18 Burst results for "Colorado Public Radio"

"colorado public radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 8 months ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sewage right now This is Keith Miller He's a biochemist at the school Close to everything right now So it's heavy load right They're taking showers right now so there isn't a lot of solids This testing helped monitor student health in the fall of 2020 Lange felt says back then at one site wastewater samples were off the charts It was a million virus units per one liter So a lot It's a lot So there's like holy holy Toledo That information convinced school officials to have everyone in one dorm do rapid nasal testing according to Miller That's what wastewater testing is It's the one that's going to give you the biggest picture first When they followed up with that quick testing they i-d-ed ten infected students and moved them to an isolation dorm Lange felt says without that perhaps a hundred more students might have caught it It works I mean it definitely is a case study I think of exactly how to control spread The CDC hopes the wastewater monitoring could help flag future surges and identify hotspots I'm John Daly in Denver This story comes from NPR's partnership with Colorado public radio and Kaiser health news This.

Keith Miller Lange Toledo Miller CDC John Daly Denver NPR Colorado
"colorado public radio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:16 min | 10 months ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Another way to support their workers to John Daly at Colorado public radio explains Many restaurants have had to raise wages and find other ways to keep servers like Nikki Perry on the job She works at French 75 Purple You're excellent How about this A restaurant in downtown Denver It is totally nerve wracking sometimes 'cause all of my tables are interacting with aren't wearing their masks Perry is 23 a DJ and music producer and has worries not just about her own health I'm more nervous about my partner He's disabled He doesn't have the greatest immune system Nikki Perry is not alone in feeling that stress After the initial pandemic shutdown the restaurant had trouble finding employees Chef and owner Frank banana wanted to know what it would take to get them back to work We put a survey monkey out and pay was number three mental health Was number one that employees wanted security and mental health and then pay His company bonanno concepts owns ten Denver restaurants He says the employees have good insurance but it doesn't usually cover mental health well Most psychologists and psychiatrists are out of pocket and we were looking for a way to make our employees happy That says his wife and co owner Jacqueline was when they had a revelation Let's hire a full-time mental health clinician No I know of no other restaurants that are doing this Groups or individual restaurants It's a pretty big leap of faith Everyone I'm Keanu and the wellness director here at banana concepts and I'm gonna teach you a hamstring today Keanu Torres Flores got the job She'd worked as a licensed professional counselor and in community mental health but jumped at the chance to create something new Especially in the restaurant and hospitality industry that stress bucket is really full a lot of the time I think having someone in this kind of capacity can be really useful Flores has taught stress reduction techniques and led mediation sessions for the company's 400 employees She produced a Santa's mental health workshop to help with holiday related sadness and grief.

Nikki Perry Frank banana John Daly Denver Colorado Perry Keanu Torres Flores Jacqueline Keanu Flores Santa
"colorado public radio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Thinkers tours by appointment Spring ma dot com In the city right now we have clear sky 69° look for overnight lows to fall into the upper 40s for tomorrow patchy fog to start the day Sunshine by afternoon and warm Tomorrow's high 74 This is all things considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly And I'm Ari Shapiro Colorado is trying to fight both poverty and climate change by retrofitting low income homes Now the state is set to get a big boost from the infrastructure law Congress just passed Sam brash of Colorado public radio reports Hi Sam It's a brisk fall afternoon when I visit loud audra scone at her mobile home It backs up to a line of mountains in a community where most people work in nearby ski towns Inside it's plenty warm but it wasn't always that way It was always really cold she says Cold air came in through the door and I had two broken windows Her family's propane furnace also had a habit of breaking down To stay comfortable they would carry space heaters from room to room Rascal says her daughter brought one too close to her bed at one night three years ago a blanket caught fire Roscon woke up just in time to hurl it out the front door before anyone got hurt What's your mail I was so scared She says because we didn't know if it was gonna happen again at night or when she was home alone after school Today she's looking forward to a far less anxious winter That's because the state updated her home with new windows insulation and something.

Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Sam brash audra scone Colorado NPR Congress
"colorado public radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sakis from Colorado Public radio at Elk Creek Marina. People wait in line to back their trailers into the water to pull their boats out. And some, like Walter Sweat cough are frustrated. We've seen this play go up and down many times, but we're not happy with it this year, of course. Cause we're all getting kicked out early and we paid for slips for the season. Blue Mesa is Colorado's largest reservoir. It's already less than 38% full, and now it's being forced to sacrifice more water to send to Lake Powell. Erik Logan is head of operations at Elk Creek Marina. He had to shut down six weeks early because of the low water levels. It's a big hit for us, for sure, there's a bunch of employees that thought they would be employed in October, and suddenly they're out looking for employment in the middle of August. The deepening drought in the West has dealt a double blow to Blue Mesa this summer. With climate change. There's less snowpack and warmer temperatures increase evaporation. So less water is making it into the Colorado River and reservoirs like Blue Mesa. And now the federal government is taking water from this lake and two other reservoirs. If we were full, it wouldn't be that big a deal. But since we're already so low, and we're barely hanging on By our fingertips on trying to stay open. You take eight ft of water and suddenly we gotta shut the doors and move everything out to deeper water, And there's nothing we can do about it. Lake Powell on the Utah Arizona border hit its lowest level on record earlier this summer. Loken worries the reservoir will need even more water from Blue Mesa. If the drought doesn't improve. The question is, are they just going to release whatever we get? That would become a very big problem for everyone around here, Blooming said. In the other reservoirs were built in the 19 sixties for times of drought. It's a bank of water that the states can tap when they need it, says John Macleod, a water lawyer in Colorado. The.

John Macleod Erik Logan Colorado River October Blue Mesa Colorado Lake Powell Sakis this year less than 38% 19 sixties Utah Arizona two other reservoirs eight ft of water six weeks middle of August Colorado Public this summer Blooming Walter Sweat
"colorado public radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Good strategy, says Kareem Quintana. She works as a promo. Torre, a community health worker for Latino Denver rights, she says many of them may trust a friend or relative. More than even a doctor. They need to be more educated about the covid because they have a lot of questions and Latino people they listen. A neighbor at Listen, My friend outside the stadium fans are tailgating and an energetic man is sporting a wrestling mask in Mexico's green and red colors. It's Jesus Romero Serrano. He's handing out cards about where to get the vaccine. Absolutely. It's a Mexico game vs Honduras So Latin Latinos are out here is the perfect place for me to reach the land community. Absolutely. He's a community ambassador for the Denver mayor's office. What do you think is the reason that folks that are not getting accident? They don't trust the healthcare system. Romero Serrano wades into the crowd. Hey, guys! You get the vaccine, And when he asks, he hears, many say they already got their shots. Everybody happened. They said They already had it coming answers. Everybody has it. Do you think they're just trying to avoid you think they really They really haven't? No, I think they don't have it And they're being so courteous. They're being so nice that they say it's okay. We already have it. He tells people he's been vaccinated and explains how the vaccines are safe and effective. Basically, it comes down to like the facts into science being truthful to what you're saying. You can really get to people's hearts. Ramiro Serrano says, even if someone isn't ready to get their shots just yet. It's good that he's making contact, ready with answers and hopefully planning a seed to get that shot soon for NPR news. I'm John Daley in Denver. That story came from NPR's partnership with Colorado Public Radio and Kaiser Health News. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King, and I'm Leila Fadel. And I'm David first. The marketplace Morning report is coming up.

Leila Fadel Noel King Kareem Quintana Romero Serrano Ramiro Serrano NPR David John Daley Jesus Romero Serrano Colorado Public Radio Kaiser Health News NPR News Torre Mexico Latin first NPR news Honduras Latino Listen
"colorado public radio" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Some of the really damaging stuff Polish has done or not done as governor or Bennett and you had just pointed out a couple of examples, including his, You know, 97% voting with Bernie Sanders, and I think the vast majority of folks don't know that because the media is so friendly to the Democrats. I totally agree with you, Dan. And it's just like that very damning story by Colorado public radio of all things about the way that poets mishandled the nursing home. During Covid. And clearly there were people who died. That should not have. Yeah. Based on the performance of his Colorado public Health Department. I mean, you can. You can just the crime figures. I mean, the way I mean, wait. What I would love to see is the ad About showing me damage to the capital night after night and and and co. Was not giving any kind of public response. That's right. A lot of these things. The issues have to be taken to poets, and that's why we need strong candidates where the strong campaign to do it. Amen. We'll take Kate appreciate the time my friend didn't look forward to the next visit. Thank you, Dan. Thank you very much that his dick Wadhams breaking down this new poll from a Democrat pollster. Great reason to hope for the GOP 8554058255 the number when we come back how young is too young to be charged with the crime Right here in Colorado. We're talking about two South Carolina case main killed on his tractor by an eight year old and a nine year old. They've been charged in South Carolina. Would they even face charges in Colorado? Would it even be possible? We'll talk about that when we come back 8554058255 I'm the Dan Capital Show. Duncan has a tasty way to take an afternoon break without breaking the bank..

Bernie Sanders Kate Dan 97% 8554058255 South Carolina GOP Democrats Covid Bennett Duncan two Colorado public Health Departm eight year old Democrat Colorado Wadhams nine year old Capital Show couple of examples
"colorado public radio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Metal It changes the whole dynamic of the entire pile of rubble. But it is a very unsafe thing to do so we do have to take our time, Brown says. Until told Otherwise. This remains a rescue operation. Jasmine Garza NPR NEWS SURFSIDE, Florida The cause of the collapse remains under investigation, but the focus is on structural problems identified in a three year old engineer's report released by suicide city officials. President Biden is set to leave the White House in about an hour to make another push for his massive infrastructure proposal. He's traveling to lacrosse, Wisconsin today's trip. There comes less than a week after the administration and a group of bipartisan senators reached a tentative agreement as NPR's Scott Detroit reports the president and several moderate senators hash together a proposal that includes a half trillion dollars in new infrastructure spending. And Biden is hoping the Senate and House passed that with votes from both parties. So they are. Biden is trying to court moderates and conservatives. But at the same time, Biden want Democrats. To pass a second massive multi trillion dollar measure. With proposals Biden set aside to reach the first deal. That means making sure moderate and progressive Democrats are on board. Over the weekend, Biden had to walk back a threat that he would veto the first measure if the second larger bill doesn't pass to Scott. Detroit. NPR NEWS the White House major highway in Colorado as reopened after a series of mudslides forced it to close Colorado Public Radio. Stina seek Interstate 70 fully reopened in western Colorado Monday night. After prolonged closures on Saturday and.

Saturday Jasmine Garza Senate Colorado NPR Democrats Brown Detroit Interstate 70 Monday night first measure President today both parties House lacrosse, Wisconsin half trillion dollars first deal western Colorado NPR NEWS
"colorado public radio" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Piece of metal Changes the whole dynamic of the entire pile of rubble. But it is a very unsafe thing to do so we do have to take our time, Brown says. Until told Otherwise. This remains a rescue operation. Jasmine Garza. NPR NEWS SURFSIDE, Florida Cause of the collapse remains under investigation, but the focus is on structural problems identified in a three year old engineer's report released by suicide city officials. President Biden is set to leave the White House in about an hour to make another push for his massive infrastructure proposal. He's traveling to lacrosse, Wisconsin today. His trip. There comes less than a week after the administration and a group of bipartisan senators reached a tentative agreement as NPR's Scott Detroit reports, the president and several moderate senators has together a proposal that includes a half trillion dollars in new infrastructure spending. And Biden is hoping the Senate and House passed that with votes from both parties, so their Biden is trying to court moderates and conservatives. But at the same time, Biden want Democrats to pass a second massive multi trillion dollar measure with proposals Biden set aside to reach the first deal. That means making sure moderate and progressive Democrats are on board. Over the weekend, Biden had to walk back a threat that he would veto the first measure if the second larger bill doesn't pass to Scott. Detroit. NPR NEWS The White House major highway in Colorado as reopened after a series of mudslides forced it to close Colorado public radio Stina Sieg Interstate 70 fully reopened in western Colorado Monday night. After prolonged closures on Saturday and.

Jasmine Garza Saturday Colorado NPR Senate Detroit Brown Democrats first measure President Scott Detroit both parties today House first deal Interstate 70 Monday night half trillion dollars western Colorado three year old
"colorado public radio" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on KCRW

"For the confirmed death toll is 11 with 150 people still unaccounted for NPR's Jasmine Garces in Surfside. Government officials and rescue crews say they remain hopeful, citing past cases of earthquakes where survivors have been found seven or eight days after the disaster. Crews on the ground have been working around the clock amidst daily thunderstorms and intense heat. Captain Adam Brown from Hillsborough County Fire Rescue, told NPR that the process is both a race for time and a delicate balancing act every time We move something. Rock boulder, a piece of metal It changes the whole dynamic of the entire pile of rubble. But it is a a very unsafe thing to do so we do have to take our time, Brown says. Until told Otherwise. This remains a rescue operation. Jasmine Garza NPR NEWS SURFSIDE, Florida The cause of the collapse remains under investigation, but the focus is on structural problems identified in a three year old engineer's report released by suicide city officials. President Biden is set to leave the White House in about an hour to make another push for his massive infrastructure proposal. He's traveling to lacrosse, Wisconsin today. His trip. There comes less than a week after the administration and a group of bipartisan senators reached a tentative agreement as NPR's Scott Detroit reports the president and several moderate senators hash together a proposal that includes a half trillion dollars in new infrastructure spending. Biden is hoping the Senate and House passed that with votes from both parties. So they are. Biden is trying to court moderates and conservatives. But at the same time, Biden wants Democrats To pass a second massive multi trillion dollar measure. With proposals Biden set aside to reach the first deal. That means making sure moderate and progressive Democrats are on board. Over the weekend, Biden had to walk back a threat that he would veto the first measure if the second larger bill doesn't pass to Scott Detroit. NPR NEWS The White House major highway in Colorado has reopened after a series of mudslides forced it to close Colorado public radio Stina Sieg Interstate 70 fully reopened in western Colorado Monday night after prolonged closures on Saturday and.

Saturday 150 people Jasmine Garces Brown NPR Senate Colorado Jasmine Garza 11 Democrats Scott Detroit Hillsborough County Fire Rescu President Stina Sieg House today both parties Monday night SURFSIDE, Florida half trillion dollars
"colorado public radio" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Planet money and how I built this from NPR. Live from NPR news. I'm trial. Snyder. Tropical Storm Claudette is bringing severe weather to coastal Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. Eric Blake is with the National Hurricane Center in Miami. They hazard we want to emphasize is The risk of heavy rainfall. 5 to 10 inches with isolated totals of 15 inches are possible across portions of the central Gulf Coast. We also expect life threatening flash floods. Possibly from coastal Mississippi, Alabama and the far Western Florida Panhandle. Flash flood warnings and watches are up across the coastal region, and forecasters say Claudette could stir out tornadoes. Claudette is forecast weakened into a depression tonight. Meanwhile, in the Pacific Tropical storm to lure is expected to make landfall along the west central coast of Mexico later this evening. As a heat wave continues to sweep across the West. Volunteers in one of Colorado's hardest hit cities are working to help help keep on housed people. Cool Colorado public radio Stina Sieg reports. Grand Junction is home to Western Colorado's largest population oven housed people and they've been dealing with temperatures above 100 degrees for about a week now. Stephanie, Uh, Vasquez heads the nonprofit mutual aid partners is distributing refillable water bottles, sunscreen and other supplies. What if you drove past a person and you could have given them some water and prevented them from dying? In this extreme weather right now, that is very, very possible If somebody's already dehydrated and malnutrition that that could happen, the National Weather Service expects higher than normal temperatures in the area for at least another week. For NPR News. I'm Stina Sieg in GRAND Junction, Colorado. Iran is getting a new president. State media say Abraham and racy won by a.

Eric Blake Stina Sieg 5 Stephanie Alabama Mississippi National Weather Service 15 inches Abraham Louisiana NPR Claudette Miami Colorado 10 inches Grand Junction Vasquez Western Colorado NPR News GRAND Junction, Colorado
"colorado public radio" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on KCRW

"Student loans or mortgages. School shootings are another big stressor. But the biggest I heard from kids is climate change, something that threatens their very existence. Like other teens, Cassidy Nick says adults aren't taking it seriously. It's frustrating because it's reached a point where I really needs to be addressed, and it feels like there's a lack of willingness to address it. And so that feeling of powerlessness is is really a struggle in that feeling of yeah, like existential dread. So much here. Have you talked to anyone? Mental health professionals, doctors about solutions. Yeah, In a lot of ways. It's doctors and doctors talk about treatment. But the youth know exactly what's needed. Their question is, is anybody listening? They want safe spaces in schools where they can decompress and learn coping skills and schools that don't overstress grades and testing. You want to learn about alternatives to four year degrees and more work based learning, and some want help with social media addiction, and they want parents to chill out. Frankly, finally, you say they want mental health and anti bullying to be top priorities. Starting in elementary school. It sounds like they have a lot of solutions themselves. Jenny Brendan Education reporter at Colorado Public Radio. Thank you, Jenny. Thank you. Now, if you or someone you know, is thinking about suicide. There are free trained counselors available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, just called the National Suicide Prevention hotline at 100 to 17. This is NPR news. Tune into some of KCRW's best work on life examined. Focus on the Exhale. Like the side. We all have this in all cultures across all religions, you know aside is aside. Relief and the release of the body and the muscular attention and the breath is again leading like a king. Life examined Saturday mornings at nine right here on KCRW. Live from NPR news in Washington..

Jenny Cassidy Nick Colorado Public Radio Washington NPR Jenny Brendan seven days a week Saturday mornings 24 hours a day 100 to 17 four year National Suicide Prevention KCRW nine
"colorado public radio" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on KCRW

"Get a covert vaccine. But in rural Park County, Colorado, which is almost as big as the state of Delaware, there's just one and the clinic exists on Lee because a seven year old doctor agreed to come out of retirement. It typically takes rural clinics years to replace family medicine doctors who leave because there just aren't enough primary care doctors Colorado Public Radio's Dan Voice reports. And you're from Bailey. Welcome to circle a 70 year old physician, Dr Katherine Fitting pops into an exam room in the small South Park Health Care clinic. Ready? 123 Pas Fitting is the only primary care doctor in Park County. Or should I say she's once again? The only primary care doc in Park County? Well, I was yes, I was retired. I'd been retired since 2013 with her gone. The South Park clinic closed for six years. Fitting helped spearhead a local sales tax effort to open it back up and recruit a new doctor. He quit within six months. There's no escape. That's the thing is you? If you don't have the personality for this type of practice, you're gonna feel very trapped. People don't want to. Work. 24 73 65 and medicine is more complicated than it used to be. Dr. Mark Deutchman directs a program at the University of Colorado Medical School dedicated to placing new physicians in rural areas. It is not easy, so many rural doctor's air under the average older and close to retirement, he says. That trend is accelerating and that medical schools are vastly overestimating how many doctors are in the pipeline to replace them. Which been recently published a study suggesting schools overestimate by almost double the real number. You don't know what somebody's going to do until they finish residency medical schools report that about 40% of their graduates enter residencies in primary care. When Deutchman and his fellow researchers followed up with nearly 18,000 medical doctors around the country after residency and the 42% That the schools would have claimed primary care turned into 22%. The American Association of Medical Colleges has problems with Deutsche Mons premise and his findings. They say 30 new medical schools have opened nationwide since 2006. And they're doing their part to address the primary care shortage. However, others say Deutchman has a point. We may have to look at a more focused analysis of how many individuals are actually going into the specialty of family medicine. Doctor Eat A Stuart is president of the American Academy of Family Physicians. She says. Schools have been graduating record numbers of doctors into family medicine residencies in the last decade, but she acknowledges many switch into much higher paying subspecialties. Host residency, and most of those jobs are in cities. Further compound in the rural problem, Dr. Mark Deutchman says younger docks want greater work life balance. We know that it takes more than one new physician to replace Really active, dedicated retiring physician. I won't make it hurt. All right, come right back at the rural South Park Clinic. Katherine Fitting is one of those docks continuing to see patients Eight years after she first retired. I feel like I And back where I belong. This is what I want to be doing Still, if the right doctor came along a few decades younger, I'd give it up in a minute. In order to secure that, Even in that circumstance, she says she would still want to cover their days off for NPR news. I'm Dan Boyce in fair play Colorado..

Dan Boyce American Academy of Family Phy Deutchman 22% Park County 42% University of Colorado Medical American Association of Medica six years Katherine Fitting Mark Deutchman Delaware South Park Clinic 2013 Fitting Colorado Public Radio 2006 30 new medical schools South Park Health Care clinic Dan Voice
"colorado public radio" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on KCRW

"What evidence will people on both sides of this martial to support the point that benefits are or not keeping people out of the workforce? The Chamber of Commerce estimates. About one in four unemployed workers is getting Maurin unemployment than they did when they were working, So it's not unreasonable to think some people would rather not go back to work. But it doesn't seem to be that simple. For example, lots of people went back to work last summer, even though the government was paying twice as much in extra jobless benefits at that time. Benefits in Alabama are more generous than those in Louisiana, but more people have gone back to work in Alabama. So the pictures really complicated. And finally, worker advocates say if extra benefits do give workers a little more breathing room a little more time to wait for the right job to go back to That, they say is a good thing. Not a bad thing. Thank you, Scott. You're welcome. NPR's Scott Horsley. Okay? You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. A mass shooting in Colorado Springs overnight Saturday left seven people dead, including the suspected shooter. Colorado Public Radio's down boy says authorities are trying to piece together what happened. He joins us now from Colorado Springs Welcome. Yeah. Hi there, Elsa. Hi. So, what have we learned at this point? Carlos brings police say the shooting happened as you mentioned either in the late night hours of Saturday or very early Sunday at a birthday party at a mobile home park here in the city and And it's just stunning. This was largely a family get together. Children were at the party. They were in the home and police say the suspected gunman. He walked into the party. He shot the adults and And then he shot himself. Now none of the Children were physically harmed, and they're now with other relatives. What do we know so far about this suspected shooter and his relationship to the people he's believed to have killed Is so police have not yet formally named him nor any of the victims. But local media outlets say through interviews and also through looking at social media posts that the gunman was in a relationship with one of the female victims and our local paper here, the Colorado Springs Gazette reports. That the party was a combined birthday party for several members of the girlfriends in laws, Huh? What about motive here? Does anyone know what the shooter's motive might have been? No. At this point. Police have not released a suspected motive. Public photos of the suspected shooter on social media. They do you have a photo of an assault rifle and relatives of the victims say he was, you know, usually carrying a gun on him. Again, though you know this couple, they appeared to be in a really serious relationship. There's a Facebook post on the woman's page suggesting the gunman had just recently bought her. A small Smartwatch in has recently is late April. There's just so many questions still. Yeah. Yeah, well, Colorado, of course, is no stranger to mass shootings. Unfortunately, just this past March, a gunman murdered 10. People write in a supermarket in Boulder. Can you just put this weekend into some context for us? How does it compare to Past violence in your state. Yeah, some important context. First, Colorado actually falls in the middle of the pack among states overall when it comes to overall deaths from firearms. On this weekend alone. There were nine other incidents in which at least four people were shot across the country. But you're right. Our state has had a number of the really high profile tragedies and we go back to you know her first deadliest, most prominent that was Columbine High School in 1999 15. Dead 24 wounded. We had the Aurora Theater shooting in 2012 with 12 Dead 70 wounded. We had 12 people shot three killed at a Colorado Springs, Planned Parenthood in 2015 and at another high school, the stem school in 2019. We had nine people shot in one person killed and then like you say, less than two months ago, the Boulder grocery store shooting and what's different about this one is our mayor here in Colorado Springs, John Suthers pointed out is this doesn't appear to be anything like a An act of domestic terrorism or some random, ideologically driven crime. It's a domestic violence case, though you know one with such a painfully high body count. Well, what's next in this investigation? It's just back to that search for a motive. And you know, it's Colorado going through this familiar tragic news cycle all over again. That is Colorado Public Radio's Dan Boyce in Colorado Springs. Thank you. Thank you Also. You were listening to all things considered from NPR news. I'm rundown that foot there. It's said that the news is the.

Elsa Scott Dan Boyce Carlos 2019 John Suthers 2015 Alabama Louisiana 12 people Colorado Springs Boulder Scott Horsley 1999 Colorado Public Radio 2012 nine seven people 10 Facebook
"colorado public radio" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Police officer who died in the mass shooting at a Colorado grocery store last week was memorialized. Today, The service drew thousands of law enforcement officers from around the country. Colorado Public Radio's Allison Sherry was there and has this report. Older officer, Eric Tally was remembered as an optimistic person who threw himself into everything he became interested in. He left an I T job in his forties and joined the Boulder police force because he said he wanted to do more good in the world. As an officer, he started the Police department's drone program and called his boss once an hour with updates about his day. Sergeant Adrian Dallas was his supervisor. I could easily described Eric. He was a pain in my butt. Eric has two speeds of work, Talk aholic and honey Badger officer tally was 51 had seven Children with his wife, Leah. They're between seven and 20 years old. They're devout Catholics and Boulder Police Chief Maris Harold addressed the kids directly. Your father was kind. Your father died a hero. There is no doubt because of his bravery and quick action. Dozens of innocent lives were saved. Tally was among 10 people killed in the shooting last Monday. Officer said in the memorial service that no civilian was injured or died after tally arrived at the grocery store, which means he saved

Eric Tally Allison Sherry 20% Buffalo Today last week Colorado Colorado Public Radio New York tens of thousands of jobs NPR thousands of law enforcement o more than $350 million a year Boulder Stokes Ryan of steak Assembly
"colorado public radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Obviously, we do have a wide wide range of threats. And what has happened. I think in the post 2007 period I'm naming the rise of the iPhone and mobile devices and faster download speeds is a lot of people who historically might have believed very fringe things but have been geographically isolated. It's easier for them to find communities that have a lot more confirmation bias. You and I've spoken in the past about how different media consumption is in a world where there are almost no barriers to entry to creating a new media organization. And so it becomes a lot easier for people to end up in a narrow little niche conversation where almost every fact if the consumer is always right, you filter out almost every fact and scare quotes. That they might not agree with. And so I do think that domestic radicalization is an issue we have to look at, and I don't think it it's primarily about untidy, a logical spectrum. I think it's primarily about the decline of place. And about the evaporation of communities of people. You actually break Bread West, So I think there's a lot more work we need to do. It's also important that our intelligence agencies get better at developing and utilizing tools that help filter out. Sort of random chaos. People talk about an actual operational planning, and we have a long way to go in the intelligence community to be ready for what the controlled because somebody could just be a citizen, saying something extreme and might even own a gun. But that's different than actually being someone who might attack someone. Is that what you're saying? Absolutely. There are all sorts of people who use rhetoric that have no actual connection to their actions. But then there are people who put the two together and we're gonna need better intelligence tools in the future toe filter out, you know, chaos and noise and actual operational planning. Ben Sasse is a Republican senator from Nebraska who voted to convict President Trump and his impeachment trial. Senator. Thanks very much. Thank you, Steve. The U. S. And China have a long running geopolitical competition, which is unlikely to change any time soon, even with a new presidential administration one way that plays out a new kind of space race involving global navigation technology. Here's Dan Boyce from Colorado Public Radio 98 back in November in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The private companies Space X launched one of its Falcon nine rockets. Real ignition..

Steve Ben Sasse Dan Boyce Nebraska iPhone November Colorado Public Radio 98 Republican Cape Canaveral, Florida two 2007 period Falcon Space X President Trump one way China one U. S. nine rockets Senator
"colorado public radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"N. Y C. FM HD and AM New York. Good morning. The pressure is on for Republicans in Congress to respond to alarming statements from a freshman member of their party, Marjorie Taylor. Greene is a devoted supporter of former President Trump and Cuban on conspiracies. Many have been slow to speak up. If anything, it is a reminder that the party has very little tolerance right now for being against Trump. I'm David first it's morning edition from NPR and W when my sake We'll get the latest following the coup in me and Mark Jeff Bezos is stepping down as CEO of Amazon WN Y. C's and a sale on Colorado Public Radio's Joanne Allen. Talk about life after 60 and in our series, appreciating some good things in life will take a walk to a bodega in the snow. It's Wednesday, February 3rd. The news is next. Live from NPR news. On core of a Coleman president Biden has signed three more executive actions to overturn some of former President Trump's most hardline immigration enforcement policies. NPR's Franco Ordonez reports. The actions include launching a task force to reunite Children and parents who were separated after crossing the border. Speaking from the Oval Office, president Biden said he hopes the steps he's taking will remove the stain of separating Children from their parents. He also defended other executive measures He's taken won't make it clear There's a lot of talk.

Trump president NPR Biden Mark Jeff Bezos Marjorie Taylor New York Congress executive Greene Joanne Allen Oval Office Franco Ordonez Amazon David Colorado Public Radio CEO Coleman
"colorado public radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"colorado public radio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tools judges will use to determine whether a person is a threat to public safety or not likely to show up in court and should not be released. There have been other efforts to get rid of cash Bail. Washington D. C was an early pioneer. It eliminated bail. In most instances in the 19 nineties. Cash bill is rarely used in New Jersey, and there's also been pushback bail reforms in Alaska in New York were rolled back or mended. In California. A ballot measure kept cash bail intact. In Illinois, there were strong opposition from the Illinois Law Enforcement Coalition, a group of police unions and organizations representing police officers and county sheriffs. You seldom see people sitting in jail for low level crimes just because they can't make bail Gymkhana took is the executive director of the Illinois Sheriffsassociation. It's amazing how people can find the money to get themselves out. The second thing is, they have an opportunity where they may very well. Very quickly go back in front of the judge, like the next day in some cases, and the judge may say, Okay, I'm gonna go ahead. Wave your bell. Let's really show on your own reconnaissance. That happens all the time. Flat wrong. That's your own Mitchell, the head of the Illinois Justice Project and part of a coalition which helped draft the Illinois bill. He says pre covert 19. There were thousands still detained in the state because they couldn't afford bail. But whether people languish in jail is not the law enforcement coalitions only argument, the group says communities will be less safe that criminals released on bail will be running free, possibly committing new crimes. And the counties across the state don't have the finances for electronic monitors, staff and other items that might be needed as people are released from jail before trial. Mitchell says he respects law enforcement but their analysis is wrong, then the policy context they opposed. Essentially any every significant proposal to change and for people like me. We understand that reform. Is not a direct trade off with safety. I think I understand that the current system It's completely broken. He and other activists point to studies of bail reform in New Jersey Washington, D C and elsewhere which a little difference in crime rates, and only small increases and people failing to show up for court. Illinois. Bail reform legislation would not go into effect for a couple of years until January, 2023 that may be enough time for supporters and opponents of the Illinois bail law. To iron out the challenges that come with such a monumental change. Cheryl Corley, NPR NEWS Chicago Rudy Giuliani, President Trump's personal attorney and the former mayor of New York, faces a massive defamation lawsuit for his baseless claims related to the election. In Colorado Public radio Benten Berglund has more Denver based Dominion voting Systems is seeking $1.3 billion in damages. Tom Claire's an attorney for Dominion, he says Giuliani and others pushed a viral disinformation campaign. That has destroyed the company's value and endangered its employees he knew from the outset, the complaint alleges that there was no evidence that the election was rigged. That's why even Mr Giuliani didn't make those claims in court, but he made them on television and online, where they would do maximum damage The Dominion but face minimal scrutiny. Dominion provides election equipment and software to 28 states, including swing states like Georgia. Giuliani has called the company's strange and frightening here. He is in mid November in a Fox business news interview, So we're using a foreign company. That is owned by Venezuelans, who were close to work. Laws to Chavez are now close to Maduro, and they are extremely happy. Able Dominion has no ownership ties to Venezuelan leadership. Earlier this month, the company filed a related suit against Sidney Powell, another lawyer who worked for the Trump campaign. But defamation cases require proof of actual malice, says Steve Zansberg, a First Amendment attorney in Denver who has represented the Colorado Broadcasters Association. It means knowing falsehood. Or a statement made with actual serious subjective doubts as to the truth, and that has to be that showing requires the plaintiff to prove that by clear and convincing evidence, it's a very high standard of care. Dominion says More lawsuits are coming. It's not ruling out anyone from Fox News personalities to trump himself for NPR news. I'm Bente Brookland in Denver. At some point next month. The death toll from Cove in 19 in this country will likely surpass 500,000. That number does not count the deaths in directly tied to the pandemic. A look at deaths of despair tomorrow on morning edition. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. It's 5 18. Let's check in with Julie de Fish. We're heading deliver more this time. Several vehicles collided eastbound.

Rudy Giuliani Illinois Dominion Mitchell Denver Illinois Law Enforcement Coali NPR New York New Jersey attorney Illinois Sheriffsassociation Washington D. C Alaska California Julie de Fish executive director New Jersey Washington Bente Brookland
Florida Truck Driver Arrested In 40-Year-Old Killing Of Colorado Radio Intern

America's Morning News

01:43 min | 3 years ago

Florida Truck Driver Arrested In 40-Year-Old Killing Of Colorado Radio Intern

"The sixty two year old Florida truck drivers been arrested and charged in the killing of a college student working as an intern for a Denver radio station nearly forty years ago now like many recent solve cold cases Douglas county sheriff Tony Spurlock said investigators used a popular DNA test company to catch James Clinton in the death of the then twenty one year old Hellene present ski and here is that announcement that was made yesterday in the crack of a cold case this is been a long time almost forty years January sixteen will be the fortieth anniversary of humming presents skis murder this is a young girl who was just starting her life came to Colorado to have an opportunity to make a difference she wanted to be in journalism she wanted to be a part of a bigger story she was involved in her choir at home and from all accounts of everyone if they had anything to say about her is just a wonderful decent nice young lady we have a lot of people doing a lot of work and we have some really really good luck if you will and then we had some great evidence and original evidence that was taken and by the CBI by our office and here we are today where we have an individual who is in custody and there was a significant amount of evidence that as I said was maintained in properly cared for over the last forty years at the crime scene and that evidence was then later turned to

Intern Tony Spurlock James Clinton Murder Colorado CBI Florida Denver Douglas County Hellene Forty Years Twenty One Year Sixty Two Year