35 Burst results for "Colorectal Cancer"

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:42 min | 6 months ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on WTOP

"More from the colorectal cancer alliance at get screened dot org Money news at 25 and 55 a WTO P at three 55 here's Jeff Bellinger This is a Bloomberg money minute The pandemic created a lot of challenges for hotel operators but it hasn't been all doom and gloom Leisure travel is holding up and that has really been the bright spot throughout the entire pandemic Chip Rogers of the American hotel and lodging association says people who have booked meetings and conferences at hotels are apparently hoping over crown will fade as rapidly as it appeared We haven't seen a lot of cancellations of large events yet and that's really good news but the white collar business travel that accounted for more than half of all hotel revenue pre-pandemic has not rebounded That's essential for the industry operators also need to overcome the huge challenges posed by the labor shortage in the bottlenecks in the supply chain Certain hotels that could be at full occupancy are having to shut down rooms or blocks of rooms because they don't have the labor or they don't have the materials and lead ins and things like that to clean those rooms And so yeah that is certainly hurting the industry right now is something we need to get past quickly From the Bloomberg newsroom I'm Jeff Bellinger on Just ahead on W TOP of course we're keeping an eye on the sky and on the roads as we expect freezing rain to overspread the area later this morning a winter weather advisory takes effect at 6 o'clock this morning just a couple of hours from now So far the radar is good but we are keeping an eye on things very closely Three 57 All of us have felt the effects of isolation during this pandemic So we can understand the little how some veterans feel.

Jeff Bellinger American hotel and lodging ass Bloomberg colorectal cancer WTO Rogers
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

01:30 min | 8 months ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"I think it alone scientist things coming as screening test. Whichever one you're willing to have it is is a to mention alongside his lifestyle. dr east. is there anything else that you wanted to add anything that we haven't covered yet. I think just the this. This is such an exciting time with with new equipment with new screening tests within. Hey i i'm kind of cancer is preventable disease and so i think this is really a time. When engagement without kansas screening we could really push rectal cancer downturn absolute minimum our. Thanks to gastroenterologist. Dr james for joining us today for mayo clinic. Healthcare in london doctor east. Thanks for all the great information today. Much mayo clinic. Qna is a production of the mayo clinic news network and is available wherever you get and subscribe to your favorite podcasts. To see a list of all male clinic podcasts. Visit news network dot mayoclinic dot org. Then click on podcasts. Thanks for listening and be well. We hope you'll offer a review of this and other episodes when the option is available comments and questions can also be sent to mayo clinic news network at mayo dot edu..

dr east preventable disease rectal cancer Dr james mayo clinic kansas cancer london mayo dot edu
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

06:56 min | 8 months ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Coming up on mayo clinic. Qna and there are wide reggie actions now for about kansas screening all of which provide substantial protection against bow kansas. Kansas actually extremely unusual cancers in theory almost completely preventable and regular screening is a key part that prevention finding detecting the cancer early increases the chance for a full recovery. I think this is really a time when engagement without kansas screening. We could really push cancer down to welcome everyone to mayo clinic. I'm deepen sitting in for dr helena's alka. According to the world health organization colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. It accounts for almost two million new cancer cases each year colorectal cancer which is also known as bowel. Cancer typically affects older adults. Although it can happen at any age screening for colorectal cancer is important to identify precancerous polyps that could develop into cancer and there are several screening options now available to patients joining us to discuss. Is dr james east gastroenterologist at mayo clinic health care in london. Welcome to the program. Dr eastern. thank you so much joining us. So can you tell us. About advances in colon. cancer screening What options are available and how to patients. No which one is right for them. I think when you're thinking about the option that's right. The the key thing is that the best test is the one that you're willing to do. There's no point in in in being setup for be if you're not willing to comfort and are wide reggie functions now for about kansas screening. All all of which provide substantial protection against bow kanza. Kansas actually extremely unusual cancers in in the in theory. It's almost completely preventable. By high quality screening examinations in terms of the options available at the moment the most commonly recognised one is busy which has the advantage of by detecting early kansas at Curable stage but also in finding and removing precancerous polyps. Stokes cancelled about pig. Over the next five to ten years. We also have flexible sigmoidoscopy which has been popular in the united kingdom which examines a just the lower third of how this is often used it. Impatience perhaps it in the fifties and sixties and at these ages this is web where precancerous polyps a pig it in the low part of the lodge out a meth laura in range for this test of the famine raped well those who would prefer a less invasive test We can now do Fecal munich Community chemical testing the cycles fit tests. This is a sensitive test for blood and still and if if blood is found then we proceed to the ranger. Be for that patient. I i'm not going to be done in the privacy of your own home. Often done every one to two years as an add on to that with using stool dna. This is a test code. Got this was developed for mayor researches now provided by exact sciences and is available in the. Us has improved test before final tests. That that's big recently. Recommended at is c. T. code inaugur. Affi so this is a cat scan of the abdomen but set up in a special way outweigh you have some gaspard into the bow to stretch about. And then you have a scan lying flat on your back in a flash on your tummy. And this is almost as good as komo's be at detecting cancer logic poets so this really quite a wide range of screening options for patients to pick from and discuss with that. Dr yeah. i'll say it's good to have so many different options. Can you tell us. Are there differences between the us and the uk when it comes to training recommendations so the the us colonoscopy has been very popular because as opposed describing has this powerful preventive effect on on bowel cancer over the entire out absolutely needs to be repeated if it's clear every ten years however it's invasive on there is a customer location today matt for the whole populations in the u. k. The national health service is chosen to use fit testing the test of let him stew Given out every a tease the in that's currently for majors. Sixty to seventy four. Although the age for that's going to decrease in england to fifty minute future. I should just say the big news for kettles could be another screening tests in the us. Is that the screening. Age has been decreased from fifty to forty five from when you should start screening initiative by the american cancer society earlier this year. This this is being taken up by the societies because we we've seen data that certainly in western calculations were seeing cancer developing at a younger age. Gotcha very important knelt. Thanks for bringing that up. How about screening rates does one country do better than the other As far as getting their population screened for colorectal cancer. The message in the us has kind of go out there and streaming engagement komansky as equally in the u. We see gauge levels particularly with the fit test which is like easier to do than the older kabul choir tests that that we're seeing engagement rates of sixty or seventy percent but seventy some populations are honda to reach in in deprived areas and from some minority groups a worldwide We're seeing low streaming engagement. I'm particularly for some patients in the middle east which is particularly golden visit. They seem to have a particularly high rates about cancer at a young age. Now i understand that research is looking at ways to better detect polyps how is.

cancer colorectal cancer kansas mayo clinic dr helena common cancer reggie dr james mayo clinic health care Kansas Affi world health organization bowel Stokes uk us gaspard komo london national health service
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

08:21 min | 9 months ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"With confidence make some changes. That's awesome. And there's multiple aspects of that that I'd love to dive into. But maybe it's just an aside because I find it so interesting as you were talking through some of your background there. Given that you have this exposure that is quite unique early in life to seeing your dad involved in science at a legitimately really high level. And then if we fast forward to when you're going to study nutritional science later in your mid 20s, I'm wondering, was it only then that it dawned on you just how big a deal I suppose his work was or how impressive it was. Like, did it become just normal as a kid and the teenager of this is just something my dad does, or were you aware of just how high level he was working at? No, I think that appreciation for the work he's done has grown year on year and continually, you know, I'm just amazed by the his contribution to science over now three four decades. And I look back and I think about our conversations about science and, you know, I've learned a lot of things from him about being objective and trying to stay critical and trying to check your biases and really letting the science do the talking and trying to wear possible not let emotions interfere with how your interpreting something. You know, so I've learned a lot from him both in terms of his dedication to science, but also in the way that he's gone about communicating it and discussing it with me. Yeah, and that actually touches on something that I wanted to bring up that actually find quite intriguing and interesting about you specifically in the work that you do is that you find yourself in this, I would say relatively rare position given your interests where I think one thing that's immediately obvious when people start looking at your content and the work you do is that you seem very deliberate in the life you are leading and by certain values that you are passionate about. And we can definitely dig into that stuff. I find it very very interesting. And then there's also this interest in science and nutritional science specifically. And there's clearly an overlap as we can probably discuss if we think about, let's say the science of health and chronic disease risk reduction and how that translates to various different dietary patterns. But you are one of the few that I think would do a really good job of making it clear where you're standing in a position on let's say ethical or value based grounds and where you're basing one purely on objective science based grounds, often they agree. Sometimes they don't in some interesting areas. But I think you've been very conscious to point out how much of a considered thing is that to you and do you find that to be something that can be difficult sometimes for people to generate if that makes sense. I'd say, you know, at a high level, it is very considered. And you know, one of my missions is, you know, if we sort of put aside the goal of helping people improve their health and helping people make food choices that consider how those different foods affect the world around them is around appreciation for science. And I feel like there is a lot of mistrust in science at the moment. And so, you know, I think it's really important to objectively look at science and communicate it as it is without letting emotions or ideology affect that interpretation. And that's how we can start to build trust back into science. And building trust is central to doing to everything that I'm trying to do. And so you're right, there are sometimes they could be something that science shows which conflicts with perhaps environmental science. And a good example of that could be dairy, for example. You know, that if you look at dairy and cancer, specifically colorectal cancer, there's some evidence to suggest that it's protective against colorectal cancer. From an environmental perspective, dairy has a higher ecological footprint than plant based dairy alternatives. And that's one example of a few that come to mind. But I do like to present the information as it is as a science shows it is, and then we can discuss what does that mean? In that case, you know, is dairy a necessary food for everyone, or if you're deciding for environmental reasons that you'd rather opt out of dairy, what does that mean in terms of considering your new training intake? And how can you because as you know, when you're replacing a food, whether that's healthy or unhealthy, it is largely determined by what you replace it with. And so, you know, discussing all of that nuance, looking at the science as it stands, but then being willing to have that conversation about, you know, okay, well when we zoom back out and we consider environmental health or we can sit at animal welfare, what options do we have and then each individual can make a decision based on what feels meaningful to them. Yeah, and it's interesting because it's something I've always before, but I find that the irony is that when someone does that and acknowledges things on a health or nutrition front, that is much more likely to be accurate, even where it does conflict with maybe a certain ethical position that we would be trying to advocate for. I think it becomes even more powerful than for being able to actually make change in that direction if that someone's goal, right? Because if you start misrepresenting some nutritional or health science because it's inconvenient, then when people find that out, they're not going to trust any of the message. Whereas they can look at something that you're saying and saying, oh, look, they're able to acknowledge all these things that are accurate, but then there's these also these other considerations for how we eat that are really good. And there's enough good ones to be made that we don't need to start misrepresenting certain ideas. So I think that kind of irony is interesting. I agree, and going back to that dairy example, you know, there's also something to be said about when evidence maybe doesn't line up with your worldview. What can you learn from that evidence though? So in the case of dairy, well, okay, if we were to go into mechanisms and look at colorectal cancer, you know, maybe it's explained by the calcium intake. That's one of the ideas out there. I don't think we fully understand. You know, and then we might look at fermented dairy versus unfermented. And we can use this information to then say, okay, well, if you're not having dairy in your diet, you want to make sure that you're consuming enough calcium. And here are here are some different options for that. And it might be advice to look for fortified of calcium fortified plant based milks or yogurt, for example. And it could be advice to include fermented foods if you're removing fermented dairy from your diet to look at fermented foods, which we know do impact the microbiome and could well play a role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. So, you know, I enjoy looking at the science as it is and then rightly as you say, just giving people options and letting people then make whatever decision feels right for them. I'm not here to tell people how to live their life. You know, that's up for everyone to sort of find the level.

colorectal cancer cancer
How To Treat And Prevent Colon Polyps with Dr. Elizabeth Boham

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:57 min | 1 year ago

How To Treat And Prevent Colon Polyps with Dr. Elizabeth Boham

"What's the big deal with pulse because we're told to get colonoscopy every two years five years ten years bidding on who you are. We're told that you know. These are big deals but really never talked talked to about how to really think about them from a functional medicine perspective in terms of prevention or treatment. It's just about going to the kospi. Cutting it out or if you have colon cancer. Cutting that out and taking chemo and radiation. But there's a whole nother world of thinking around this that allows us to to be much more targeted in our approach to preventing and treating these things so talking about whether polyps why did we get him. How how common are they in. Like the general thinking about them. Yeah absolutely so you know polyps are these growth. That occur in the inside of your intestine. So in your colon you can get these growths that are polyps and there's all sorts of different shapes types of polyps you know from at a no most hypoplastic pileups and you know all of that really influences. How risky the polyp is in terms of it. Turning into colon cancer so a percentage of these polyps can become cancerous and caused colorectal cancer. And as you mentioned unfortunately there's there's an increased rate of ecole rectal cancer. It's the second leading cause of cancer death in the united states and unfortunately we're seeing real precipitous increase in young people getting colon cancer and it's hit home for unfortunately a few times on with some of some really close friends of mine and And so it's something that you know we wanna think about you know. How do we prevent these abnormal growths from occurring especially the ones that can become dysplasia or cause

Colon Cancer Cancerous United States Dysplasia
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on The Rural Health Voice

The Rural Health Voice

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on The Rural Health Voice

"That's that's a great question. We love partnering with our our rural virginia partners. We again as i believe. I stated earlier. We traveled to different areas. Whether it's a gosh danville emporia. Christians broke We've we've we've connected with certain. Gi groups down in those areas and the main thing that we wanna do is start the conversation and raise awareness in regards to what needs to be discussed with your doctor. We just discussed the symptoms. That sort of thing Raised the patient's confidence to talk to their doctor about that at the same tame. Same time excuse me is to talk about your family history with your loved ones even if you Had a polyp removed at a colonoscopy that needs to be discussed with your loved ones because of this constant polyps being removed than that may mean that your family members might need to screen a little bit earlier. It's this kind of information that we're really trying to get out in regards to actually increasing access to timely screening the gi groups. I know are are further away in a rural area. Transportation is an issue so a lot of a lot of clinics Gathering together and educating is an issue again because of transportation so anytime that we work or speak with anybody the out in the rural community transportation and actually access to to food to clean. Food is also an issue. We're working right now with some folks in sussex because they are they are in a food desert where unfortunately there are so many folks that are experiencing the same thing and so right now we're in conversations in regards to Where the grants out there where we can get there. Is somebody there. That's interested in an open. Grocery store water the grants out there That can help create this smaller. Grocery store Were also getting ready to talk to Extension to see what kind of idea that they may have. Could i believe they've got a problem as well. We're chatting with our context here in the richmond area grocers who are friends of us to find out a little bit like how actually a grocery store can work. How can we bring in more farmers markets down in that area so when we're working with the rural community we don't really go in with an agenda. We literally just try and listen to what they are needing summer needing transportation. Summer needing actually g. eye doctors. 'cause i know some folks have left and so it's quite a ways to even get to a gi practitioner And and some are are food deserts so the needs are great in the rural era. And i don't have to have claim that to you. Obviously but we are working. Or someone from the rural. Eric contacts us. The very first thing obviously we are are wanting to hear is what is needed. And sometimes it's just basic. Can you come down with your inflatable colon. Because we're having a fair and can you use be here. Of course we go absolutely so I don't have a direct answer for you It really depends on on the needs of that world community so if a hospital or clinic or maybe community of leader was worried about colorectal cancer community. They wanted to get involved with h c b to bring services community. What should they do..

Eric virginia richmond Christians first thing sussex folks
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on The Rural Health Voice

The Rural Health Voice

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on The Rural Health Voice

"Of folks aren't aware that there are on that they're they're coleman is the large bowel or large intestine so and and this is all ages a lot of folks you sometimes need a little bit of anatomy lesson as well and that's again the very first step to defeating is is is raising awareness and bringing education to the public churn. We've talked before on this. Podcast about the need for health literacy and being able to talk to patients in terms that they understand exactly. Yeah exactly and in a fun way to a non threatening way. And that's why we love the label call in its ten foot by ten foot so you actually walk through it and And you see what clean coal and looks like. As well as what a polyp looks like and then some crohn's disease is also i'm bedded the coal in as well diverticulitis in of course malignant polyps are also seen so it it. It is very educational so aside from having giant inflatable cohen. That's big enough for me to walk through. What else does hitting cancer below the do. Yeah well we have to. On main initiatives and it started with eat claim get screened so clean is already the prevention side of of hitting cancer blood about we also go by h c b to the acronym and then the get screened side is obviously the detection work that we do And so we've kind of blown out those initiatives a whole lot more and so the screaming. Side of h c. B two is encompasses the nine Clinics we have five free clinics here in the richmond area where we have created colorectal cancer screening programs. And and then we funded these programs. We find the actual in home on screening kits and the testing strips for the staff and the medical the medical teams at each clinic to actually do testing on site for their patients. And we've got one on east of richmond and then we have three up in the northern virginia area so Right now we're funding nine sites which is fantastic. And we're looking for more partners across the state of virginia to help support as well In ingar sir screening needs at the same time We have a. Can we talk initiative which is basically just that. Hey can we have a conversation. Can we talk about not only screening but gi symptoms and that sort of thing These are presentations that we do at rash rotary clubs civic organizations chambers of commerce businesses organizations schools many presentations on site via zoom and then obviously just with our pdf's and whatnot And research we sent on literature and information we send out as well so that stimulate the conversation about colorectal cancer. what is signs and symptoms. We've got one. Pdf that we'd love. It's just it's it's shorts. Six six questions very short. Very simple that basically pre-assesses one's risk for colorectal cancer. Then what to do about it. If some red flags are shown after your answer these six questions. So that's the can we talk initiative a little bit more about..

six questions northern virginia ten foot nine sites five free clinics virginia richmond Six six questions first step three each clinic one nine Clinics h c. B two colorectal h east
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on The Rural Health Voice

The Rural Health Voice

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on The Rural Health Voice

"Welcomed the rural health voice. I am beth o'connor your host. We discuss real health issues at the grassroots level and how state and federal policies play out in our local communities. Why is it important to talk to your family members about their health history. Mindy cochran join me to discuss the efforts of her nonprofit hitting cancer below the belt and the risk factors. You should consider for colorectal cancer. Well welcome mindy. Glad to have you on the podcast. Well i really appreciate the opportunity. Thank you so much now. This is going to be released in. March and march is very special month for hitting cancer below the belt. Why is that. What are you doing. Mark the occasion. Yes marches national colorectal cancer awareness month. And honestly beth since we're a colorectal. Cancer prevention nonprofit. Colorectal cancer awareness. Month is every day for us. So there's an basically what we do for the month as we stay open to make sure that we can Meet the requests. That come in for either. Presentations are Appearances with inflatable colon interviews things of that nature so we definitely ran up our educational messages during the month. But at the same time we keep our calendar open we start getting request sometimes And late january early february for certain appearances. We just got back from roanoke last week. a variety of an appearance with them wrote trillion clinic down there. Dr lindsay byerly is amazing and She invited us to come down and support her initiative. All right so you said something that. I'm going to have to backtrack and ask whereabout inflatable colon. Tell me about label co how gosh. What a great purchase on back in two thousand eighteen. We had some We had some grant money left over. And i am really have always wanted this inflatable colon. And i've seen at other events throughout the years and Wasn't sure gosh if we could actually pull it off and we were able to. It's such an educational but entertaining tool. That really breaks the ice in when you're talking about colorectal cancer You need that. you need. That is to be broken and a lot of folks obviously are not comfortable talking about Bathroom habits are or irregular bathroom habits in fines and symptoms of potential. Gi issues so they avoidable. Colon allows us to start that conversation but at the same time It allows us to let people know that they're colon is their large tested..

lindsay byerly march March last week Mindy cochran beth o'connor two thousand beth late january early february mindy colorectal cancer roanoke national colorectal cancer eighteen
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Who can discuss not only preventive for in screening for colorectal cancer but also for many other. Absolutely absolutely it'd be the unfortunate reality is in the world of primary care. It's a job that as sub specialists. I think i don't know how somebody could do. Such a great job at primary care. Because there's just so many things you know it's like a fire hose of just these different issues that are going on not to mention All of the screening recommendations. That are quite important. So i think from a patient's point of view I think that you know. Hopefully your doctors had time to sort of bring up screening. But if they haven't. I think you know being an advocate for yourself and saying. Hey you know. Doc i read online that you know the they've changed the screening guidelines to forty five and i just turned forty five or know. I know you didn't ask me about this. But i have two siblings. That have had colon cancer in their forties You know that may be just sort of the reminder that tips off your doctors say oh you know what i need to get a line. I need to get I need to get them on With colonoscopies and and in some circumstances that can make all the difference. Jeremy we were talking earlier about younger To a trend toward younger individuals being diagnosed and wondering if we could get back to that a little bit and talk about our preventative measures that people can can can undertake an lower their risk. So yes like i said we've seen a actually a greater than fifty percent increase in the rates of colorectal cancer In patients under the age of fifty which would early onset colon cancer in fact in clinical practice. You know it's not patients that are forty five or forty eight just sorta. It's twenty five year olds. Thirty five year olds and so There's clearly a trend in. This is a global trend. It's not just in westernized nations. We're seeing all throughout the world in so there's a significant increase in You know although we lump colon and rectal cancer together If you look at the trends actually rectal. Cancer is rising actually quite a bit more even than colorectal can't colon cancer by itself and so In my mind. One of those research interest that i have is sort of trying to see if we can look at. Is that a different disease. We lump them together because they do have very much similarities. But it is quite possible that there are different mechanisms in different levels of pathogenesis driving rectal cancer versus colon cancer and in fact This is a little bit of subject but if you look at culling colorectal cancer. In general we've learned over the past decade or so that a left sided colon cancer is actually completely or significantly different than a right side. Call cancer and you would think that you know it's one tuba. It should be the whole disease but in fact it's not and so the more that we can understand the intricacies the differences between a rectal cancer colon cancer colon cancer or colorectal cancer in somebody who is young versus old. There's likely a difference in pathogenesis in in my mind. That's sort of how we unlock the secrets and try to figure out. Why is it that we're seeing these differences because up to this point we have a lot of hypothesis but the truth is that we don't really know as the scientific community. We don't really know exactly why patients are why we're seeing these trends and answer your question of Is there anything we can do.

Jeremy twenty five year Thirty five year forty eight forties forty five two siblings One colorectal greater than fifty percent of fifty colorectal cancer one past decade
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"It's actually quite surprising that things work as well as they do. I love that perspective. Jeremy that it's miraculously ourselves recover every day. Would you tell us a little bit since you mentioned it earlier. What are the risks of developing colorectal cancer. So by far the biggest risk of that we know of is age so advanced ages are going to be the highest risk population. Now i say that with the caveat that that has been sort of traditional risk factor and we'll get a little bit more into sort of unfortunate trend that we've seen lately In younger patients actually had been having a significant increase risk. A fifty percent increased risk of developing colon and rectal cancer Over the last thirty years. Or so. So i think we should definitely get into that later but but if you look from population. Point of view still Age is one of the biggest risk factors Having a family history having there are certain genetic predispositions Can increase the risk although again that counts for a very small proportion of patients who actually have colon cancer There's a number of other sort of small risk factors so not small risk factors but relative portion So obesity On diets that are high. Fat low fiber Smoking Alcohol use But but but by and large We don't really have a good kind of if you do this deal do that. We know that there's a bunch of things that of increase your risk as population but But by and large those risks or the absolute risk increase of for an individual patient is relatively low. I'm a little intrigued and horrified by fifty percent increased risk over the last decades and i looked getting back to that. I'm wondering if you could tell us. Now jeremy what are the signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer. How would an individual know that they should be concerned. Yes so again. It's one of those things where you can really have any sign or symptom. But the things that i sort of would tell if my wife came to me. And said hey. I'm having this symptom. I will be quite concerned so Anytime you have rectal bleeding. That really is a red flag at it truly needs to be taken seriously and in fact One of the sort of disconcerting. Faxes that in. The patients who are on set or young age was rectal cancer or colon. Cancer twenty five thirty and they have rectal bleeding which you know in a seventy year old is a very big risk factor. The factors are these signs and symptoms have sort of been ignored In some part by the medical community but by the patients as well you know. I'm too young to have cancer As it turns out. That's not the case. And so i think that you know certainly if you're having rectal bleeding I would not really take you know this is just hemorrhoids. Because that's sort of the classic is rectal bleeding It's him right bleeding until proven otherwise. And i think that that's okay. But the proven otherwise part is very important. So i would. I would not just sort of write it off And unfortunately you know. I see unfortunately at a clinic full of patients who are young and otherwise healthy. Who were told for some time six months a year that you know this is royal bleeding Only to find out that there was actually a fairly sizable cancer that they had and so So rectal bleeding. I think it is unique. And it's something that. I would take seriously every time Other signs of changes in the caliber frequency of your stooling if you have you know persistent diarrhea or constipation Previously very regular now. These things are happening if you have again persistent or severe abdominal pain. That can be a sign or symptom unintentional a significant weight.

Jeremy fifty percent twenty five thirty seventy year old one last decades six months a year jeremy one of those things colorectal cancer last thirty years
This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

Science Friction

05:58 min | 1 year ago

This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

"I wanted. I didn't want to have not only smoldering away in my pelvis. bit also small does away and you hit. It's always in your head as much as i could rationalize it and say i'm very scientific in my approach things and it wasn't a problem every day would come to me at three o'clock in the morning when i sat a worrying about all the other things worry about three o'clock in the morning you will saying parts of them and the body that they will never really say themselves. Also get tonight. It's an extraordinary thing that that was true kind of but it is still amazes me today. That people want to see the inside. Bids cannot have my video. I want to share it on social media. you know. i've seen all your videos on youtube. Can you make sure my prostate goes up in this episode. It's a franken. Feel this conversation about an experience. Men don often talked publicly about. So let's meet the scientist and the surgeon interested in nature. This is professor robe ramsey as a molecular biologist and kansas scientist and on the saudi also makes art. He's a black belt in karate rossi's by his husband father of two children but trying to understand how the natural world works was a i love of his and i've always been driven by trying to understand biology and i'm also a little bit inclined to like machinery and structures and the way things work and essentially sells Machines and i like the way they operate and they're really have siamese different facets to them and of causing disease machinery goes wrong for me. The very first day i was in an operating theatre watching people take cancerous. Lump sexually as it was then breast cancer. I was instantly captivated. This is professor. Declan murphy lading urologist and kansas surgeon. He's been in a for over a decade but you can he he's rh lilt and even though it's cancer he's dealing with everyday like rob. He's loved his job. Died dot. I was in the operating theatre was meeting these patients before and after as a medical student and honestly i just became almost overwhelmed by the idea that people will allow other people to do surgery on them. That it's such a huge privilege to be allowed to do surgery but i was fascinated by urology because it's it's quite a a big field work. In it's everything from the kidneys dancer. The bladder and the prostate and the pain is in. The testicles are all areas in the urology domain that can be affected by cancer. Now dick lennon rob happened to be call. Eggs at the pay to mccallum will pay to mac cancel santa in melbourne as a scientist rob's focused on amongst other tricky conundrums developing vaccines that target gastrointestinal cancers like colorectal cancer as a surgeon declines leading the way with us robotics in the operating theatre and often the cancer arena. You'll find that scientists and surgeons just don't traditionally makes much but robin declan like many others at paid amac a different because i want to do science. That reflects the needs of people with cancer and the clinicians trading them are remember being at a hospital where declan was doing a tag team robotic procedure on a patient was having some colorectal surgery plus a prostatectomy and i was there on saturday morning with my eyes pocket collecting some samples clincal trial without doing their in the operating room because these patients have agreed to be part of a trial in that case. That was a patient to kansas. Quite complex work but rob wanted some tissue as some cancerous tissue to take into the lab. And i was watching these two guys work. Seamlessly together is something is a of beauty in any group of people that do things well together and there's almost subliminal communication. What's coming next that i'm bumping to each other The theater staff all expert. They work as attainments really like a formula one team. It a stop and i'd never. I've never worked in the center where you will have a a professor of colorectal science in the operating room with you so and we get used to that at peter. Mac it's the same prostate the same for melanoma central breast and and i just find as an extraordinary environment. I've never worked in a place that has that. Degree of translational multidisciplinary care where people are. They're asking the questions taking the tissue doing trials etcetera etcetera. And it's just a extraordinary. I can do some cool things in my lab question. I of been geneticists for most of my research life and we can do cool things with jane's in cells and also indeed on animals and you can find great science out of that but does it always reflect what's going on in the patient and the answer is sometimes but not always and i want to the always it is relevant. What happens in a patient. It's all about the patient in the has always westbound lot that though so these two colleagues late in their fields in cancer but then kind of a sudden curve ball and a role change. The scientists in the surgeon were about to become the surgeon. And he's patient he's rob i have a great jp. I've been going to for quite a long time. Really thoughtful considerate kanda guy. We've we always have a great show. When i go to visit him. I have a checkup every six months. For basically blood blood pressure to have a level that cannot be controlled just by exercise and diet.

Robe Ramsey Declan Murphy Kansas Cancer ROB Dick Lennon Rob Gastrointestinal Cancers Robin Declan Franken Rossi DON Mccallum Youtube Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Declan Melbourne MAC Melanoma Jane
Start screenings for colorectal cancer at age 45, panel advises

WBZ Morning News

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Start screenings for colorectal cancer at age 45, panel advises

"On colon cancer screenings announced on Tuesday after a panel of health experts suggesting people should start getting screened earlier than previously recommended. CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr Jon Lapook specialist gastroenterology got more colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. Getting screamed at age 45 rather than 50 could be especially important for people who are black because colon cancer tends to occur earlier and be more aggressive in this group.

Colon Cancer Dr Jon Lapook Cbs News United States
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Colon cancer is on the rise among younger adults

Beyond the Beltway

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Colon cancer is on the rise among younger adults

"Cases of colon cancer The disease had killed actor Chadwick Boseman and Rectal cancer are on the rise in young adults. Colorectal cancer is the third deadliest cancer in the U. S. With cases among those under 50 climbing since the 19 nineties in 2017, more than 52,000 people died of colorectal cancer nationwide and a report in March by the American Cancer Society said Half of all new diagnoses are in people under the age of 67. Experts say obesity may be a contributing factor. But the new research doesn't specifically defined causes of increases or declines by age or ethnicity.

Rectal Cancer American Cancer Society Chadwick Boseman Obesity
What to Know About Colon Cancer

WBZ Morning News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

What to Know About Colon Cancer

"Shock of her Chadwick Boseman is death is bringing urgent attention to the second deadliest cancer in the United States. According to the CDC. Both men was diagnosed in his late thirties, much younger than the age. Many doctors recommend for your first screening at the age of 50 2018, the American Cancer Society. Drop that number 2 45. Clearly the recommendations to even start at 45 are not sufficient because it wouldn't have caught patients like Chadwick Boseman. Dr Kim, being with Harvard Medical School points out that many young patients are getting colorectal cancer since they're not getting screen. Chadwick Boseman had been privately battling colon cancer since 2016.

Chadwick Boseman American Cancer Society Colon Cancer Harvard Medical School Dr Kim CDC United States
Making Colorectal Cancer Screening Less of a Pain

The Bio Report

05:22 min | 2 years ago

Making Colorectal Cancer Screening Less of a Pain

"Alex thanks for joining us. Thank you very much for inviting me. We're going to talk about colorectal cancer. The problems of screening and check cap cease Gada capsule based system for preparation free screening. Let's start with colorectal cancer. Though how big a problem does it represent? So for the if you look on the American population. You would fine approximately twenty five percent of the people that have policies and approximately zero point, five percent of the population of the average risk population may have a cancer that's about the statistics the cancer. And what's the prognosis today for people with Colorado Cancer, and what role does early detection play in terms of better outcomes? So it is clear and known by all the physician community that detecting precancerous politics before they develop into cancer basically saves life's. Dial about fifty thousand Americans while dying every year from collector cancer. And, if you look worldwide, the number can reach up to about eight hundred eighty plus thousand people while dying from these horrible disease, so and not to mention the fact that the people also with incidence meaning they have the cancer itself, and not necessarily died at the same moment, but continuously unfortunately continues to die from that over the years, so by allowing detection of the polyps ahead of time, whereas if there is a window of opportunity of about ten years to catch does police before they become malignant. You allow that to remove. Risk potentially for people to become cancerous people and This is basically what we a checkup a doing. Our job is to make sure that we increase the adherence people and allow them to go for a screaming. And, by that address, an unmet meet that exist in this landscape. Well! How good are people today at complying with checkups when they should get them for colon cancer? Before. We talk about checkup. Let me talk about the compliance. At least in the US, which represents I think. A A good number compelled to what you may find worldwide in the US about forty percent of the eligible. Americans are not going for a decent screening. Which means about forty six million people are not getting this screening this is. The instead good and. This is this is good. Yeah, if you compare to the European markets, you would find about. Seventy to eighty percent of the population that doesn't that here from various reasons, but since the US market is the most sophisticated and um guidance, I'll very cleal I would expect a much higher adherence of people, and this is not the case because of the current screening methods which are not that friendly. In be is of those eligible people, so our job is to make sure that we. Increase the adherence and bring more people into these screening methods, and we believe that to our method which doesn't require the preparation that he's probably the a biggest bear for people not to go for screaming. We believe those people with with Al Methods would not require the preparation, and thus would hopefully join and performed the screaming, and then after once found, a polyp could be refilled to. Which is the gold standard? That's the best solution to remove the polyps, but yet could be referred because they could not be referred since they wouldn't go to such screening beforehand, and this is why we believe we address an unmet need, a huge unmet need in the US, and as I said not to mention also other areas or other locations worldwide. Well for for listeners who haven't had the pleasure of colorectal screening a walk us through the process and the barriers to people doing this when they should. The barriers as I mentioned. Before are mostly the fact that for structural tests. You need a preparation. And for non-structural tests, which are mostly biomarker tests, you need to handle unfortunately with stool, so those two elements are not that friendly in the eyes of those patients of those eligible patients.

Colorado Cancer Colorectal Cancer United States Colon Cancer Alex Al Methods
Coronavirus and Cancer Patients

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

02:45 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus and Cancer Patients

"Jen. We've talked a lot about how the hospitals have been inundated with Kovic nineteen patients and so so many people across the country or having to postpone routine treatments among them cancer patients and survivors. We know I know how scary it is. Just to live with that diagnosis. But imagine doing that during these times. There is a huge impact every year in this country about one point. Eight million Americans are diagnosed with cancer. So that is a huge number of people. We also know that early. On in this pandemic the American Cancer Society put out a statement recommending that all routine cancer screenings be temporarily postponed. Which of course can trigger a lot of fear and anxiety for people and as a result of that we also know now that people who have already been diagnosed with cancer are now facing delays in their treatment. So it's a stressful time both medically and psychological. I mean for people who are fighting cancer. What can they expect to face right now? Well I think we have to understand that. There's a lot we still have to learn about. How cancer and Kovic nineteen or this corona virus indirect from already very limited published preliminary data. That comes out of China. It does appear that people with cancer face a higher risk of death than people without cancer. The risk was seven point six percent for people with cancer versus one point four percent of someone without any pre existing medical condition. We also think that if someone who is in the process of having treatment for cancer becomes sick with cove nineteen that we have to prioritize. And it's probably a better idea for the cancer treatment to be put on hold to just manage the corona virus or Cova Nineteen because cancer treatments can weaken the immune system in and of themselves. So we don't want to add salt to the wound. And what don't we know right now. About how covert one thousand nine affects cancer patients? There's still a lot to learn. Amy I mean first of all. We don't know how this pandemic will play out in terms of affecting new diagnosis of cancer in this country. We also don't know if the pandemic will have an effect on mortality rates or death rates either because of delay in treatment for people who already have cancer or because they're getting sicker with Cova one thousand nine and we also don't know how different types of cancer may interact with Kovic nineteen so for example. We don't know if someone battling breast cancer will fare differently with exposure or disease of corona virus versus someone. Let's say with colorectal cancer. There's still a lot of data that needs to be collected and then studied

Cancer American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Breast Cancer Kovic Cova Jen. China AMY
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

09:50 min | 2 years ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"That's a good question. Good question time for a Mayo Clinic. Expert's opinion on that and joining us in studio as Mayo Clinic. Dentist in prostate oddest. Dr Thomas Salinas. Welcome back to the program. Thank you for having me. Pro-saddam surprise. You did a good job before what does that. What does that process dot is due? Prosthetics prosthetic dentistry. As it were is. Just one of ten specialties. In dentistry that deals with replacing a full or official structures that could be teeth could be parts of the jaw number of other areas as well. So you do all those implants now. Does anybody get dentures anymore? People do Fortunately in this country that has gone down as the way patients present with needing dentures. Let's say present dentists without any teeth? That's becoming less of an incidence than it was. Maybe just even ten to fifteen years ago it was an upwards of twenty plus percent and in varying areas of the country. You'll find that that's different now. It's down to about eight to ten percent of what it was in comparison because of good dental care partly I think people are becoming more innately aware of what that really means. People living longer keeping their teeth for a longer period of time. So yes that's exactly right right. So what is a dentist? What is your dental health have to do with your heart? Health are the two mix has become really More aware now. If I in our medical community years ago The NIH in conjunction with the Dean of University of Southern California Herald. Slatkin put out a paper that connected the systemic nature of disease with oral health and this became to more in the years following that and I think that some of the pilot studies that have been presented recently. Look at that. There's not really a an implied nature of saying causation. In other words having oral health or diseases that does not really causative. In the fact that for instance cardiovascular disease is probably a little more common linked types of systemic diseases now. So that's really where we're at with. We're looking more of a causation. And that's difficult difficult to prove. Given the size of many of these studies that have become so there's no concrete evidence of a relationship. They are no concrete evidence that poor oral hygiene causes heart disease. Not At this point. There's so many confounding. Some patients present with multiple diseases. They may have osteoporosis. Diabetes and all of these do have sort of a link to oral health because of many of our patients have becoming certainly older now in comparison to twenty five thirty years ago. Many of them have multi system type disease. And it's hard to know exactly what causes what so. The causation really is not there but the association is and there was another paper another study. That came out. That showed that if you brush your teeth three times a day you are less likely to have heart failure and less likely to get atrial. Fibrillation HABITUAL FEB RELATION. Which is a common type of Heart Arrhythmia? That's correct that study was put out. Recently it drew a lot of attention but I think there are some innate flaws with it number one A lot of these patients were self reporting. And you know we all like to think that we have oral hygiene on a regular basis and many of us do of course but it's not as reliable as we think first of all. It's quite different than we. Compare some of the other studies that have linked professional period donald cleaning with cardiovascular disease those have interventions that are very different even one that linked diabetes and the effect of professional period apple therapy with the nature of diabetes. It's as effective as a triple drug regimen. Actually so people with diabetes benefit from having period dental care. They certainly do amazing. And it says affect gave as what it's effective as even using a third drug a third drug to control budget. That's correct. Yes wow I was gonna say it seems to me that if you taking good care of your dental health you'd be someone who takes good care of your physical health but there's more to it than that certainly and this was The basically the cooperation between the American Academy of period on policy and a European Federation period on college back in two thousand seventeen at showed this this finding at that I had heard a story a few years ago. That if you've lost your teeth it was good for your heart is at the same type of link Yes essentially I mean I think we have to look at period Donald Disease and how this is. It's it's sort of a growth of bacteria within the mouth. It's film on Teeth. Certain areas between teeth can actually depleted of oxygen. So it's not just a fact of removing bacteria through the physical act of floss but it's disturbing that anaerobic or without oxygen that tends to promote period donald disease. That's one of the real reasons to to floss. So if you have bacteria in your mouth because you haven't taken obviously there are a lot of bacteria anyway but you lessen the number of bacteria in your mouth by brushing lossing etc. then you reduce the number of bacteria in your bloodstream. You reduce the inflammation in your bloodstream. Which reduces your risk for heart. Disease the theory. That is the theory in. There's there's lots of levels to that certainly you. You actually increase the bacterial count in your bloodstream. Just by the nature of brushing floss your teeth as well. However some of the pathogens we find that are commonly found in patients that have extensive period donald disease pathogens meaning disease correct. In some of these bacteria also are found in cholesterol based plaques within the artery itself have been found to be sort of a confounder in this type of disease process. So it's not really clear if if it's a chicken in there or thing what comes first. Is it a common finding in both disease states and their other diseases that may have this this Effect as well by just by nature of of these types of bacteria nother story I saw and it said that tooth loss patterns are connected to coronary artery disease? Can you explain this is this is somewhat linked? So even though there's an association here it doesn't seem to be causal again is there's an association it's it doesn't mean that there's a cause effect type relationship with this but there is an association so patients that have advanced period. Donald Disease often have a loss of tooth loss pattern that will predict in some way coronary artery disease so it's not well understood Some of this is based on inflammation and the fact that some of the inflammatory markers seen with period Donald Aziz also are found with other disease states like diabetes. One happens to be coronary artery. Disease some of these pathogens also just by nature of their involvement in the bloodstream will actually elevate cholesterol and That's found so when you talk about a tooth loss pattern. What does that mean? I mean what particular pattern would suggest. You're more likely to get coronary artery disease. Certainly having a certain number of teeth that are lost within a given period of time for instance the most common missing tooth and the adult population in the United States is the lower first molar. Why is that well? It's been there since you've been six years old. However it's been subject to attack longer than any of the other teeth have been with regard to bacterial plaque poorer hygiene etc. But the idea of seeing multi rooted teeth being lost is somewhat of a sign of an advanced tooth loss pattern. All right if you ever ask a dentist okay. What do I really need to do to take care of my teeth and gums standard suggestion? This comes also from the NIH. It's looking at Seeing a professional every year at least for an examination a thorough examination that includes visual examination prophylaxis cleaning deep cleaning if it's appropriate period donal therapy if it's indicated also looking at the X. Rays as a screening mechanism to detect carries an advanced bone loss patterns in in many of the backyard's or cavities. So once a year for x-rays once a year for x-rays in some patients we we might accelerate that based on the incident carries. We're seeing lots of changes and carries these days. I mean some of us know all the vaping. That's gone on now. And the controversies around that many of these vaping products hold sweeteners in them and actually increase the incidence of Carey's as well we're looking into that in our own patient lossing flopping is is is essential. Once a day is sufficient it again disturbs that environment that bacteria tend to reproduce it all right and brush two to three times a day brushing at least two times a day. Three if it's possible is suggested to reduce the bacterial count as far as may bring you know what I've got some of those little ones that you can carry with you in your purse. Are Those those wisps? Are those good enough. Those are great. I'm excited those handed out when we're done here. I think you know it gets people into the cognizant habitat of regular oral care each day. So those right. We'll take good care of your teeth and gums is a good idea. We know that gum disease is associated with an increased risk of heart disease maybe not causing effect but there is a relationship there are thanks to Mayo Clinic dentist. Prostate honest. Dr Thomas Salinas. Thank you thank.

Diabetes Donald Disease coronary artery disease Mayo Clinic Dr Thomas Salinas NIH official United States bone loss Slatkin European Federation Donald Aziz University of Southern Califor American Academy donal Carey
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"The face hands there the wounds in an annual battle with dry winter air. Dr Don Davis Mayo Clinic Dermatologist. Says when the temperature drops the humidity tends to drop with it and your skin. Dehydrates dry hands are especially vulnerable to cracks and cuts? They can put you at risk for infection. Dr Davis Says Winter Clothing can help keep moisture in. If that's not enough you can try one of three categories of moisturizers ointments which contain oil creams. Which may have oil and water and lotions which are generally water-based she says if your skin is extremely raw you may want to start with the mets want. Skin improves rubbing a hypoallergenic fragrance. Free Cream or lotion may provide enough moisture to prevent further problems and remember these products only lasts for a few hours at maximum. See a need to hydrate and moisturizer at minimum two or three times a day for the Mayo Clinic News Network. I'm the Dean Williams. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom Chives. And I'm Tracy mccray peripheral neuropathy now if you don't have it you're lucky and you probably aren't familiar with the term but unfortunately it's fairly common and worth knowing something about your nervous system is divided into two parts the central nervous system that includes the brain and the spinal cord. Hey and the peripheral nerves which come out from the brain and spinal cord and we'll be talking about the peripheral nerves. I've already learned something new today. If the peripheral nerves are damaged and that can.

Mayo Clinic Dermatologist peripheral neuropathy Mayo Clinic News Network Dr Don Davis Mayo Clinic Radio mets Dr Davis Dr Tom Chives Tracy mccray Dean Williams
The Link Between Obesity and Cancer

Dishing Up Nutrition

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

The Link Between Obesity and Cancer

"I WANNA share an interesting fact from the American Cancer Society. Excess Body weight is linked to eight percent of all the cancers. The American Cancer Society reported that the link between obesity and cancer risk is clear actually excess body fat increases your risk for several types of cancers including colorectal cancer breast. Uterine kidney pancreatic at Safa. Gio Cancer's good morning listeners. I am Melanie Beasley a registered and licensed Dietitian and because I had breast cancer Several years ago. I'm always on the lookout for the latest research about cancer prevention and the

American Cancer Society Gio Cancer Melanie Beasley Licensed Dietitian Obesity
Of Mice and Men: This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

Science Friction

08:53 min | 2 years ago

Of Mice and Men: This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

"On science fiction. Today really special story for you. It's about what happens when life throws you a warping curve ball and win roll escape appended. I wanted gone. I didn't want to have not only at smoldering away in my pelvis but also small does away and you hate it. It's always in your head as much as I could rationalize and SAM. I'm very scientific in my approach to things and it wasn't a problem everyday would come to me at three o'clock in the morning when I started worrying about all the other things worry about it. Three o'clock in the morning. You'll sing parts of them and the body that they will never really say themselves or get to know. It's an extraordinary thing that that was true kind of but it is still amazes me today that people people want to see the inside bids you cannot have my video. I want to share it on social media and I've seen all your videos on Youtube. Can you make sure my prostate goes for new in this episode. It's Franken feeless. Conversation about an experience. Men often talked publicly about so. Let's meet the scientists and the surgeon interested in Nitro. This is Professor Ramsey as a molecular biologist and elating in Kansas scientist on the Saudi also makes art. He's a black belt in karate rides. His bike is a husband father of two children but trying to understand how the natural world works was a I love of his and I've always been driven by trying to understand understand biology and I'm also a little bit inclined to like machinery and structures and the way things work and essentially excels machines and are like the way they operate. And they're really have Siamese different facets to them and of causing disease machinery goes wrong for me. The very first day I was in an operating theatre watching people takeout cancerous lump actually. It was then breast cancer. I was instantly league captivated. This is Professor Declan Murphy. elating urologist and cancer surgeon. He's been a strategy for over a decade. But you can he. He's Irish lilt and even though it's cancer he's dealing with everyday like rob. He's loved his job. Since died dot I was in the operating theatre. I was meeting these patients before and after as a medical student and honestly I just became almost overwhelmed by the idea that people will allow other people to do surgery on them that it's such a huge privilege to be allowed to do surgery but I was fascinated by urology because it's it's quite a a big field that we work in. It's everything from the kidneys. Down through the bladder. And the prostate in the penis and the testicles are all areas in the domain that can be affected by cancer. Now Dick Lyneham enrolled happened to be colleagues at the pay. McCallum will pay Domecq Cancer Center in Melbourne as a scientist Rob's focused on amongst other tricky conundrums developing developing vaccines that target gastro intestinal cancers like colorectal cancer as surgeon Dickens leading the way with using robotics in the operating theatre and often in the cancer arena. You'll find that scientists and surgeons just don't traditionally meeks much but robin declan like many any others at paid Amac a different because I want to do science. That data reflects the needs of people with cancer and the clinicians trading them. I remember being at a hospital where declan was doing. A TAG team robotic procedure on a patient was having some call rectal surgery Torri plus prostatectomy and I was there on Saturday morning with my arse pocket collecting samples clincal trial with doing there in the operating room because these patients have agreed to be part of a trial in that case that was to Kansas quite complex work but rob wanted some tissue as cancerous tissue to take into the lab and I was watching these two guys work. Seamlessly together is something is a corner beauty in any group of people that do things well together and is almost subliminal communication. I know what's coming next that I'm bumping into each other. The theta staff all expert. They work as attainments really like a Formula One tame it a pit stop and I've never worked in the center where you will have a professor of colorectal rectal science in the operating room with you so And we get used to that Peter Mac. It's the same for prostate is the same for melanoma skin for breast. And and I I just find it an extraordinary Jordan Environment I. I've never worked in a place that has that degree of translational multi-disciplinary care at where people are they're asking the questions taking the tissue doing trials Etcetera Etcetera Cetera. And it's just an extraordinary. I can do some cool things in my lap not question I have been a geneticist for most of my research life and we we can do cool things. Jane's in cells and also indeed on animals and you can find great science out of that but does it always reflect what's going on in the patient and the answer is sometimes but not always I want to do the always. It is relevant. What happens in a patient? It's saw the patient in the end has always been like that though has already close so they to a colleagues ladies in their fields in cancer but then came a sudden curve ball and a role change the scientists in the surgeon were about to become the surgeon. and He's patient he's Rob. Why have a great? JP being going to him for quite a long time really insightful. Consider Kanda Guy. We've we always have a great chat when okay visit him. I have a checkup every six months. For basically blood blood pressure to have a level that cannot be controlled just by exhumed diet and he's chosen to have PSI tastes to PSI stands for prostate specific antigen. It's a protein which can be elevated in Maine for various reasons prostate cancer being one of them. Some guys avoid testing. They pay CY levels. But as we've heard rob is a lover of information. Summation looks forward and he lanes into it so overtime every couple years get it tested and it just kept rising a little bit one stage. It got to a level. We're thought maybe it's getting a bit high. And I actually was referred to declan. We had nothing to say about that. Spe- keep an eye on it and then about two years ago now. The test Monday morning test Tuesday morning. Phone Call My JP said Rob. It's about time he got back and see. Declan are not happy about this. Psi Level so rob's colleague paid a Mac dikla Murphy becomes he's urologist. So should I have look and and progressively we went through all the tests initially an MRI that I remember sitting next to declan looking at his laptop to the imaging obtaining lots SUV meetings are obligated images before thought that shadow very much. Either any say well I think we need to get a boxy. And then he did. I remember it was during Christmas. Wasn't isn't it. Yeah so we could. You Know Ho- prostate. Think I knew I was on this journey as soon as I saw the image. I thought this looks wchs suspicious at least need to find out what it is and then phone call or message saying squeezing stage seven the doubt I had prostate cancer and that meant I had to make a decision about which direction I went after that so suddenly rob the Kanta Hansa scientists becomes. Rub The cancer patient. Then he went through the whole process. We did the pet scan and then we discussed whether surveillance might be an option is. Is this a cancer. We can leave alone because a tradition of Invasive procedures early on in this process and Maine have suffered the consequences of their lifelong off long impotence urine re problems the whole beat shifted now. Oh totally went on. When I started training a diagnosis of prostate cancer equalled cold treatment for prostate cancer there was no concept of? You could leave the cancer there you know whereas now it's the polar opposite it means as a process will start got to figure out. Is this a threat to this patient. And how will he and his loved one balance up the success of surgery or radiation or other treatments in terms of cancer versus the predictable side effects so for us. The first thing is always doing to do anything. We found a

Cancer ROB Robin Declan Declan Professor Declan Murphy. Domecq Cancer Center Kansas Maine Scientist Professor Ramsey Franken Dick Lyneham Kanda Guy Amac Torri Jane
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she's 'cancer-free'

Morning Show with Sean and Frank

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she's 'cancer-free'

"News different court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she's beaten pancreatic cancer for a second time doctors credit radiation treatments last summer she previously had pancreatic cancer in two thousand died of lung cancer in twenty eighteen and colorectal cancer in nineteen ninety nine the eighty six year old justice says she'd like to serve at least four more years on the

Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Is meat the new tobacco?

Thom Hartmann

04:23 min | 2 years ago

Is meat the new tobacco?

"No one Australia is on fire right now we have a a climate disasters happening all over the planet we've had our share of them here in North America as well and one of the things that is feeding this is meat they get the consumption of meat around the world is contributing about ten percent of the greenhouse gases out there so you've got on the one hand scientists climate scientists saying that we all need to eat less meat and re visit our we do agriculture and then also you've got health folks like you know the the lance at the the the British medical journal came out this was a new report published in the British British medical journal lancet recommends a largely plant based diet this is of a group of scientists from around the world to study nutrition food policy deliberating for three years and said that around the world meat consumption should drop by fifty percent that's for health that's to reduce the number of heart attacks to reduce the number of strokes to reduce the amount of obesity and and the concomitant so type two diabetes and problems that that follow along with that last October a power and a another separate completely separate study was published in the journal nature that essentially said the same thing and then this is impact here's the ABS abstract health risks associated because I'm sure if you happened email logical studies this was in the journal of nutrition research consumption of increasing amounts of red meat particular process meat is us here the increased risk of total mortality cardiovascular disease colorectal cancer in type two diabetes both men and women and that's even when you consider things like age race BMI history smoking blood pressure lipids in physical activity none of those things have as much impact apparently or were you know they are not fit to swing the the variables as simply eating me in terms of your risk of dying young single at and in my opinion between version of climate change and did you want to die on meat has become the new tobacco which is I guess my question for you do you think that meat is the new tobacco because guess what read the back fought back the track you know Mike pence water not bad for a one of the newspapers in in Indiana back in two thousand saying tobacco doesn't cause addiction nicotine doesn't cause addiction tobacco doesn't cause cancer a so now you've got you know the kind of the equivalent of the of the tobacco industry has you know the meat industry has one of these two and that is an amazing story James tapper writing for the guardian the headline red meat plays a vital role in diets claim expert in fighting against veganism never has a red meat will begin a call right back against the growth of veganism this week at the UK's biggest farming conference with claims and eating lamb and beef is vital because drum roll some plants a fisherman drained of their intrusion yes factory farming has caused the nutrient level in our vegetables to drop by fifty percent over the last fifty years in a speech at the I had the option farming conference Alice stand will tell ministers farmers and environmentalists a key nutrients and some fruits vegetables and grains and drop by up to fifty percent over fifty years the solution when you think the solution would be out of farming practices that keep the nutrients in the soil so the plants can absorb them or how about farming practices where you're growing nutrient rich species rather than ones the simply don't be known white button rapidly on the way to the store or as a ship across the country no no no no there there responses you're lacking nutrients unity made I don't get it made is pretty nutrient poor I mean if you want the nutrients from eating animals basically need the entire animal all is organ meats and brains and got some and all that kind of stuff you know like they did back in the old days Justina Burgess team muscle meat is not gonna do it so is meet the new is meet the new

Australia
U.S. Justice Ginsburg treated for pancreatic cancer

Michael Savage

00:23 sec | 3 years ago

U.S. Justice Ginsburg treated for pancreatic cancer

"Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has undergone successful treatment for cancer the Supreme Court statements as the eighty six year old justice has completed radiation therapy for cancer is to run her pancreas and that there is no evidence of any remaining disease Ginsburg had lung cancer surgery in December as well as two other previous bouts with cancer colorectal cancer in nineteen ninety nine and pancreatic cancer in two thousand

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Eighty Six Year
9/11 first responder who fought for victim fund dies

The Morgan Show

00:45 sec | 3 years ago

9/11 first responder who fought for victim fund dies

"A former New York City first responder, who was a leader in the fight for the nine eleven victims compensation fund has died. The AP's Julie Walker reports. Luis Alvarez responded twice to nine eleven once as a New York police officer who spent three months working in the rubble and then again when he fought for funding for those sick and that ground zero in his final days of battling colorectal cancer. He testified before congress about the need for permanent funding, you'll said you never. Forget, well, I'm here to make sure that you don't his family. In a statement on Facebook said we told him at the end that he had won his battle by the many lives he touched. He was fifty

Luis Alvarez New York City Julie Walker Colorectal Cancer Facebook Congress Officer Three Months
Anal cancer is on the rise, especially in women

Dr. Daliah

08:57 min | 3 years ago

Anal cancer is on the rise, especially in women

"So we're gonna talk about anal cancer. Okay. And the American Cancer Society estimates that we will have eighty three hundred new anal cancer cases this year in the two thousand nineteen and the majority of them women fifty five hundred women twenty seven seventy and men and the expect twelve hundred this year seven hundred sixty women five hundred twenty men now do anal cancer cases and rising for many years, and it is rare. I mean, I have to say it's rarer than others more rare younger individuals that we usually see these older adults the average age actually being in the early sixties, but they say the risk of being diagnosed with anal cancer. In your lifetime is about one in five hundred. And it can be treated so. There's been some suggestions on what we should maybe do to try to lessen these. So what's the number one risk factor of getting anal cancer? Well, the. So the. The human papillomavirus can cause a squamous cell cancer. And it could also cause cancer the throat it could also cause cancer of the penis. It could cause cancer of the cervix and we do vaccines for it. But HP is a group of about one hundred fifty related, viruses and the called papilloma viruses because the calls papilloma 's like warts. Subtypes, but the one most of the cause anal cancer is HP sixteen now other types can cause Ken awards. Ena works not cancer. The two types of HIV that caused the wards are HP six HP eleven. Most AIn awards do not develop into cancer. But they say people have had in awards are more likely to get anal cancer. Well, why well because if you've been infected with some HP subtypes, you might be more at risk of infecting of if you've got HP one way, then it just takes just as a matter of time that you might get HP again same way, but a different HP, basically get it from skin-to-skin contact. And so if somebody's warts or somebody's vaginal discharge or a wreath. Wreath touches, you you could then contracted. So it's very easy HP usually spread by sexual activity. Or seen a lot more throw cases for seen them mostly men and again access to HP. You could even spread it by your hands. Now HP is so common is probably the most common sexually transmitted disease out there, even though a lot of people don't have symptoms. In fact, I think committee is the number one diagnosed s but HP is the most common one out there. Well, that's why we have vaccines for now. Smoking puts you also at risk for cancer. HIV put you at risk. Certain gender and race ethnicity. They say African Americans younger than age sixty seems to be more common than women. But after sixty were common in women. So there was a article written slate where should man start getting Pap smears, anal peps. So the Pap smear was a we've talked about that develop for cervical cancer. Doctor Pap Nicolau was discovered it. So what he would do would collect a small samples of cells for the cervix examine the for stages and the structure to see who could be precancerous interesting when you look at these these cells, you could tell when one is starting no, turn vicious and start to change. And so just simple. Let's look at the cells under the microscope. Start seeing changes. And so we then start to do paps since we found out that we could identify cervical cancer so easily. We start to yearly we wouldn't even give birth control. Until you got your Pap smear. Things have changed to make things less expensive to have less procedures done on people and put people through possibly unnecessary tests. They decided to spread out when no pun intended when you get a Pap test. So now, you don't even have to get a Pap test to twenty one even if you're having sex as a fourteen year old I disagree with that. I think you should still be screened for today's I still think somebody should be giving you a talking about sex. But you could now wait till you're twenty one and have paps every three years. So. We do this to look for HP infection. Of the of the cervix. Now, I talked about a Pap smear of the throat years ago. Why aren't we check in the back of the throat if somebody performs a lot of oral sex, and it's in somebody who has had HPV why don't we screen them? And I believe some Dennis actually have in their office and oral HP test where you gargle and you spit into something. And then they could look to see if they could see HP that's something they can do. Now, just even avid said, we know that HP infect cells that line the anal canal the same as infect cells that line the service that he's a physician specialize in an infectious disease in Whitman Walker health, and they offer comprehensive health and wellness services to LGBTQ people throughout the DC area. And you do have increase in editor sexual homosexual activity when it comes to anal sex that seems to be a very very common. Celli say addition to the repertoire that people have. Whereas decades ago some people really want to go there or they wanna talk about going there. Now, people are very very open about that. So there's then unfortunately, more there's a whole nother now orifice that needs to be looked at an unfortunately could be ignored. You don't want to ignore the. Now, the rectum and we've talked about was not specifically designed to take the pressures of sex. That's why some people get tearing some people get a fissures things like that. And so could unfortunately introduce a lot more vaccinia pathogens STD's? So why are we ignore it? When it comes to HP. So Howard Brown health, which serves LGBTQ patients at numerous locations in Chicago has the decision to screen certain subgroups of patients because they believe that early detection of anal cancer precancerous areas of potentially circumvent greater vity and mortality now. It's actually that difficult man. Lies on his side. It's not as bad as woman getting Pap smear LES on his side. They take a little swab inserted a couple centimeters into the anus rotates. And then take take the swab out throw it into the container into the solution that then the fix that then gets into the lap. So it's a lot quicker than a passer. Now, some of you have been, you know, asking what are symptoms of colon cancer or colorectal cancer or anal cancer? Sometimes not sometimes you get some bleeding when you wipe now. Lot of you guys get blood when you wipe, and if that happens you've got to see. Dr. And you'll say, oh, well, no, I just have some hemorrhoids. Okay. Can make you bleed. Absolutely. Then the question is why did you give birth? Are. You a truck driver. Are you constipated? So there's a reason. Well, now, let me ask you. Why are you constipated? My diet. Maybe you're constipated because you have a mass in there, and you have to keep pushing the stool around that mass. And that's why you're constipated, and that's. So just because you think you have a reason for a symptom. You have which we all try and do and search for don't wanna panic west of the doctor if you have constipation if you have him rights, if you have blood on your toilet paper, you've got to get that checked out. I'm not saying it's not saying you have rental cancer. But it's. You can't blow off something as simple symptom because there may be something on this

Anal Cancer HP Cancer Cervical Cancer American Cancer Society Anal Canal Doctor Pap Nicolau Vaginal Discharge Vaccinia ENA Editor Celli KEN Dennis Howard Brown Whitman Walker DC Chicago
Cancer, UK And Twenty Five Grams discussed on Atlanta's Morning News

Atlanta's Morning News

00:18 sec | 3 years ago

Cancer, UK And Twenty Five Grams discussed on Atlanta's Morning News

"News about your health. And new study finds eating the equivalent of a slice of bacon. A day increases the risk of cancer. Researchers tracked a half million people in the UK and found eating just twenty five grams of processed meats each day raise their chances of getting colorectal cancer twenty percent. The study also finds a link between cancer and red meat put it took a larger amount

Cancer UK Twenty Five Grams Twenty Percent
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

08:42 min | 3 years ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The natural approach to healthcare. Well, it's colorectal cancer awareness month is March madness. Cool hand in hand, colorectal cancer awareness month. And that's what we're going to talk about today. What exactly is colorectal cancer? It is a normal growth of the cells in the large intestine or in the wrecked, America. And it is a very big problem. Man, something that can be very preventable. That's encouraging. Yes. Yeah. Preventable. Well, how communists colorectal cancer? Will. It is the second leading cause of cancer deaths. The number of people who are diagnosed each year with colorectal cancel is one hundred forty thousand and fifty thousand people die a year from colorectal cancer. Okay. So you said the second of all cancer, the second leading cause of death of all the cancers and one of the. I mean coming out at earliest this that's prevention. And how deadly is it? Well, it's you know, if you get it. It's about a third of the people die from it. So it's about one third. So. You know, it is it is something to be taken very seriously and people should be aware of that. That's one of the reasons that the really wants to have this get out there and talk about it. I get some information. Because people are are not aware and not taking the proper precautions. I always talk to my patients about that. And make sure that that is one of the screening things that they're doing. And it's is something that isn't isn't done as it should be only about one third of the people are getting there. Getting their their checks to make sure that they don't have the colon cancer. Talked about prevention. During the show. Let's get. Getting some facts Now, Dan. To talk about. But who gets colorectal cancer? It's it's as common in males and females. It is. It. It has quite a few different types of things that go along with that obesity is one of the things if you are overweight. You have a higher chance of getting colorectal cancer. The average age is that you get that is between fifty and seventy five. So those are kind of the prime times that you should be aware and having having that checked so. Vis-a-vis is one of the main factors along those lines. You also if you're a cigarette smoker, you have a higher chance of having overindulging in alcohol. Those sorts of things can help to lead to a higher incidence of colorectal cancer. So what are some of the symptoms? This one of the difficult types of things is that most people who have colorectal cancer show, no signs or Simpson's whatsoever. So is sort of one of those silent types of killers. So, you know, there are a few Tysoe symptoms that could be showing up that if you see you need to take that seriously. One of the things that I remember when I first opened up as I had a patient who came in who is back pain. And I was checking out and things weren't checking that he should have. You that he wouldn't have a problem with his back, and I checked his abdomen, and he had extreme tenderness there. So I started asking about his mouth, and I said, you know, have you seen any blood in your stolen? He said. Yes. And he's seen three other doctors for his back pain. And I said, did you tell them that you had? You know, blowing usually says, no, I've kind of kept quiet so people don't like to talk about their stools. They're still that's not one of the common things. So I immediately sent him to the emergency room an explanation of what was going on and he had advanced colon cancer. And he was only thirty one. So it can strike it younger ages, especially if you have a history of that. Monkhood died of colon cancer at a young age to know, he should have been starting to have shell and ask piece. Yeah, he should have been starting a alive sooner along those lines in is one of the major types of symptoms that can is blood in the stool. So if you happen to see that, even though you're young stomach aches and pains because pope aided his his complaining back pain. But really he was having Donald pains and then losing weight unexplained losing weight can also be a sign of colon cancer. But that's usually more than advanced types of Simpson's. So having that awareness, and you know, he he died soon afterwards. But, but you said a lot of times, you don't even know most of the time. Ratings are so important. And here's was very advanced all these Simpson's didn't really start out on him until it was much more of an advanced type of case. So, you know, having awareness that type of thing, and it is something that we try to educate our patients on in make sure that that's one of the things that they're having done. So why is screening so important? Well, you know, it's it's. Actually, your your brother talked about that. My brother-in-law. He's he went in for a colonoscopy, and the GI specialist say, well, that's why I do what I do does. He was able to see some polyps that were precancerous I was able to remove them and get those out of there because if those had been left. Yeah. Fifteen twenty years he would have had full blown can't call cancer. But because he had those we moved. He probably won't have that. So he's getting every three years getting a colonoscopy to make sure that those are taken care of. And it's a very simple procedure to remove those initial cancerous polyps. So you know, it's something that is. Can be easily prevented and controlled if you are getting that check that if you're not getting checked and those things are are left alone. They can be they can become very deadly. Right. You know, you're talking about over one third of the people who get colon cancer wind up dying from it in spite of the treatments that go on. So it has a very high death rate. So you don't want to you know, you want to take care of your colon. Make sure that it's functioning properly and then also getting that check to the proper time. And that's something that you, and I do make sure that we have have a good check making sure that we don't have. This really like when you get your calling. We we had to bring that up. I am quite humorous. I guess they do the twilight thing because I don't like to feel anything. Yes. I was there that I'm not missing the next. Please do not video tape because. Because I have. There for your first one, and you are quite hilarious. All right. Maybe we have to bring the radio, Mike. As they were. I didn't even our son pitch you back after. And. Narrow lined up is you was rolling out. They were they were laughing. Yes..

colorectal cancer cancer Simpson America Dan Mike Monkhood pope Donald Fifteen twenty years three years
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

05:33 min | 3 years ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"You, you don't realize that importance of them being able to right there on the spot, pull out Apollo that can turn into cancer during that span of five to ten years. The ability to catch it before hands like you said to. It's just so so good. So I encourage people get your poll NAS be get get it done. It's not as bad. So I. Definitely. Definitely. Encouraged people to do that. Right now, the colonoscopy itself is painless and. It's done under twilight sedation. So you don't feel anything. You don't have any memory of it 'cause really the worst part and I'd like to say the prep is getting easier all the time The researchers do realize how often would prep can seen to people who aren't used to sitting on the toilet for a long. And so so they're trying to make it easier and easier and they are succeeding. So it's it's let off every time you do. So. So if I could refer back to Mike to just to let Mike now that you know since I've become you know more knowledgeable. Just understanding things about You know there was talk a little bit about biomarkers taking a test such as a fit test a urine test or tissue tissue tests to those are all bio bio markers that can help. Guide and treat your next step cancer. If it's a next step, like it was for me, I kind of liken it to, for example, all of us get in our car and sometimes if the traveling somewhere and we put on Google maps for directions and Google. Map tell us to get to our destination safely without any issues. Well, it's kind of like how biomarkers indies testing the new tests that they have out. To Helpless, get that personalized cancer treatment. Instead of always chemotherapy, they're so good and there there are a lot of clinical trials. If you you know if you. If you're interested there, they're all kinds of clinical trials for the even for the preps that they're using these things. So I looked on the I looked on the clinical trials dot, go while ago a for colorectal test, and there are a bunch of them and some of them just involve the different tests for the ramp that they're using. You know the the localize five year survival rate for colorectal ninety percent. The once is sources spread. Reasonable is seventy, one percent and distant drops down to fourteen. So that's one of the reasons why it is so important to be stand in to be monitored by some sort of some sort of test I. Agree with you. In fact, as a survivor out now from colorectal cancer eight years out now, I call it my. List I still go to the oncologist I. Go to my dermatologist I, go to my gynecologist all because colon cancer is known to have those associated risk as well, and for me, it's every six months. It's not like a year or two for some individuals. But because I am Lynch Syndrome patient I, have to monitor my own care, and for me, that's every six months of getting tested getting fit test again, getting the C or a once a year having a cool enough to be with a little bit more serious if you are. Are Lynch Syndrome patient because of that mutated gene associated with it though what your general practitioner will do your family doctor is they have a list of these are the most common things.

cancer Mike colon cancer Google Lynch
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"This is fishing, is that there may be something genetic going on and is it so getting these genetic tests? Becomes more important in families where someone died of cancer under the age of fifty. You mentioned that your grandfather died at thirty eight and that's a signal that there may well be something genetic going on, Robin? Yeah. I was GONNA say. Have the west of your family were more have been tested? For Lynch? Syndrome. Because I know there's a lot of a lot of resistance. among family members, even though they know Lynch Syndrome or BRACCO or something genetic is in their family, there's a lot of resistance to getting tested as though not being tested, we'll make it less real. Yes Robin. You bring up a valid point. In fact, my oldest daughter, who is you know? Well, well, over thirty when I tried to convince her to get tested, she was like I don't even WanNa. Hear it. So sometimes, the hardest people to convince can be the closest ones that you love which are you know sometimes, you're gambling number in members of your children in and I what I tried to remind him of is that you don't. WanNa go. Go through what your mom went through unnecessarily. So I'm hoping that at some point I'll get through and and and all I can do is just keep incursion them. Hey, get tested and if nothing else even if they don't get tested for Lynch Syndrome at least take fit tests on a regular basis soon, that any forms of cancer that may develop along those lines could be caught only enough so that they don't have to suffer like I, did as well. You're absolutely right and especially when the test is simple, inexpensive and non invasive like the fit test, we talked about the fecal smear test That's something that you really ought to incorporate into your healthcare management. I mean young people go for a run or you eat this and that or. This, and that in order to maintain their health. But what they forget about is that there are these sneaky things that you never anticipated. That could sneak up on you and really do a job on you. Right. Now, if I could just back up just a tiny bit now as I go back and we talked a little bit badge my genetic testing, the genetic tests also revealed something else too. That was very important. It stated that I had an eighty percent chance of having in Dimitrios cancer within the next five years and I was like, wow, when my when I told my oncologist, my concern about this, she says. Nora. That's why we did this test because now you have an opportunity to do some preventive maintenance so that you don't have that that that issue that arises five year, five years from now. So that's why opposite have a complete fool 'cause Directa me, but on biopsy endometrial cancer had already started. So great meeting. That was another wakeup call that this testing is so vital and important. That's right. So you had an opportunity to nip that in the bud. So to speak to to get those sales out of your body before it became a problem here, I won't speak up for another thing. Once you reach the age of fifty, if you haven't been screened for Colorectal Cancer I would, I would almost advocate to go ahead. And and take the liquid and go see you. Go..

Lynch Syndrome Robin Colorectal Cancer endometrial cancer Lynch WanNa Dimitrios Nora Directa
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

05:46 min | 3 years ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"For colonoscopy and from there, really just blossomed to help me understand that. Policy is where it kind of begins and their researching and and getting on board. With places like Cap, which is the College of American pathologists and and being a patient advocate advocates boys for for helping them understand from patient view. This is what works for us and this is what doesn't work. Well. Let's talk about Lynch Syndrome diagnosis, what what leads you to have the genetic cast made? You realize that you were loop syndrome patient? Well, for for me, my I have to I I. I'd be remiss if I did not say that I had a really great healthcare chain, they were behind you one hundred percent on, encourage me to to to to attach myself to two groups that are you know involved in colorectal cancer, and that's what I did, and then they took care of me in that sense and helped me really further understand this disease. So. What happened in Twenty, sixteen? My on colleges suspected that I was limp central. She actually suspected back in two thousand fourteen when we started talking about my history further, I told her that you know by the way, my my i. think my grandfather passed away from cancer. I'm not sure what kind My mother had passed away from Glee Blackstone or cancer, and she suspected. Suspected I. Really Think you're Limp Syndrome, but let's get you tested and she went further out on a limb and said Hey I'll contact the insurance company. I'll do all the legwork for you. So you don't have to worry about costs associated with her or anything and I was like, okay. What can I go wrong to two years of her badgering? Me Finally committed to it. Window report comes back. I was shocked I was Lynch Syndrome. But by that time in the meantime, my brother was diagnosed late-stage colorectal cancer. He was diagnosed with Stage three C, and then before my aunt passed away, she told me that year and twenty sixteen. Oh, by the way, their grandfather action pass away from colorectal cancer at the age of thirty eight. So immediate. His there is an immediate opened his and I'm going. Wow. So much knowledge that could have helped me with getting an earlier diagnose and and being treated Papa looked instead of having six inches of my colon removed and treated or you know with..

Lynch Syndrome cancer Syndrome Glee Blackstone Lynch College of American Papa
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"That's right and it's not that you ignore it symptoms. His this stuff is sneaky it it. As you say, you probably had it for fifteen years. 'cause it starts with just a single cell and it grows very slowly and it doesn't really cause any problems until it gets too late stage, and as you know, you don't WanNa get to that late stage. So somehow we got this thing along net path before it gets dangerous. I was wondering when oral you said something about having a more symptoms. Did you have any early symptoms that that if you had known what the symptoms were, you would've noticed. You know what? In all, honestly when I look back. The one symptom that I did have and believe it or not. It was just using the bathroom on a regular basis as I look at I. Go. You know I didn't have regular bowel movements for me going two or three days? That time was just something that I always had in my body for years that I've you know I've gotten used to so. For me that probably wasn't number one, sent them the fact that I wasn't using the bathroom on a regular basis, but I never brought that up to my doctor. I. Just you know that's probably my. Body habits, but not going to the bathroom on a regular daily basis allows for all that bacteria, the bad cells and all that stuff to to generate in that the and sit in that Colin and thus did teen years. Later, you have a late stage colon diagnose. That's that's very interesting. Now, the screening tests are described and a little bit more detail on the fight colorectal cancer, dot org website, as well as a lot of good information Why don't you tell us how you got involved with colorectal cancer? A little bit. Nora. Well, I I I'd like to continue to say that knowledge is power. So through this journey I wanted to continue to give myself more knowledge on how I con how I contracted the disease. So what could I have done differently or and What can I do for others who may possibly be going through something similar? So I found by colds. By Colorectal Cancer in twenty fourteen, and immediately. The first thing that I did, it was just shared my story like I went through this and from their advocacy was born I join what they had at this time called rats, we love to be called RASC- day is actually an acronym that stands for Research Advocate Training Support And currently now, I've worked my way up to be clinical trials curator. Since the focus is on better treatment while going undergoing. Lead stage of cancer treatment and one of the things that I really had to learn I and and take the patient out of temporary is understand the policy of it Why isn't something being done more? So for patients who are suffering from the lease, why aren't people finding out sooner or what can be done and it will down really to understanding policy. So I can't pay wind up on the hill and talk with my legislative. My. Legislative Support to to help them to to see that you know what people are being diagnosed with this disease. At an early stage, you could do something to help us lower the the age of of of being..

colorectal cancer Colin Research Advocate Training Sup Nora
"colorectal cancer" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"colorectal cancer" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"I'm Doug Stephan with a focus on watching television. And how bad it is all the way around if you sit for a long time on your arse. You're going to have a problem with all kinds of things including something to do with colorectal cancer Kenya. Exactly. Colorectal cancer. It's different in the young those under age fifty than those older age fifty and this comes at J NCI Kansas spectrum medical journal just this week that there's a connection between prolong time spent sitting while watching TV and increased risk of colorectal cancer for younger Americans, Doug Young onset. Colorectal cancer. This is diagnosed under age fifty is increasing in the US and globally sharply. Contrasting with the dramatic decreases among older people largely as a result of cancer screening, initiatives, young onset, colorectal cancer. Is typically more aggressive and found that a more advanced stage than those in older patients resulting in greater years of life lost the news this week is that more than one hour of daily TV viewing time is associated with a twelve percent increase in risk compared to those who watched less, but stand by the results were even more striking for those watching more than two hours day with nearly seventy percent increase in risk. This is young people. You're talking about underage. Dating younger could be people with devices in front of computers. Not just television. Exactly where I saw something the other day. And I thought of you the expert advice is to make sure you're up at least five to six minutes every hour and moving every hour euro wake up and moving in order to get away from things like this. Exactly. Yeah. You see this whole business?.

Colorectal cancer Doug Stephan Doug Young J NCI Kansas spectrum Kenya US seventy percent twelve percent six minutes two hours one hour
U.S. cancer death rate hits milestone – but it's not all good news

Here & Now

01:23 min | 3 years ago

U.S. cancer death rate hits milestone – but it's not all good news

"According to a report from the American Cancer Society cancer death rates overall have been dropping for at least twenty five years. The rate dropped twenty seven percent between nineteen Ninety-one in two thousand sixteen meaning about two point six million fewer cancer deaths than expected during that period. Yeah. But there are some outliers to the trend the number of prostate cancer deaths is no longer dropping. It's flat and the number of obesity related cancer deaths is rising doctor Daryl gray is deputy director of the center for cancer health equity at Ohio State University. Dr gray your thoughts about the overall drop. Can we assume the campaign against smoking has played a part here? Absolutely. So this is good news. Is you highlighted that? We are making progress, particularly for those cancers that are amenable to prevention lifestyle and screening strategies, and particularly you highlight. Added a smoking. Yes, that is contributing to a decline not only in lung cancer, but other smoking related cancers such as breast cancer and colorectal cancer. And as I mentioned, you know, those Kansas for which we have good screening strategies such as for colorectal cancer screening, breast cancer screening with mammography, we are making significant progress, and we have in I expect will continue to do. So. But also as you highlight, it, there are other cancers that we have to be mindful of of improving pants or

Colorectal Cancer American Cancer Society Daryl Gray Dr Gray Deputy Director Ohio State University Kansas Twenty Seven Percent Twenty Five Years
Cancer Deaths Have Fallen 27% Since 1991

WSJ What's News

02:14 min | 3 years ago

Cancer Deaths Have Fallen 27% Since 1991

"Deaths from cancer peaked in the early nineties. But they've taken a dramatic turnaround down twenty seven percent over the past quarter century, Wall Street Journal health and science reporter, Amy docs, are Marcus joins us with details. So Amy, this represents two point six million fewer deaths and efforts to reduce smoking are big part of it. Definitely the case. According to this new report from American Cancer Society. Researchers smoking was one of the biggest drivers of cancer deaths overall for men and Bruin. And while this is seen as good news people. You spoke to said there's still a long way to go in terms of preventing deaths. It is good news. People are very happy about it. And they should be because people worked hard to bring awareness of HANA make lifestyle changes to develop new drugs. But there are many people who are still going to die from cancer statistics that they gave. Projections and twenty nineteen are sobering. And they themselves acknowledged that they still wanna make further improvements in these death rates. You know, the authors of the cancer death study said the wall we've seen significant progress in decline in cancer deaths. We could actually see almost two million new cancer diagnoses next year along with six hundred six thousand deaths. Yes, those are staggering and sobering numbers. The other thing that they raised in the report that I think is interesting is that they don't have explanations for some of the reasons why some of that were calendar rates still continue to increase in the report Hudson significant data on cancer deaths among men in women's specifically, which types of cancer affects them, yes. They said that men die in the greatest numbers from lung prostate and colorectal cancer. And they said that women die primarily from lung breast and colorectal cancer. One of the differences. They said is that lung cancer incidence is declining twice as fast in men as women and some of that can reflect some of the historical trends in when women started smoking.

Cancer Colorectal Cancer American Cancer Society Amy Docs Health And Science Reporter Wall Street Journal Marcus Hudson Twenty Seven Percent