35 Burst results for "Colorado River"

A 20-Year Megadrought Threatens Hydropower in the West

Environment: NPR

02:09 min | Last month

A 20-Year Megadrought Threatens Hydropower in the West

"A twenty year. Mega drought in the west is threatening hydropower. For millions of people so the federal government is taking emergency action it sending water from other reservoirs to lake powell to help. Keep the power turbines. They're spinning. here's michael. Elizabeth sack is from colorado public radio at elk creek marina. People wait in line to back their trailers into the water to pull their boats out. And some like walter. Slut cough are frustrated. Resumes legua up and down many times. But we're not happy with it this year. Of course because we're all getting kicked out early and we pay for slips for the season. Blue mesa is colorado's largest reservoir. It's already less than thirty percent full. And now it's being forced to sacrifice more water to send to lake powell eric. Logan is head of operations at elk. Creek marina he had to shut down six weeks early because of the low water levels. It's a big hit for us for sure. There's a bunch of employees. That doctor would be employed into october and suddenly they're out looking for employment in middle of august. The deepening drought in the west has dealt a double blow to blue mesa this summer with climate change there's less snowpack and warmer temperatures increase. Evaporation so less water is making it into the colorado river and reservoirs like blue mesa and now the federal government is taking water from this lake into other reservoirs. If we were full it wouldn't be that big deal but since we're already so low and we're barely hanging on by our fingertips on trying to stay open. You take eight feet of water and suddenly we got shut the doors and move everything out to deeper water and there's nothing we can do about it. Lake powell on the utah. Arizona border hit its lowest level on record earlier this summer. Logan worries the reservoir will need even more water from blue mesa. If the drought doesn't improve the question is are they going to release whatever we get. That would become a very big problem for everyone around here. Blue may sat and the other reservoirs were built in the nineteen sixties for times of drought. It's a bank of water that the states can tap when they need. It says john macleod. A water lawyer in colorado. The water always goes to lake. Powell and this release is part of the plan. And it's using the reservoirs for one of their intended purposes

Elizabeth Sack Elk Creek Marina Blue Mesa Powell Eric Creek Marina Colorado Federal Government Powell Logan Walter Michael Colorado River Mesa Lake Powell Utah Arizona John Macleod
"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:16 min | Last month

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Is native american calling.

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:21 min | Last month

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

"You finish your thought for us. Thanks to one of the major contributors to arezzo ona's ability to withstand. The cutbacks. next year has been the healer river indian community so there was a long and i think birth painful process within the state of arizona as a Came up with the way. The negotiations for the drug contingency plan that i mentioned and it was ultimately. It was a healer river community that stepped up and provided the assurances. through water. that's gonna naval Arizona as a whole to a standard. I cut back so bringing that voice into the into the negotiations was critical. Because frankly out the try participating there arezzo would not have been able to meet It's its cutbacks. It's requirements under and shortage conditions for next year and ultimately it lays out a pathway for additional voices to be heard as these negotiations move forward and have tribes had a hand in helping those along the river adjust to the water shortages and facilitate these conversations So the tribes in our senior water rights holders at least for many of the tribes. We heard from tim wavy that they're relatively recognize tribe but some of the tribes There watering among the most senior. And therefore i need to be included in any conversations moving forward so the problem. A one of the fundamental problems with the colorado river is that more water is allocated out of the system then flows in even normal years. And we've seen in the past twenty years. Roughly twenty percent reduction in in through the system. so there's even less water bailable So there's much less supply than there used to be in demand at least on paper exceeds. That's lie so again having a senior one rightsholders in from the tribes participating in these conversations. It's critical to actually solving the math basic fundamental math problem at on the system. It sounds like a budgeting issue. I mean we're taught that you're supposed to spend less than what you bring in every month and it's almost like we should apply that same concept to water usage on individual level on an individual level but also on a regional local and state level and in some ways. That's what this shortage declaration does it says less waters available so therefore less water is going to be Did beat out will be delivered from Lake me to at least zone about the republic mexico so its first effort and i think just about everybody on the system agrees it's not gonna be sufficient particularly given how dry the caller baseman and Really over the past twenty two years understood. A lot of adjustments seemed to take place someone else we have on the line is alex hager reporter covering the colorado river basin at ku. And see so calling in from Colorado alex how's it going today company. Well thanks for having me here. Thank you so. How difficult is it for average people to understand the complexities of water. In your opinion yeah the short answer it is. It is pretty difficult. But i think that's changing you know with with a lot of attention on water now more than maybe ever before that means that means there's more and more ways for people to learn And i'll say this when i'm talking about water here i'm really talking about you. Know in the western united states in the colorado river basin And the reason it's complicated is that there's just so many factors that affect how water reaches the average person when when they turn on the tap and a lot of that comes from the way we decide who gets how much water so tribes farmers ranchers cities they all have water rights out of all the water that's available in the west. Everyone who has a slice of the pie has very specific limits on how much they're allowed to take And because there are a lot of people in dry places there's a huge web of infrastructure to get water to them in some cases pipes canals tunnels. They carry water through the mountains across hundreds of miles of desert in some cases And because it's it's such a complex system with with pretty strict rules conversations about water or conversations. Politics are conversations about money and definitely about the environment Especially right now you know just how much water there is. That's influenced by drought. And we're just seeing now and then we're gonna see for for years and decades to come how that's influenced by climate change Right now both are having a huge impact on on just how much water is to go around and because there are so many factors You know all leading into the water reaches. You're tapping it can be complicated to understand in your earlier reporting. Did you get a sense that it would get this bad. Yes and no Yes i think it's been kind of so many years in the making but the people in the world have seen this coming and when you talk to people who are water experts who've been studying this for years it doesn't sound like it has that quite level of urgency in emergency that you might think if only been tuned to water issues to the past few months there has been a lot of extra attention on water in the past couple of months especially because of that federal government declaration that there is a water shortage at like we mentioned before but it. It is important to remember that this has been a long time coming. People who make decisions about your water have been thinking about drought. They've been thinking about how to plan around it for years but that all said that the drought is still bad. And it's getting worse and it seems like climate change is only gonna exacerbate that when you're thinking about drought. It is important to keep in mind. That is mainly driven by three factors. Demand are sorry this shortage just driven by three factors and that's demand drought and climate change. And when you look at that Demand is increasing. Drought is bad and it's unclear. What of my turnaround and climate is getting worse So i think that it is important to keep an eye on all three of those. And i think that people who are in this world have been for some time and alex as you go and talk with local farmers and individuals about how they're being impacted by the water shortages. What have they been telling you. Well farmers are going to be some of the first people to see these actual saying you have to use less water as a result of the shortage but it it is very likely that they will not be the last Starting next year. We're gonna see some cuts in the state of arizona. That's eighteen about lose about eight percent of its total supply that will impact farmers. I Like we heard earlier in nevada in mexico also have mandatory cuts coming But there's more on the way if things don't turn around you know it's it's hard to predict exactly how much water's going to be in the system but there are more people trying to get a slice of the pie and and there are some climate indication that there may be a smaller pie to take those license from though it is not out of the question to think down the road we'll come for more people And when you think about the south west There is no who life here. There's no business here without water And it is easy to see how those cutbacks will down. the road. impacts residential development will impact factory production will impact agricultural production And that all stems from the water. That's available speaking of a business than can you speak more about how you think. The drought will have an impact on the economy. I'm certainly not an economic expert here but You know. I think that when you start to see those cutbacks. You're going to have to start to see cutbacks in production as well. I think despite the fact that there have been major major efforts taken to conserve water in some parts of the southwest and to store water to supply for future years. The fact of the matter. is that You know if we continue on this course there will likely not enough for everyone to get what they need and that means limits to production in agriculture. And like i said you know perhaps factories might see cuts. You might see cuts to the development of residential communities that cannot afford cannot get rights to water to pipe into those homes and and that will definitely scalp The region's economy. Thank you alex. Dr nelson talked to us about the infrastructure and funding issues that are impacting tribes access to to their traditional water.

colorado river basin arezzo ona tim wavy republic mexico alex hager colorado river arizona ku Arizona Colorado united states alex nevada mexico Dr nelson
"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:27 min | Last month

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

"The indian arts and crafts act protects authentic american indian and alaska native artists and craftspeople and their art and craftwork under the acted as illegal to market art or craft. Work misrepresented as american indian indian native american or alaskan native made or is the product of a particular indian tribe. Reporting potential act violations can be done at d. o. dot gov slash. Iacb or at one. Eight eight eight art fake support provided by indian arts and crafts board. We're listening to native american calling. Melissa london we are talking about water shortages on the colorado river. Today this is a major river in the west that is used by more than forty million people. Dozens of tribes included. Give us a call and join our conversation or at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native now before the break we were listening to matthew livas senior telling us about how he has seen the colorado river change over the time. Mchugh finish your thought. Sure I was talking about the creation of the fan bars that at lake havasu at the northern part of the lake. Now there are some prominent basil. You're on the california side and one that there's a our housing area is called catfish bay and there's it's a huge bay and there's another bay norcal clear bay and other bet's up river so play call blankets you bend. And that's where reservation began and the sandbar movement has moved so much into the lake at creating these new islands. And it's the great habit to our Fisheries which already has because of the level of the lake and and The sandbars have filled in some of these Days and the bottom of lake has risen causing michael algae to grow and and also Changing the fisheries with Worms and flag mos zebra mussels and Fish die offs and things like this But also there's there's the number of contaminants That earned the river. That people don't talk about and i'll i'll start from the bottom of the list that pharmaceuticals that having bro- broken down in the sewage system from las vegas Ammonium chlorate from las vegas from henderson nevada In blows into the call of all this change changes change the fisheries and biologically up in that area and Hasn't affect downstream also downstream. We have excellent chromium that This is the gas and electric compression station. North of reservation on the colorado river has been leaking a heck spent chromium or kind memorial. I guess but There's been changes to the river and we've had All these contaminants and one of the things that we stopped was the potential of low level radioactive waste dump out in the mojave desert The word valley Waiting to instrumental and with other tribes and organizations to stop that Do kill waste down and show that if you had leaked there. Five different paths that communists could take to reach. The caller river and our goal was protect the colorado river and the mass of the people all the way into mexico so we had a relationship with the mexican government and working closely to stop this project. But you know these are some of the contaminants others are uranium mill. Tailings a lot of sewage just downstream blotter trash plastic bottles everything and anything that coming downstream settled in our league at lake. Havasu we have were tech's where the the main channel comes in in it hits the island. What is now. The island used to be a peninsula. But now it's an island that connects the london bridge. Okay but but the water the island and then makes a clockwise turn and then makes it like a whirlpool at any rate all the sand and sediment is coming downstream and you could see how evident all the stuff is in the leg and our people rely on the colorado river and lake havasu at its maximum capacity of four hundred fifty feet above. Be level to to provide our Our recreational outlet for the general public so maybe tribe owns and operates habits land resort and casino and we have a new hotel and fasino and marina. And we'll try balls has it santa system ferry system across the colorado river and Box people at the the london bridge and we have a terminal there that brings people across back and forth and we a number of people from lake cavs city arizona. Matt sounds like there's so many cultural health and economic impacts as a result of the pollution of the colorado river water supply. We have a caller on the line By the name of misty from lame deer montana Listening online misty. What's your comment or question today for our Hello i just wanna say I would like to challenge People that are in the water shortage area Like you guys are talking about right now to take it amongst themselves not taking Don't wait for your community organizers. How you to start using less water or start managing water in different ways. Just take it upon yourself and your own family to really try to conserve water where you guys can because it's We went eleven months without water sewer here at our house by choice but because of just you know read life. That's what happens. Sometimes we live in old housing. And so we. We've found ways to suffice with six kids and still be hygienic and be able to be You could still be clean. You could still bathe and stuff like that but just having no water at all Showed us how much water we really do. Waste on a daily like Even when doing the dishes keeping your water running when you're in senior dishes you can have a bucket of water for just your rents rents water and wash water so We're we experienced water shortage here on a reservation in Northern cheyenne reservation here in southeast montana. Recently we had to have water restrictions on everything because the water was depleting people up in the higher elevations weren't getting the water at all to their households and stuff and then we had wildfires sweeping through and It's really serious. We really need to start. Conserving water and teaching our kids. How to conserve water. And so i just challenged anyone listening right now if if you've had the luxury of being able to turn on your faucet and flush your toilet and not worry about where it's going or how to get it back into your system you really need to. You need to try to live off not even live off grid but just just think about it before you do things like that. You know maybe a couple of people using the bathroom. If there's no you know number twos in there could go a long way. Just flushing the water. But that's really good comment and contribution to the conversation. We also have melvin from santee nebraska listening on k. c. Y que melvin. Do you have a comment or question for our guest. Today you're listening to the condition of the colorado. It's just terrible is happening. They other she was getting to happen here on the missouri. Where i they're just as bad on the Yeah point dam. And that's getting filled up with finn matt and above us all these dan that they built now in trouble big trouble they had a meeting on. You know the whole radio thing with the town. The county's towns all the people that get.

colorado river indian arts and crafts board Melissa london matthew livas lake havasu mexican government las vegas Mchugh alaskan colorado river water alaska mojave desert henderson Havasu nevada california london bridge montana Northern cheyenne
"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:24 min | Last month

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Drought. Thank you great question and thank you. Hi there matt. And that's a dear dear elder teacher. Friend brother Going back to traditional forms of agriculture The zuni waffle gardens doing Minimal irrigation drip irrigation as opposed to aerial spraying. Waste so much. Water evaporates before it even hits the ground and and feet the crops So there's many different ways that we can go back to traditional agriculture but using the best of of course a modern techniques to minimize that This use and overuse of water also We have to limit pollution sources that enter the colorado river I remember that horrible spill of the mind that happened in colorado Five six years ago we really have to do better at preventing pollution from entering the colorado river because it is a life source for so many people and then do we really need so many swimming pools in golf courses and desert ecosystems That takes a tremendous amount of water For just a very limited amount of people and it doesn't share the water as much as it to be shared with people for basic needs You know washing cars every day. All of that simple things that children do to turn off the sink water when they're brushing their teeth or washing dishes. So there's many different ways that we can really conserve. The water that is being wasted and misused and indigenous leaders at the forefront of this with being land planners tribal planners They need to be at the table with these conversations about the allocation soak water and really focusing on basic need rather than excessive development in areas like las vegas in los angeles and Phoenix that keep growing in growing Realizing that many tribal people still don't even have Running water in their homes for basic needs. So i think separating needs from you know excessive desires with water and not taking it for granted like matt said so tribal leaders need to be part of those conversations with the board of reclamation In city and county water agencies To be able to make these decisions to keep water clean and pure accessible to everybody not just to those who have the power to bring it to their communities for development. Thank you melissa. Those are all really good contributions of this conversation and help us understand some of the ways that even everyday people could help reduce their usage of water if that is drawing down from the colorado river matthew. How have you seen the colorado river change over time. Well i've been living here Lake havasu on the reservation since nineteen seventy seven Relocated from colorado river indian reservation down river and I've i've seen the changes in the river system itself Within my area on the to my reservation to to the north where. The colorado river flows into lake havasu There's been a drastic change with The amount of water that has been released Since nineteen eighty three You're reclamation started opening up all the dams to Released all the debris in behind the dams as well as you scour the river and and and do a lot more water flow through really well all at betterman has slowed all the way down near to the mouth of lake havasu and the we have about a mile and a half and beyond of Sandbar and islands that have been created by all the sediment. That's downstream creating navigational hazards have been accidents and deaths and people hitting these islands and Have the Boyd off who identify gonna to hold that thought and hear more about the impacts and changes the colorado river right after the break. This is native america calling and we'd love to hear from you today so call in at one. Eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. You can also interact with us on instagram. Facebook native america calling and take me elissa kate. London.

colorado river matt lake havasu colorado river matthew colorado river indian reservat colorado swimming golf Phoenix las vegas los angeles melissa Boyd america Facebook elissa kate London
"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:21 min | Last month

"colorado river" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash. Assess me native voice. One the native american radio network. This is native america. Calling and i'm melissa london. The colorado river is drying up and that is unwelcome news for the more than forty million people who currently rely on the water from the river. It is one of the largest rivers in the western united states. Stretching from colorado through five states and into mexico thirty tribes have access to its water through treaties and legal settlements. They have also had longstanding cultural connections. Recent federal water shortage declaration starts the first phase of water use restrictions. We'll hear who's affected coming up tribes will have to be at the forefront of helping to usher in a new way of living on limited water supply. Does your community use water from the colorado river hauer water shortages affecting your area. Give us a call at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. that's also one eight hundred nine nine native. Our first guest today is joy is from california and he is matthew Leave us senior. He's an elder traditionalist and salt singer. He's from the komo wavy nation. Welcome native america calling matthew and it sounds like we may have lost him on the line. So we're going to go to melissa. She's joining us from tempe arizona. Dr melissa nelson is a professor of sustainability at arizona state university. She's initially bay from the turtle mountain band of chippewa indians. Welcome native america calling melissa greetings. Thank you so much. Thank you looking forward to learning from you today. And can you start us off by giving us a sense of the differences between indigenous and non-indigenous water-management absolutely will thank you for the question When think of water for indigenous peoples from our own traditional knowledge original instructions waters relative. Water is an amt fester. We are water. The planet seventy percent water. Our bodies her seventy percent water so for us. It's not a resource outside of us that needs to be managed. It's actually a sacred element that we are completely Invalid in every day. as chief oren lyons often says if you want to know what natural law is Don't drink water for tried to not drink water for a day and that thirst that i will show you how essential water is for life and how dependent we are on water for all of life so for us waters a sacred element that needs to be cared for and conserved and protected and restored as much as possible so us water is relative not a resource and that really flies in the face of a lot of water management projects That really you know. Measure water an acre board. fedin Really try to You know control it in a way. That is not sustainable. So indigenous people are concerned with the sustainability of water for all life and not just for human life. Thank you melissa Indigenous worldview needs to be at the table in these conversations about the preservation of the colorado river and another individual who. I think we have back on the line. Who can speak to what the colorado river means to to him and also his native community is matthew livas. Matthew you there yes yes thank you for thank you. Thank you for being here. Can you talk to us about why. The colorado river is so important to you into your community. Well the way we tried. We're located in eastern san bernardino county california and the gym maybe ended. Reservation is Is started by the call of river at lake you Across lake havasu is the thriving town lake city at its peak population. Eighty thousand people and and the colorado river is vital to this lake because this league is important all of southern california arizona and and we try being young tried getting our federal recognition and nike seventy. It's been A horrendous Feet trying to accomplish a lot of Tribal issues and the water being the primary issue that we're dealing with important to our tribe because we have an allocation of colorado river water or agricultural development and We've been faced with a lot of issues over the years and Now my tribe is moving forward with active element. What is the cultural significance of the river to your tribe. Well it's it's important. It's very spiritual warriors water as life and memory and and you know our people saying to the water and we get songs from the water. It's a very powerful element you know. Essential to survival of mother earth primarily. And it's been blocked off with all these downs Long colorado river that You know All of a sudden california's become spoiled by the free water which is native american water. That's being taken from the colorado difference. Life do california and arizona and mexico is getting some but not even their full allocation As as a director in the treaty between mexican america. So there's an issue of the river but agriculture is one but misuse is a big issue. overuse misuse waste excetera. What from your perspective. What are some other ways that misuse can be reduced by being conscious of the of water. You know every takes water for granted that it's gonna continue to flow. And you know droughts are are something that happened all the time People learn to live with and adapt and change but Because of westernization people have become spoiled. And you know. Harnessing the power of the river recreating hydro-electricity and storing water and developing communities and cities such as los angeles and all the way down to san diego with colorado the water But it's being misused and If i being respected should be dr nelson. You spoke about the respect that needs to be given to water that it should be treated as a relative so from your perspective. What are some of the ways that tribes or leading the way to adjusting to water shortages and.

colorado river roswell park melissa london america matthew Leave Dr melissa nelson turtle mountain band of chippe melissa greetings oren lyons california melissa colorado arizona matthew livas arizona state university lake you Across lake havasu mexico tempe matthew
"colorado river" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

05:03 min | Last month

"colorado river" Discussed on Trumpcast

"You know. I think if you're sitting on the east coast or or maybe in the mid west on the south you might not have a mental picture of the colorado river and the colorado river sort of ecosystem are their images in your head or or things you think about. That can help people kind of visualize what we're talking about. I mean i've been up and down the river and it's a fourteen hundred mile system. You know both from the high in the rocky mountains in colorado all the way down to the gulf of california and mexico. I mean the iconic images are the big dams the hoover dam and lake mead outside of las vegas and glen canyon dam and lake owl in northern arizona and those are just desert landscapes of red rocks and cliffs lining this immense sort of pool of water. But then i lived in colorado for a number of years and the colorado river. there is a You know is a raging clear stream full of trout running through high mountains with snow. Melt running into it through gorgeous meadows of a green grasses. And it's really that kind of idyllic cliche of a bit wild river. I think what i have been struck by reporting is the fastness of who relies on this river system..

colorado river lake owl east coast gulf of california colorado rocky mountains glen canyon dam hoover dam lake mead mexico las vegas arizona
"colorado river" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:49 min | 2 months ago

"colorado river" Discussed on The Takeaway

"I'd say an also sort of a contrast between what the biden administration has responded on the ground in terms of actually delivering eight in haiti versus How handling patients who are facing these increasingly difficult circumstances in arriving the us stores so. Why doesn't the temporary protected status or tps apply in such a way that it would protect asian patients in this moment so the biden administration did opt to expand tps and the aftermath of the president's assassination in july but that only applies to haitians who were in the us. As of july twenty ninth and vita rations said that it's not actually planning to expand eligibility for tps Who are continuing to arrive in the us after the earthquake and you know as political violence has escalated gang. Violence is excavated on the ground. So that move did make another one hundred thousand or so haitians eligible for tps. But it's not really helping anyone who's trying to get to the us now and see protection again on folks who who were already here though. I know that there was a pause briefly earlier this year. On deportation flights have flights resumed. Or we actually sending people back to haiti under these current disaster circumstances so there have been dozens of flights that the vitamin ministration has chartered to haiti. Since he took office one arrived just days before the earthquake hit and these planes have been carrying vulnerable. People like pregnant women and babies so advocates are asking at this point for those flights to be put on hold indefinitely the by administration did say that there were any deportation flights scheduled for last week but commitment doesn't really last any longer than that so at this point advocates are really looking for a bit of a longer term commitment. Just because the conditions on the ground aren't going to meaningfully change over the course of a week or monks help us understand the magnitude. How many haitians typically seek entry into the us on annual basis so. There's at least in a typical year in twenty and eighteen for example which is the last year that we have data from the government. There were more than one hundred. Forty thousand haitian immigrants. Who arrived in the us legally but there is a big gaspar population. Here of roughly one point two million haitians and so that may not account for all the people who are trying to get here but it's also worth mentioning that there's somewhere between five to ten thousand haitians waiting in mexico for a chance to cross the us mexico border at this point. And it's possible. There may be more on their way and one of the indicators that is were seeing migration levels at the darien gap which is a migration quarter on the border of panama and colombia frequented by haitians. Those levels have been higher this year than they have been in the last three years combined With about forty three thousand migra crossings. So that suggests that more people are leaving the country and making their way through central america. So you mentioned the administration sort of focus on relief efforts in this moment sort of in country relief efforts. And i'm wondering is that connected to sort of this as the vice president harris articulated. The like don't come please. Don't come. Don't come don't cross here..

biden administration haiti vita rations us earthquake mexico colombia panama harris
"colorado river" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:40 min | 2 months ago

"colorado river" Discussed on The Takeaway

"And lake meat is now only thirty five percent full that's the lowest level since it was created nearly one hundred years ago last week. The federal government declared the first ever water shortage for the colorado river and mandatory. Cutbacks began immediately. The effects will be far reaching joining me today to explain how we got here. And what's ahead is beaten becker. An attorney with the navajo tribal utility authority. Beata thank you for being here my pleasure. It's an honor and also with me. Is brad udal senior water and climate scientists at colorado state university pride welcome to the takeaway was great to see you and beat that also now brad before we get into all of the details. Can you just begin by helping our listeners. To understand what is the importance of the colorado river to this region and also maybe more broadly so the river supplies water to forty million different americans seven states and our two nations an important to thirty tribes that rely on this water. It goes to every major city in the american southwest. It's ninety percent. Las vegas supply fifty percent of phoenix fifty percent of denver four and a half million acres of irrigated. Agd depend on this river. It's really hard to overstate. How important it is this part of the country brad. Walk us back a bit. How did we get here. I mean you can go back a hundred years if you want to win the car. River compact was signed in nineteen twenty two. And perhaps that's the logical place to start here. The river was allocated at that time between upper base in four states of colorado wyoming utah new mexico and the lower basin arizona california and nevada importantly there were a number of players not at the table when the river was allocated. The environment was not the table. The tribes were not at the table. Recreation was not at the table and so what they did back then was using frankly pretty crummy data over allocated the river and this didn't matter for close to a hundred years call it. Eight years didn't matter because we didn't have the capacity to actually take all that water out of the river but starting around two thousand we actually did habit and something else happened in two thousand which is climate change started affect the flow of the river so since two thousand the flow is actually down twenty percent so between overuse and a reduction in water supplies. We're now at a critical crunch point in what's happened since two thousand the two largest reservoirs. The united states late pell lake me. They were ninety percent full flash forward to now they're thirty percent full. We've drained sixty percent of them. That's two years worth of flow and we're on our way frankly to drain the completely if we're not careful here so there's a whole series of challenges around this including the tribal one which is figuring out how to do right by them. Many of whom have never had a water right and there's an enormous issues here result and beat to. Maybe you can also sort of digging on the same question and help us to understand the critical significance particularly to indigenous communities. So we're talking about drinking water. Water all types of water. Use plus energy. Use the reason..

colorado river navajo tribal utility authorit brad udal brad Beata colorado state university becker american southwest federal government phoenix denver Las vegas pell lake wyoming new mexico
States in the West Face Water Cuts

Environment: NPR

02:31 min | 2 months ago

States in the West Face Water Cuts

"Residents in arizona. Nevada and across the border in mexico will have to cut their water consumption starting next year this the day after the extraordinary announcement by the us government of a first ever water shortage on the colorado river. Here's npr's kirk siegler. Some forty million people and countless farms rely on the colorado river and its tributaries. The shortage comes amidst a mega drought on the river basin. That's so far. Lasted twenty two years and as desert cities like las vegas and phoenix. Continue to grow at among the fastest rates in the us the entire reservoir system including lake mead with it's alarming white bathtub brings behind the hoover dam is now it just forty percent of capacity. Here's the department of interior secretary for water. Tanya trujillo we are seeing the effects of climate change in the colorado river basin through extended drought extreme temperatures extensive wildfires and in some places flooding landslides and now is the time to take action to respond to them. Arizona will be the hardest hit initially with these cuts. Losing almost a fifth of its entire river allotment for now california will not see any cuts because it's water rights are senior under century-old river laws. This shortage is monumental but it was also widely expected western. Water officials have been planning for this eventuality by ramping up conservation and water recycling. Tom bukowski directs arizona's department of water resources. This is a serious turn of events but not a crisis for now. Most cities won't see water. Supplies cut but farmers will in arizona. Thousands of acres of fields are expected to go fallow. Ironically the arid southwest is a huge producer of water intensive crops like cotton and alfalfa water law experts like marks quill lachey at the university of colorado say climate change will force this region to rethink how it uses its limited water. So many people rely on. We can't handle anymore stresses we're looking at a pretty dire situation right now on the river. School laci says climate. Change is drying out the soils and leading to rapid. Evaporation even a near average winters. Like this last one in the rocky mountains where snow melt feeds the river. That dry soils are acting like a sponge and they're soaking up a lot of water before that water can make it into the reservoirs. And that's likely to continue and federal water. Managers warned the shortages to will continue and probably get more severe. They'll reassess whether more cuts are needed in the next year.

Colorado River Kirk Siegler Department Of Interior Tanya Trujillo Colorado River Basin Arizona Tom Bukowski Lake Mead River Basin Department Of Water Resources Us Government Hoover Dam NPR Nevada Mexico Phoenix Las Vegas University Of Colorado
In a First, U.S. Declares Shortage on Colorado River, Forcing Water Cuts

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

In a First, U.S. Declares Shortage on Colorado River, Forcing Water Cuts

"For the first time. Low levels of water and arizona's lake mead are triggering. A federally declared water shortage under which some western states will need to reduce their use of colorado river water. It's a sign of severe pressure on a water source that's vital to both the us and mexico. And amid the second worst mega drought. In twelve hundred years some say it portends the need for new water-management policies due to change but the emergency declaration reflects something else success at a collaborative model. That can help pave the way forward. The cutbacks are based on states past ability to agree on plans to cope with precisely this kind of scenario a bilateral. Us mexico deal is also in place and significant conservation. Actions are already happening.

Lake Mead Colorado River Arizona Mexico United States
Climate Change Is Threatening The U.S. West's Water Supply

Short Wave

02:22 min | 4 months ago

Climate Change Is Threatening The U.S. West's Water Supply

"Technically just started but it seems. Like the drought in the western. Us is already really extreme. Oh yeah yeah. There is some scary numbers. I'm sorry to say here. I go almost half. The population of the country is facing dry conditions. Seventy percent of the west is in severe drought already. Several states like california and arizona had their dryest year since recordkeeping began in eighteen. Ninety five Wildfire risk is really high. Keep going here. This is very very worrying everything you're saying especially when you put it in a big list like that. Yeah it really is and as you might imagine it's already leading some difficult conversations and then we will provide an update on the current status of the colorado river over so the colorado river is a key water source for seven states around forty million people. Ted cook is a water manager in arizona and he and his colleagues held a meeting in late april that everyone had hoped to avoid the reason. We're meeting today is at lake. Mead is thirty eight percent salt lake. Mead is the largest reservoir on the colorado river and in the country for that matter. It's just outside of las vegas and it's it's formed by the hoover dam. Y'all lauren i have been to the hoover dam o. My family and i drove over the hoover dam when you could still do that when i was fourteen. And what i remember is like precipitously tall. Massive concrete dam and a steep rock canyon. And when you look down at a dizzying so high yeah. Yeah and so back. Then you probably saw like a decent amount of water in the reservoir definitely. Yeah so since you've been there. The vars dropped by a lot since two thousand. It's fallen by a hundred and forty feet. Wow so now what you see when you look out. Is this white bath tub ring on the rocks around the reservoir which kinda shows where the water used to be and just this month it fell to its lowest point since it was first filled in nineteen thirties that is shocking and does that mean people have to start cutting back on their water us. Yeah and this summer you know. We're expecting the first ever official shortage to be declared on the river which basically means mandatory cutbacks for states like arizona. Which is why they call that meeting. Ten cook is expecting a thirty percent cut. He called pant hall reduction painful.

Colorado River Ted Cook Mead Arizona Hoover Dam California Salt Lake Lauren Las Vegas United States Pant Hall
"colorado river" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:53 min | 4 months ago

"colorado river" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Ranger with the Army Hammer. And who was that Johnny Depp for somebody mission Impossible to they shot scenes. They're amazing Film and Luis hits where Thelma and Louise drove off the cliff in the T Bird. Same area. Indiana Jones the last crusade, all kinds of amazing stuff, and lots of bad movies were shot there, too, and you recognize it all. I didn't know that when we went there. Geronimo movies, son of coach, She's all kinds of really great stuff. Vanishing point, City slickers. Two Warlock, gold members shot stuff. They're all kinds of great stuff. TV commercials where they put cars on top of these. These beauts. And Towers, really a remarkable place, Professor Valley. We went and did a little bit of off roading and Professor Valley where they shot a lot of these movies and again. I didn't know that I thought, Well, let's go down to Monument Valley where they shot these classic westerns, and it turns out more of them were shot. In the Moab area. John Wayne said that Moab is where God put the West And there is a museum to motion pictures there at the at the Red Cliffs Lodge. And we went there and got their little DVD. Not very well produced, but fun, Nice stuff, and it's an amazing amazing place. Moab, Utah and the surrounding environs. We went white water rafting. We went horseback riding through the canyons and stuff. It was kind of work. And we and we went. We went skydiving. We went on Friday. Today is Monday. On Friday, my my best girl decided that on this trip, we're going to go skydiving over the The buttes and canyons in the Colorado River and all this great stuff and we went to Canyon Lands Airport with Skydive Moab Skydive Moab is the group. He went skydiving with. And and we got arrived there from the people. The nice people at our hotel and, um and we to Canyonlands, which is about a 40 minute drive. I think from the hotel had to go into downtown Moab and then take a right and go to the airport. They got a hangar there. Skydive Moab and Tandem jumps, Tandem jump, So it's like, you know, there's a man strapped to your back and you say, you know, die or whatever you know, they do it a lot. And in fact, the people at least my best girl people that she jumped with it was their seventh skydive of the day. Out of the week or the month of the year of the day, and we get in this crazy Little New Zealand main made plain with no seats. There are no seats in it and you get in backwards and you face the back of the plane and you get up to 17,500 FT above Sea level. And that was 13,500 ft. Above ground level, right? And, um and then you jump out of perfectly good airplanes flying along with no mechanical problem of any kind. And they were, I think. Five, maybe six. Others got Evers on the plane with us, and they jumped out of the play opened the big old kind of garage door thing. The side of the airplane. Um, the plane is what is a peck. It's a pack seven, something rather and they slid the side door open, and my best girl turned to me and said, Now it's getting real and she had a big smile on her face. Big old smile on her face. Now it's getting real when they opened this big door on the side and the winds buffering you in the You know you're bumping along at 17 5 above sea level and 13 5 above ground level And and then, sure enough, we we willingly jumped out of the airplane. And and had a free fall of 7500. Ft. 7500 ft Free fall is what the skydiving people.

John Wayne Friday Colorado River 13,500 ft Johnny Depp 7500 ft Utah six Today Monument Valley Five Moab 7500. Ft. Indiana Jones Skydive Moab Canyonlands Two Warlock Monday 13 5 17 5
"colorado river" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:55 min | 4 months ago

"colorado river" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Original Colorado River compact of 1922 excluded some people already on the landscape and nature itself. 1944. The United States entered into a treaty with Mexico to share the Colorado River. Much of her work has focused on the Colorado River Delta in Mexico, where the river hasn't reached the sea for decades, and Mexico does have a treaty right to the river to 1.5 million acre feet of water, which at that time was considered to be about 10% of the river's annual average flow. As Mexico built their divert built their diversion to use that, uh, their share of the river. There was a lot of river still flowing by their diversion over the following decades as development continued in the Colorado River watershed and exports of water from the watershed to places like, um, the growing Southern California Urban coast, the river flow diminished and in their early sixties, when the Glen Canyon Dam was dealt excess water in the river. Was that was not needed for delivery to a water user downstream was was then stored behind the Glen Canyon Dam. That was the first time that we saw A near complete elimination of flows into the Colorado River Delta. So the U. S is grabbing the water regardless of the treaty that has signed with Mexico. Well, the U. S is delivering Mexico their treaty water every year in Mexico is taking their treaty water every year. What has changed is that over time the U. S has developed the rest of the river. And so, um I don't think you can point a finger at the U. S. Or Mexico and say it's your fault that the Delta isn't running anymore. I think you have to look at the fact that when two countries Although they had a treaty were effectively managing the river at arm's length. As that unfortunate circumstance unfolded of the river drying out in the delta. Neither country felt Um, as though they had the mandate or the jurisdiction to do anything about it, and we have lived with that unfortunate reality for more or less half a century. And you wrote about eight glorious weeks when the Colorado River flowed into the delta, which was is rare occurrences you've been describing. How does sending more water to Mexico ensure benefits to both the environment and wildlife in both countries? I mean, really that river flow did bring the river back to life with enormous benefits, or, um, critters that rely on the river and also for the communities that live nearby in the largest town. It's really a city in Mexico, situated on the Colorado River is called San Luis Rio, Colorado and that community Um, lives on top of a dry riverbed. And so imagine your name being your city's name being after a river that doesn't flow That's sort of a better pill, but there was definitely a lot of celebration Act. Um, the reversed temporary resurrection. I think However, particularly as we are contemplating impacts of climate change and prolonged drought in the Colorado River basin. It's important to understand that the binational agreement which is under that treaty Is much broader than just environmental benefits. It is an agreement that brings the U. S and Mexico from that arm's length relationship into how much closer Management relationship sharing,.

1944 Colorado River Delta Glen Canyon Dam two countries 1922 Southern California Urban both countries San Colorado U. S 1.5 million acre feet Colorado River first time about 10% both Delta Mexico early sixties half a century Colorado River basin
Dire Forecast for Lakes Mead, Powell Trigger Drought Plan

AP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 4 months ago

Dire Forecast for Lakes Mead, Powell Trigger Drought Plan

"A drought is drying up the Colorado River that serves as the region's primary water source. Like Meet and Lake Powell. The two reservoirs store in Colorado River water are both projected to shrink to levels this year. That would trigger the region's first ever official shortage declaration, triggering reductions to water allocated to Nevada and

Colorado River Lake Powell Nevada
Drought-Stricken Nevada Enacts Ban on 'Non-Functional' Grass

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Drought-Stricken Nevada Enacts Ban on 'Non-Functional' Grass

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting drought stricken the vada emacs a ban on non functional grass Nevada will be the first state to enact a permanent ban on certain categories of grass governor Steve Sisolak signed legislation Friday that will outlaw about thirty one percent of the grass in the Las Vegas area beginning in twenty twenty seven the ban applies to so called non functional turf including grass at office parks in street medians at entrances to housing developments a drought is drying up the Colorado River that serves as the region's primary water source lake Mead and lake Powell the two reservoir restoring Colorado River water are both projected to shrink to levels this year that would trigger the region's first ever official shortage declaration triggering reductions to water allocated to Nevada and Arizona hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Steve Sisolak Nevada Colorado River Las Vegas Lake Powell Arizona Mike Rossio
"colorado river" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

07:48 min | 5 months ago

"colorado river" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Has been dealing with drought conditions for years, and that's had a big impact on the Colorado River basin. The region's been looking warily. The reservoirs along this long river that winds its way from Colorado's Rocky Mountains, all the way to Mexico, just shy of the Gulf of California. Water levels have been getting lower and lower in for the first time ever. A shortage seems almost certain. This is prompting a lot of people that ask what's going to happen next. Joining me to shed a little bit more light on this is Luke Runyon. He's a reporter at K. U. N. C, based in Fort Collins, Colorado. Luke covers the Colorado River Basin. Welcome back to Science Friday. Luke. Yeah, happy to be here. So So, Colorado is obviously the name of this water system. But for people who don't know the Colorado River, maybe just give us a little geography lesson. What states? What Tribal nations. Does this cut through? So seven U. S States make up the Colorado River Basin, and it's split into two watersheds. So the upper watershed you have the headwater states those Air Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico and Utah. Lower basin is made up of Arizona, Nevada and California. The river also crosses over the US Mexico border and two Mexican states, Baja California and Sonora. They both used water from the Colorado River. There is also 29 federally recognized tribes in the basin, of which 10 of those tribes hold a significant amount of water rights from the river on that group includes the Navajo Nation, the Southern Ute tribe that could chon Indian tribe. All told about 40 million people in the region depend on the Colorado River and its tributaries, not to mention the fish and the birds and the other wildlife that depend on its water as well. Yes, a lot of people a lot of wildlife in many, many jurisdictions to give us an idea if you would just how low the supply is in the basins, reservoirs right now. Sure, So much of the attention in the basin goes towards the river's largest reservoirs, which also happened to be the biggest reservoirs in the entire United States. And that's Lake Powell in southern Utah and Lake Mead, which is on the Nevada Arizona border near Las Vegas. They're already low because the entire watershed has been experiencing above average temperatures and below average river flows since the year 2000. And there's already a supply demand imbalance on the Colorado River, and the supply is shrinking faster than officials are able to shrink the demands that we have on the river on that's left Lake Powell at 34% of its capacity by the end of the summer, it's projected to be even lower at 29% of its capacity. Which is a record low and Lake Mead is currently at 37% capacity. It's also headed toward a record low later this year. So it's not just the reservoirs, though, where you see these dramatic pictures of just how low the water is. It's also in the ground water something that you can't see it. Explain that a little bit forest looking just how Dire. The situation is for the groundwater in the region. Yes. So this is something that is harder for us to visualize because you know we're so used to looking at reservoirs and rivers, and you're able to say oh, the river's higher The river is low. You can't do that with groundwater, but it plays a huge role in the Colorado River basin this year because things have been so dry. I know some of the states in the Colorado River watershed have have had the driest year on record over the last year. And that's left the soil incredibly parched. And so when you have snow that's melting off. It gets soaked up into the ground before it flows into a river or flows into a reservoir. And that sponge is very dry right now, and it's sucking up all of that water before it can be used its water supply. So, you know, with so many stories like this, we say this is probably due to climate change. So, Luke, I don't know. Is this all just because of climate change? Yeah, This is a question that has been of intense interest to climate scientists. There's an increasing body of work that I would say, puts climate changes fingerprints on this mega drought on that's a word that you're hearing a lot. Maura's mega drought, not just this temporary state of drought. And there is some evidence that this dry period would have happened without our greenhouse gas emissions. But the warming temperatures that we're seeing make it considerably worse than it would have been. And really what we're seeing in the basin is that warming of just a couple degrees has the potential to completely upend how the water cycle functions in the Southwest. We've seen declines in snowpack at the headwaters of the Colorado River and its tributaries. We've seen record set when it comes to dwindling soil moisture. We've seen evaporation increase from reservoirs and streams at higher temperatures. And as we warm even further, it makes it that much harder for our infrastructure or water storage to recover. When you use the term mega drought that sounds like a newer term. What about the idea of a water shortage? I said at the top that we don't have an official water shortage. What would constitute that? So in the Colorado River Basin. A lot of the management of the river is tied to the level of its two largest reservoirs. So when Lake Mead declines, certain policy triggers are put in place. And right now people are watching the level of Lake Mead very intensely because when it dips below critical threshold People have to start taking less water from the river, and those cutbacks are spelled out in agreements that the states and the federal government have put together in order to manage some of that decline. That's really what we're watching right now is how low is Lake Mead going to go? And what does that mean for the user's on the river? Well, given all these users, all these various jurisdictions are there competitions for what water is remaining, and what sort of disputes are coming to the forefront because of us well, Arizona is in the line for the steepest cuts from the Colorado River. And that's because some of these past agreements have put that state in the in the most vulnerable position for cutbacks, and most of those cutbacks are going to fall on the central Arizona project system. This is a 300 mile canal that runs through the deserts of Arizona to deliver water, too. Farmers and to the Phoenix and Tucson metro areas, and it's staring down the possibility of losing access to a third or more of its water in the next year. And you know that's way beyond any sort of voluntary conservation that Arizona has done up until this point, And you know those air cutbacks that users are actually going to feel and that Municipal leaders farmers tribal users in Arizona are having to plan for right now. How are the tribes preparing differently Maybe than the states are Well, this is kind of ah narrative or story line in the basin that has gotten a lot more attention recently is. How have tribal users been excluded from agreements.

Arizona Mexico Luke Runyon California Sonora Lake Powell United States Utah Nevada New Mexico Baja California Wyoming Phoenix Las Vegas Lake Mead 29% Colorado River Tucson Colorado 34%
Coast Guard Searches for Missing Person After Deadly Boat Crash on Colorado River

GardenLine with Randy Lemmon

00:13 sec | 6 months ago

Coast Guard Searches for Missing Person After Deadly Boat Crash on Colorado River

"Guard is searching for a missing person in Matagorda Bay near the Colorado River. Five people were in a boat it was hit by a ray had a piling. All of the people were ejected for rescued. At least one died.

Matagorda Bay Colorado River
US West Prepares for Possible 1st Water Shortage Declaration

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

US West Prepares for Possible 1st Water Shortage Declaration

"Man made lakes that store water used throughout the American West will fall to historically low levels and trigger an official shortage declaration for the very first time projections from the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation forecast. That that unless Colorado the Colorado River water will fill Lake Powell and Lake Mead, which would force cuts to Arizona and Nevada. The April projections don't have binding impact because federal officials used the forecast released each August to make decisions about how to allocate River water. It's 9 43. Now we'll have

U. S. Bureau Of Reclamation Colorado River Water American West Lake Powell Lake Mead Colorado Nevada Arizona
US West Prepares For Possible First Water Shortage Declaration

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 6 months ago

US West Prepares For Possible First Water Shortage Declaration

"Federal officials are projecting historically low water levels in the western U. S. over the coming months the bureau of reclamation's twenty four month outlook forecasts less water will cascade down the Colorado River from the Rocky Mountains and intellect Powell in lake Mead water levels in the two lakes are expected to drop low enough for the agency to declare an official water shortage for the first time threatening the supply of water that feeds cities and farms across the southwest seven states rely on Colorado River water Arizona California Colorado Nevada New Mexico Utah and Wyoming by November of next year twenty twenty two the agency projects lake Mead could drop to levels that would threaten Hoover dam stability to generate electricity I'm Ben Thomas

Colorado River Bureau Of Reclamation Lake Mead Rocky Mountains Powell Arizona Nevada New Mexico Wyoming Colorado Utah California Hoover Dam Ben Thomas
Cloud seeding can boost mountain snowpack

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 8 months ago

Cloud seeding can boost mountain snowpack

"In the spring melting snowpack in the rocky mountains feeds the colorado river which supplies drinking water to forty million people across seven states but as the climate warms snowpack is shrinking prompting concerns over water shortages. One technique that can help increase precipitation is called cloud seeding is been used in some areas. Since the nineteen fifties a machine or airplane releases particles such as silver iodide into developing storm clouds. The particles attract molecules of water vapor. And if the conditions are right those droplets for more rain or snow. Mohammed mahmoud is with the central arizona water conservation district which is funded cloud seeding projects in the rocky mountains for years. The type of cloud seeding we're interested in is winter cloud city and what that does is enhance the snowpack so that ultimately in the spring that enhance no pack increase the runoff that water users rely on downstream. The practice remains controversial but researchers have found that cloud seeding can increase the amount of precipitation that falls the storm by up to fifteen percent so it can help reduce the impact of climate change on critical water supplies.

Rocky Mountains Mohammed Mahmoud Colorado River Central Arizona Water Conserva
"colorado river" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:28 min | 9 months ago

"colorado river" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Com slash virtual From NPR NW bur I'm Callum Borchers. And I'm Peter O'Dowd. This is here and now a new forecast from the federal government predicts a bleak year for the Colorado River. Drought conditions are as bad as they've been in two decades. And that could mean problems for the 40 million people in the Southwest who rely on the river Kunc is Luke Runyon joins us now from Greeley, Colorado. Luke Welcome. Hi, Peter. So you report that 84% of the upper Basin of the Colorado River is an extreme or exceptional drought. What does that mean? Put it into context for us. It means that we're currently in one of the worst droughts on record in the American Southwest. Exceptional drought is the worst category that we have for droughts and large portion of the American Southwest is currently classified as being in an exceptional drought. And this is the type of dry period where you can see real economic damage. That's done. Tioga cultural communities where you see you know the potential for dust storms to kick up and desert areas on the Great Plains and where you see cities start to take action to limit water use within their boundaries and where water officials start ringing some alarm bells about what we can expect. Okay, So for people who do not live in this part of the country, give us a quick geography lesson here. What states really depend on water from the Colorado River Basin takes up Ah, large reach of the Southwest. You have the upper basin states of Wyoming, Colorado, Utah and New Mexico that act as the headwaters for the Colorado River and its main tributaries. And then the Lower basin states of Nevada, Arizona and California are where the demands for Water are the highest on Ben to Mexican states also use water from the river. There are 22 federally recognized tribes within the watershed on the river's water is is primarily used for agricultural use. But some of the region's biggest cities. PHOENIX, Denver, Los Angeles, Salt Lake City are all reliant on the river in some way for drinking water. Right, and the conditions on the river right now are not good. So describe the cycle of drought and rainfall over the past 20 years, two decades or so and how that cycle has compounded the problem on the river. Yes, Some people have referred to the last 20 years on the river as a mega drought. And that's because in the Southwest, we've seen temperatures climb faster than in many other parts of the country and those climbing temperatures. Air having big effects on the availability of water s O first off, we've seen declines in snowpack, which is what feeds the whole Colorado River system. But a big problem that we've seen in the past three or four years is how the warmer temperatures are affecting how that snow melts. In the spring and the summer you have these shoulder seasons around the winter that have been hot and dry last summer and fall was extremely dry in the Southwest. Both Utah Nevada had their driest years on record in 2020. On. So the problem comes when the snow starts to melt. The soil's really dried out. It acts as this giant sponge and so instead of water running into rivers, it all gets sucked up by that dry soil before it can make it to reservoirs..

Colorado River American Southwest Colorado River Basin Colorado Water Peter O'Dowd Callum Borchers upper Basin federal government Lower basin Utah Nevada Luke Runyon Greeley Great Plains Wyoming Nevada PHOENIX Salt Lake City New Mexico Utah
Oglala Sioux community leaders take COVID-19 vaccine to build trust

Native America Calling

03:56 min | 10 months ago

Oglala Sioux community leaders take COVID-19 vaccine to build trust

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzalez. The oglala sioux tribe in south dakota has started cove in nineteen vaccines for healthcare workers with both pfizer and moderna. As lee strube injure reports tribal leaders are carefully. Managing the number of vaccine doses. They receive alicia. Musso is vice president of the tribe. She says they're asking frontline workers what they want to do that. We are polling to make sure people wanna take it or not to say you have these infrastructures asking if they want to musso says tracking vaccines for healthcare. Workers helps the tribe advocate for the exact number of doses. They need during this first phase. Musso says they're also working to boost confidence in the medina and pfizer vaccines. They're asking other respected members of the community to set an example. By taking the vaccine. We do have different influences in our community leaders in that way and those of us who even though we have these political positions who may have less risk factors and want to you know in our own way Culturally allow people to take that who are higher risk. The tribes medical task force will continue to roll out. Its covid vaccine. Plan unleashed droop injure in rapid city. A long running water right settlement between the navajo nation. The state of utah and the federal government has become law as ryan hinds reports as part of the sweeping covid nineteen government spending bill signed by the president. The navajo utah. Water rights settlement act among several bills included in the two point three trillion dollar package it ends decades of negotiations between tribal federal and state officials and affirms tribes right to more than twenty six and a half billion gallons of water a year from. Utah's colorado river basin apportionment. The legislation also settles all current and future water claims made by the navajo nation in utah and allocates two hundred and twenty million dollars to water infrastructure on the portion of the reservation located in the state navajo nation president. Jonathan nez calls the settlement historic in says it'll increase access to drinking water for many navajo families. The president's office says more than forty percent of navajo nation households in utah lack running water or adequate sanitation according to the navajo water project. One in three residents on the reservation lack a sink or toilet in their homes. The settlement act was approved by the navajo nation council in two thousand sixteen and introduced in congress by a bipartisan group of lawmakers from arizona utah and new mexico last year for national native news. I'm ryan hinds in flagstaff. The little shell tribe of chippewa indians in montana was federally recognized. One year ago the tribes working on opening its own health clinic next year as yellowstone public. Radio's caitlyn nicholas. Reports tribal health director molly. Wetland says the tribal launch a healthcare system to provide medical dental behavioral traditional care to tribal members at their own clinic in great falls. We've been a landless. Try reservation let's tribe and so to have something of our own and to be able to provide. Our members carry is really important to the little shell tribal health. Clinic will likely open late. Summer of twenty twenty one but wetland says work tribes first healthcare facility is well underway. He just completed demolition of the building that we purchase. And we're in the design phase. And we're getting ready to start with remodel. Wetland says the team will offer a holistic approach to healthcare as an example. She says she is working closely with little shells. Housing director heath lefranc boys to ensure patients aren't struggling with homelessness as healthcare and housing are closely connected to our primary care team all focused on sort of understanding each of our customers and their own unique story and values and influences an effort to kind of engage them in their care and support long-term behavior change and help our tribal members be successful. I'm caitlyn nicholas and damien antonio

Musso Ryan Hinds Utah Antonio Gonzalez Lee Strube Pfizer Tribes Medical Task Force Moderna Colorado River Basin Jonathan Nez South Dakota Alicia Navajo Nation Council Medina Rapid City Caitlyn Nicholas
Man falls to his death while taking pictures on Arizona cliff

The Conservative Circus

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Man falls to his death while taking pictures on Arizona cliff

"Off Phoenix man is dead after falling off a cliff overlooking the Colorado River in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area near Page, the National Park Service and the Coconino County Sheriff's office say 25 year old Orlando Surana are. Zola was taking pictures Sunday morning when he fell 100 ft and slid another 150 ft in the Glen Canyon Dam overlook Officers say, Well, they were recovering his body. They found human remains in the base of the Overlook those deaths are not believed to be related.

Glen Canyon National Recreatio Glen Canyon Dam Coconino County Sheriff National Park Service Zola Colorado River Phoenix
The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

Short Wave

09:53 min | 1 year ago

The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

"In August more than five months into the pandemic Jordan. Bennett. was about to see some data she'd waiting for for a long time. Yeah. No a truly I was really excited because there hasn't been any data on American Indians or Alaska natives since the start of the pandemic from the CDC that's right. Until last month while universities had released a good bit of data about Covid and its effect on some. Native, American and Alaskan natives. The CDC really hadn't Jordan would know she's a reporter and editor with the Public Media News organization Indian country today she's also a citizen of the Navajo nation and she's been covering the pandemic since the beginning as well as a twenty twenty census and all of Indian, country no big deal just all of Indian country Yeah. The whole. That data that she'd been waiting to? was released by the government as part of a weekly CDC report in mid August the title of the top red. COVID nineteen among American Indian and Alaska Native Persons in twenty three states and when i read it, it was Kinda already something that I knew and a lot of native public health experts already knew and what I was really looking for is you know what is new that they gave to us the report said because of existing inequities, native Americans and Alaskan natives are three point five times more likely to get the corona virus than white people but anyone who'd been looking at tribal nations as closely as Jordan had could have told you that they were. Being hit especially hard for example, at one point earlier this year, the Navajo nation, which spans parts of Arizona New Mexico and Utah The nation's now reporting nearly four thousand in nineteen cases in a population of one hundred, seventy, five thousand had an infection rate greater the New York State. Eight PM curfews on weekdays and on weekends a fifty seven hour lockdown, not even the gas stations are open. That was just one tribal nation that got a lot of attention. Many others had infection rates that were also higher than the hard hit states in the northeast like the Colorado River Indian tribes in Arizona and California the Yakima in Washington state or the White Mountain Apache tribe in Arizona. And data from the states where many of those reservations are located weren't included in the CDC report, which gets it a larger problem. If there's data had you know where the impact is, how do you know where you could send testing to where there's a lack testing? You have to have that data in order to create policies into also figured out how to distribute vaccines. This episode was the CDC does and doesn't know about Covid in native American and Alaskan. Native tribal nations and how Jordan is working to get more data to the people who need it most I mattie Safai and you're listening to shortwave from NPR. This report from the CDC which linked to in our episode notes does say two important things. The fact that native Americans and Alaskan natives are more likely to get the virus. That's one. The second thing is that compared to white people young folks in those communities people under eighteen tested positive at higher rates. When it comes to these findings, the CDC did make one thing clear. Here's one of the researchers on the study, Sarah Hatcher it really important that the. This disproportionate impact. Likely driven by versus stinks social and economic inequity not because of some biological or genetic. Persisting social and economic inequities we're talking about access to healthy food housing income levels, stuff like that. Here's Jordan again the and other just like public health infrastructure or in like the lack of investment in the public health infrastructures in native communities and you have over credit households, anders a number of inequities that this pandemic is bringing out. More on that in a bit. But first Jordan says that the CDC report is notable for what it does not include this report did leave out tons of cases right now it only looked at twenty three states and it didn't include Arizona. Is One of the hot spots in Indian country. And they account for at least a third of all the cove nineteen cases according to the report. They also left out states like Oklahoma Washington. California Colorado thousands and thousands of cases. And researchers from the CDC were up front about leaving all that data out. Here's Sara Hatcher. Again, our announcement is really not generalize beyond those twenty three state overall. And we're not really able to speculate whether we expect the overall rate to be higher or lower we. The reason some states got left out was because the they recorded about race and ethnicity including that for native, American, and Alaskan Native Cova Cases was incomplete and that was really at least surprising to me because. I like how can you not capture this data right here you have Arizona where you know again, the Salt River Pima, Maricopa Indian community Healer River, ending community, White Mountain Apache their cases are thousands You had the tone, nation and Navajo Nation and the possibly Yawkey tribe. There's just thousands of cases in this one St. So many gaps like in this data as well. I think just points to how the CDC doesn't really know tribal communities and know that Indian health system and how it's built instead up. So, let's talk about that. Now. It's much more complicated than this. But basically, when tribal nation signed treaties giving up their land, the federal government promised to provide them with healthcare and set up the Indian Health Service, a government funded network of hospitals and clinics. To deliver adequate healthcare to tribal nations but that's not what's happening right now and what the pandemic is very much highlighting. For years the IHS has been way underfunded per person the federal government spends about half the amount of money on the IHS. Medicaid. And that's part of the reason a lot of tribes over time have step to establish their own privately run tribal health clinics. So throw history. They all IHS. But then tribes wanted to you know take hold and own and operate their own healthcare. So that's how these tribal health clinics came about. At this point, the large majority of healthcare facilities are operated by tribes about eighty percent in those facilities are encouraged but not required to share data that they collect on the virus but Jordan says, that's something a lot of them do not want to do not with the federal government or even with reporters like her even now as a Navajo WOM-. In as a Navajo reporter, it's also difficult for me to try to get the data. Because then I understand that like I grew up around my background is in health and so I I know you know it's because of settler colonialism but also research to a lot of times and medical research you have researchers going in parachuting in parachuting out and they don't give back that data it at least from everything that I've seen the past several months trust is like the main factor in this That's one thing trust. There's also the reality that doctors can get race or ethnicity wrong in California where it's pretty prevalent from what sources tell me some doctors will just check a box on native people because of their surname, their surnames, more likely to be coming from like a Hispanic or line next or origin like Dominguez or Garcia or you know today's assumed there Um Latin x but they're not, and if those people wind up dying that seem incorrect data can wind up on their death certificate right? You don't know what's going on or the pact of the pandemic if you don't have that data if you don't know what the person died from. How are you going to prevent it and prevent more from dying from it? These factors lack of trust underfunded public health infrastructure, racial classification all add up to a picture of the pandemic that isn't complete. For example, there's an alarming lack of covid hospitalizations data for native American or Alaskan native folks stuff like if somebody was admitted to the hospital, the ICU or even died compared to white people, CDC only has about a third of that information for Alaskan natives and native Americans and I think that's just again it just goes back to how well you know the state health department or even like the CDC or the public health experts they're not these tribal communities

CDC Jordan Arizona Federal Government California Alaska Covid Reporter Indian Health Service American Indian Colorado River Indian Bennett. Sarah Hatcher White Mountain Apache Tribe Oklahoma Sara Hatcher
Scientists Say Disasters Are Teaming Up During Time Of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Scientists Say Disasters Are Teaming Up During Time Of Climate Change

"It's been a record shattering year for heat in the American West and this weekend is going to be hot too. If it seems like heat drought and wildfires are all piling together it's not your imagination scientists say climate change makes them more likely to happen at the same time. As NPR's Laura Summer reports. It takes a lot for heat to make headlines in Tucson. Arizona as Stephanie Small, House realize listening to the radio recently a couple days ago he said well, no warning for today it's only be one hundred six. Apparently. We're not over a hundred ten everybody should join the weather but this year is getting people's attention. Small House says she's president of the Arizona Farm Bureau Federation, and she also runs a cattle ranch outside of Tucson in the twenty years that I've been here on the ranch. This is probably just the second time that I remember a summer that's dry on top of the heat the entire Colorado River, which is key for Arizona's water supply has been in a twenty year drought. Is there tension in the Vermont Community Right? Now ranchy community absolutely is their stress absolutely these rare events. Are simply becoming more common says, Mogi Sunday professor of Civil Engineering Boise State University in a study in the journal Science advances he says that trend is clear over the past few decades basically routes or getting more intense and hot years or getting more hud, and the cycle between them is intensifying droughts and heat waves feed each other. He says when the soil is dry more of the sun's energy heats up the air then it's hotter making more water evaporate causing more drought. It's climate change driven cycle via have to move past that traditional thinking of heat waves and droughts and fires separately. Because they would work together they. They are the reason that we are seeing so many disasters, happening disasters like the extreme. Across the West this year, what is happening in California is a preview of what we'll see every. We need to act. Now we do not have any more minute I'm not talking about the years we do not have any more minutes to cut our emissions because in a hotter climate he says disasters are teaming up lauren summer NPR news.

Stephanie Small Arizona Tucson NPR Mogi Laura Summer Small House Arizona Farm Bureau Federation Colorado River Civil Engineering Boise State Vermont California Professor
Arizona National Parks

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

08:30 min | 1 year ago

Arizona National Parks

"Amateur Traveler episode seven hundred today. The amateur traveler talks about Spanish explorers native Americans a volcano crater cactus and canyons of various sizes. One really really grand and one really really small as we go to the National Parks of Arizona. Welcome to the immature traveler. I'm your host Chris. Kristen sending this is indeed episodes. Seven hundred of the amateur traveler as we approach the fifteenth year anniversary. So let's celebrate a and now let's get back to work. Let's talk about Arizona. I like to welcome back to the show. Gary Aren't from everything. Dash EVERYWHERE DOT com. Who's come to talk to us? About Arizona? National Parks Carry. Welcome back to the show. Thank you for the. What is it? Fifteen or sixteen. So it's not like it's been that long since I've talked to Gary Gary and I also have been a CO hosting this. We can travel with a couple of other friends for ten years now so we get to talk periodically but you pitched me going to Arizona and seeing national parks I would say why should someone do that. But you already said national parks so Arizona just has the Grand Canyon right well. That's that's the big one I would say you're looking at. That's what it's best known for but actually Arizona has twenty two different national park service sites. Which places at third amongst all states as far as the number of sites behind California and Alaska only having some second now that I think about it but yeah there's a lot and I've been to a lot of these but you actually came up with some that I'd never heard of so. That was one of the reasons that I was anxious to. Have you back on the show and talk about this but let's talk about? Why should someone go to Arizona and see the national parks? Well for starters you can go year round and I think that something that you can't do easily in a lot of parks last year. For example I did a trip to southern Oregon and Northern California and even in June a lot of the parks there were snowed in and when I showed in I mean. Twenty feet of snow snowed in right so this is in the summer. And they're still so much snow. Because it's an altitude. And you're you're not gonNA really see that in Arizona Star in in the south so if you're looking for a trip in the winter or something it's it's a great place to go and there's a great diversity. These aren't just natural sites although it certainly has those there's a great deal of history. That goes back told him. The ancient people who lived in this area before Europeans showed up as well as a westward expansion in a host of other things so there really is a wide diversity. I also going to see some landscapes that you're really not going to see anywhere else or other desserts in the United States but The SONORAN desert that. You're going to see here is really unique and have some things that you're just not gonNA find saying California Nevada or even Utah. The one exception I can think of to. You're not going to run into whether here would be the North Rim of the Grand Canyon Which closes in October want to say because it had closed before. We did a trip in October of last year. It hadn't snowed in yet but all services were closed on the largest closed in all facilities are closed at that point and then it will snow in. And they'll stop plowing the roads as soon as the snows happen. Yeah so I was last there. In January of twenty twenty those primarily in the Tucson area but then I made a trip up north around flagstaff and a lot of people don't realize that there's snow up in flagstaff primarily because of the elevation than anything. And so yeah. There was definitely snow on the ground when I visited some of the sites but I live in Minnesota so this was like your price my first winter. It was not a lot of snow. Wasn't that coal right. The roads are open. You can you can actually go and see stuff well and I remember being at the Grand Canyon in April when there was snow at the Rim and it was eighty degrees at the bottom so it depends a lot where you are absolutely. So what kind of itinerary do you recommend? It really depends on where you're going to be. I think most people are probably going to be flying into Tucson or Phoenix right and the third place might be flagstaff. One smaller town. But it's in the north and There's kind of pockets of parks around those. And the first one I would bring up is a park while National Monument and it's extremely unique among all the sites in the United States that's Hokum National Monument anemic because you cannot visit and if you could visit. There is nothing to see well then. It's unique in an unusual way. I have needs a little bit of explanation so just south of Phoenix is the reservation. There was an archaeological dig. Their WANNA say took place in the seventies sixties and seventies called snake down and what they ended up doing was once. The excavation was over the reburied it. So you got declared a national monument and it's on the reservation and they don't let you go and visit the site or snake town is but if they did there is literally nothing to see because it's buried and for National Park collectors. It poses a problem because for whatever reason it's still on the books huff thirds no visitor center. There's no there's nothing but technically make them really getting technical here if you look at the outline of what constitutes the National Monument isn't interstate that runs through it so should actually go to the Beltway Beneath Phoenix. YOU'RE ON THAT ROAD. You will technically drive through this area and you'll see buffing. There's nothing there so it's kind of an oddity on. I don't know why it's still on the books or why it's there. But supposedly there was a cultural center for the tribe and you go there and they had a display about snake Tama. They closed it. And they're going to be reopening again and you could actually get a stamp there and that would be the closest thing to visit other than that I mean. I think we could talk about so there of the twenty two sites. There are three national parks proper. The first is obviously the Grand Canyon. I don't know how much we need to talk about that. I'm sure done shows on the Grand Canyon. We have done a show on the Grand Canyon in the first year of Amateur Traveler. And then we did another show later on about Rafting the Grand Canyon with the George Wendt the now late founder of ores rafting But that's been a little while ago so it's worth a mention. Yeah I mean everyone's familiar with it. Is You mentioned you can access it from the North or the South? It's a very common trip for people to make from Las Vegas. Yeah although people go to the South Rim from Las Vegas. That's long drive right. I mean and it should be noted. The Grand Canyon says enormous chunk taken out of the state of Arizona and their bridges to get around. It writes the you have to drive around at our fly over it. The southern rim is lower elevation and by far the more popular of the two sides. You can visit. It gets ninety percent of the tourism. Am I read about that? Would sound about right if you go further up river you get into the Glen Canyon Recreation area. And that's where you'll see that's like horseshoe bend is a famous site of most people may have seen the photo also National Park Service site on the Colorado River but not part of the Canyon and if you go downstream there are also some Indian reservations. One of which which famously built the Skywalk horseshoe-shaped. Yeah so it it. It's one of the most popular parks in the United States. It should have been put on the list of the seven. Natural Wonders of the world said the underground river in the Philippines. Made it not that. We're bitter fool. No in the way they walked in it was kind of ridiculous but yeah it's the one thing that if you're an American or even if you're not American coming to visit the United States I think you should I mean it's literally alongside maybe yellowstone in Yosemite those are considered the three crown jewel national parks in the US system brand. It really is an incredible

Grand Canyon Arizona National Parks Of Arizona United States National Monument Amateur Traveler Phoenix Flagstaff Glen Canyon Recreation Tucson Gary Gary Kristen Las Vegas Chris National Park Service National Park Oregon North Rim Philippines
The Grand Canyon

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

06:00 min | 1 year ago

The Grand Canyon

"Have you ever heard of the Grand Canyon. The Grand Canyon is the Whitest Canyon in the world and located in Arizona which also happens to be my home state. It's also considered one of the seven natural wonders of the world. The Grand Canyon is two hundred seventy seven miles long up to eighteen miles wide in over six thousand feet deep in places. It's very colorful a combination of reds browns whites and many other colors because each of the different layers or strata were formed at different times during the Earth's history. The Earth is very very old so the Grand Canyon is made up of different rocks from its two billion year old history early on the Grand Canyon was actually a mountain which overtime sunk down until it was flat. Then is the earth shifted. It became a canyon and over a very long period was even underwater. Eventually a river started flowing through the Canyon which is now known as the Colorado River. The water in the river was full of rocks. So over. Millions of years the river acted like sandpaper. Shaving down the canyon this is called erosion today. When you look at the Grand Canyon you can see the different layers in it similar to a layered cake. Some of the layers are white. Limestone other layers are filled with shells from was underwater and the upper layers are dark and reformed by a volcano after the Grand Canyon was formed into what it looks like today around three thousand years ago native people who now call the ancestral publians live near the Grand Canyon. They built homes out of stone and farmed corn squash and beans. They made carvings and paintings on Canyon walls which is one way we know they live there. Another group who lived there were called the co Nina for the ancestors of the modern Yuma Havasu Pie and who a lot by people who still live around the Grand Canyon. The native people call the Grand Canyon. Cab which means mountain on its side. The ancient people believed the Grand Canyon was a holy place and often visited for miles around to experience. It's wonder after Europeans discovered the new World Francisco Vasquez Coronado and a group of Spanish explorers were in the area. Searching for the fabled seven cities of Cipolla in fifteen forty Coronado ordered captain Garcia Lopez de Cardenas and. His soldiers to explore the area they and their Hopi native guides where the first European to see the wonders of the Grand Canyon. They were amazed at its size and fastness. Two hundred years passed until another European visited the canyon in seventeen seventy six to Spanish priests Francisco Dominguez and Sylvester de Escalate into explored southern Utah and the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and the eighteen fifties. They were followed. By Jacob Hamlin a Mormon explorer sent by Brigham Young to find a way to cross the river. They made friends with the WHO a lot by tribe and found the crossing discovered by the Spanish priests which later became Lee's ferry. A theory is a place where a flat boat helps wagons and people cross the river then in eighteen sixty nine major John. Wesley Powell led the first expedition down into the Canyon. He had set out to explore the Colorado River and the Canyon. They wrote down the river on a boat and survived the dangerous rapids and finally ended up in what is now known as MOAB UTAH. John Wesley Powell later became famous for the founding of the Boy Scouts of America. In one thousand nine hundred three. President Theodore Roosevelt visited the Grand Canyon and marveled at its beauty. Teddy Roosevelt was known for his love of nature and spent much of his time outdoors in the Grand Canyon. He did everything he could to help. Preserve its natural. Wonder he worked to make it a national monument and believe places like the Grand Canyon should be preserved so people all over the world can enjoy it. All Roosevelt was president. He formed the National Parks Association to help. Save places like the Grand Canyon today. The Grand Canyon is one of the most famous places to visit in the world with about five million visitors every year. Who come from all over to see and explore it. Most people just come to look out over the vast canyon. I've been there a few times with my family. It's about a four hour. Drive from US where we live near Phoenix Arizona. The last time I went we brought our foreign kids who also looked out over it in awe. We had to hold them close to us because the canyon is a very steep drop below which made us very nervous. When I was in high school our family and a group of other families hiked down into the part of the canyon known as Havasu Pie. We drove there early in the morning and had all of our camping gear and food loaded onto the back of mules. Then we hiked about four hours down into the Canyon at the bottom of the trail. The huge picturesque Havasu falls. You can swim at the falls. Jump off cliffs and hike further into see and swim in the waterfalls. Our trip was very fun but took a turn for the worse when one of the days I slept on Iraq and twisted my ankle pretty bad the next day we were supposed to hike out so my close friend. I got up early and started hiking. I live most of the way. Even up the steep switch-backs. It was a rough hike out but the waterfalls and swimming holes made it worth it anyway along with hiking people take helicopter tours over the Grand Canyon love to raft the Wild Colorado River. They also take horseback tours down into the Canyon. And it's very popular. Hike it from Rim Durham. By sisters in their friends. Do this recently. Another main attraction is the Grand Canyon. Skywalk which lets you walk on a glass bottom path out over the canyon so you can look at the drop far

Grand Canyon Whitest Canyon Colorado River Arizona Utah President Theodore Roosevelt Wild Colorado River Wesley Powell John Wesley Powell Francisco Vasquez Coronado Rim Durham Havasu Falls Cipolla Brigham Young Boy Scouts Of America Jacob Hamlin Garcia Lopez De Cardenas Iraq Nina United States
Closing Of Coal Power Plants Means Debates On What To Do With The Water They Used

All Things Considered

02:42 min | 1 year ago

Closing Of Coal Power Plants Means Debates On What To Do With The Water They Used

"Coal fired power plants are being closed across the country in the arid west those plants use a lot of the region's scarce water supplies now with closure dates approaching communities are having sometimes contentious debates about how this newly freed up water should be used from K. U. N. C. and Colorado Luke Runyon reports it's snowing in downtown Craig Colorado when Jennifer Holloway walks into the local bookstore she runs the city's chamber of commerce and access the start of twenty twenty has been full of mixed emotions it's been hard to face the fact that okay we are needed in January Craig's dominant employer the company operating the nearby coal plant and mine confirmed the rumors it will shut down by twenty thirty because we've been providing electricity for millions of other people and that is a source of pride at first people worried about the loss of jobs at the plant now they wonder what's gonna happen to the sizeable amount of water it uses it's ten times more than all of Craig's nearly nine thousand residents use there is some discussion on this in the community and people have different views but my personal view is that that water needs to be safeguarded for long term environmental usage because Holloway says a healthy environment means a healthy local economy across the west more than thirty five coal plants have either closed recently or are slated for closure in the next fifteen years when you look at a typical call facility it uses an enormous volume of water between highly is CEO of tri state generation and transmission which operates Craig's plant coal plant closures will free up more than two million acre feet of water in western states about as much as the Phoenix metro area uses in a year and the fact that that will be liberated and available for other uses going to be significant significant because in this part of the country it's unheard of for large amounts of water to suddenly become available highly says tri state is already receiving calls from buyers interested in Craig's water drawn from the Yampa river part of the drought plagued Colorado River basin this is a big opportunity to you know make the other decisions more wisely cook Tricia I'm John researched coal plants in their water rights in a grad school project for the nature Conservancy it's one of a few environmental groups interested in buying water from plants slated for closure in Wyoming New Mexico and Arizona and keeping it in reverse it all comes down to who can negotiate with these clients owners and we can make it better claim or make a better

Colorado Arizona Wyoming Yampa River Phoenix CEO Twenty Twenty Luke Runyon K. U. N. C. New Mexico Nature Conservancy John Tricia Colorado River Basin Jennifer Holloway Craig Colorado
Closing Of Coal Power Plants Means Debates On What To Do With The Water They Used

Environment: NPR

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Closing Of Coal Power Plants Means Debates On What To Do With The Water They Used

"Coal fired power. Plants are being closed across the country. In the arid West. Those plants use a lot of the region scarce water supplies now with closure dates approaching communities or having sometimes contentious debates about how this newly freed up. Water should be used from K. Unc in Colorado Luke Runyan reports it snowing in downtown Craig Colorado when Jennifer Holloway walks into the local bookstore. She runs the city's Chamber of Commerce and says the start of twenty twenty has been full of mixed emotions. It's been hard to face the fact that okay we are needed in January Craig's dominant employer the company operating the nearby. Coal Plant and mine confirmed the rumors. It will shut down by twenty thirty because we've been providing electricity for millions of other people and that is a source of pride at first people worried about the loss of jobs at the plant. Now they wonder. What's going to happen to the sizable amount of water? It uses its ten times more than all of Craig's nearly nine thousand residents us. There is some discussion on this in the community and people have different views but my personal view is that that water needs to be safeguarded for long term environmental usage because Holloway says a healthy environment means a healthy local economy across the West than thirty five. Coal plants have either closed recently or are slated for closure in the next fifteen years when you look at a typical coal facility. It uses an enormous volume of water. Dwayne highly CEO of tristate generation and transmission which operates Craig's plant coal plant. Closures will free up more than two million acre feet of water in Western states about as much as the Phoenix Metro area uses in a year. And the fact that will be liberated and available for other reuse is going to be significant significant because in this part of the country. It's unheard of for large amounts of water to suddenly become available. Highly says tristate is already receiving calls from buyers interested in Craig's water drawn from the Yampa river part of the drought plagued Colorado River basin. This Chris big opportunity to make the decisions. More wisely Cook Chechen. John researched coal plants in their water rights in a Grad School project for the Nature Conservancy. It's one of a few environmental groups. Interested in buying water from plants slated for closure in Wyoming New Mexico and Arizona and keeping it in rivers. It all comes down to who can negotiate with these plans owners than look who can make it better claim or make a better offer but with no large scale regulated market for water rights in the Colorado River Basin. It's hard to say exactly how much money it's worth. People like. Megan Veenstra would like to see water from the Craig plant stay. Local place painted. She and her husband run good vibes river gear. Rafts lifejackets all kinds of stuff just to get you out on the water. And she says Craig is starting to make a transition that other communities in the West over the last century have gone through from mining to recreation based economies. It's been a boom and bust town for a long time as time to just kind of get away from that and we just a steady growing town plenty of other growing. Western cities have the means to pay top dollar for the Craig Plants Water but moving it from one place to another is in some cases physically or legally impossible and you can count on locals to put up a fight to hold onto it for NPR news. I'm Luke Runyan in Craig Colorado.

Craig Colorado River Basin Craig Colorado Luke Runyan Jennifer Holloway Colorado Yampa River Megan Veenstra NPR Phoenix Metro Cook Chechen Tristate Chamber Of Commerce Dwayne CEO
"colorado river" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"colorado river" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Are your projections for the future as it gets hotter and drier in this state right so when I say that the Colorado rivers over allocated by one point five million acre feet that's today that doesn't really even take into account the fact that scientists are telling us that the Colorado River flows may diminish buys much as twenty five percent over time it's a big problem and people need to start planning for that today this base is states do work very well together those that share the Colorado River basin and you know we have a very strong history of coming up with collaborative solutions I'm sure that will continue so I'm pessimistic about the problem but I'm optimistic about our ability to confront it I was looking at your testimony before Congress and you said something else that I thought was compelling that this idea of a drought isn't even really relevant anymore what I mean by that well it's really not it's always hot and dry here in Phoenix that is our normal day to day life and as we confront a future where it's going to be even hotter and drier what does drought really even mean in that context we have to make sure that we have the water the infrastructure the water conservation everything it takes to ensure a resilient future for our community what is the worst case scenario do you think that people might move out of the city as a result of the water situation do you think that there may be whites. spread public health emergencies no I don't because we're gonna plan methodically to avoid that so I mentioned there are five hundred million dollar investment in infrastructure that is to plan for a contingency of no water on the Colorado River we can't take a chance with you know one point seven million people dependent on our product in the middle of a desert city so we are made we are doing investments today that make sure that no matter what comes on the Colorado River we can still provide.

Colorado River Colorado River basin Congress Phoenix five hundred million dollar twenty five percent five million acre
"colorado river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"colorado river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Numbers that even though agriculture is so big in California as a percentage of the state's overall you know, two and a half trillion dollar. Konami agriculture just generates. Couple of couple of percent of that. So you know, but but it consumes three times as much water as anybody else. So this is where we get into the weeds tad. Yeah. Try I'll try to simplify it. So when you look at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, had a small river, the L, A river, they attacked into it, by the, by the late eighteen hundreds, so they went out and stole themselves. You know, three different rivers, I it was the river from the Owens valley dried out that valley, two hundred miles away. Then they went to the Colorado river, and then they went to the Sacramento river way up in the so L A the farmer here is going to tell you, what does L A have a right to, to preach to us anything. They're, they're, they're growing suburbia across the desert with borrowed water in the valley. We have these five rivers here, and those are the rivers that chiefly are being tapped into for agriculture so. So there's a proprietary sense, okay? Well, we're, we're growing food. We're growing these crops, and we're using our own rivers. Even if we had to borrow another valley river, the Sacramento to help us out so it's just not so simple. And then the folks up north, you know, up up mount Shasta down to, to, to Sacramento. They feel put upon because it's their, their rivers their system that is being borrowed by all the rest of the state. So it's, it's a weird kind of, you know, logic. Yeah. Well, so everyone's feeling put upon because California's at forty million people built are on a water infrastructure as you're talking about which I mean, as he said, the drought revealed that it's a finite resource, and the and California's future is to face more such, you know, such challenges. So it makes sense that people are. Sort of looking at each other as will you're the problem. No, you're the pump. But you're saying the whole system is the problem. The, the system was magnificent, but it was built when we had eleven million people here, we've got forty million hours. You say so, so the system is cracking under these demands, and, and something has to give in the problem in California. You know, the impression that it'd be house of California is a very progressive state at tackles these environmental issues before any other states, and that tackling them becomes a model for, for other states. But it took us a one hundred sixty five years to regulate the taking of groundwater that great aquifers beneath us. And so we were taking it so much of the land was sinking not inches, but feet, you know, thirty forty feet sinking in the land was sinking and the then the roads and the canals were sinking along with it. So, so there's this kind of madness to the extraction, and an. And that's what we're now confronting in California. As progressive, as it is doesn't want to start off with a number that the number being how big can we get right? Can we be fifty million sixty million? If so, where's the water going to come from in? We had these this great volatility of climate, we are our whole history is one of swinging from drought to flood. And yet, we forget about drought as soon as we're in flood, and we forget about flood as soon as we're in drought, but, but that is now teaming up with climate change. And so we're going to get these habits that, that we've never had before. I mean, doesn't it just it just makes you more fundamental truth about human nature that is soon as we're back in the good times. We forget how bad the bad times where I mean that drought. They California only just barely came out of was a decade long. I was just out there in the bay area last month, and everything was green, and blooming, and people seemed that they, you know, they were not. Criticizing them, but they were someone were behaving as, if they just hadn't lived through ten straight years of virtual water emergency. No, the there's this kind of collective amnesia, that is remarkable to see. It really is. And we've grown in places that we shouldn't have grown. I, I was up in paradise the, the, the city, right? The city on a built.

California Sacramento valley river Sacramento river Colorado river Konami Owens valley Los Angeles mount Shasta one hundred sixty five years forty million hours thirty forty feet trillion dollar
"colorado river" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"colorado river" Discussed on KCRW

"Plan for the future of the Colorado river, but that plan has been put on hold in the eleventh hour after the imperial irrigation district filed lawsuits. You may have never heard the name of that group. But it is very powerful in California imperial, hold senior rights to the single biggest allocation of river water on the entire length of the Colorado river, it's spokesperson Robert shetler says you're out contingency plan or D C P will endanger major body of water in its district. Is this DC P goes for like, it is now nobody is held accountable for anything that might to the salts foreign period to change its mind Shutler says it would need a monetary commitment from the federal government to help with the salt and see the group of states, however says the plan is necessary to prepare for future droughts. It essentially this plan does sets up a roadmap for water conservation in the coming years where states keep water in their reservoirs during extra dry periods. For KCRW. Benjamin Gottlieb, the Colorado river supplies drinking water to about forty million people in California and six other states as well as northern Mexico. On location, filming in Los Angeles is down nine percent in the first quarter of this year. That's according to new numbers from film LA, the office that processes permits for location shooting in the city and county of Los Angeles. It's a steep drop from one year to the next for key local industry KCRW's. Caitlyn Plummer reports fell LA says the slowdown was across the board feature film. Production dropped by thirteen percent. But it's expected to pick up soon. Eighteen feature projects were selected for the state's tax credit program. Earlier this month TV's thirteen percent decline stems from drops in web based TV reality TV and most of all pilot production, the number of days spent shooting TV pilots in the first quarter dropped by more than half from twenty eighteen to twenty nineteen a result of the declining need for traditional pilots as more streaming networks by shows straight to series as for commercials film. LA says a dip was inevitable. Because the first quarter of twenty eighteen had the highest level of commercial production of any quarter on record. Film. LA also says that negotiations between advertisers and sag after over. How commercial talent gets paid may have slowed down production. The two sides reached a tentative agreement earlier this month, but it still needs to be ratified by union members and all in the family and the jeffersons are coming back to TV live and for one night only. Woody Harrelson Marisa Tomei, Jamie Foxx, Wanda Sykes will star in re-creations of episodes from the influential sitcoms born in the nineteen seventies..

Los Angeles Colorado river California Woody Harrelson Marisa Tomei KCRW Robert shetler Caitlyn Plummer federal government Benjamin Gottlieb Wanda Sykes Shutler Mexico Jamie Foxx thirteen percent nine percent one year
"colorado river" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"colorado river" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Studio. Your local fiduciary, Trajan wealth dot com is AM seven ninety and art radio station. Democrats take aim at the attorney general, I'm Dave Anthony, Fox News demanding the full Muller reports. I think it would strike a serious blow to us system. Yes. While democracy. That report is not fully seeing. I saw the start of a house hearing followed by Nita Lowey, who's the attorney general bars summary of the findings raises more question and answer farro the report found there was no Trump Russia conspiracy. Not enough evidence of obstruction of Justice in American people deserve. The fact we're Baras testified he's trying to make as much public as he can. But there's information that needs to remain private grand jury testimony and other sensitive material, the special counsel is working with us on identifying information in the reports that fall under those four categories, but after Taliban suicide bombing killed three newest troops and ghanistan. We find out a contractor in the vehicle previously thought killed has been found alive. According to US officials, the Afghan contractor was working as a. An interpreter during the American security patrol the massive blast place outside. Bog Romera base? The largest US base Afghanistan. Fox's Louis Tomlinson. One of the troops killed New York City firefighter. President Trump just announced new tariffs. A tweets. Fox's John decker live at the White House. The president tweeting the World Trade Organization finds that the European Union subsidies to Airbus has adversely impacted the United States, which will now put tariffs on eleven billion dollars of e you products, the US taken advantage of the US on trade for many years, it will soon stop among the e u products targeted by the US trade Representative aircraft, dairy, products and wine. A spokesman for the European Commission tells Fox News that the Trump administration has exaggerated it's claims and the e u s ready to retaliate with tariffs of their own David and Jonathan judge is blocking US policy of sending migrants who seek asylum back to Mexico to wait. This is Fox News. We have a drought plan. I'm Greg Paul k and S T news. The Colorado river drought contingency.

United States Fox News Baras Fox US trade Representative Dave Anthony attorney president Nita Lowey fiduciary Trump Colorado river New York City Muller Taliban Greg Paul k Russia
"colorado river" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"colorado river" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The imperial valley uses more Colorado river water of an Arizona and combined and yet if there's a shortage they wouldn't have to give up water until almost everyone else has but the draft deal being negotiated would require everyone to chip in. We cannot give so much that we injured slash cause harm to our community. Briscoe is on the board of directors. Of the imperial irrigation district. He knows how tough these decisions can be. He was on the board in two thousand three after decades of using more than its share California was being forced to cut back. He voted to sell some of imperial's water to San Diego as part of that deal. I was voted out of office over that boat. I was the swing vote. I lost friends, and I lost business associates over that Kuhn's customers were farmers were not happy. Now Kunis back on the board with another water sharing vote in front of him at public meetings. Some haven't let them forget the past Bruce. How did that work force? The idea of sharing water doesn't go over. Well, this is a wrong deal. It's another chip away at our water right Koon and the other director say they'll support the water sharing plan if they're offered the right incentives Coon hopes his friends will stay with him. One thing. I will not lose this time. I will not lose customers. I sold my business a year ago. Arizona still hasn't agreed to the deal yet. Either. If that doesn't happen by the end of January. The federal government says it will step in to decide the future of the Colorado river for NPR news. I'm Lauren summer. You're listening.

Briscoe Arizona Colorado river Kunis Colorado federal government Lauren summer Coon NPR Kuhn Koon San Diego California Bruce director