely on board obviously with you don't rush back bonsey causing a rushed back any body but if he's healthy enough to play i don't think you make the decision but we're not gonna play have because we're not gonna make the instantly tournament because as long as you got you know in poker terms of chip and a chair you got a shot you know you can i'd rather go try to win the eight a c tournament than the sec tournament but if you're in that tournament you in you get hot you can theoretically get an automatic the instantly tournament so i i just don't think you're ever quote out of it the way you are in some other sports major league baseball the nfl the nba you get to places where you're out of it the college basketball because this conference term if you're you're never technically out of it until you lose in a conference.

colson football nfl nba basketball sec
"colson" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"colson" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"Maryland new constable happens and then we're sitting together and marcus foster goes now for crate in their game against seton hall and he goes practice is off for tomorrow and he starts laughing like he's going to legitimately cancel practice he doesn't in that practice bonsey colson is running down the floor it's not it's not a bang bang play it's a noncontact injury he feels a pop in the next damn practice what he was joking about cancelling that is cruel irony there and he played in that next game because they were hoping bray was telling me on wednesday they were hoping was just going to be a strain there were taken a he just he kind of fought through it then sunday came monday came it was still there tuesday finally comes it's not getting better he wasn't practising he goes they could it xrayed sure enough there's a fracture doctors say it's got to be surgery and it's braz nightmare come to life here it was the one thing he was trying to avoid he was telling me that he was taking farallon colson days after games not running them hart he was per serving than basically as much as he could because there is no six men on this team there is no seventh man he's like i want to be able to go seven deepen the tournament i'm waiting for those players to establish themselves to step up and so because of that i'm not running my guys ragged 'cause he was so worried about this very thing happening and then ironically it happens just when colson is running up and down the floor no one other thing he said he told any cats as well noted amos put an eightweek time line on this but bray like if they're not going to make the tournament colson second play again if they do make the tournament i still think he's going to have to be a 100 percent because bray is concerned and coaches more more think about this because frankly it'll kill you and.

Maryland seton hall colson amos bray marcus foster 100 percent eightweek
"colson" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"colson" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"Uh my question for you is will notre dame make the incidentally tournament no i don't think so and it's not simply because it's i mean how do you go through an acc schedule without your best player i mean that's tough especially when you know maybe somebody like do could do it because they got so many awesome players in us you know at notre dame they they don't work could at that level mike would tell you that and so you lose bazi colson like that hurts i mean i think you could reasonably say marvin baghli better basketball player than bonsey colson duke could deal with lose the marvin baghli better than notredame could deal with losing bonsey goals affair it is fair and you mentioned their best player let slip reinforced the fact that he was on pace to be a firstteam all america we were the preseason first dimona us yeah but in any and then a backed up with his play like all said he was their best player like arguably topfive player in america at this point yeah i don't disagree and so you'll lose that guy fate weeks with a fractured foot and is this big twelve scared i mean i acc schedule is gonna be is tough no matter what is tough for everybody no matter what is especially telling when you lose a guy like bonsey colson again somebody who might be one of the five best players in america and then you combine that with even when they had bonsey colson they didn't get much done they've got lost a ball state on the resume a lost to a terrible indiana team on the resume and that's with bonsey kohl's so if your resume with ponzi colson is yeah nice win but like kind of a miracle win over wichita stay but either way it counsels count it but you got lot you've already got to sub ninety kimpan losses with bonsey colson we try to get done without him i.

mike notredame america colson bonsey kohl basketball indiana wichita