35 Burst results for "Colorado River"

Joe Biden Politicizes Hurricane Ian, Blaming Damage to Climate Change

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:43 min | 2 months ago

Joe Biden Politicizes Hurricane Ian, Blaming Damage to Climate Change

"Here was Joe Biden yesterday speaking of Florida hurricane assistance. And it was, I admit, it was a nice moment to see governor desantis and President Biden together pledging to help the people of Florida, but then Biden had to politicize it. Incidentally, desantis didn't, in any way, shape or form. Listen to here's cut number one. Listen to Joe Biden. And what he said about climate change, we're in a situation where the Colorado River looks more like a stream. There's a lot going on. And I think the one thing this is finally ended is the discussion about whether or not there's climate change we should do something about it. You know, I'm not I don't consider myself a bad person. I think I'm a pretty decent guy. And I did want to say, wow, that's great to see. Biden and desantis there. And then there's Biden obsessing about climate change and global warming, and he couldn't help himself. This is what Democrats do. A hurricane hits a state and they want to preach their climate change doctrine. Here's cut three. Listen to Biden being asked by a reporter about his visit to Florida with governor desantis. What the governor's done is pretty remarkable. In terms of, you know, it's first of all the biggest thing the governor's John and some of the others have done. They'd recognize this thing called global warming. The world is changing. It's changing. That's sickens me.

Governor Desantis Biden Joe Biden President Biden Desantis Florida Colorado River John
California agencies float Colorado River savings in drought

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

California agencies float Colorado River savings in drought

"There's a new proposal to save water from the Colorado River California water agencies that rely on the parched Colorado River say they are willing to cut their use by about one tenth The proposal to cut 400,000 acre feet annually marks the first time California water agencies are publicly and formally indicating what they're willing to give up since federal officials demanded major cuts the summer the agency's supply water to farmers and millions of people in Southern California drought exacerbated by climate change is diminishing the river which provides about one third of Southern California's urban water and is the only source of water for farms in the imperial valley California shares the river water with 6 other states tribes and Mexico California however has rights to the single largest share and is the last to lose water in times of shortage I'm Lisa dwyer

Colorado River California Colorado River Southern California California Valley California Mexico Lisa Dwyer
"colorado river" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 2 months ago

"colorado river" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A Martinez. Water from the drought played Colorado River is much sought after and much disputed. Cities such as Phoenix and Las Vegas depend on it, but the single biggest user of that water is a single irrigation district in the southern tip of California, which serves about 400 farms. The farmers there face growing pressure to give up some of that water. Dan Charles reports from El Centro California. Drive straight east from San Diego across the mountains and you come to bone dry desert. And then suddenly, weirdly, there's mile after mile of green fields. Steve Benson, whose co owner of Benson farms drives me by a crew planting lettuce. I have to get out and see what I assume it's romaine lettuce, but it might be iceberg lettuce. This is not California's central valley. The country's biggest producer of produce and nuts. It's imperial valley, along the Mexican border. And these fields only exist because more than a century ago, fortune seeking land speculators and engineers dug a canal to bring in water from the Colorado River, 80 miles east of here Today, the imperial irrigation district takes more water from the Colorado River than all of Arizona and Nevada combined. It's enough to cover all the irrigated land here, almost 800 square miles with 5 inches of water. Every year. But now with the giant reservoirs of Lake mead and Lake Powell shrinking fast, the federal government is demanding a plan for cutbacks, up and down the river. And Sarah Porter, whose director of the Kyle center for water policy at Arizona state university says everybody is looking at the imperial irrigation district. They have the most water and in some senses the most power. You know, the more water you have, the more, you know, you have a lot of leverage if you have a lot of water. Imperial valley farmers, like Andrew lime group, say this water is their property. We

Colorado River Dan Charles Steve Benson Benson farms California El Centro Martinez Phoenix Las Vegas central valley San Diego Kyle center for water policy Lake mead Lake Powell Sarah Porter Nevada Arizona
"colorado river" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

09:33 min | 3 months ago

"colorado river" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"And I'm Jane clayson in Boston. This is here and now. Last week, the federal government declared an unprecedented shortage on the Colorado River, which means states like Arizona and Nevada are about to lose a tremendous amount of water. In a way, it's no surprise. The 7 states that use the river agreed to those cuts several years ago when they signed a deal to limit its use in times of extreme drought. That day has finally arrived. The country's largest reservoir at Lake mead has gotten so low that Arizona will be forced to cut 21% of its annual water supply from the river in January, and the cuts are likely to get much worse. Sarah Porter joins us now. She's director of the Kyle's center for water policy at Arizona state university, Sarah, welcome to the program. Good to be with you. We are talking about unprecedented cuts on a river that gives life to 40 million people in the southwest. Give us a sense of the magnitude of this problem. How dire is it? We're in a very serious situation where the levels of Lake mead and Lake Powell, the two big reservoirs that hold water for California, Arizona, Nevada, and Mexico are approaching Deadpool. And Deadpool is, that's the point at which water can no longer be delivered off the reservoir. So the 7 states that rely on the Colorado River agreed to cut of those states, Arizona was actually the hardest hit. The state will lose 592,000 acre feet of water in January. That is technically enough water for more than a million, about 1.5 million homes in a year. But most of these cuts will actually hit farmers first. Tell us what farmers are up against in the next year or so. Well, it's not quite as simple as it looks. So the central Arizona project is a canal that moves Colorado River water 330 miles across from the western border to central Arizona to be delivered to Phoenix and Tucson and the farming region in between. When the CAP was first built, the farmers in central Arizona realized that they couldn't afford the water. It takes so much energy and it costs so much to start paying back the loans for the infrastructure that that water was extremely expensive. And so the cities agreed to subsidize the cost of that water for farmers in exchange for farmers to essentially give up their priority. So this is a deal that was worked out over 20 years ago where farmers agreed that if there was a shortage, they would take a cut. And it means that the cities stay in the highest priority pool on the CAP. And so they're the last to take the cut. And the reason for that really makes sense. The last group of people you want to have have their water cut are people in a city. You know, it becomes a matter of public health. I don't know. Our farmers are growing our food. Don't we want them to have water? Yeah. You're right about that. But all of this is about long-term planning and long-term certainty. So I think the bigger picture and the bigger concern in terms of making sure that there's enough Colorado River water for continued farming is on the main stem of the Colorado River, imperial valley, Yuma, Arizona. These are regions that produce the food that the nation eats. And having them have to produce less because there's less water will have repercussions for the national food basket. So let's step back a little bit because, you know, these agreements, these cuts really aren't going to solve the problem. The reservoirs are so low right now that this summer earlier this summer in June, the federal government actually stepped in, told the states, they're going to have to cut even more. Another two to 4 million acre feet of water next year. Tell us why the federal government felt like they needed to step in here. Well, there's a federal agency the bureau of reclamation that manages the Colorado River system. And the allocations that were decided back in 1922 overestimated the amount of water that we can reasonably take out of the Colorado River annually. On top of that, when they made the allocations out of Lake mead, the water managers didn't calculate in the fact that 1.2 million acre feet of water are lost through evaporation and through seepage. And then on top of that, we have an over 20 year drought that is reducing the amount of water that flows into the system and climate change impacts, which point to a long-term reduction in flows. So all of those factors added together really lead to the conclusion that the Colorado River sharing states and the republic of Mexico need to get to a place where we reduce the total amount of water that we expect from the Colorado River by at least 20%. And that has to be our new normal. While getting to that place to that new normal has been painful and states have been fighting over how to meet these new conservation targets. In fact, they missed a deadline to come up with a plan. Tell me the kinds of conflicts that you see playing out between states. I mean, do you expect lawsuits here? Are we talking about violence? I mean, these are, these are weighty issues. And problems with people in their everyday lives. This is just, it's such a tough one because it means that some water users have to go without water. I don't think that violence is going to emerge. And I would point to a quarter century of collaboration and consensus to resolve big problems on the system. I believe that they are looking to action by the federal government. That would be the easiest for them because then none of the water managers needs to go back to their water users and take the blame instead they can put the blame on the federal government. Our colleagues at Ku NC have reported that even if every home in Los Angeles in Las Vegas, in Phoenix, turned off their faucets, you still would not save enough water. So how in the world do we resolve this problem if the drought doesn't end soon? Are there any ideas that will actually work? Yeah, I mean, there are, but it means less water, it means that everybody pitches and uses less water and where that will be felt the most is in agriculture. And of course, that participation means that they take a hit, those rural communities that depend on agricultural production will be impacted. And I think the solution includes making sure that those impacts are mitigated to the extent that they can be, that cities, you know, step up to help mitigate the impacts that agricultural rural communities feel. And beyond agriculture and farming, I mean, if water stops flowing through the Glenn canyon dam at Lake Powell, I mean, you're going to lose hydropower, and that's going to get a lot of people's attention. Yeah, you know, in big cities, big, well resourced utilities are working to make sure that they have backup supplies of power should the hydropower production in the Colorado system be impacted, where we'll see the impacts again are more likely with rural communities and with tribes. We have these rural electric co ops. We have tribal communities that depend very heavily on that hydropower, and they will be the most strongly impacted. Do you think water users in the southwest fully understand the significance of this problem, the potential catastrophic impacts that we're facing? Everybody understands that this is a much more serious situation than we were facing a few years ago. But I'll tell you, there's been a kind of a cultural avoidance of talking very openly about water challenges in the southwest, the water managers have been very Frank with each other about water challenges, but they have been hesitant to speak very candidly with decision makers and business leaders because it's a complex subject, and they've always been hesitant to make people fear more than they should. We're now at a place where I'm seeing much more candid conversations much more willingness to act. I think that there has been a big shift because we're talking about these unprecedented cuts, but really it's a fraction of what the government says is needed to keep the Colorado River system from fully collapsing. How do you see this ending, Sarah? I think we're going to get to a point where we have figured out a way to leave 2 million acre feet of water in the system every year and move forward from that. What it's going to take, the one ingredient that is essential is leadership. I believe that we'll get the leadership we need and we'll get to where we have to be because it's an imperative. We really don't have a choice. Sarah Porter runs the Kyle center for water policy at Arizona state university, such an

Colorado River Arizona Lake mead federal government Jane clayson Kyle's center for water policy Colorado River water Nevada Sarah Porter Lake Powell Arizona state university republic of Mexico Phoenix imperial valley
"colorado river" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:17 min | 3 months ago

"colorado river" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Hey, happy to be here. Good to have you. And we will save you for last and best for last, you know? I get it. But first we'll start with waylon. What do you got for us? Well, do you remember last year the indicator did a whole series about the mega drought in the west and the value of water. And things have only gotten worse since then. And the impact has been catastrophic for the Colorado River, which is the source of water for tens of millions of people in 7 states plus Mexico. Well, in June, federal authorities told the 7 states that use the Colorado River, they had two months to figure out how to cut their water consumption by 15 to 30%. That deadline came and went this week without an agreement, so the government ended up mandating cuts for two of the states, Arizona, and Nevada. 21% less water for Arizona, and 8% less for Nevada. Showering. Yeah, you know, and it's going to take way more than just shorter showers to account for these cuts. You know, it's going to require pretty drastic rethinking of infrastructure and the agricultural economy. I mean, the Colorado River irrigates millions of acres of agricultural land, and when you look at farmers in California and Arizona, they're already leaving land unplanted. Fallowed fields. Yeah, and that's like all the fruits and vegetables that we eat in the U.S., right? Wait, wait a second, why are the feds picking on Arizona and Nevada? Well, the states that use the Colorado River are divided into upper basin and lower basin and there are all these agreements like govern kind of who is first in line for cuts when there's a water shortage and it happens to be Arizona and Nevada. They have what's called junior rights. But massive cuts are needed in order to stabilize the reservoirs at Lake mead and Lake Powell. So the 7 states still at the negotiating table and meanwhile, there is $4 billion for drought resilience in the inflation reduction act, but that's going to be just a part of a solution to this crisis. And this has been a really long time coming. It's not like we're just learning that the Colorado River is over allocated. So at some point we all know that harsh measures are going to have to happen. All right, but let's switch gears from rivers to the forest. Darren, what is your indicator of the week? So I thought of my indicator while I was at this documentary premiere. And it's a movie called the territory. It's out today, actually. It's about an indigenous group in the Amazon rainforest fighting back against the clearing of their land. So here's the trailer. He's burning the Amazon. It's intense. Yeah, wow. Yeah. And just to give a bit of context, the Brazilian president jair Bolsonaro, he did get elected on a platform that promised to open up more indigenous land for farming and mining. So there are both legal and illegal clearings happening in Brazil. But what's happening in the documentary is not legal under Brazilian law because it shows random farmers like vigilante farmers basically staking their claims. It's pretty intense. But even though that is illegal, there are very few prosecutions. And the indicator that they highlight in the documentary is that deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon is trending up. Cash flow and soy farming, tin mining, rubber harvesting. This land is sought after by all kinds of industry. And last year, the rate of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon reached a 15 year high. In fact, that year alone, they cleared forests equivalent to the size of Connecticut. That's staggering. Yeah. Not the kind of news you want to hear, given all the climate warnings we've got and biodiversity warnings over the last few years. Not at all. And for people like the indigenous people in the film, the Uruguay, this is devastating. But the settlers will respond with arguments like the number of people on this planet is expected to reach 8 billion later this year. And there's more richer people to demand more beef and lamb and free range chickens that farmland has to come from somewhere. That's the argument. You know, I saw a chart the other day that gave me pause on that narrative of needing more farmland. Because overall land use for farming has actually stopped growing across the globe. And this chart was collated by our world and data, and it showed that according to the UN and others, the amount of land used for agriculture peaked somewhere between the 1990s and the early 2000s. So it's gone down since then. It's kind of plateauing a little bit. And there's been a few reasons for this. There's been a shift in diets towards animals that are more intensively farmed indoors. And we're getting better at producing more food on less land. But that is kind of cold comfort for people like beta Uruguay or from the film. Beta lives in Brazil where agricultural land use is increasing. And he spoke after the screening that I saw. He's saying what his people suffer all indigenous people in Brazil suffer as well. And given the Amazon rainforests, historical role as a carbon sink, this affects us all too. Yeah, bummer. Yeah. But they're fighting back. I mean, that's the kind of sliver of hope that I see in this documentary. Nate, I hear you have another sliver of hope for us. That's also a little scoop. Yeah, let's call it a scoop, right? And it is a sliver of hope. My indicator is related to both of the topics you guys were talking about, which is the link between nature and the economy. So obviously, we know those two things are related, right? But when we talk about the global or national economy, we talk about GDP, jog figures. How often do you hear the phrase natural capital? Not very frequently. You're talking like natural resources, equivalent to wealth. Exactly, right? It's basically talking about nature like you would talk about a factory or a road. And yeah, we don't really talk about it because we don't do a good job of tracking it. Obviously, right? We track oil and gas. We track National Park Service revenue, but we've never done a throw accounting of what other natural resources like water quality or the air we breathe, what kind of economic gain that is worth, right? Plus, how those things are changing over time. How are we using them? So an example I like to think of is like a wetland on the coast, right? You could pay that, you could charge 20 bucks ahead for people to come park so they can sunbathe for the day. It's pretty easy to do the math, figure out what the value of that is, but what is the value of that wetland as a shield from ghost or storms or is it drained for floodwaters? You know, looking at the ecosystem services that wetland provides. Yeah, I don't think the calculator my iPhone is capable of handling this task. I doubt it. And that's because environmental economists have been trying to crunch numbers on this for years, but it's really hard. For example, how do you judge the value of a tree left standing in a forest or like a park? Urban trees save people billions of dollars in heating and cooling. We know that, but how do you calculate the value of a tree in a forest? It's way harder. That is totally true. I have a tree in my backyard. And I thank it for

Colorado River Arizona Nevada Amazon jair Bolsonaro waylon Brazil Lake Powell Lake mead Uruguay Mexico Darren California U.S. government Connecticut
"colorado river" Discussed on Skimm This

Skimm This

04:40 min | 3 months ago

"colorado river" Discussed on Skimm This

"Before we go, we wanted to talk about one sport that's taking America by storm. And no, we're not talking about football. We're actually referencing pickleball. A racket sport that's kind of like a combo of tennis badminton and ping Pong. Pickleball was invented not too long ago. Back in 1965, and now, in 2022, it seems like everyone and their mother literally has picked up a racket and a wiffle ball and has started playing. You encounter as a reporter a lot of fan communities and a lot of people who are really excited about lots of different things. But the joy of this sport really touched me. That Sarah Larson, a staff writer at The New Yorker, who did a deep dive on pickleball and why it's taking over cities and suburbs alike. She told us that besides the sport being pretty easy to play, natural athleticism is optional here. And relatively low maintenance, there's also a community element to pickleball that's really different than say, tennis. It's a simple way of getting people moving and active and happy and connecting to one another. Everybody I interviewed talked about how they love playing it and it's challenging and fun, but accessible, but also they really just love meeting new people. I just think it brings people a lot of joy. I mean, everyone I've talked to at a pickleball, you know, recreational game or tournament or day of play in the city where everybody kind of meets up and plays. They're just giddy and they're sort of brimming with happiness and they can't wait to come back and do it the next morning. In fact, pickleball brings people together so much that one person even told Larsen that pickleball could be the thing to save America and heal the country's divisions. That's a bold statement for sure. But according to Larson, it's not a crazy proposition. They think that under the right conditions, it can inspire people to call on their better selves a little bit in a way that sports don't always foster. Somebody with sort of rude to me about something pickleball related on Twitter. And I was really annoyed and it was unfair. And then I thought, I'm going to call on my pickleball part of myself as I respond to this. And I'm not going to be rude about how unfair it was. Okay, if you're intrigued and haven't pickled yet yourself, here's some advice on how to get started. In terms of finding how and where to play, there are these great apps that connect players with one another everywhere. Like I was just in Vermont and I was playing with a bunch of nice people in the local place. I mean, this exists all over. And the culture still is quite friendly and people tend to be very encouraging and even someone who doesn't know what they're doing can generally show up and be welcomed and taught how to play. But I think just getting a cheap paddle and giving it a whirl is probably the best and then falling in love with it. And then wanting to get better. That's the other thing that keeps people hooked. They're like, I know I can do much better at this. This slightly goofy, lovable sport. I'm currently being beaten by my grandparents, but I can beat my grandparents, you know, that kind of thing. We will leave a link to some of those apps in our show notes. Happy pickling. Thanks for listening to skim this this podcast with skin by me. Alex Carr, along with our producer will Livingston and our associate producer Blake Lou merwin. This episode was engineered by Ellie McAfee Han and Andrew Calloway, and the skims head of audio is grayland brashear. Skim this will be back in your feet again next Thursday. But I'll be on vacation, so you'll be hearing the week's news from our producers Blake and will. Until then, check out the other podcasts from the skim. 9 to 5 ish is where we talk all things career. With our founders, Carly and Danielle, and pop culture is our weekly deep dive into the culture stories you can't stop thinking about. Follow 9 to 5 ish and pop culture wherever you're already listening to us.

pickleball Pickleball Sarah Larson tennis badminton America The New Yorker football Larsen Larson Alex Carr Vermont Blake Lou merwin Twitter Ellie McAfee Han Andrew Calloway grayland brashear Livingston Blake Carly
"colorado river" Discussed on Skimm This

Skimm This

01:38 min | 3 months ago

"colorado river" Discussed on Skimm This

"The skim dot com.

US: Drought-stricken states to get less from Colorado River

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 4 months ago

US: Drought-stricken states to get less from Colorado River

"The federal government is told to drought stricken states they will be receiving even less water from the Colorado River I Norman hall Arizona and Nevada already enduring extreme drought face more water cuts from the Colorado The reductions come as experts predict levels at Lake mead the largest U.S. reservoir will plummet even further The cuts will place officials in those states under extraordinary pressure to plan for a hotter drier future and a growing population Mexico will also face cut like meat is currently less than a quarter full the 7 states overall to depend on its water mist a federal deadline to announce proposals on plans to cut additional water next year Arizona will lose an additional 3% Nevada 8% I Norman hall

Norman Hall Colorado River Federal Government Lake Mead Nevada Arizona Colorado U.S. Mexico
Colorado River cuts expected for Arizona, Nevada and Mexico

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 4 months ago

Colorado River cuts expected for Arizona, Nevada and Mexico

"Federal officials plan to tell several western states how much more they'll have to cut back in water usage because of less water flowing through the Colorado River The Colorado River provides water to 40 million people in 7 states including Arizona California and Colorado as well as Mexico but drought and climate change have left less water flowing through the river and depleted reservoirs state water officials are expecting federal officials to tell them that the Lake mead reservoir on the Nevada Arizona border will likely shrink to dangerously low levels that could disrupt water delivery and hydropower production The states already are trying to cut their water usage by a federally mandated 15% I'm Donna water

Colorado River The Colorado Ri Lake Mead Reservoir Arizona Colorado Mexico California Nevada Donna
Bodies surfacing in Lake Mead recall mob's time in Las Vegas

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 7 months ago

Bodies surfacing in Lake Mead recall mob's time in Las Vegas

"People people people people in in in in Las Las Las Las Vegas Vegas Vegas Vegas are are are are certain certain certain certain more more more more bodies bodies bodies bodies will will will will be be be be found found found found as as as as the the the the waters waters waters waters of of of of lake lake lake lake Mead Mead Mead Mead continued continued continued continued to to to to fall fall fall fall amid amid amid amid an an an an historic historic historic historic drought drought drought drought the the the the lake lake lake lake Mead Mead Mead Mead reservoir reservoir reservoir reservoir fed fed fed fed by by by by the the the the Colorado Colorado Colorado Colorado River River River River has has has has dropped dropped dropped dropped more more more more than than than than one one one one hundred hundred hundred hundred seventy seventy seventy seventy feet feet feet feet since since since since nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen eighty eighty eighty eighty three three three three some some some some seventy seventy seventy seventy percent percent percent percent of of of of capacity capacity capacity capacity gone gone gone gone the the the the drop drop drop drop exposing exposing exposing exposing one one one one Las Las Las Las Vegas Vegas Vegas Vegas drinking drinking drinking drinking water water water water intake intake intake intake forcing forcing forcing forcing a a a a switch switch switch switch to to to to a a a a deeply deeply deeply deeply can can can can take take take take to to to to continue continue continue continue to to to to supply supply supply supply casinos casinos casinos casinos suburbs suburbs suburbs suburbs two two two two point point point point four four four four million million million million residents residents residents residents and and and and forty forty forty forty million million million million tourists tourists tourists tourists per per per per year year year year a a a a decomposed decomposed decomposed decomposed body body body body in in in in a a a a barrel barrel barrel barrel was was was was spotted spotted spotted spotted by by by by boaters boaters boaters boaters the the the the man man man man had had had had been been been been shot shot shot shot his his his his shoes shoes shoes shoes put put put put the the the the killing killing killing killing between between between between the the the the mid mid mid mid nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen seventies seventies seventies seventies and and and and early early early early nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen eighties eighties eighties eighties more more more more remains remains remains remains were were were were found found found found this this this this past past past past weekend weekend weekend weekend university university university university of of of of Nevada Nevada Nevada Nevada Las Las Las Las Vegas Vegas Vegas Vegas history history history history professor professor professor professor Michael Michael Michael Michael green green green green is is is is fairly fairly fairly fairly certain certain certain certain additional additional additional additional remains remains remains remains will will will will show show show show up up up up however however however however green green green green says says says says people people people people should should should should be be be be more more more more focused focused focused focused on on on on the the the the so so so so called called called called bathtub bathtub bathtub bathtub ring ring ring ring now now now now high high high high up up up up on on on on the the the the walls walls walls walls of of of of the the the the lake lake lake lake where where where where the the the the water water water water level level level level once once once once stood stood stood stood I'm I'm I'm I'm Tim Tim Tim Tim McGuire McGuire McGuire McGuire

Las Las Las Las Vegas Vegas Vegas Lake Lake Lake Lake Mead Mead Lake Lake Lake Lake Mead Mead Vegas Colorado Colorado Colorado Col Nevada University University Universi Michael Michael Michael Michae Lake Lake Lake Lake Tim Tim Tim Tim Mcguire Mcguire Mcguire Mcguire
What I Saw on the Frontlines of the Biden Border Invasion

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:42 min | 10 months ago

What I Saw on the Frontlines of the Biden Border Invasion

"But Yuma has become the superhighway for illegals to come into America. Yuma, once about 5 to ten years ago, used to have maybe 6 or 7 illegals passing through their sector a day. Manageable, not a lot. Now they have well over 1000 people passing through the Yuma sector every single day. 1000. We saw it for ourselves. Now rarely, in life, do you get to witness a physical location or an event? Coordinates on a map, where you know, decisively that this is the unraveling of your civilization. So a lot of you listening feel like you're losing your country and you are. A lot of you listening feel as if that the country you grew up in is deteriorating and you're right. But rarely do actually get to see it happen in real time. Where all of a sudden the abstract becomes the concrete. So our tour began right on the Colorado River. The Colorado River, of course, cuts all across the western part of the United States. And is the dividing line between Mexico and the United States in this particular area. What was so stunning is as we talked to border patrol and we talked to the experts on the ground, including the Yuma county supervisor, they pointed out a brush area. They said, yeah, there's probably 5 to 20 people just in that brush area waiting to make a break for it right now. In the Mexican area. And I said, well, why is the max can government doing nothing? And we'll revisit this theme later on. They said, well, Mexican government wants them to come across. It is a stimulus every illegal that comes into America is a financial and monetary advantage. To the Mexican government and to the Mexican economy and I'll explain exactly how that is. So the board of patrol guy was kind of sitting there up against his SUV. Doing a good job and he has a boat right there on the Colorado River now. He's not allowed to get into the boat. He's not allowed to go try and intercept until they actually come into America. He can't go into Mexico to go get them, so then I asked some of our, I guess you could call them tour guides, but that definitely kind of dilutes the significance. We had border patrol we had everything there. I said, well, what happens if we went into Mexico and stopped them, they said, well, that would be, that would be an international crisis. I said, oh, really. So we go into Mexico to go stop a bunch of criminals to come into our country. That would start a war, not a war, but it would start a controversy, but the illegals with Mexican government support can come into our country and there's nothing we can do about

Yuma Mexican Government Colorado River America Mexico Yuma County
A 20-Year Megadrought Threatens Hydropower in the West

Environment: NPR

02:09 min | 1 year ago

A 20-Year Megadrought Threatens Hydropower in the West

"A twenty year. Mega drought in the west is threatening hydropower. For millions of people so the federal government is taking emergency action it sending water from other reservoirs to lake powell to help. Keep the power turbines. They're spinning. here's michael. Elizabeth sack is from colorado public radio at elk creek marina. People wait in line to back their trailers into the water to pull their boats out. And some like walter. Slut cough are frustrated. Resumes legua up and down many times. But we're not happy with it this year. Of course because we're all getting kicked out early and we pay for slips for the season. Blue mesa is colorado's largest reservoir. It's already less than thirty percent full. And now it's being forced to sacrifice more water to send to lake powell eric. Logan is head of operations at elk. Creek marina he had to shut down six weeks early because of the low water levels. It's a big hit for us for sure. There's a bunch of employees. That doctor would be employed into october and suddenly they're out looking for employment in middle of august. The deepening drought in the west has dealt a double blow to blue mesa this summer with climate change there's less snowpack and warmer temperatures increase. Evaporation so less water is making it into the colorado river and reservoirs like blue mesa and now the federal government is taking water from this lake into other reservoirs. If we were full it wouldn't be that big deal but since we're already so low and we're barely hanging on by our fingertips on trying to stay open. You take eight feet of water and suddenly we got shut the doors and move everything out to deeper water and there's nothing we can do about it. Lake powell on the utah. Arizona border hit its lowest level on record earlier this summer. Logan worries the reservoir will need even more water from blue mesa. If the drought doesn't improve the question is are they going to release whatever we get. That would become a very big problem for everyone around here. Blue may sat and the other reservoirs were built in the nineteen sixties for times of drought. It's a bank of water that the states can tap when they need. It says john macleod. A water lawyer in colorado. The water always goes to lake. Powell and this release is part of the plan. And it's using the reservoirs for one of their intended purposes

Elizabeth Sack Elk Creek Marina Blue Mesa Powell Eric Creek Marina Colorado Federal Government Powell Logan Walter Michael Colorado River Mesa Lake Powell Utah Arizona John Macleod
"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Is native american calling.

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Sources. Boy that's a big one Economics is not exactly my forte. I know a little bit more about the private sector with philanthropy but certainly federally recognized tribes You know receive grants and resources to help be a part of these processes and dialogues in collaborations And certainly to uphold their water rights. you know those senior water rights that were mentioned earlier but tribes are often under resource to end under supported in to be able to participate in some of these processes so then look to private foundation funding. And that's where groups like you know hewlett foundation or Ford foundation or christmas fund or other smaller foundations have to contribute to try to support tribes in their efforts to protect and restore their water and also to Educate you know their youth in their their tribal citizenry about the issues because they are complex and they are political. they're extremely political and there's also You know an environmental justice aspect to it is well because so many tribes really have rights to these waters Don't actually get access to them because of various reasons that are a bit too complex to go and right now but the point is there needs to be more resources From the government to uphold their tribal trust responsibility nation to nation agreements with federally recognized tribes. But we know there's also indigenous communities that do not have Tribal recognition native american community. So they're really left without any resources and have to you know create nonprofit organizations and and ask for philanthropic dollars to try to participate in some of these water Conversations and water rights claims and issues. And of course you need lawyers which cost a lot of money So there's a legal dimension to it that is very much barrier for native people to be able to participate in fortunately in arizona. There are strong You know sovereign nations. Who who have some resources to participate in the great example of the hilo river indian community really contributing back for the whole state of arizona is just such a great sign of of generosity Despite kind of the historical injustices that have happened. Thank you melissa. Mike ford our show today. You mentioned that you could share with us about how we got here. The irritation of the west. And you've been corrected me. You and i had noted that i read an article that said that there wasn't any water getting down to mexico and Can you share a little bit of that conversation that we had with our audience. I'm sure so. I guess two different things going. On one of the west that we're seeing Hotter drier climate in the west and was much previously. Climate change is a big factor driving the current declaration of shortage and reductions in water generally. So what we saw last year or the current. Sorry current water year is that snowpack until precipitation this year has been a little bit below average but the total run off because the soil is so dry and because so much of the snow is actually just rather than melting and running down has been only about a third of what we would've expected so hot drought. That's really driving changes the west and although we're seeing populations throughout the west becoming much more efficient in their use of water people are starting to realize that they live in the desert and can't just go out and fill the swimming pools let the sprinklers. Run all day all night. that They're simply less less and less water available. But i think one of the good news stories. That's come out In colorado for base in the past Really fifteen years has been a greater. Central collaboration among many of the parties and to my mind was the best examples of this. Is that back in twenty fourteen. The united states and the republican mexico agreed to deliver water down the colorado river down a channel had been almost completely dry for decades down into the caller ever delta system. So there's something called the pulse. Slow back in twenty fourteen which is a fair amount of water again based on a collaborative agreement between the united states mexico and some nonprofit organizations and funded by all three of those Found some water Lease it from willing sellers and then deliver this water for the benefit of the environment. And what are the real I think most exciting part of that story was that there was a expected. Ecological response a the cottonwoods and willows. Came back and a lot of birds. Came back to us to bruce nece in those trees again but the response of the communities along river particular louise real colorado and some other communities mexico Which had been living next to drive river channel. This explosion of community -joy really embracing flow of the river again. really i think perhaps the the best part of that that story. That is a great story thank you. I'm alex with your reporting on the colorado river. Can you give us an idea of where we can follow. Follow your reporting and also how people can get ideas for future mitigation solutions or the water shortage that is only going to increase it. Sounds like you have a minute left. Sure you can get my reporting on a network station throughout southwest Some of which terry native america calling and also on k unc dot org And in terms of mitigation resources. I would say that. Lot of local water authorities whether it be Your city or a tribal water authority are putting out information on how to conserve whether that be less water for you're getting lawns or You know kind of echo flow taps and showerheads and that kind of thing A lot of those things are happening on a fairly small scale when you talk about what you can do in your home but i would recommend that you turn towards Whoever is in charge of delivering water to your house for some more information on that. Thank you alex. It's been great having you on the show. Matthew livas senior dr melissa nelson and mike cohen. Thank you for being on the show as well. Today we've been talking about water shortages on the colorado river. And if you've got a comment you'd like to share you. Can connect on our webpage native america calling dot com or post a comment on our facebook page. And you can let us know how you're affected by the low water levels on the colorado river and house affecting your agriculture and home usage. You can also reach out on twitter at one. Eight zero zero nine nine native so the colorado river isn't the only water source affected a number of rivers and reservoirs that feed that they feed into a record. Low is because of the sustained drought in the western half of the united states. So be sure to let us know how that is affecting you and even email us at comments. At native america calling dot com. We have reached the end of the hour. And i'd like to once again. Say thank you to our guests. Mike cohen melissa nelson and be sure to join us tomorrow for a celebration of native american journalism as we speak with some of this year's national native media award winners. I'm your host elissa. London and this.

hewlett foundation hilo river colorado river Ford foundation arizona mexico Mike ford united states mexico bruce nece colorado melissa united states government swimming Matthew livas dr melissa nelson mike cohen unc terry alex
"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

"You finish your thought for us. Thanks to one of the major contributors to arezzo ona's ability to withstand. The cutbacks. next year has been the healer river indian community so there was a long and i think birth painful process within the state of arizona as a Came up with the way. The negotiations for the drug contingency plan that i mentioned and it was ultimately. It was a healer river community that stepped up and provided the assurances. through water. that's gonna naval Arizona as a whole to a standard. I cut back so bringing that voice into the into the negotiations was critical. Because frankly out the try participating there arezzo would not have been able to meet It's its cutbacks. It's requirements under and shortage conditions for next year and ultimately it lays out a pathway for additional voices to be heard as these negotiations move forward and have tribes had a hand in helping those along the river adjust to the water shortages and facilitate these conversations So the tribes in our senior water rights holders at least for many of the tribes. We heard from tim wavy that they're relatively recognize tribe but some of the tribes There watering among the most senior. And therefore i need to be included in any conversations moving forward so the problem. A one of the fundamental problems with the colorado river is that more water is allocated out of the system then flows in even normal years. And we've seen in the past twenty years. Roughly twenty percent reduction in in through the system. so there's even less water bailable So there's much less supply than there used to be in demand at least on paper exceeds. That's lie so again having a senior one rightsholders in from the tribes participating in these conversations. It's critical to actually solving the math basic fundamental math problem at on the system. It sounds like a budgeting issue. I mean we're taught that you're supposed to spend less than what you bring in every month and it's almost like we should apply that same concept to water usage on individual level on an individual level but also on a regional local and state level and in some ways. That's what this shortage declaration does it says less waters available so therefore less water is going to be Did beat out will be delivered from Lake me to at least zone about the republic mexico so its first effort and i think just about everybody on the system agrees it's not gonna be sufficient particularly given how dry the caller baseman and Really over the past twenty two years understood. A lot of adjustments seemed to take place someone else we have on the line is alex hager reporter covering the colorado river basin at ku. And see so calling in from Colorado alex how's it going today company. Well thanks for having me here. Thank you so. How difficult is it for average people to understand the complexities of water. In your opinion yeah the short answer it is. It is pretty difficult. But i think that's changing you know with with a lot of attention on water now more than maybe ever before that means that means there's more and more ways for people to learn And i'll say this when i'm talking about water here i'm really talking about you. Know in the western united states in the colorado river basin And the reason it's complicated is that there's just so many factors that affect how water reaches the average person when when they turn on the tap and a lot of that comes from the way we decide who gets how much water so tribes farmers ranchers cities they all have water rights out of all the water that's available in the west. Everyone who has a slice of the pie has very specific limits on how much they're allowed to take And because there are a lot of people in dry places there's a huge web of infrastructure to get water to them in some cases pipes canals tunnels. They carry water through the mountains across hundreds of miles of desert in some cases And because it's it's such a complex system with with pretty strict rules conversations about water or conversations. Politics are conversations about money and definitely about the environment Especially right now you know just how much water there is. That's influenced by drought. And we're just seeing now and then we're gonna see for for years and decades to come how that's influenced by climate change Right now both are having a huge impact on on just how much water is to go around and because there are so many factors You know all leading into the water reaches. You're tapping it can be complicated to understand in your earlier reporting. Did you get a sense that it would get this bad. Yes and no Yes i think it's been kind of so many years in the making but the people in the world have seen this coming and when you talk to people who are water experts who've been studying this for years it doesn't sound like it has that quite level of urgency in emergency that you might think if only been tuned to water issues to the past few months there has been a lot of extra attention on water in the past couple of months especially because of that federal government declaration that there is a water shortage at like we mentioned before but it. It is important to remember that this has been a long time coming. People who make decisions about your water have been thinking about drought. They've been thinking about how to plan around it for years but that all said that the drought is still bad. And it's getting worse and it seems like climate change is only gonna exacerbate that when you're thinking about drought. It is important to keep in mind. That is mainly driven by three factors. Demand are sorry this shortage just driven by three factors and that's demand drought and climate change. And when you look at that Demand is increasing. Drought is bad and it's unclear. What of my turnaround and climate is getting worse So i think that it is important to keep an eye on all three of those. And i think that people who are in this world have been for some time and alex as you go and talk with local farmers and individuals about how they're being impacted by the water shortages. What have they been telling you. Well farmers are going to be some of the first people to see these actual saying you have to use less water as a result of the shortage but it it is very likely that they will not be the last Starting next year. We're gonna see some cuts in the state of arizona. That's eighteen about lose about eight percent of its total supply that will impact farmers. I Like we heard earlier in nevada in mexico also have mandatory cuts coming But there's more on the way if things don't turn around you know it's it's hard to predict exactly how much water's going to be in the system but there are more people trying to get a slice of the pie and and there are some climate indication that there may be a smaller pie to take those license from though it is not out of the question to think down the road we'll come for more people And when you think about the south west There is no who life here. There's no business here without water And it is easy to see how those cutbacks will down. the road. impacts residential development will impact factory production will impact agricultural production And that all stems from the water. That's available speaking of a business than can you speak more about how you think. The drought will have an impact on the economy. I'm certainly not an economic expert here but You know. I think that when you start to see those cutbacks. You're going to have to start to see cutbacks in production as well. I think despite the fact that there have been major major efforts taken to conserve water in some parts of the southwest and to store water to supply for future years. The fact of the matter. is that You know if we continue on this course there will likely not enough for everyone to get what they need and that means limits to production in agriculture. And like i said you know perhaps factories might see cuts. You might see cuts to the development of residential communities that cannot afford cannot get rights to water to pipe into those homes and and that will definitely scalp The region's economy. Thank you alex. Dr nelson talked to us about the infrastructure and funding issues that are impacting tribes access to to their traditional water.

colorado river basin arezzo ona tim wavy republic mexico alex hager colorado river arizona ku Arizona Colorado united states alex nevada mexico Dr nelson
"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

"The indian arts and crafts act protects authentic american indian and alaska native artists and craftspeople and their art and craftwork under the acted as illegal to market art or craft. Work misrepresented as american indian indian native american or alaskan native made or is the product of a particular indian tribe. Reporting potential act violations can be done at d. o. dot gov slash. Iacb or at one. Eight eight eight art fake support provided by indian arts and crafts board. We're listening to native american calling. Melissa london we are talking about water shortages on the colorado river. Today this is a major river in the west that is used by more than forty million people. Dozens of tribes included. Give us a call and join our conversation or at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native now before the break we were listening to matthew livas senior telling us about how he has seen the colorado river change over the time. Mchugh finish your thought. Sure I was talking about the creation of the fan bars that at lake havasu at the northern part of the lake. Now there are some prominent basil. You're on the california side and one that there's a our housing area is called catfish bay and there's it's a huge bay and there's another bay norcal clear bay and other bet's up river so play call blankets you bend. And that's where reservation began and the sandbar movement has moved so much into the lake at creating these new islands. And it's the great habit to our Fisheries which already has because of the level of the lake and and The sandbars have filled in some of these Days and the bottom of lake has risen causing michael algae to grow and and also Changing the fisheries with Worms and flag mos zebra mussels and Fish die offs and things like this But also there's there's the number of contaminants That earned the river. That people don't talk about and i'll i'll start from the bottom of the list that pharmaceuticals that having bro- broken down in the sewage system from las vegas Ammonium chlorate from las vegas from henderson nevada In blows into the call of all this change changes change the fisheries and biologically up in that area and Hasn't affect downstream also downstream. We have excellent chromium that This is the gas and electric compression station. North of reservation on the colorado river has been leaking a heck spent chromium or kind memorial. I guess but There's been changes to the river and we've had All these contaminants and one of the things that we stopped was the potential of low level radioactive waste dump out in the mojave desert The word valley Waiting to instrumental and with other tribes and organizations to stop that Do kill waste down and show that if you had leaked there. Five different paths that communists could take to reach. The caller river and our goal was protect the colorado river and the mass of the people all the way into mexico so we had a relationship with the mexican government and working closely to stop this project. But you know these are some of the contaminants others are uranium mill. Tailings a lot of sewage just downstream blotter trash plastic bottles everything and anything that coming downstream settled in our league at lake. Havasu we have were tech's where the the main channel comes in in it hits the island. What is now. The island used to be a peninsula. But now it's an island that connects the london bridge. Okay but but the water the island and then makes a clockwise turn and then makes it like a whirlpool at any rate all the sand and sediment is coming downstream and you could see how evident all the stuff is in the leg and our people rely on the colorado river and lake havasu at its maximum capacity of four hundred fifty feet above. Be level to to provide our Our recreational outlet for the general public so maybe tribe owns and operates habits land resort and casino and we have a new hotel and fasino and marina. And we'll try balls has it santa system ferry system across the colorado river and Box people at the the london bridge and we have a terminal there that brings people across back and forth and we a number of people from lake cavs city arizona. Matt sounds like there's so many cultural health and economic impacts as a result of the pollution of the colorado river water supply. We have a caller on the line By the name of misty from lame deer montana Listening online misty. What's your comment or question today for our Hello i just wanna say I would like to challenge People that are in the water shortage area Like you guys are talking about right now to take it amongst themselves not taking Don't wait for your community organizers. How you to start using less water or start managing water in different ways. Just take it upon yourself and your own family to really try to conserve water where you guys can because it's We went eleven months without water sewer here at our house by choice but because of just you know read life. That's what happens. Sometimes we live in old housing. And so we. We've found ways to suffice with six kids and still be hygienic and be able to be You could still be clean. You could still bathe and stuff like that but just having no water at all Showed us how much water we really do. Waste on a daily like Even when doing the dishes keeping your water running when you're in senior dishes you can have a bucket of water for just your rents rents water and wash water so We're we experienced water shortage here on a reservation in Northern cheyenne reservation here in southeast montana. Recently we had to have water restrictions on everything because the water was depleting people up in the higher elevations weren't getting the water at all to their households and stuff and then we had wildfires sweeping through and It's really serious. We really need to start. Conserving water and teaching our kids. How to conserve water. And so i just challenged anyone listening right now if if you've had the luxury of being able to turn on your faucet and flush your toilet and not worry about where it's going or how to get it back into your system you really need to. You need to try to live off not even live off grid but just just think about it before you do things like that. You know maybe a couple of people using the bathroom. If there's no you know number twos in there could go a long way. Just flushing the water. But that's really good comment and contribution to the conversation. We also have melvin from santee nebraska listening on k. c. Y que melvin. Do you have a comment or question for our guest. Today you're listening to the condition of the colorado. It's just terrible is happening. They other she was getting to happen here on the missouri. Where i they're just as bad on the Yeah point dam. And that's getting filled up with finn matt and above us all these dan that they built now in trouble big trouble they had a meeting on. You know the whole radio thing with the town. The county's towns all the people that get.

colorado river indian arts and crafts board Melissa london matthew livas lake havasu mexican government las vegas Mchugh alaskan colorado river water alaska mojave desert henderson Havasu nevada california london bridge montana Northern cheyenne
"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Drought. Thank you great question and thank you. Hi there matt. And that's a dear dear elder teacher. Friend brother Going back to traditional forms of agriculture The zuni waffle gardens doing Minimal irrigation drip irrigation as opposed to aerial spraying. Waste so much. Water evaporates before it even hits the ground and and feet the crops So there's many different ways that we can go back to traditional agriculture but using the best of of course a modern techniques to minimize that This use and overuse of water also We have to limit pollution sources that enter the colorado river I remember that horrible spill of the mind that happened in colorado Five six years ago we really have to do better at preventing pollution from entering the colorado river because it is a life source for so many people and then do we really need so many swimming pools in golf courses and desert ecosystems That takes a tremendous amount of water For just a very limited amount of people and it doesn't share the water as much as it to be shared with people for basic needs You know washing cars every day. All of that simple things that children do to turn off the sink water when they're brushing their teeth or washing dishes. So there's many different ways that we can really conserve. The water that is being wasted and misused and indigenous leaders at the forefront of this with being land planners tribal planners They need to be at the table with these conversations about the allocation soak water and really focusing on basic need rather than excessive development in areas like las vegas in los angeles and Phoenix that keep growing in growing Realizing that many tribal people still don't even have Running water in their homes for basic needs. So i think separating needs from you know excessive desires with water and not taking it for granted like matt said so tribal leaders need to be part of those conversations with the board of reclamation In city and county water agencies To be able to make these decisions to keep water clean and pure accessible to everybody not just to those who have the power to bring it to their communities for development. Thank you melissa. Those are all really good contributions of this conversation and help us understand some of the ways that even everyday people could help reduce their usage of water if that is drawing down from the colorado river matthew. How have you seen the colorado river change over time. Well i've been living here Lake havasu on the reservation since nineteen seventy seven Relocated from colorado river indian reservation down river and I've i've seen the changes in the river system itself Within my area on the to my reservation to to the north where. The colorado river flows into lake havasu There's been a drastic change with The amount of water that has been released Since nineteen eighty three You're reclamation started opening up all the dams to Released all the debris in behind the dams as well as you scour the river and and and do a lot more water flow through really well all at betterman has slowed all the way down near to the mouth of lake havasu and the we have about a mile and a half and beyond of Sandbar and islands that have been created by all the sediment. That's downstream creating navigational hazards have been accidents and deaths and people hitting these islands and Have the Boyd off who identify gonna to hold that thought and hear more about the impacts and changes the colorado river right after the break. This is native america calling and we'd love to hear from you today so call in at one. Eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. You can also interact with us on instagram. Facebook native america calling and take me elissa kate. London.

colorado river matt lake havasu colorado river matthew colorado river indian reservat colorado swimming golf Phoenix las vegas los angeles melissa Boyd america Facebook elissa kate London
"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash. Assess me native voice. One the native american radio network. This is native america. Calling and i'm melissa london. The colorado river is drying up and that is unwelcome news for the more than forty million people who currently rely on the water from the river. It is one of the largest rivers in the western united states. Stretching from colorado through five states and into mexico thirty tribes have access to its water through treaties and legal settlements. They have also had longstanding cultural connections. Recent federal water shortage declaration starts the first phase of water use restrictions. We'll hear who's affected coming up tribes will have to be at the forefront of helping to usher in a new way of living on limited water supply. Does your community use water from the colorado river hauer water shortages affecting your area. Give us a call at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. that's also one eight hundred nine nine native. Our first guest today is joy is from california and he is matthew Leave us senior. He's an elder traditionalist and salt singer. He's from the komo wavy nation. Welcome native america calling matthew and it sounds like we may have lost him on the line. So we're going to go to melissa. She's joining us from tempe arizona. Dr melissa nelson is a professor of sustainability at arizona state university. She's initially bay from the turtle mountain band of chippewa indians. Welcome native america calling melissa greetings. Thank you so much. Thank you looking forward to learning from you today. And can you start us off by giving us a sense of the differences between indigenous and non-indigenous water-management absolutely will thank you for the question When think of water for indigenous peoples from our own traditional knowledge original instructions waters relative. Water is an amt fester. We are water. The planet seventy percent water. Our bodies her seventy percent water so for us. It's not a resource outside of us that needs to be managed. It's actually a sacred element that we are completely Invalid in every day. as chief oren lyons often says if you want to know what natural law is Don't drink water for tried to not drink water for a day and that thirst that i will show you how essential water is for life and how dependent we are on water for all of life so for us waters a sacred element that needs to be cared for and conserved and protected and restored as much as possible so us water is relative not a resource and that really flies in the face of a lot of water management projects That really you know. Measure water an acre board. fedin Really try to You know control it in a way. That is not sustainable. So indigenous people are concerned with the sustainability of water for all life and not just for human life. Thank you melissa Indigenous worldview needs to be at the table in these conversations about the preservation of the colorado river and another individual who. I think we have back on the line. Who can speak to what the colorado river means to to him and also his native community is matthew livas. Matthew you there yes yes thank you for thank you. Thank you for being here. Can you talk to us about why. The colorado river is so important to you into your community. Well the way we tried. We're located in eastern san bernardino county california and the gym maybe ended. Reservation is Is started by the call of river at lake you Across lake havasu is the thriving town lake city at its peak population. Eighty thousand people and and the colorado river is vital to this lake because this league is important all of southern california arizona and and we try being young tried getting our federal recognition and nike seventy. It's been A horrendous Feet trying to accomplish a lot of Tribal issues and the water being the primary issue that we're dealing with important to our tribe because we have an allocation of colorado river water or agricultural development and We've been faced with a lot of issues over the years and Now my tribe is moving forward with active element. What is the cultural significance of the river to your tribe. Well it's it's important. It's very spiritual warriors water as life and memory and and you know our people saying to the water and we get songs from the water. It's a very powerful element you know. Essential to survival of mother earth primarily. And it's been blocked off with all these downs Long colorado river that You know All of a sudden california's become spoiled by the free water which is native american water. That's being taken from the colorado difference. Life do california and arizona and mexico is getting some but not even their full allocation As as a director in the treaty between mexican america. So there's an issue of the river but agriculture is one but misuse is a big issue. overuse misuse waste excetera. What from your perspective. What are some other ways that misuse can be reduced by being conscious of the of water. You know every takes water for granted that it's gonna continue to flow. And you know droughts are are something that happened all the time People learn to live with and adapt and change but Because of westernization people have become spoiled. And you know. Harnessing the power of the river recreating hydro-electricity and storing water and developing communities and cities such as los angeles and all the way down to san diego with colorado the water But it's being misused and If i being respected should be dr nelson. You spoke about the respect that needs to be given to water that it should be treated as a relative so from your perspective. What are some of the ways that tribes or leading the way to adjusting to water shortages and.

colorado river roswell park melissa london america matthew Leave Dr melissa nelson turtle mountain band of chippe melissa greetings oren lyons california melissa colorado arizona matthew livas arizona state university lake you Across lake havasu mexico tempe matthew
"colorado river" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"colorado river" Discussed on Trumpcast

"You know. I think if you're sitting on the east coast or or maybe in the mid west on the south you might not have a mental picture of the colorado river and the colorado river sort of ecosystem are their images in your head or or things you think about. That can help people kind of visualize what we're talking about. I mean i've been up and down the river and it's a fourteen hundred mile system. You know both from the high in the rocky mountains in colorado all the way down to the gulf of california and mexico. I mean the iconic images are the big dams the hoover dam and lake mead outside of las vegas and glen canyon dam and lake owl in northern arizona and those are just desert landscapes of red rocks and cliffs lining this immense sort of pool of water. But then i lived in colorado for a number of years and the colorado river. there is a You know is a raging clear stream full of trout running through high mountains with snow. Melt running into it through gorgeous meadows of a green grasses. And it's really that kind of idyllic cliche of a bit wild river. I think what i have been struck by reporting is the fastness of who relies on this river system..

colorado river lake owl east coast gulf of california colorado rocky mountains glen canyon dam hoover dam lake mead mexico las vegas arizona
"colorado river" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"colorado river" Discussed on The Takeaway

"I'd say an also sort of a contrast between what the biden administration has responded on the ground in terms of actually delivering eight in haiti versus How handling patients who are facing these increasingly difficult circumstances in arriving the us stores so. Why doesn't the temporary protected status or tps apply in such a way that it would protect asian patients in this moment so the biden administration did opt to expand tps and the aftermath of the president's assassination in july but that only applies to haitians who were in the us. As of july twenty ninth and vita rations said that it's not actually planning to expand eligibility for tps Who are continuing to arrive in the us after the earthquake and you know as political violence has escalated gang. Violence is excavated on the ground. So that move did make another one hundred thousand or so haitians eligible for tps. But it's not really helping anyone who's trying to get to the us now and see protection again on folks who who were already here though. I know that there was a pause briefly earlier this year. On deportation flights have flights resumed. Or we actually sending people back to haiti under these current disaster circumstances so there have been dozens of flights that the vitamin ministration has chartered to haiti. Since he took office one arrived just days before the earthquake hit and these planes have been carrying vulnerable. People like pregnant women and babies so advocates are asking at this point for those flights to be put on hold indefinitely the by administration did say that there were any deportation flights scheduled for last week but commitment doesn't really last any longer than that so at this point advocates are really looking for a bit of a longer term commitment. Just because the conditions on the ground aren't going to meaningfully change over the course of a week or monks help us understand the magnitude. How many haitians typically seek entry into the us on annual basis so. There's at least in a typical year in twenty and eighteen for example which is the last year that we have data from the government. There were more than one hundred. Forty thousand haitian immigrants. Who arrived in the us legally but there is a big gaspar population. Here of roughly one point two million haitians and so that may not account for all the people who are trying to get here but it's also worth mentioning that there's somewhere between five to ten thousand haitians waiting in mexico for a chance to cross the us mexico border at this point. And it's possible. There may be more on their way and one of the indicators that is were seeing migration levels at the darien gap which is a migration quarter on the border of panama and colombia frequented by haitians. Those levels have been higher this year than they have been in the last three years combined With about forty three thousand migra crossings. So that suggests that more people are leaving the country and making their way through central america. So you mentioned the administration sort of focus on relief efforts in this moment sort of in country relief efforts. And i'm wondering is that connected to sort of this as the vice president harris articulated. The like don't come please. Don't come. Don't come don't cross here..

biden administration haiti vita rations us earthquake mexico colombia panama harris
"colorado river" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"colorado river" Discussed on The Takeaway

"And lake meat is now only thirty five percent full that's the lowest level since it was created nearly one hundred years ago last week. The federal government declared the first ever water shortage for the colorado river and mandatory. Cutbacks began immediately. The effects will be far reaching joining me today to explain how we got here. And what's ahead is beaten becker. An attorney with the navajo tribal utility authority. Beata thank you for being here my pleasure. It's an honor and also with me. Is brad udal senior water and climate scientists at colorado state university pride welcome to the takeaway was great to see you and beat that also now brad before we get into all of the details. Can you just begin by helping our listeners. To understand what is the importance of the colorado river to this region and also maybe more broadly so the river supplies water to forty million different americans seven states and our two nations an important to thirty tribes that rely on this water. It goes to every major city in the american southwest. It's ninety percent. Las vegas supply fifty percent of phoenix fifty percent of denver four and a half million acres of irrigated. Agd depend on this river. It's really hard to overstate. How important it is this part of the country brad. Walk us back a bit. How did we get here. I mean you can go back a hundred years if you want to win the car. River compact was signed in nineteen twenty two. And perhaps that's the logical place to start here. The river was allocated at that time between upper base in four states of colorado wyoming utah new mexico and the lower basin arizona california and nevada importantly there were a number of players not at the table when the river was allocated. The environment was not the table. The tribes were not at the table. Recreation was not at the table and so what they did back then was using frankly pretty crummy data over allocated the river and this didn't matter for close to a hundred years call it. Eight years didn't matter because we didn't have the capacity to actually take all that water out of the river but starting around two thousand we actually did habit and something else happened in two thousand which is climate change started affect the flow of the river so since two thousand the flow is actually down twenty percent so between overuse and a reduction in water supplies. We're now at a critical crunch point in what's happened since two thousand the two largest reservoirs. The united states late pell lake me. They were ninety percent full flash forward to now they're thirty percent full. We've drained sixty percent of them. That's two years worth of flow and we're on our way frankly to drain the completely if we're not careful here so there's a whole series of challenges around this including the tribal one which is figuring out how to do right by them. Many of whom have never had a water right and there's an enormous issues here result and beat to. Maybe you can also sort of digging on the same question and help us to understand the critical significance particularly to indigenous communities. So we're talking about drinking water. Water all types of water. Use plus energy. Use the reason..

colorado river navajo tribal utility authorit brad udal brad Beata colorado state university becker american southwest federal government phoenix denver Las vegas pell lake wyoming new mexico
"colorado river" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"colorado river" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Make public radio great every day and also those who listen for the first time ever the. Us government declared a shortage on the colorado river last week. That means states like arizona that rely on the river for their water. Supply are seeing big cutbacks as a punishing drought in the west the colorado river and its tributaries are a lifeline to some forty million people in multiple states including in california who rely on it for drinking water. The river also arrogates countless farms and generates lots of cheap hydropower. So a shortage on the colorado is a big deal and we wanted to hear more about that we ask. Npr's kirk siegler to talk us through it. He covers the west and has been reporting on the colorado river for years kirk. Welcome thanks for joining us for sure. Glad to be here. So this this shortage declaration was unprecedented. But i understand that it wasn't really surprise. So tell me more about that. I mean how big of a crisis is this. Well it is big though not a surprise as you say a lot of people have been planning for this eventuality for years. I i read it as really the latest indicator that climate change is making this drought been going on for twenty two years even worse and things are getting even more severe. You know fundamentally overall there's just less snow falling up in the rocky mountains which of course feeds into the two biggest reservoirs lake powell and utah and the nation's largest reservoir lake mead Near las vegas and the moisture that we are getting. It's evaporating much quicker into these extremely dry soils and you're seeing if operation in the reservoirs as well if you've had the chance to see lake mead recently as i have you know. It's giant white bathtub rings behind the hoover dam just alarming and the lake has gone below the threshold set under federal law meeting that these mandatory cuts are now triggered. You know the pictures from lake. Mead are alarming. I mean the latest numbers show. The reservoir has dropped one hundred thirty feet since the year. Two thousand so tell me about what. These cuts mean in practice. Well initially most of the spotlight is on arizona because it's going to be hit the hardest..

colorado river kirk siegler arizona Npr kirk colorado california rocky mountains Us powell utah las vegas hoover dam mead Mead
States in the West Face Water Cuts

Environment: NPR

02:31 min | 1 year ago

States in the West Face Water Cuts

"Residents in arizona. Nevada and across the border in mexico will have to cut their water consumption starting next year this the day after the extraordinary announcement by the us government of a first ever water shortage on the colorado river. Here's npr's kirk siegler. Some forty million people and countless farms rely on the colorado river and its tributaries. The shortage comes amidst a mega drought on the river basin. That's so far. Lasted twenty two years and as desert cities like las vegas and phoenix. Continue to grow at among the fastest rates in the us the entire reservoir system including lake mead with it's alarming white bathtub brings behind the hoover dam is now it just forty percent of capacity. Here's the department of interior secretary for water. Tanya trujillo we are seeing the effects of climate change in the colorado river basin through extended drought extreme temperatures extensive wildfires and in some places flooding landslides and now is the time to take action to respond to them. Arizona will be the hardest hit initially with these cuts. Losing almost a fifth of its entire river allotment for now california will not see any cuts because it's water rights are senior under century-old river laws. This shortage is monumental but it was also widely expected western. Water officials have been planning for this eventuality by ramping up conservation and water recycling. Tom bukowski directs arizona's department of water resources. This is a serious turn of events but not a crisis for now. Most cities won't see water. Supplies cut but farmers will in arizona. Thousands of acres of fields are expected to go fallow. Ironically the arid southwest is a huge producer of water intensive crops like cotton and alfalfa water law experts like marks quill lachey at the university of colorado say climate change will force this region to rethink how it uses its limited water. So many people rely on. We can't handle anymore stresses we're looking at a pretty dire situation right now on the river. School laci says climate. Change is drying out the soils and leading to rapid. Evaporation even a near average winters. Like this last one in the rocky mountains where snow melt feeds the river. That dry soils are acting like a sponge and they're soaking up a lot of water before that water can make it into the reservoirs. And that's likely to continue and federal water. Managers warned the shortages to will continue and probably get more severe. They'll reassess whether more cuts are needed in the next year.

Colorado River Kirk Siegler Department Of Interior Tanya Trujillo Colorado River Basin Arizona Tom Bukowski Lake Mead River Basin Department Of Water Resources Us Government Hoover Dam NPR Nevada Mexico Phoenix Las Vegas University Of Colorado
In a First, U.S. Declares Shortage on Colorado River, Forcing Water Cuts

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

In a First, U.S. Declares Shortage on Colorado River, Forcing Water Cuts

"For the first time. Low levels of water and arizona's lake mead are triggering. A federally declared water shortage under which some western states will need to reduce their use of colorado river water. It's a sign of severe pressure on a water source that's vital to both the us and mexico. And amid the second worst mega drought. In twelve hundred years some say it portends the need for new water-management policies due to change but the emergency declaration reflects something else success at a collaborative model. That can help pave the way forward. The cutbacks are based on states past ability to agree on plans to cope with precisely this kind of scenario a bilateral. Us mexico deal is also in place and significant conservation. Actions are already happening.

Lake Mead Colorado River Arizona Mexico United States
Climate Change Is Threatening The U.S. West's Water Supply

Short Wave

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Climate Change Is Threatening The U.S. West's Water Supply

"Technically just started but it seems. Like the drought in the western. Us is already really extreme. Oh yeah yeah. There is some scary numbers. I'm sorry to say here. I go almost half. The population of the country is facing dry conditions. Seventy percent of the west is in severe drought already. Several states like california and arizona had their dryest year since recordkeeping began in eighteen. Ninety five Wildfire risk is really high. Keep going here. This is very very worrying everything you're saying especially when you put it in a big list like that. Yeah it really is and as you might imagine it's already leading some difficult conversations and then we will provide an update on the current status of the colorado river over so the colorado river is a key water source for seven states around forty million people. Ted cook is a water manager in arizona and he and his colleagues held a meeting in late april that everyone had hoped to avoid the reason. We're meeting today is at lake. Mead is thirty eight percent salt lake. Mead is the largest reservoir on the colorado river and in the country for that matter. It's just outside of las vegas and it's it's formed by the hoover dam. Y'all lauren i have been to the hoover dam o. My family and i drove over the hoover dam when you could still do that when i was fourteen. And what i remember is like precipitously tall. Massive concrete dam and a steep rock canyon. And when you look down at a dizzying so high yeah. Yeah and so back. Then you probably saw like a decent amount of water in the reservoir definitely. Yeah so since you've been there. The vars dropped by a lot since two thousand. It's fallen by a hundred and forty feet. Wow so now what you see when you look out. Is this white bath tub ring on the rocks around the reservoir which kinda shows where the water used to be and just this month it fell to its lowest point since it was first filled in nineteen thirties that is shocking and does that mean people have to start cutting back on their water us. Yeah and this summer you know. We're expecting the first ever official shortage to be declared on the river which basically means mandatory cutbacks for states like arizona. Which is why they call that meeting. Ten cook is expecting a thirty percent cut. He called pant hall reduction painful.

Colorado River Ted Cook Mead Arizona Hoover Dam California Salt Lake Lauren Las Vegas United States Pant Hall
"colorado river" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"colorado river" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Original Colorado River compact of 1922 excluded some people already on the landscape and nature itself. 1944. The United States entered into a treaty with Mexico to share the Colorado River. Much of her work has focused on the Colorado River Delta in Mexico, where the river hasn't reached the sea for decades, and Mexico does have a treaty right to the river to 1.5 million acre feet of water, which at that time was considered to be about 10% of the river's annual average flow. As Mexico built their divert built their diversion to use that, uh, their share of the river. There was a lot of river still flowing by their diversion over the following decades as development continued in the Colorado River watershed and exports of water from the watershed to places like, um, the growing Southern California Urban coast, the river flow diminished and in their early sixties, when the Glen Canyon Dam was dealt excess water in the river. Was that was not needed for delivery to a water user downstream was was then stored behind the Glen Canyon Dam. That was the first time that we saw A near complete elimination of flows into the Colorado River Delta. So the U. S is grabbing the water regardless of the treaty that has signed with Mexico. Well, the U. S is delivering Mexico their treaty water every year in Mexico is taking their treaty water every year. What has changed is that over time the U. S has developed the rest of the river. And so, um I don't think you can point a finger at the U. S. Or Mexico and say it's your fault that the Delta isn't running anymore. I think you have to look at the fact that when two countries Although they had a treaty were effectively managing the river at arm's length. As that unfortunate circumstance unfolded of the river drying out in the delta. Neither country felt Um, as though they had the mandate or the jurisdiction to do anything about it, and we have lived with that unfortunate reality for more or less half a century. And you wrote about eight glorious weeks when the Colorado River flowed into the delta, which was is rare occurrences you've been describing. How does sending more water to Mexico ensure benefits to both the environment and wildlife in both countries? I mean, really that river flow did bring the river back to life with enormous benefits, or, um, critters that rely on the river and also for the communities that live nearby in the largest town. It's really a city in Mexico, situated on the Colorado River is called San Luis Rio, Colorado and that community Um, lives on top of a dry riverbed. And so imagine your name being your city's name being after a river that doesn't flow That's sort of a better pill, but there was definitely a lot of celebration Act. Um, the reversed temporary resurrection. I think However, particularly as we are contemplating impacts of climate change and prolonged drought in the Colorado River basin. It's important to understand that the binational agreement which is under that treaty Is much broader than just environmental benefits. It is an agreement that brings the U. S and Mexico from that arm's length relationship into how much closer Management relationship sharing,.

1944 Colorado River Delta Glen Canyon Dam two countries 1922 Southern California Urban both countries San Colorado U. S 1.5 million acre feet Colorado River first time about 10% both Delta Mexico early sixties half a century Colorado River basin
Dire Forecast for Lakes Mead, Powell Trigger Drought Plan

AP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Dire Forecast for Lakes Mead, Powell Trigger Drought Plan

"A drought is drying up the Colorado River that serves as the region's primary water source. Like Meet and Lake Powell. The two reservoirs store in Colorado River water are both projected to shrink to levels this year. That would trigger the region's first ever official shortage declaration, triggering reductions to water allocated to Nevada and

Colorado River Lake Powell Nevada
Drought-Stricken Nevada Enacts Ban on 'Non-Functional' Grass

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Drought-Stricken Nevada Enacts Ban on 'Non-Functional' Grass

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting drought stricken the vada emacs a ban on non functional grass Nevada will be the first state to enact a permanent ban on certain categories of grass governor Steve Sisolak signed legislation Friday that will outlaw about thirty one percent of the grass in the Las Vegas area beginning in twenty twenty seven the ban applies to so called non functional turf including grass at office parks in street medians at entrances to housing developments a drought is drying up the Colorado River that serves as the region's primary water source lake Mead and lake Powell the two reservoir restoring Colorado River water are both projected to shrink to levels this year that would trigger the region's first ever official shortage declaration triggering reductions to water allocated to Nevada and Arizona hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Steve Sisolak Nevada Colorado River Las Vegas Lake Powell Arizona Mike Rossio
Coast Guard Searches for Missing Person After Deadly Boat Crash on Colorado River

GardenLine with Randy Lemmon

00:13 sec | 1 year ago

Coast Guard Searches for Missing Person After Deadly Boat Crash on Colorado River

"Guard is searching for a missing person in Matagorda Bay near the Colorado River. Five people were in a boat it was hit by a ray had a piling. All of the people were ejected for rescued. At least one died.

Matagorda Bay Colorado River
US West Prepares for Possible 1st Water Shortage Declaration

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

US West Prepares for Possible 1st Water Shortage Declaration

"Man made lakes that store water used throughout the American West will fall to historically low levels and trigger an official shortage declaration for the very first time projections from the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation forecast. That that unless Colorado the Colorado River water will fill Lake Powell and Lake Mead, which would force cuts to Arizona and Nevada. The April projections don't have binding impact because federal officials used the forecast released each August to make decisions about how to allocate River water. It's 9 43. Now we'll have

U. S. Bureau Of Reclamation Colorado River Water American West Lake Powell Lake Mead Colorado Nevada Arizona
US West Prepares For Possible First Water Shortage Declaration

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

US West Prepares For Possible First Water Shortage Declaration

"Federal officials are projecting historically low water levels in the western U. S. over the coming months the bureau of reclamation's twenty four month outlook forecasts less water will cascade down the Colorado River from the Rocky Mountains and intellect Powell in lake Mead water levels in the two lakes are expected to drop low enough for the agency to declare an official water shortage for the first time threatening the supply of water that feeds cities and farms across the southwest seven states rely on Colorado River water Arizona California Colorado Nevada New Mexico Utah and Wyoming by November of next year twenty twenty two the agency projects lake Mead could drop to levels that would threaten Hoover dam stability to generate electricity I'm Ben Thomas

Colorado River Bureau Of Reclamation Lake Mead Rocky Mountains Powell Arizona Nevada New Mexico Wyoming Colorado Utah California Hoover Dam Ben Thomas
Cloud seeding can boost mountain snowpack

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Cloud seeding can boost mountain snowpack

"In the spring melting snowpack in the rocky mountains feeds the colorado river which supplies drinking water to forty million people across seven states but as the climate warms snowpack is shrinking prompting concerns over water shortages. One technique that can help increase precipitation is called cloud seeding is been used in some areas. Since the nineteen fifties a machine or airplane releases particles such as silver iodide into developing storm clouds. The particles attract molecules of water vapor. And if the conditions are right those droplets for more rain or snow. Mohammed mahmoud is with the central arizona water conservation district which is funded cloud seeding projects in the rocky mountains for years. The type of cloud seeding we're interested in is winter cloud city and what that does is enhance the snowpack so that ultimately in the spring that enhance no pack increase the runoff that water users rely on downstream. The practice remains controversial but researchers have found that cloud seeding can increase the amount of precipitation that falls the storm by up to fifteen percent so it can help reduce the impact of climate change on critical water supplies.

Rocky Mountains Mohammed Mahmoud Colorado River Central Arizona Water Conserva
"colorado river" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"colorado river" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Com slash virtual From NPR NW bur I'm Callum Borchers. And I'm Peter O'Dowd. This is here and now a new forecast from the federal government predicts a bleak year for the Colorado River. Drought conditions are as bad as they've been in two decades. And that could mean problems for the 40 million people in the Southwest who rely on the river Kunc is Luke Runyon joins us now from Greeley, Colorado. Luke Welcome. Hi, Peter. So you report that 84% of the upper Basin of the Colorado River is an extreme or exceptional drought. What does that mean? Put it into context for us. It means that we're currently in one of the worst droughts on record in the American Southwest. Exceptional drought is the worst category that we have for droughts and large portion of the American Southwest is currently classified as being in an exceptional drought. And this is the type of dry period where you can see real economic damage. That's done. Tioga cultural communities where you see you know the potential for dust storms to kick up and desert areas on the Great Plains and where you see cities start to take action to limit water use within their boundaries and where water officials start ringing some alarm bells about what we can expect. Okay, So for people who do not live in this part of the country, give us a quick geography lesson here. What states really depend on water from the Colorado River Basin takes up Ah, large reach of the Southwest. You have the upper basin states of Wyoming, Colorado, Utah and New Mexico that act as the headwaters for the Colorado River and its main tributaries. And then the Lower basin states of Nevada, Arizona and California are where the demands for Water are the highest on Ben to Mexican states also use water from the river. There are 22 federally recognized tribes within the watershed on the river's water is is primarily used for agricultural use. But some of the region's biggest cities. PHOENIX, Denver, Los Angeles, Salt Lake City are all reliant on the river in some way for drinking water. Right, and the conditions on the river right now are not good. So describe the cycle of drought and rainfall over the past 20 years, two decades or so and how that cycle has compounded the problem on the river. Yes, Some people have referred to the last 20 years on the river as a mega drought. And that's because in the Southwest, we've seen temperatures climb faster than in many other parts of the country and those climbing temperatures. Air having big effects on the availability of water s O first off, we've seen declines in snowpack, which is what feeds the whole Colorado River system. But a big problem that we've seen in the past three or four years is how the warmer temperatures are affecting how that snow melts. In the spring and the summer you have these shoulder seasons around the winter that have been hot and dry last summer and fall was extremely dry in the Southwest. Both Utah Nevada had their driest years on record in 2020. On. So the problem comes when the snow starts to melt. The soil's really dried out. It acts as this giant sponge and so instead of water running into rivers, it all gets sucked up by that dry soil before it can make it to reservoirs..

Colorado River American Southwest Colorado River Basin Colorado Water Peter O'Dowd Callum Borchers upper Basin federal government Lower basin Utah Nevada Luke Runyon Greeley Great Plains Wyoming Nevada PHOENIX Salt Lake City New Mexico Utah
Oglala Sioux community leaders take COVID-19 vaccine to build trust

Native America Calling

03:56 min | 2 years ago

Oglala Sioux community leaders take COVID-19 vaccine to build trust

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzalez. The oglala sioux tribe in south dakota has started cove in nineteen vaccines for healthcare workers with both pfizer and moderna. As lee strube injure reports tribal leaders are carefully. Managing the number of vaccine doses. They receive alicia. Musso is vice president of the tribe. She says they're asking frontline workers what they want to do that. We are polling to make sure people wanna take it or not to say you have these infrastructures asking if they want to musso says tracking vaccines for healthcare. Workers helps the tribe advocate for the exact number of doses. They need during this first phase. Musso says they're also working to boost confidence in the medina and pfizer vaccines. They're asking other respected members of the community to set an example. By taking the vaccine. We do have different influences in our community leaders in that way and those of us who even though we have these political positions who may have less risk factors and want to you know in our own way Culturally allow people to take that who are higher risk. The tribes medical task force will continue to roll out. Its covid vaccine. Plan unleashed droop injure in rapid city. A long running water right settlement between the navajo nation. The state of utah and the federal government has become law as ryan hinds reports as part of the sweeping covid nineteen government spending bill signed by the president. The navajo utah. Water rights settlement act among several bills included in the two point three trillion dollar package it ends decades of negotiations between tribal federal and state officials and affirms tribes right to more than twenty six and a half billion gallons of water a year from. Utah's colorado river basin apportionment. The legislation also settles all current and future water claims made by the navajo nation in utah and allocates two hundred and twenty million dollars to water infrastructure on the portion of the reservation located in the state navajo nation president. Jonathan nez calls the settlement historic in says it'll increase access to drinking water for many navajo families. The president's office says more than forty percent of navajo nation households in utah lack running water or adequate sanitation according to the navajo water project. One in three residents on the reservation lack a sink or toilet in their homes. The settlement act was approved by the navajo nation council in two thousand sixteen and introduced in congress by a bipartisan group of lawmakers from arizona utah and new mexico last year for national native news. I'm ryan hinds in flagstaff. The little shell tribe of chippewa indians in montana was federally recognized. One year ago the tribes working on opening its own health clinic next year as yellowstone public. Radio's caitlyn nicholas. Reports tribal health director molly. Wetland says the tribal launch a healthcare system to provide medical dental behavioral traditional care to tribal members at their own clinic in great falls. We've been a landless. Try reservation let's tribe and so to have something of our own and to be able to provide. Our members carry is really important to the little shell tribal health. Clinic will likely open late. Summer of twenty twenty one but wetland says work tribes first healthcare facility is well underway. He just completed demolition of the building that we purchase. And we're in the design phase. And we're getting ready to start with remodel. Wetland says the team will offer a holistic approach to healthcare as an example. She says she is working closely with little shells. Housing director heath lefranc boys to ensure patients aren't struggling with homelessness as healthcare and housing are closely connected to our primary care team all focused on sort of understanding each of our customers and their own unique story and values and influences an effort to kind of engage them in their care and support long-term behavior change and help our tribal members be successful. I'm caitlyn nicholas and damien antonio

Musso Ryan Hinds Utah Antonio Gonzalez Lee Strube Pfizer Tribes Medical Task Force Moderna Colorado River Basin Jonathan Nez South Dakota Alicia Navajo Nation Council Medina Rapid City Caitlyn Nicholas
Man falls to his death while taking pictures on Arizona cliff

The Conservative Circus

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Man falls to his death while taking pictures on Arizona cliff

"Off Phoenix man is dead after falling off a cliff overlooking the Colorado River in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area near Page, the National Park Service and the Coconino County Sheriff's office say 25 year old Orlando Surana are. Zola was taking pictures Sunday morning when he fell 100 ft and slid another 150 ft in the Glen Canyon Dam overlook Officers say, Well, they were recovering his body. They found human remains in the base of the Overlook those deaths are not believed to be related.

Glen Canyon National Recreatio Glen Canyon Dam Coconino County Sheriff National Park Service Zola Colorado River Phoenix