19 Burst results for "Colonel Hands"

"colonel hands" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:58 min | 3 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on WDRC

"I'd much rather take something that you could handle. So it's that kind of rate. Today we spend about 3% of GDP on the defense budget Back in the Cold War days for half a century, we've spent 5% that was average or normal. So we have gotten used to very low levels of funding that was effective because the type of enemy that you were engaging If you go up against the big country in the cold War level sorts of forces and the funding that goes with that, so 700 billion huge amount of money only 3% of the budget. It's below the rate of inflation. If you went to 5% on the $20 trillion economy, it's about a trillion dollars. I don't think we need that much. But that would be below historical averages. And folks just haven't been explained. You know that That's the reality and s O Any government coming. The office is gonna have to better do a better job of explaining to the taxpayer what we need what it costs and how long it's gonna take to get there. All right, Colonel, let me ask you this. Are there places where we could say Well, these tools really worked well back then. But they don't work well at all today, and they're places where we can find some of the savings. I'm not saying Don't increase the overall budget. But there are things where you can see even the military has famous examples. I think the Sergeant York gun or one of those where they said this was a weapon we didn't want Shouldn't have been built etcetera, but some congressman's district got a lot of jobs out of it. Are there some efficiencies we confined there if we actually listen to what the military says it needs You have to be more focused on the type of enemy in the environment. You're gonna fight instead of having a generalized horse that is kind of good, and a lot of areas of the Marine Corps is dramatically refashioning itself. It says, Look, we're going to go up. Serve the country. We have to be able to fight in a very contested environment against China. If we can do that, we confined anywhere. That's a maritime environment. Lots of islands of the tolls, those things they say tanks don't work there. So the Marine Corps is actually getting rid of all of its tanks, all of its heavy bridging unit's getting around regrettable art of its old tube artillery or that you normally see in battlefield so that it can shift. Those resource is to do types of equipment that are relevant, ineffective, so I think it's a brilliant move. On their part, the Army has a different kind of fight much longer, arranges these longer range rockets instead of standard artillery. It means vehicles that are more nimble instead of an 80, or 90 ton tank s O firepower of global protected firepower is what they call that a form but modern sensors and modern anti platform weapons are so good. She just can't fly in 1980 benches airplane into somebody else's airspace and expect not to get shot down. So we need things like the F 35, which is the joint Strike fighter That's colonel hand production. Absolutely essential, and it's amazing. How will they brought the cost down relative to what was.

Marine Corps congressman Army China
"colonel hands" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:47 min | 3 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston. The.

Jacqueline Cabrera Boston Museum of Fine Arts Boston Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Sandra Shave Kernaghan NPR Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands Andrea Shea Matthew Teitelbaum collections manager director
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:37 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Sandra Shave W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Boston Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Korir
"colonel hands" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:48 min | 3 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals, They're still able to find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's Iemma Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Cory ER, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registers right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue throughout the pandemic. Shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off now. Instead of borrowing. Cabrera sees more institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Go out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding up and highlight that in your collection, The collection of Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful. I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston got the latest trend in pandemic distraction..

Jacqueline Cabrera Boston Museum of Fine Arts Boston Jill Kennedy John Michel Basquiat Kernaghan Sandra Shave Korea NPR Lisbon Los Angeles Cory ER Colonel Hands Andrea Shea Matthew Teitelbaum collections manager director
"colonel hands" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:27 min | 3 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on KCRW

"You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall Managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum, Korea's used to ride on the trucks that not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sure about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest an exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue throughout the pandemic. Shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off now. Instead of borrowing. Cabrera sees more institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Go out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of.

Jacqueline Cabrera Korea Jill Kennedy Kernaghan Boston's Museum of Colonel Hands Basquiat Boston
"colonel hands" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:41 min | 3 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Kernaghan Museum of Fine Arts Boston Boston's Museum of Andrea Shea Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands collections manager Boston
"colonel hands" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:40 min | 3 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of.

Jacqueline Cabrera Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Kernaghan Museum of Fine Arts Boston Boston's Museum of Andrea Shea Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands collections manager Boston
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:41 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Andrea Shea W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Npr News
"colonel hands" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

The Kirk Minihane Show

02:59 min | 3 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

"I dot com and retailers around the country have to be twenty one year old Years old a purchase is robbie fox. Twenty one yes okay And remember this is not cbd. I will give you buzzer. Please use responsible use code kirk twenty twenty one at checkout you five percent of the order code kirk twenty one twenty twenty one at checkout five percents off your order three ci. The industry leader in delta eight t h c product. All right go ahead. Well i just got a little email from williams. Oh okay. i've got a cell phone number. That might work. I'm going to give them a call. Hang on their callers. Hang onto the bill and alan john. Eric and chemical back after the break. I have questions for dale for dale. Spent twelve hundred dollars slot. There's a lot neck. got him. Forty tickets more. Spend on real shame you you don't have much. How much twenty bucks. Ninety thousand dollars you did did. Yeah sorry. Kirk sergeant williams. Yeah sorry this is my work cell tournament colonel hand. how're you. How good their congratulations. Yeah well i mean what what. Where are you from sergeant. I live in arnhem after now. You a sergeant. In in in what capacity on the new hampshire national guard. Excellent right. So you are. You have won the how did you. How did you feel when you find that. You won the golden ticket myself. Yeah okay. I'll kick it's real. It's surreal isn't it. I mean you get the thinking of the things that you get to. Have you watch chrissie chicken fingers. I'm pretty pumped about that during that. You don't want you want to participate in everything or is this something you know like. Yeah i was wondering if we could like maybe donate some of other people like one you want to look. You want the golden ticket. I imagine a three year past all the shows absolutely okay. Do you want to play golf with me. And ryan whitney for sure. Yeah okay do you want to do. You wanna watch the kirk and callahan. Show just the three of them just are could be whatever however you want. Yeah i would definitely like to see that as together ones. I haven't never. We'll figure out these days. Oh yeah i see. I'm not not really interested in the video calls. Tucker donald there get okay not i i think the cats what are we gonna tell c. Charged with you on that one. So i said so. Those are out steve. All right good okay. Everything else you're on board with our your for.

alan john twelve hundred dollars Eric robbie fox williams five percent Ninety thousand dollars twenty bucks Forty tickets Kirk dale three Tucker donald ryan whitney twenty one year old Twenty five percents steve new hampshire chrissie
"colonel hands" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:56 min | 4 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on KGO 810

"Site position. Just Captive on the loose ball ended up in the colonel's hands. Yeah. Gordon at the top seers back to Gordon Bounces in jump shot off dance, Johnson. No good. Dan is gonna be a foul. On Ceres. She can't believe it. Put his hands up saying What I D o gonna be bears Balt Cal basketball is sponsored by video on Lee get operated HD TVs at better prices than the club stores or online. We'll be right there. Ronnie slaps the ball. The baseline gets into the Joel Brown. It's brown, 20 Bradley. Kelly and Bentley on the floor for Cal Brown brings it up. With directions, Kelly and taken away by Kevin Johnson Johnson able to just tap it to himself and steal it. Williams in paint, looking for a place to go with it. Sears kicks it back out. Gordon director, Little traffic with his hands will stutter. Johnson. Deep Ball three is good two point game. Cal 30 Nicholls State 28 13 14 to go second half bears offensively and this have haven't even been able to get shot six turnovers in the first. Six minutes and 50 seconds. Around Kelly Nuggets to Bradley. Joel gets it back. On the wing. Couple bounces fires it over Open Bentley. Good Look, It's good. Cal calls a time out Mark Fox. Every time I turn around on the floor, we'll take one with, um Five point ballgame between the Bears and.

Kevin Johnson Johnson Cal Brown Kelly Nuggets Bears Joel Brown Gordon Bradley Bentley Dan Mark Fox Ronnie Sears Williams Lee director
"colonel hands" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:32 min | 4 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on KGO 810

"Prize in the 25 K weekday payday. Turtles, with the ball approaching eight minutes to go in the first half. Moving around the outside. They've got a great job of taking care of the basketball. And Bradley reaches in and that one ends up out of bounds. Last touched by the Bears. Nicholls State maintains possession. That's an understatement. They have eight turnovers already. The Bears are four of nine beyond the arc and two of nine inside the art. Journals back to work on offense, Garvin Of that Andre Jones. Jones has been out for quite a while. And they just going to say Nicholls State is they do have a shot clock violation right there. Just haven't found any rhythm in the half Court offense. No, they have not. So that's their ninth turnover. You mentioned Jones. He's a guy that average double digits. Last year's a four year player, But they don't get a lot of guys that have four years and at that continuity. No, they don't pass underneath. Auntie's a bitch. Mister, lay up. Grant will go to the line. Foul is on Garvin. So Auntie's bitch to the free throw line for the Bears. First trip to the line this season on grants First is good. You know, Right now, Geico is offering extra 15% credit on car, motorcycle and RV policies. That's on top of what Geico could already save you. So what are you waiting for? Geico dot com. Learn more and he's rich. For the second. Beauty. He gets a pair Cal leads by a dozen 18 to 67 33 reigning first half hospital. You Hmm. State tie Gordon with the ball picks up. His dribble goes over Johnson left side started by former another trying to go down underneath, and it's a miscommunication that tried to get it down to Sears. On the block, and Jones, who had been out with an injury came in and his past Ends up rolling past the baseline. Foreman and tease a bitch. Bradley Kelly. And Bentley on offense for the Bears trying to stretch out a lead. Grant over Bradley, Matt thought about making move instead pulls up and drills the 3 21 6 bears. 18 to run for the Bears. And if you cal, tip the gas and pile it on Offensive goaltending, I believe. Yes, Indeed. It is shot was missed by Jones and then all sorts of colonels. Hands coming to try to finish it. Offensive gold 10. Bears with a chance to extend their lead even further. Foreman getting across half court and tease a bitch in the direction of Bradley and said, goes down to Kelly under a kickback out, Brant Cat, shoot deep ball off the rim and bounces out and then Bradley Pals Jones over in the corner. There, grant that that's the perfect look for him Straightaway three pointer just in and out. Kelly with a good job of recognizing the double team coming, kicked it straight out to the open man. So those are shots that will fall and good recognition by Andre to find the open man with that double team member last year that Stanford game over there, there's big, really struggled on double teams. Driving the lane short shot off the hands of Gordon. No good whistle and a foul. Let me grab on, Gordon. So kernels get a little frustrated right now. They are both coaches trying to play a lot of people early in the year. Try to find the right combinations and right now for nickel state, the colonels Have been able to find any continuity of the offensive end. If they've taken some tough shots. Not many good shots in the paint and the Bears have done a nice job on the perimeter defense. There's do deserve credit. When you see a lot of his brown in the ball game kicks to Auntie's a corner one extra pass to Bradley Match three won't go down, Gordon going to fire it up, Ed. Jones down makes the catch can hit the Shorty and then a whistle underneath. And Joel Brown has got to be Able to recognize he's the point guard in this current configuration for the Bears, and when Matt shot.

Bears Andre Jones Bradley Pals Jones Bradley Bradley Kelly Gordon Nicholls State Geico Garvin Foreman Grant basketball Matt Court Cal Mister Bentley Johnson Sears
"colonel hands" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:42 min | 5 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on WDRC

"Some efficiencies we confined there if we actually listen to what the military says it needs You have to be more focused on the type of enemy in the environment. You gonna fight instead of having a generalized force that is kind of good, and a lot of areas of the Marine Corps is dramatically refashioning itself. It says. Look, we're going to go up. Serve the country. We have to be able to fight in a very contestant environment against China. If we can do that, we confined anywhere. That's a maritime environment. Lots of islands of the tolls, those things they say tanks don't work there. So the Marine Corps is actually getting rid of all of its tanks, all of its heavy bridging unit's getting a right regrettable lot of its old tube artillery that you normally see on the battlefield. So that it can shift those resources to do types of equipment that are relevant, ineffective, so I think it's a brilliant move. On their part, the Army has a different kind of fight. Much longer ranges is longer range rockets instead of standard artillery. These vehicles that are born nimble instead of an 80, or 90 ton tank s O firepower of mobile protected firepower is what they call that a form but modern sensors and modern anti platform weapons are so good that you just can't fly and 1980 ventured airplane into somebody else's airspace and expect not to get shot down. So we need things like the F 35. Which is the joint strike fighter. That's colonel hand production absolutely essential in. It's amazing how low they brought the cost down relative to what was projected. So once I'm going to develop order Exactly exactly. You get efficiencies as you start to produce things so.

Marine Corps Army China
"colonel hands" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:30 min | 9 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Dutch prime minister to hate me for Hungary, but he's attacking Seoul harsh and making very clear that because Hungary in his opinion Does not respect the rule of law must be punished financially. That's his position, which is not acceptable, really shows that the kind of fragility of the you the world's Orla Berry. Thanks a lot, Orla. Thanks, Karen. Europe is grappling with a lot more than just a stimulus package. There's also been a rise in far right extremism. Germany prides itself on taking a tough stance against this, especially neo Nazi ideology. In Berlin alone, More than 36 memorials and museums are dedicated to remembering the atrocities of World War two. But now Germany is battling a rise in right wing nationalism, including in the highest ranks of its own military. Louisa Back reports from Berlin earlier this month, Germany's defense minister come, Caroline Bauer made a startling announcement She was disbanding a company of Germany's most secretive and elite military unit, the K S. K. Because it was filled with far right extremists. She described a troubling pattern. This is populated as an answer in a few songs after there's an unhealthy elitism among some leaders in the K s K, which has fostered and developed a toxic leadership, extremist tendencies and absolutely unacceptable handling of weapons and ammunition in parts of the chaos. The defence minister reported 48,000 rounds of ammunition, and about £135 of explosives were missing from the casket, which are also known as special forces. And it's unclear whether they were stolen are missing because of slop. People keeping you can kind of liken say today that we can't rule out any of these possibilities. We have to consider everything. The special forces have gotten a lot of media attention lately, and may police commandos found Nazi songbooks stickers and magazines in the home of a surgeon Major They also discovered explosives, ammunition and weapons that had likely been stolen from the German military. In recent years. Former soldiers and other eye witnesses have been coming forward with more stories about extremism in the cask, eh? In 2017 Interview with German public television, Ah woman reported attending a secret case case celebration. She saw members do the Hitler salute and heard them play neo Nazi rock songs. The woman whose voice was altar to protect your identity, said she'd been flown into the celebration as a prize for one of the colonel's bonus for Todd. I was carried around the fire if I was let down in front of the colonel in Dun, and from there, I was supposed to bring him to a tent that had been prepared for us and where I was supposed to have sex with him. The woman said that the colonel's hands were bloody because He just completed an obstacle course that involved tossing around a pig's head. She said. He wound up getting too drunk to have sex. After the event, the woman reported what she said to the German broadcaster. They'd tried to verify the details of her report, Mr Liszt and trying. It wasn't easy because other eye witnesses kept silent. Finally, we asked the German military and to our surprise, they confirmed some parts of her story. And are still investigating. Others. Colonel himself objected to the woman's allegations, although military counterintelligence kept an eye on him. After the reports came out, he was promoted to one of the highest officer ranks on the K S. K, according to reporting by The New York Times. The problem of fire right extremism within German security institutions isn't new. Between 4007 a terrorist group called the National Socialist Underground, killed a total of nine immigrants, among others. One of the group's members was a former soldier. It took over a decade for the government to identify and start investigating the perpetrators. Experts say the problem that worse again after 2015 That was the year Chancellor Angela Merkel kept the German borders open and allowed over a 1,000,000 refugees and migrants fleeing war and poverty to enter the country. Many of them were from the Middle East. Tired, bewildered Children going from treacherous seas.

Colonel Germany Orla Berry Berlin Hungary prime minister Chancellor Angela Merkel Caroline Bauer Seoul Europe Karen Middle East S. K. Louisa Back National Socialist Underground Mr Liszt
"colonel hands" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:32 min | 9 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on PRI's The World

"What was the personal reason for the Dutch? Prime used to hate me or Hungary, but he's attacking so harshly and making very clear that because. In his opinion. Does not respect. The rule of law must be punished financially. That's his position, which is not acceptable. Really shows that the kind of fragility of of the you throwthe, Orla, Barry thanks a lot earlier tanks car. Europe is grappling with a lot more than just a stimulus package. There's also been a rise in far-right extremism. Germany prides itself on taking a tough stance against this especially Neo Nazi ideology in Berlin alone more than thirty six memorials and museums are dedicated to remembering the atrocities of World War Two, but now Germany is battling a rise in right wing nationalism, including the highest ranks of its own military. Louisa back reports from Berlin earlier this month, Germany's defense. Minister Unidad come. Com Bois made a startling announcement. She was disbanding accompany of Germany's most secretive and elite military unit. The KS K. because it was filled with far right extremists. She described a troubling pattern. Those was uploaded as an. Elitist into this antuna fueling stifter. There's an unhealthy elitism among some leaders and the chaos K which has fostered and developed a toxic leadership, extremist tendencies and absolutely unacceptable handling of weapons and ammunition in parts of the chaos K., the defense minister reported forty eight thousand rounds of ammunition, and about one hundred thirty five pounds of explosives were missing from the cascade, which are also known as special forces, and it's unclear whether they were stolen or missing because of sloppy bookkeeping. Does via. Kind of can say today that we can't rule out any of these possibilities we have to consider everything. The special forces have gotten a lot of media attention lately, and may police commandos found not to Songbooks, stickers and magazines in the home of a surgeon major. They also discovered explosives, ammunition and weapons that had likely been stolen from the German military. In recent years, former soldiers and other eye-witnesses have been coming forward with more stories about extremism in the case K. in two thousand seventeen interview with German public television. A woman reported attending secret case case celebration she saw. Do the Hitler salute and heard them play Neo Nazi rock songs. The woman whose voice was altered to protect your identity, said she'd been flown into the celebration as a prize for one of the colonels issued it under Foia, Guitar I was carried around the Fire Douglas was let down in front of the colonel in done in from there. I was supposed to bring him to a tent that had been prepared for us. Six N where I was supposed to have sex with him. The woman said that the colonel's hands were bloody, because he just completed an obstacle course that involves tossing around pig's head. She said he wound up getting too drunk to have sex. After the event the woman reported what she started the German broadcaster A. R. D.. They'd tried to verify the details of her report to relied an undertone trying it wasn't easy. Because other eye-witnesses kept silent. Finally we asked the German military and to our surprise they confirmed some parts of her story and are still investigating others. Kernen salve objected to the women's allegations, although military counter-intelligence can I. I on him. After the reports came out, he was promoted to one of the highest rings in the case K., according to reporting by the New York Times the problem of far-right extremism, within German, security institutions isn't new between two thousand, two, thousand, seven, a terrorist group, called the nationalist-socialist around killed a total of nine immigrants among others. One of the group's members was a former soldier. It took over a decade for the government to identify and start investigating the perpetrators experts say the problem got worse worse again after two thousand fifteen, that was the year Chancellor Angela Merkel kept the German borders open and allowed over a million refugees and migrants, fleeing war and poverty to enter the country hunger. Many of them were from the Middle East tired bewildered children going.

Germany Berlin Hungary Chancellor Angela Merkel Bois Minister Unidad Europe New York Times Middle East Kernen Barry Hitler Douglas A. R. D
"colonel hands" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

03:43 min | 10 months ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"Beginning in late, seventeen, seventy, six and into 1777. Delaware and Mingo warriors began a series of attacks on settlers in the Ohio Valley. They did not have the numbers to strike eastward at the settlements. But. Frontier villages in what is today. Ohio and Kentucky fell victim to a great many attacks. One common tactic would be to attack an isolated farm or just kill farmer out in his field. When the local militia assembled and tried to chase down the killers, they would retreat giving the indication that they were a small group of renegades. They would let them Alicia Chase them for miles until they led the militia into an ambush of a much larger group of Indians. The warriors would then fall on the militia which adventure too far from the protection of their forts. To combat the native warrior threat. General Washington, assigned General Edward Hand to protect the American frontier. General hand moved his command to Fort Pitt Modern Day Pittsburgh. Edward Hand had been born in Ireland in seventeen, forty four. He, attended Trinity College in Dublin where he received enough medical training to become a surgeons mate with the British army. Seventeen sixty seven. His Regiment sailed to Philadelphia where then Ensign Han was stationed at Fort Pitt with the British army. In Seventeen, seventy four, he had resigned his commission and moved to Lancaster Pennsylvania to begin a medical practice a year later, he got married. Around that same time, he took up a leading role in Pennsylvania's Patriot movement, forming a regiment of associated. Hand was among the first Pennsylvanians to join the siege of Boston. He took a commission as Lieutenant Colonel in Colonel William Thomson's first Pennsylvania Regiment one of the first regiments of riflemen to join the New England army after George Washington took command. And eventually became colonel of the first Continental Regiment. During the British invasion of New York in Seventeen, seventy, six hand had commanded a group of twenty five soldiers who held off four thousand British trying to land at throbs Neck New York. See Episode One twelve for more details. Of that defense was only possible because of the British leaderships, ridiculous choice of a landing site, but still a pretty impressive feat. Remember that Colonel Hand was second in command of a brigade defending Trenton when General Cornwallis was attempting to retake that town. After French. General Fair Moi. Simply turned his horse and ran away. It was colonel hand who took command and commanded the delaying action that prevented the British from entering Trenton until shortly before dusk. Thus making these second battle of a success for the Patriots. A few months after his leadership in the Princeton campaign. Congress promoted colonel to Brigadier General and sent him to Fort Pitt in his first independent command. Congress task hand with handling the hostile Indian attacks all along the frontier. Congress had plan to provide general hand with two thousand soldiers and supplies to embark on a campaign through Indian territory and wipe out tribal villages and food stores. As had been done in the Cherokee war in the western Carolinas a few months earlier..

General Edward Hand British army Fort Pitt Ensign Han Colonel William Thomson Lancaster Pennsylvania George Washington Ohio Valley Congress General Cornwallis Trenton Alicia Chase Pennsylvania Regiment Continental Regiment Delaware Ohio New York
"colonel hands" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Brady fox news the storms now heading northwest at five miles an hour after strolling over the northern Bahamas getting close enough to threaten flooding and power outages in Florida and Georgia before reaching the Carolinas Thursday evening we could be looking at a landfall of the storm's somewhere probably around the North Carolina area thanks chief meteorologist Rick Reich news mandatory evacuations underway in the Outer Banks that area especially vulnerable because of the road route twelve which extends the full length of the Outer Banks is prone to washing out in heavy storms once that road washes out you are stuck in a tiny tiny little thread of land which is prone to storm surges hope that the worries are calling on people to pay very very close attention to Doug McKelway in Wilmington where the university of North Carolina starts evacuations later today new Hanover county will start clearing out tomorrow morning meantime the new tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico Ferdinand prompting storm warnings for the northeast Mexican coast the latest mass shooting over the weekend in Texas is spurring action at Walmart making more changes to its gun policy boxes going all Scott has this lively so Walmart CEO Doug McMillon says its handgun in military almost stock will not be renewed once the current inventory is gone the retailer will also ask customers not to openly carry guns in stores even a state laws allow it the retailer face mounting pressure to change its come policies because of recent deadly shootings two of them in Walmart stores in Texas and Mississippi in addition Walmart will stop selling handguns in Alaska that's the last state where handguns are sold however it will still sell hunting rifles and ammunition associated with them thanks colonel hand our to the clothes on Wall Street the Dow is down to three hundred thirty.

Walmart Mississippi CEO Mexico Rick Reich chief meteorologist Georgia Alaska Doug McMillon Scott Brady fox Texas Hanover county North Carolina Wilmington Doug McKelway Carolinas Florida Bahamas
"colonel hands" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"After strolling over the northern Bahamas getting close enough to threaten flooding and power outages in Florida and Georgia before reaching the Carolinas Thursday evening we could be looking at a landfall of the storm's somewhere probably around the North Carolina area fox chief meteorologist Rick Wright muse mandatory evacuations underway in the Outer Banks that area especially vulnerable because of the road route twelve which extends the full length of the Outer Banks is prone to washing out in heavy storms once that road washes out you are stuck in a tiny tiny little thread of land which is prone to storm surges hope that the worries are calling on people to pay very very close attention to Doug McKelway in Wilmington where the university of North Carolina starts evacuations later today new Hanover county will start clearing out tomorrow morning meantime the new tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico Ferdinand prompting storm warnings for the northeast Mexican coast the latest mass shooting over the weekend in Texas is spurring action at Walmart making more changes to its gun policy boxes going all Scott has this lively so Walmart CEO Doug McMillon says its handgun in military almost stock will not be renewed once the current inventory is gone the retailer will also ask customers not to openly carry guns in store see laws allow it the retailer face mounting pressure to change its gun policies because of recent deadly shootings two of them in Walmart stores in Texas and Mississippi in addition Walmart will stop selling handguns in Alaska that's the last state where handguns are sold however it will still sell hunting rifles and ammunition associated with them thanks colonel hand our to the clothes on Wall Street the Dow's down three hundred.

Scott Mississippi CEO Mexico Rick Wright chief meteorologist fox Georgia Alaska Doug McMillon Bahamas Walmart Texas Hanover county North Carolina Wilmington Doug McKelway Carolinas Florida
"colonel hands" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Matters are resolved for more on the E. U.'s reaction here's our Brussels correspondent Damon dramatics I think the east side have Cena and think they've seen Boris Johnson paints himself into an even tighter corners than to reason may was in with their the condition preconditions he setting that saying that absolutely no way you can he live with that Irish backstop the insurance policy that the only route to a deal now is through scrapping that and told him no deal so we had a diplomatic nights that was written by the chief negotiator Michelle Bonnie a destined for the E. U.'s top leaders of the countries around that you immediately after Boris Johnson was talking to parliament in it he talks about the fact that the eliminating the backstop as being the only way to reach agreement is unacceptable and that these talks about the Boris Johnsons toll could no deal as being a way to try to sort of fracture the unity of the evening that you I think on moved by what it sees as threats and also on me by what it sees an attempt to pin the blame on the either the idea of Mister Johnson's that unless that you leave so you can be forced to do something that you sang very differently now you the E. resistance being consistent the UK has to address these issues now or choose no deal itself because the now kneels here with some of the stories from one newsdesk Canadian police say to teenagers suspected of murdering three people on probably in hiding in a remote area close to where they were lost seen come a cloud and Bryce Miguel ski wanted in connection with the killings in northern British Columbia they were last spotted in the small town of good limited told us about thirty three hundred kilometers from where the murders took place Mister Schlegel skis father told the media that he's believed his son wanted to die in a blaze of glory the Mexican authorities say they found two mass graves in the central state of Puebla with the remains of at least twenty people the state Attorney General said one of the bodies found was that of a senior state government official kidnapped a week ago from our America's desk is Nicholas Russia the body of federal I'm looking closer to want this was found in a will fifty meters deep and he's wasn't the only one there the attorney general's office in Puebla sit so far they had found the remains of six more people and will and discovered another mass grave nearby the other victims have not yet been identified but officials fear they may be more victims of Mexico's drug wars despite campaign promises to drive down violence six months of the president and that is my maternal persona love took office the murder rate in Mexico continues to rice Austria has issued international arrest warrants for a Russian military intelligence officer it says recruited an army colonel who allegedly spent thirty years spying for Moscow the Austrian police of the Russian named as Igor your garbage site staff had been the colonel's hand love from the nineteen nineties until his arrest last year the colonel remains in detention while investigations continue thanks it's been announced in the U. S. the five people have been found guilty of federal crimes will be put to death in December and January the Attorney General William Barr said further executions would follow it's the first time in sixteen years that the federal government has ordered executions the death penalty is usually carried out by states and not the federal government so what's behind the move Robert Dunham is the director of the death penalty information center in Washington this decision is essentially the first time that the current administration in Washington has taken steps to try to carry out executions are haven't been execution for more than fifteen years and the death penalty has been in the steep decline across the United States so this pretty much Bucks the trend that we've seen and the court tends future executions at the federal level what caused the administration act now I don't think anybody can answer that question but it isn't a surprise president trump has been a staunch supporter of capital punishment and has proposed several extreme uses of it including for selling drugs and for all murders involving state and local police officers so it was not surprised that he would seek to have executions carried out I think the biggest surprise is that it took as long as it did Robert Dunn I'm of the death penalty information center in Washington now how do you make top water exciting how about branding it as an up market drink with the slick marketing campaign and linking it to a trendy pop up bar that's exactly what the Icelandic government is doing they hope to encourage tourists to ditch plastic bottles of water and take advantage of the country's extremely abundant natural resource this report by our correspondent Elizabeth Olsen the gain in southwest Iceland it's.

E. U. Brussels Damon thirty three hundred kilometer fifteen years sixteen years fifty meters thirty years six months
"colonel hands" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

Ross Patterson Revolution!

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"colonel hands" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

"When you press pop. Just to get things kicked off every Mike is different. Different at least get it to where it needs to be. That's a quick three thirty on high. Bob quinn. Therefore you, I've never used it for popcorn, but in this instance, I would would it may be the first time that I ever pressed that button. No, I get it because it's too long for popcorn, like actual popcorn. Whoever made that setting just doesn't understand how cokes a minute too long. Every single for sure. You'll have a bag of burnt Colonel hand. Well, guide probably did to be real real. These. Yeah, me that was a that was definitely a good crime corner, crime Gorno who's a good one. But it was one of the shit where part of my reason guys for the way that I pick these is like just the visual of it, like it has to release strike me in a weird way. And for me, like setting that seen, it really made me like feel uncomfortable. So I knew it'd be a good one. Oh my gosh. McLachlan, and then the person, the person that this chips, no style keep going. I want it. I want it all now. No, I told you I can't read it anymore, but I just wanted to let you know that detective Lee shoots, he shoots, he scores, he's protein in pancakes on Instagram. But anyway, I'm I'm sorry. sorry, protein in pancakes. Hand. Okay goods. And he's the investigative reporter on this or. No, he's he's in my precinct. Precinct co was the detective that brought that to me. So thanks buddy. Gotcha. Thanks. And and yeah, I guess Clem saying thanks but a real dark one bud. I think you're saying thanks, super dark, but good work. Basically. I'm saying good work. That was really because that was a deep. I like the deep cuts. I don't like the ones that like everyone sending me because then it's like that means you've probably seen it or like, you know what I mean? Bunch of people send it. It's probably like that. Everybody's reading if you send me a deep cut from like eight shit or something, I'm sure, and I'm on it and I love it. In a little bit. That's man. I'm having a hard time reading past that. Ooh. In my mind, would you ever try that? So like it's in my, no, I wouldn't actually wouldn't. What is it legs like meth methy. I mean, obviously it makes you do some questionable in college. There was there was some people getting we'd in Ohio was difficult at Ohio State some at some periods. Sure, right. And the weed that you did get there, shitty shitty, we'd and like I look, you know, these people and I noticed people can't go a day without. We'd just like yo man. And so I knew a buddy of mine in his roommate. We're just going to have a meltdown. There was no Weeden weeded is state during this time period. They had made these busts and what they were doing was in the wintertime as in the winter, they were taking helicopters over houses. And if you didn't have snow on your roof, then they knew it was probably a fucking grow house and they would come in and pop them. Yes. So they would. They would monitor their monitor it like intermittently or whatever. So you go through these like three or four months dry spell's. You can't do it obviously in the spring or summer and things like that. It's harder to to bus these people. So at this particular time. There was no, they're drug is pots. There was no, we'd they couldn't get weed, and I knew these guys, we're going to have a meltdown I walked in on them huffing pledge. Pope ary her. So I made fun of it forever. I called it Huffman PO. Oh, yeah. Impo-. So it was like, what's? What's the, what's the catch here? What's what? What do you do? I was curious about it and I was like, what? What do you do this? You take a rag? Probably tell us the audience, but..

investigative reporter Gorno Bob quinn Mike Ohio McLachlan Clem Lee Weeden four months