37 Burst results for "Colon Cancer"

Fresh update on "colon cancer" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "colon cancer" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Suggests amending hate crime language to include ethnic identity to allow for prosecution for targeting a Jewish victim or someone believed to be Jewish, the report also calls for Virginia state police to maintain a publicly available hate crime database. Now, these are just recommendations and the General Assembly or education department have to actually change policies before this can take effect. More than 70% of people want President Biden to release the last of the secret JFK assassination records later on this month. That's according to a poll released today in coordination with the research group that has sued the administration to force more transparency when it comes to those documents. The president committed to releasing the last of the documents last year, but NBC News reports the scheduled December 15th release could still be delayed. The final trove of records could shed light on ties between Lee Harvey Oswald and the CIA. Today's poll shows the president would have broad bipartisan support in releasing the documents. Tributes are pouring in for two time Emmy winner Kirstie Alley, who's dead at 71. Her kids announced her death on Twitter yesterday, saying her colon cancer was just recently discovered and that's what killed her. Longtime friend and one time costar actor John Travolta says he loved her, and that kirsty was one of the most special relationships he's ever had. They starred together in the hit movie, look who's talking. Ali also had a starring role for several years in the classic TV comedy cheers. She was 71. The White House is looking to accelerate artificial intelligence and government through a new bill of rights, federal news networks, jorie heckman has more. The Biden administration, through its blueprint for an AI Bill of rights, is outlining what more than a dozen agencies will do to ensure AI tools align with privacy rights and civil liberties. Sorel friedler, the assistant director for data and democracy at The White House office of science and technology policy says the document puts government wide focus on a policy area that's provoked a lot of conversation, but hasn't led to widespread implementation by agencies. We are, again, not really breaking the ground, but adding to the conversation, helping to move the conversation forward. Jury heckman, federal news

General Assembly Or Education President Biden Virginia State Police Nbc News Lee Harvey Oswald Kirstie Alley Jorie Heckman Biden Administration Emmy CIA John Travolta Colon Cancer Kirsty Sorel Friedler Twitter ALI White House Office Of Science White House Jury Heckman
Fresh update on "colon cancer" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "colon cancer" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Points. How much cheaper it is to rent. I'm Jeff Gable. Sports at 15 and 45 powered by maximus. Moving people and technology forward. Let's go to Dave Preston. World Cup soccer, a major upset in Qatar's Morocco shocked Spain, the game went to penalty kicks after a scoreless 120 minutes where Spain had possession for over 75% of the time on a 13 6 shot advantage, but Morocco 6 three penalty kicks, Spain does not score in the penalty kick phase and Morocco advances to the quarterfinals. Coming up at two Switzerland plays Portugal the winner takes on upstart Morocco. Baseball's winner meetings nationals here have yet to make any major moves, the big deal so far this week was Philadelphia locking up xnet trade Turner to the tune of $300 million over 11 years. Dave Preston. Thank you, David. 1247. Kirsty alley, a two time Emmy winner who starred in the 1980s sitcom cheers, and the hit film, look who's talking, has died of cancer. Her children announcing the death on Twitter yesterday, saying her illness was only recently discovered. Her longtime friend actor John Travolta says he loved her and that kirstie was one of the most special relationships he ever had. Kirstie Alley was 71, and we've recently learned had been receiving treatment for colon cancer. The bribery trial of a Harvard fencing coach and a deep pocketed Potomac Maryland businessman is underway in a Boston federal court. It's a similar case to the college admissions bribery scandal, coach Peter brand is charged with accepting gifts in exchange for recruiting the kids of a wealthy donor. Prosecutors say that donor is Jack zhao, the CEO of

Dave Preston Morocco Jeff Gable Spain Kirstie Alley Qatar Soccer Portugal Switzerland Emmy Turner Baseball Philadelphia John Travolta Kirstie Potomac Maryland David Cancer
"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:42 min | 4 months ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"They said, we need to get you back here in 5 years at the most. And I called it three years and they said, well, come at 5. And then at 5 years, I called, and this was in February. And I got my appointment for September for the first appointment where they go in and tell me what junk to drink so that I can clear out. And I probably won't actually get the colonoscopy until November, December, maybe even 2023. And so I wish that things like your products were freely available on the market. My doctor could at least say we're going to do this screen just to make sure you're cool because this is something we need to catch early if there's an issue. So you're not falling on deaf ears with your thoughts on this particular concept. Well, that's not an uncommon problem that we've heard. Not only are wait times in the GI space very long, but patients especially in rural areas or areas where they have lack of access to healthcare. It's nearly impossible for them to get the screening they need. And also in the developing world where you may not have the same kind of hospital infrastructure and accessibility, this kind of thing you would have accessibility. Absolutely. Yeah, so this kind of technology has this wonderful way to democratize science, which is really exciting too. That's really cool. And it's really good that you can detect cancers. That's wonderful. But there's so many other conditions of the lower GI that we hear about all the time, whether it's whether it's things like Crohn's disease or inflammatory bowel disease or other types of chronic colitis. Is there other types of diagnostic tools that can help shed some light on exactly what is affecting somebody in a lower GI disorder? Yeah, one of the really beneficial things about using RNA instead of DNA markers is that we can look beyond oncology. So we're actively developing diagnostics to monitor mucosal healing for patients with IBD to predict therapeutic response for those individuals. We're looking at other inflammatory conditions of the GI tract like IBS or celiacs, we're looking at infectious causes and diseases and trying to understand those disease indications more effectively and treat them better. So I think when you're when you're thinking about the colorectal cancer screening space for us, that's a very busy space. There's a lot of companies out there that are trying to develop techniques to prevent and detect cancer. But there's also this very huge unmet need in clinical burden in the GI disease community in the inflammatory and autoimmune space and we're hoping to address that with our technology as well. This is all very exciting. If people want to learn more about what's happening at genoscope or maybe the new products that are available, where would they look? Absolutely. So you can see our upcoming research and what we've been doing in our press releases

Crohn's disease or inflammator chronic colitis cancer colorectal cancer
"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:11 min | 4 months ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"And I mentioned that we're looking at that kind of universal signal that all adenomas create in the transcriptome. And that's how we improve our sensitivity relative to other diagnostic tests. I guess the other question would be our other gastrointestinal cancers adenoma based where this may be able to detect something like stomach or esophageal cancer. Yeah, so we're definitely looking at cancers in the GI tract or GU tract that could leverage our extraction technologies. So if we're thinking about just looking at stool samples, it's possible that we could be pulling down pancreatic cells or cells or hepatic cells that are dysplastic and be able to detect those cancers. We also have the ability to transition to other sample types like menstrual tissue or urine and look at the transcriptome of the cells in that sample type and we could detect other diseases like ovarian cancer endometrial cancer or bladder cancer or kidney cancer, things like that. So we're exploring both opportunities trying to see if we can go further up in the GI tract as well as use of other waste material that people really just throw away to inform ourselves about human health. Yeah, and that's what I really love about this. Is that it's the stuff we throw away that now we can test to get a reading as to how we're doing on the inside. And that just seems to me to be the way we're going to do a lot of things in the future. And if you had to look at in your crystal ball at what these kind of noninvasive or minimally invasive cancer techniques, detection techniques do, does it seem like that this is going to be a, that maybe this will have a lot of really deep diagnostic ability for us to even go into places like liver and that kind of thing.

cancers adenoma cancers ovarian cancer endometrial can esophageal cancer kidney cancer bladder cancer invasive cancer
"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:18 min | 4 months ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"So it's a part. It's a two part process. We use our own collection kit that has stabilization buffers that preferentially degrade those materials that you're describing that are attacking our signal and then subsequently when the stool sample is received in the laboratory. We go through a series of steps to isolate the cells, isolate the RNA, preserve the RNA, and then quantify it effectively to get a robust signature that we can look at to assess for disease. And you mentioned something about transcriptomes earlier, so are you just doing transcriptome sequencing of what's left after you do this preservation step? Or is there an amplification step just to do a specific PCR targets just with traditional PCR? It's actually a combination of the two. So the reason why we've been successful is because there's been massive advancements in the ability to evaluate and quantify the RNA signals in samples. So people have been able to use kind of single cell sequencing or digital PCR, which leverages amplification approach, as well as those kind of traditional PCR methods, and we've done something similar. So our platform for the CRC screening assay is a digital PCR approach that leverages amplification, but it's contained within droplets. So it provides an absolute count of the RNA signature that we're looking for. Oh, I see. So you have a quantitative ability to do this, right? That's because can you learn more about the progression from the quantity of the target RNAs that are present? That's correct. So we use a quantitative approach to understand if the RNA transcript is too high. Or too low, we can find a signature that we know is associated with disease, and that informs our decision to send an individual to a colonoscopy or not. It still seems remarkable to me because just, you know, as a scientist who's worked with RNA for years and who understands these things a bit and does transcriptome work, it seems like if I was pulling RNA out of a human stool or any stool, it would seem like the vast vast majority of RNA I would get would come from bacteria. And so how are you able to really separate basically the question is, how do you find the needle in the haystack? Yeah, again, that's a long time that we spent in the laboratory to kind of preferentially amplify the eukaryotic or human signal relative to the bacterial noise. I was working in a laboratory that was funded by the Melinda Gates Foundation grant. And that was kind of my task at the time, was to see if we can differentiate the cells in stool sample and kind of map out which ones are eukaryotic map out, which ones are bacterial, and then separate them effectively during transit while it's coming into the laboratory, and then after we receive it in the laboratory. And so that was the basis for the technology that JanusGraph uses. To degrade that bacterial noise and amplify the human signal, which is what we use to detect disease. Seems to be, you know, it's just my guess. Kind of a newer player and what is already a an industry that does some sort of stool based detections. And how is your assay different from, say, other companies that have been working in this space? Yeah, I think there's two different types of companies in the colorectal cancer screening space. So there's exact sciences who produce Cologuard in 2014.

Melinda Gates Foundation colorectal cancer
"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:27 min | 4 months ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Now we're back on the talking BioTech podcast. We're speaking with doctor Erika barnell. She's a cofounder and chief science officer at genoscope, and we started out the conversation today by talking about colorectal cancers and their prevalence in society. And the reason that these can be at least avoided if caught early, the molecular steps that happen in an iterative way that lead from a benign type of lesion into an aggressive malignant cancer. And so the question now is, how can we enhance the ability to detect this early in the absence of a colonoscopy that the sigmoidoscopy that has occurred is good, but not everybody gets it. And so the question now is, are there ways to catch this early? The other thought is, too, is that if this kind of assay is so good, it may completely eliminate the sigmoidoscopy at least in the beginning and maybe just the folks who get some warning signs need to go get it checked out. But we'll talk about that. So your company has developed a method to detect evidence of this commitment to this cancerous progression. And you're looking at gene expression in the gastrointestinal tract by looking at stool material, how exactly does that work? Absolutely. So stool samples are a combination of the waste that you produce when you eat things. As well as kind of some of the cells that are lining the intestinal tract of the colon, those cells are sloughed off into the stool and excreted as waste along with the other byproducts of what you ingest. And so what we're interested in is kind of collecting those cells that are sloughed from the lining of the colon and looking at them to see if any of those cells would signify that you have a cancer or a pre cancerous change in the colon that would require a colonoscopy for lesion removal. And are you looking

Erika barnell genoscope colorectal cancers malignant cancer cancer
"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

02:37 min | 4 months ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Which is which can cause germline predisposition for cancer. And then you'll accumulate a kras activating mutation in subsequently the kind of last steps are when you have a TP 53 variant. So the APC gene is kind of the gateway to developing these polyps. That launched the process. And when you look at the APC gene relative to kind of the other genes in your genome, it's very large. And it's a tumor suppressor. So pretty much any pathologic mutation along that entire transcript can induce this type of change. So you really have a high target in this APC gene to develop a precancerous Paula. When you're thinking about those later changes, like activating kras mutations, it's a really specific variant that has to occur to activate kras, which is an onco target. So those the difference in the biology between the types of transcripts and the types of DNA variants that are accumulated over time is what creates the underlying biology of how this disease takes ten years to develop. And that's really illuminating. That helps tremendously because if people understand that this is a process of different events that are happening at the molecular level, now it starts to make sense of why the prevention is even more critical and it also really sets the table for your technology. And that's an excellent setup for us to discuss the way in which your company geney is using stools to do diagnostics to identify these different molecular events that have occurred to really be able to catch this nice and early. So this is the talking BioTech podcast by collabra and we'll be back in just a moment. This podcast is brought to you by collaborator featuring their electronic laboratory notebooks. One of the challenges of being a laboratory PI is that when working with diverse scientists, you find a diversity of record keeping preferences. And this can make long-term curation of data a real challenge. Looking back

Paula cancer
"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:55 min | 4 months ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"And so what we're finding is that colorectal cancer screening programs that utilize that time can actually detect these pre cancerous changes before malignant transformation of the lesion and that allows us to prevent people from actually developing colorectal cancer. So colonoscopies have been the gold standard for colorectal cancer screening since about the 70s. And those are excellent at detecting these precancerous lesions as well as detecting full blown colorectal cancer, but the reason why it's we shouldn't rely exclusively on colonoscopy is because patients are really non compliant with that procedure. So patients don't like doing the bowel preparation. They don't like taking time off work and who can blame them. It's not a procedure that should be taken lightly. There can be serious adverse events associated with the procedure. And most patients that undergo a colonoscopy actually don't have findings and will be instructed to come back ten years later. So our goal is to create molecular diagnostics that use samples that people just throw away in the toilet every day. And leverage that sample type to understand if patients actually need to go through this very invasive procedure of a colonoscopy to detect and remove a lesion. Yeah, you see this is what I was hoping you had mentioned is that the colonoscopy is really good, but only if you get one. Yeah, and too many people find this, like you say, the prep work and all that stuff. Frankly, I haven't really ever had a problem with it. I really enjoy the day off and knowing that I'm okay. Especially because I've come back with polyps that they've pulled out. And so I look forward to getting the next one just because I don't want to know that this preventable thing is being prevented. So I would like listeners who are in that age range to make sure that you do it, make sure your loved ones do it.

colorectal cancer blown colorectal cancer
"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:40 min | 4 months ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"And welcome to this week's edition of collaborative talking BioTech podcast. Now, over the last couple of weeks, we've talked a lot about different medical interventions that really are laying in the future. Things that are going to happen that will radically transform the way we treat different diseases.

"colon cancer" Discussed on How to Live A Fantastic Life

How to Live A Fantastic Life

04:16 min | 10 months ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on How to Live A Fantastic Life

"Is retired from a 25 year Internet marketing career to start a passion project called life apocalypse. What's life apocalypse will get ready because Jim is going to tell you and also will help you create your burial. Jim, thank you for being here. Hey, it's my pleasure to be here. Boy, you have an impressive career. And I'm so excited to be here to talk to you. And your audience. But tell me about this life apocalypse. What do you mean by that? Well, look, you know, that's a long story, but we have time, right? Let's talk about it. Look, you know, the definition of the word apocalypse, really, the true core median of the word apocalypse is revelation. A lot of people hear that word apocalypse. Well, you know, I thought apocalypse was like Apocalypse Now, you know, the movie in Vietnam, where everything was being destroyed. How could this be a revelation? Well, the core root of the meaning word is revelation, but that's what everybody thinks of now is apocalypse. Now, and now, really zombies. Yes, for sure. For sure. So many of you post apocalyptic books. I have lots of friends who write books like that. Shows like zombies show. So they've co opted that word. But really, really, what apocalypse means is revelation. So tell me what are you, what do you want to do with your revelation? And how do you want to reveal things? Well, what I want to do is talk about how people move through the transitions in their life. Wow. Let's do that. That's really what a life apocalypse is. It's a non predictive moment on your life's timeline that usually happens without your express consent. That directly trajectory is your class moving forward. Yes, and so apropos now, Jim, because look, we've just been through COVID. We're still living through COVID, and we may be living through COVID for the next generation, if we don't. Well, absolutely. You're right. I mean, that's basically one of the reasons this whole concept came up for me was already starting a midlife crises before the pandemic hit. During the pandemic, I got colon cancer, right? So you get this hyper acceleration of what I want to do for the rest of my life..

Jim Vietnam colon cancer
Doctor recommends 'routine surveillance' after polyp removed from Biden's colon

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Doctor recommends 'routine surveillance' after polyp removed from Biden's colon

"The Pollock removed from president Biden's Colin last week was benign the president's physician says it was a slow growing but potentially pre cancerous lesion that required no further action in a follow up memo doctor Kevin o'connor says the specimen was similar to one removed from Biden in two thousand eight he says routine surveillance which normally calls for another colon Naskapi in seven to ten years was recommended the Mayo clinic's website says most colon polyps are harmless but some can develop into colon cancer over time my

President Biden Pollock Kevin O'connor Colin Biden Mayo Clinic Colon Cancer
"colon cancer" Discussed on Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

"Salicylic acid. The active ingredient in aspirin has been used for thousands of years as an anti inflammatory painkiller. In the form of willow tree bark extract. Which pocket is used to treat fever until alleviate pain during childbirth. It became trademarked as drug in eighteen. Ninety nine remains to this day probably the most commonly used drug in the world one of the reasons that remained so popular. Despite the fact that we have better painkillers now is that it also acts as a blood thinner. Millions of people. Now take aspirin. On a daily basis to treat or prevent heart disease it all started back in nineteen fifty three with the publication of this landmark. Study in the new england journal of medicine length of life and cause of death in rheumatoid arthritis paper started out with the sense. It has often been said that the way to live long life is to acquire rheumatism. They found fewer deaths than expected from accidents. Which could be explained by the fact that people with arthritis probably aren't out you know going skiing but also significantly fewer deaths from heart attacks. Maybe it was all the aspirin. They were taking for their joins. Those thinning their blood and preventing clots forming in their coronary arteries in their heart. And so in the nineteen sixties. There were calls to study whether aspirin would help those. At risk for blood clots and the nineteen seventies. We got our wish study suggesting regular aspirin intake protects against heart attacks today. The official recommendations that low dose aspirin is recommended for all patients with heart disease but in the general population for those without a known history of heart disease or stroke dealy. Aspirin is only recommended when the heart disease benefits outweigh the risks of

cancer colon cancer tumors
Husband of 'Real Housewives' Star NeNe Leakes Dies at 66

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Husband of 'Real Housewives' Star NeNe Leakes Dies at 66

"A cast member of one of the real house wives shows is facing a personal tragedy back in twenty eighteen many leaks of the real housewives of Atlanta told her Instagram followers her husband had colon cancer and now he has died a family publicist and friend says Gregg Leakes died of the disease at home peacefully and surrounded by his wife and children he was sixty six years old the rep says the family is in deep pain with a broken heart Greg and many leaks were first married in nineteen ninety nine two years before their son Brett was born they split in twenty eleven but reconciled and remarried a second time a couple years later I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Gregg Leakes Colon Cancer Atlanta Greg Brett Oscar Wells Gabriel
The Dangers of Sugar and Children

Food Issues

02:09 min | 1 year ago

The Dangers of Sugar and Children

"We all know that sugar isn't good for us but really let's take a deep dive into why we really need to limit it in our kids diets. Oh absolutely well. I think you know. Sometimes we forget that during times of rapid growth like in childhood and adolescence that you know kids bodies are really sensitive to the influence of dieting activity. Because they're growing so fast they're seltzer turning over rapidly and that makes them especially vulnerable to the effects of food of physical activity and weight and even environmental damage that can occur and so we really need to put an emphasis during this time of rapid cell growth to make sure that the genes that are being activated or turning on towards health not towards a genetic susceptibility and sugar can actually displace some of these high value. Nutrition foods that play in essential role not just in growth but an immunity but also cognition and genetic expression okay. That's something that we don't typically hear about. And so what about the things we do hear about a lot in terms of childhood obesity. Type two diabetes like these things. We should be concerned about. Oh absolutely i mean first off anytime you look at childhood obesity wolf whether you know kids are really actually normal weight or an overweight. Too much sugar again. Just places. high value nutrition and micronutrients that can increase the inflammatory process that leads to chronic disease over time. Even kids who were teenagers who are overweight and adolescents have a significantly higher risk of colon cancer later in life. I mean we're even seeing precursors in heart disease in children. I mean if you look at like obesity in preschoolers. I think it's risen from around five percent in the early seventies like nineteen seventy two up to close to fourteen percent

Seltzer Obesity Diabetes Colon Cancer Heart Disease
"colon cancer" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

All Talk Oncology Podcast

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

"It's funny you and another person or the only people talk about it because there were so many questions about how i made it why i made it if it was. If it wasn't it was for sure Skeptics they're like at eight years old. Why but because of megan in my dad was tested for colon cancer and head kohlhaas squeeze every year. My dad ended up getting colon. Cancer in his fifties and my dad was tested and found out. Because i was still getting colin oscrise and still to this day every year. I do my grandfather. My dad's dad ended up getting colon. Cancer i was the first in my family chain at eight to strike the conversation and imagine. If i didn't have an imagine my dad just would have passed it as a Oh no just a torn visit. Pick up a second potatoes and he just rips up is normal and tear blah blah blah blah blah on. So i remember this. Give italy and don't get into it a lot because it's it's this is the last time my parents weren't together too much longer after this. This added a lot of stress on to my family. My parents i think at the worst. I think three years after this. I can't my parents insurance so bad. My mom told me after the fact that the insurance bill was creeping up and to three quarters of a million dollars in one thousand nine eight or the time of all the time i kept going and kept going and kept going in. I missed a lot of school. So i ended up having to miss school that year and restart so i was a eighteen year old nineteen year old senior in high school. I graduated because. I'm just a lot of time on story short. Is i sitting out in front and our yard with my dad and my mom and my dad was spraying us with a hose. That was our Country version of pool. My dad was just stand there and he expressed as poor poor man's pool and just the job done and i remember. My dad had to go to work. And i refuse to take the medication that night refused to take it. I refuse to take it and my mom was. She had an older daughter son. And i went to bed i we. I slept in the trailer. Read a trailer in front of my parents in the house and they slept in the trailer and my brother. And i and i'll never forget this. I'm woken up by my dad was short. Do you talk about human. You remember that little human character had the shoulders that will bounce around with the sprang up. Legs he was like a like a guard like fierce fierce kind of a bouncy really strong mighty guard like very ken shamrock. My dad was very And i woke up to my.

colin oscrise Cancer colon cancer megan italy ken shamrock
"colon cancer" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

All Talk Oncology Podcast

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

"To be a father. I never wanted to be a dad. Never wanted to get married and when the universe probably my wife. It was not about being any. It's all about what i could give her. And when we and we're not public about this. I'll say this when we found out when you have kids And that science was going to be the rule for that we accepted it and we acknowledged it. We have two beautiful girls because of science. And that's a really cool thing. And i never let it down for us that we couldn't have child together just supported her and i just said hey man. Check this out by the way women men out there. They're supporting partners carrying kids. Just say uh-huh just be there. Just hold a hand. Your role is so big and so small the same time you know. I'm carrying a child for almost three quarters of a year. I i you know. I'm not having this bully. Ball push up against your spine has sciatica. You can't walk correctly in your. you troubled. Go in the bathroom or we have such small roles. Just be present the best present. You can give people that you consider friends and family is your presence otherwise get them out of your phone and let them move on with their own life guys out there and girls out there. They're dragging people on relationships because you're so insecure about being alone. Let them go so they can blossom defined there right person. Stop dragging people on and start looking at yourself. So when i wake up any at forty one i am the best version of the i could ever be and i looked to the universe and costal atheist catholic wherever you are and what did we are. I think the universe for who i am because we live here on such short amount of time and when i get people that the emmy in message may and rights fan mail to me and say thank you for making me smile today because that's authenticity. I don't walk on stage for the today show and think can't what am i going to save. Jin asked me this question. And if this what am i going to say. And then i'm on with kelly clarkson would've kelly.

emmy Jin kelly clarkson kelly
Alonso bests Mancini, Ohtani for 2nd straight HR Derby title

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Alonso bests Mancini, Ohtani for 2nd straight HR Derby title

"Peter ones are combined his power with warm temps and Colorado's thin air to win the twenty twenty one home run derby with the victory the New York Mets first baseman successfully defended the derby title he won in twenty nineteen Alonso ripped a derby record thirty five homers to beat Salvador Perez in the first round then eliminated Juan Soto before winning the final against Baltimore Orioles first baseman treatment Saini whose presence was its own miracle he missed the twenty twenty season battling stage three colon cancer Bruce Morton Denver

Salvador Perez New York Mets Juan Soto Peter Colorado Alonso Baltimore Orioles Saini Colon Cancer Denver
Trey Mancini to Participate in Home Run Derby a Year After Cancer Diagnosis

Papa and Lund

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Trey Mancini to Participate in Home Run Derby a Year After Cancer Diagnosis

"Fun the home run Derby is going to be in a few weeks. Defending champ Peter Alonso Back Shohei Otani has opted in and now cancer survivor, Trey Mancini has also accepted the invite. He's overcome. Colon cancer after missing all of last year with chemotherapy has been an inspiration will come back to the Orioles slugger and knowing that the mid summer Classic will have something good to focus on is exactly what we all need. This is Damon,

Peter Alonso Shohei Otani Trey Mancini Colon Cancer Cancer Orioles Damon
"colon cancer" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Other types cancer all right. Thank you for asking tyler. Thanks for reaching out. Also here with us. Today is dr elissa. Chander family physician at the chief. Andrew isaac health center here to senior case manager for family medicine at the ten and not chiefs conference. alexandria rawson and this one goes to dr lisa alexander Any thoughts for our caller tyler. i think right now. We don't know y alaskan native people are american. Indians have higher incident Or rates of colon cancer. As brian mentioned it could be due to a number of different factors. So is it a question of the change in diet from a traditional diet to a more kind of refined processed. Sugar diet maybe Is it a question of family history of colon cancer or other types of cancers maybe I don't know that we have that answer specifically right now We do know that the rate that happened or recurring to right now. Alaska native people have two point eight times the incidence of colorectal cancer compared to non native people that's pretty high and that why an me and i'm we follow the guidelines. Put out by them to start screening at a much earlier age. And i think it's important to note If you have a family history of colon cancer so for example if you have A mother or father or other family member who had colon cancer at a younger age. It's important to tell your doctor that because the recommendation might eat for you to actually get screened earlier than age. Forty so for example. If your father was diagnosed at age forty five the recommendation would be for you to get start getting screened at age. Thirty five so Telling your doctors about your family. History of any kinds of cancer is really important so that they can know when the right interval is to start. Getting used screened Brian i don't know if he had anything additional to add to that. Yes please do bright. no that was. That was wonderful. Agree and tyler. Thank you for giving us a ring. They're out of anchorage alaska. And when person story is it's time to treat cancer if you know it's gone beyond detecting polyps in removing them Is there anything you'd like to share on that side of things about what treating colon. Cancer looks like a brian. Go ahead and start us off. Okay the the the the treatment is try is obviously The complicated but the the only The only cure for colon cancer is surgical removal of the cancer at an early stage Oftentimes we can do that. Take the cancer out about back up during the procedure. And then Do some surveillance to make sure it hasn't come back. Oftentimes chemotherapy or immunomodulators are recommended And these are getting better and better all the time to the point where we've seen patients with advanced stage four colon cancer Respond and put Go to these modulators and put this colon cancer in remission. So it's never too late. Treatments are getting better and better but surgical removal of the cancer is is is the gold standard and will If it's caught early Has over a ninety percent chance of of Cure and no returns and dr alexander anything to add about treating colon cancer. No i think that's Accurate so usually if you end up being diagnosed with colon cancer Usually the first place you go to a surgeon so brian works for the surgical department for the hostile. He's in and then after that It would be a combination of working with An ecology team and they would determine if you need any additional intervention beyond the surgery but surgical intervention is The first step and that's why colon occupies or so great because not only are they a screening tool they can also be treatment so as i mentioned earlier if you have a polyp that has turn cancerous but it hasn't gone into the wall of the colon it all and that is removed you've essentially treated the cancer so if a great Way to intervene early and any changes. That may be happening in dr alexander win. Does it come to a point where a person has to get a column coal colostomy bag. Brian could probably talk a little bit more about that As he mentioned you know the treatment is surgical. So if you have cancer that has gone into the wall of the colon. So if they remove apollo up and they say the margins or not clear that means that they have to go in and figure out. Where's the base of that cancer. How far has it spread They may have to take out a section of your colon If that happens then they will Often put in Colostomy bag sometimes. Those are permanent sometimes temporary That's all those are all decisions made in conjunction with you and your surgeon so I don't tend to look after that portion of it. I follow the recommendations from the surgical team But brian could probably talk a little bit more about that. Things dr alexander brian. Yes please expand the the decision to create an austin me or bag to give a the coal and a chance to heal is one that is oftentimes made at the time of surgery and it is also dependent on which side the colon cancer is on it on the left side on the right side. How far is it advanced. How can we get a good connection during the first surgery will do. We need to let inflammation he'll before we reconnect those Those decisions all go into it and we have these conversations with the patient and the patient's family prior to the operation but we we try to get it back together during during the surgery. But if it's not the best thing to do we don't end. The majority of these are are reversed in. You know we've covered a lot of ground here and just trying to understand. All of this in prevention is a big part of it. we're hearing screening Or even things you can do to try and have a healthier diet Something that pops up in this discussion is also something called color guard. You see advertisement for it on tv. brian any thoughts or or knowledge on this in using it again it is a screening tool if if the patients don't have access to colonoscopy they can't pay for a colonoscopy the they they can't tolerate the prep are. There are many reasons. Why a patient chooses not to get a colonoscopy or isn't appropriate to get a colonoscopy social reasons to health reasons but it is a tool and it is a screening tool and if we use that at the recommended intervals It's great that we're getting patient. Screen over thirty percent of patients. That are eligible for colon. Cancer screen have never gotten screen on even once and so anything that we can do to increase that number. Of course it's not the gold standard. We're not looking inside the coal but But i I highly suggest using.

alexandria rawson Brian Forty Today tyler brian Thirty five over thirty percent elissa. alaska Alaska forty five first first step Chander lisa alexander alaskan Andrew isaac eight times alexander
"colon cancer" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Native America Calling

"To american indians. One and sixty died from colon. Cancer and If you look at specifically the alaska natives wanted thirty six full die from this disease But what's interesting is the variability in the geographic region That that has been noted on many scientific studies If you compared to the us population as a whole American indians and alaskan natives In the northern plains and of course alaska have significantly higher colorado cancer mortality rates. Whereas if you go to the south west They have significantly lower rates than than The northern plains in alaska but still high enough to to need needs screening You have to to to look at the risk factors of colon cancer to appreciate y. It might be higher in american indians. And alaskan natives. The diet of course diet affects any A poor diet increases the risk of any cancer have to just assume that the the diet greatly affects colon cancer rates. Because that's where the diet is going and we found that you know over the last hundred. Two hundred years as indigenous population has Moved away from providing their own food farming and moved away to the more Processed foods sugary high sugar content drinks in less fiber that that is driving Driving rates and also in phoenix here. At least we see a much higher prevalence in lynch syndrome. Which is a cancer syndrome. In the american indian alaskan native population as a whole and. This is a Brian i want to hear more about that. In wire. connecting that to our discussion today will pick up right there right after the break. But we're going to pause here while we do that. You can steel dial in share your thoughts one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is number. Phone lines are open. Were ready to hear from you. Go ahead and dial in support for journalism that raises the awareness of child wellbeing to citizens into policymakers provided by the annie e. casey foundation building a brighter future for children families and communities information at a e. Cf dot org support by the suit. Trading post who special selection of dried herbs or chosen for superior quality than many sage sweetgrass braids and red willow bark and cedar are wild crafted. All available at sue trading dot com. Whoa pila thank you for starting off your week with us today here on native america calling. I'm tara gatewood and there is still time if you want to ask your questions about colon cancer. The number to gets you into the conversation is one eight hundred nine nine six. Two eight four eight. That's also when he'd hundred nine nine native and we are chatting with different folks who have a view on all this right before the break. We introduce you to brian. Burtt a who's joining us out of phoenix arizona. And he is a physician. Assistant in the department of surgery of the phoenix. Indian medical center and Commander burt thank you for being with us and please tell us more you had mentioned And in likely to go further with that and tell us Y it's kinda connected to this conversation. Yes man thank you. the The lynch syndrome is Is a cancer syndrome and patients stat have lynch syndrome. Many don't know they have it But those that do They they get more cancers particularly ed much younger age. And there's very specific cancers that we see with this Including the colon cancer. Uterine cancer kidney cancer or those sorts. It's so almost predictable. That cancer will kerr impatience with lynch syndrome that we start Start screening That at a very early age and and very frequently yearly as a matter of fact. So there there seems to be a higher prevalence in the american indian population. At least the ones that i serve here And and i i think it's important because if you're if you have a family member with this condition it's very important to know that and so you can start receiving the the the the proper screening tests At a very early age to help you live a longer healthier life. Thank you for that and brian. What are some of the signs that That may start to happen that in science. Maybe you should be talking to your doctor about colon. Cancer is there. Anything you can share. yes yeah. They're they're typically are no symptoms or signs of colon cancer until it's too late which makes colonoscopy or colon cancer screening very valuable and meeting by the time that you feel the symptoms of colon cancer. It may have spread to other parts of the body making treatment more challenging. But if you If you impolitic typically don't don't Have any symptoms. however it's not all the some polyps do cause symptoms such as rectal bleeding Such as Changes in bowel habits and constipation changes in the color of your stool weight loss. Anemia Sometimes the large polyps can can use Some of your blood supply to help prosper and that causes you to be nemec so those are some some signs that You might The if you have any of those symptoms you want wanna talk to your doctor or healthcare provider The age is is the biggest factor ninety four percent of colon cancers are diagnosed At the age of forty five or greater so if you're at that age it at least have a conversation with your healthcare provider about what kind of colon cancer screenings you should have. I thank you for that and you can ask your questions directly to our guest to. Maybe you do have some questions or maybe. There's a bit of fear in not wanting to talk to your doctor about colon cancer or even getting screen What's holding you back. Maybe that is something you'd like to offer into the conversation you can call us. Tell us about it. Share your thoughts and if you need to call in anonymously that option is always there for you. You can reach us at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight and you know what. Let's go to the phone lines. We're gonna say hi to tyler. Who is in anchorage. Alaska tuned in on k. Nba tyler. Thanks for giving too serene. Welcome you're on here. i good morning. Thank you for having me Yeah my name's tyler. Alaskan native man. I live here in anchorage. Alaska forty two. It was sort of surprised when i went for an annual checkup that my doctor suggested. I get a colonoscopy He recommended that. Alaska native people began at the age of forty instead of fifty. And i'm just wondering why the incidence rates of colon cancer greater in people and if that's cool related with.

One brian Two hundred years Brian phoenix today sixty thirty six forty five ninety four k. Nba Alaska tyler American annie e. tara gatewood hundred nine nine fifty eight hundred native america
"colon cancer" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Native America Calling

"In so thinking of all this and in what you're told when somebody says or your physician says it's time for this water. Some of the things that people are told types of screenings anything you can share dr alexander true so basically there's three types of screenings that We can't offer four colon cancer. The colonoscopy and kind of the old standard i because you'll get to see the whole coal If you remove any policies that are senior abnormalities that time you have the procedure and it can detect really small polyp to other options for sitting colon cancer when it's called the test which has been around for a long time and it's basically taking a really small sample stool and putting on this little card and you drop some solution on it and It green positive is any signs of essentially like blood on the test. At test isn't as Pacific for colon cancer particularly so ample bleeding hemorrhoids or something like that. That s will be positive if that has his positive we would recommend preceding to a cold nas kapika native i. It doesn't pick up we small polyp and it won't pick up all that aren't bleeding in your colon and so it's an okay screening yet but it's not really specific And then the other test is a colder test which is used Pretty common in the lower forty eight is a little bit more specific. Picks up dna So it'll pick up from abnormal lesion but again beedon's have larger. And you don't use that or we don't recommend it a lot. Alaska or specifically recanted that. She's conference.

Alaska forty eight dr alexander three types
"colon cancer" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:50 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Ahead. Yeah so My provider You know basically just told me know what. It's time for the colonoscopy being a nurse I think they kind of knew that. I sort of had some of these expectations So they may not have gone quite as intimate quite as much detail as they do with with patients I know usually the doctor doctors that i work with go into a bit more detail as far as what to expect with the procedure that kind of talk about you. Know the bell prepped. And things like that. We also have other staff members that also reach out and and talk with people about what to expect And help help to get them. Scheduled helped make sure that they understand what medications they need to take. When they need to take it. I was also provided with the information written So i was able to have something to refer to If there's more than two things that my doctor tells me i won't remember and So i really did appreciate that. The written instructions were also sent to me as well as giving them verbally One of the things that i did forget was that i shouldn't have anything. Read like red jello And so when i went to the grocery store and i got that and i brought it home and then i looked at my instructions again said no regio jello and i'm like it but thankfully i was able to be given those instructions so that annuity expect and i could follow them so that i could get a good colonoscopy and a good picture of Everything on the inside there. And so alex for somebody who's on the fence right now about getting tested or screened. Is there anything you want to tell that person. Oh absolutely you know. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure and so for myself Like i said having done this now it was so much easier just to go through a day of having too fast and just drink fluids and then to have the procedure done and then to have something very small removed from my colon Because if i had waited much longer Like some other people that i have seen That could actually those one of those two little things could have actually led to colon cancer. Which would have meant a much. Bigger surgery It had spread. It could have meant chemotherapy. It could have met radiation exit have meant so much more and so actually having those removed when they're so small and so much more removable Has definitely allowed me to continue to be healthier and to not have to go through a much bigger ordeal and to see more specialists and to have to go to the hospital more and so i just having had that colonoscopy i really did prevent a lot more needs for more medical care and an harsher medical care you know bigger surgeries more chemotherapy. And things like that can absolutely be much more uncomfortable And so. I'm i'm just very happy that i kind of got over it and went ahead and got this call off kapika. That was much smaller and much easier to do and is going to give me a much better quality of life in the long run. Well thank you for that and again. If you'd like to share any words with alex now one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number and maybe just have questions. In general about what colon cancer is and the different forms to treat it. You can give us ring one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number and hearing alex. Alex's story is encouraging you to go ahead. Make that appointment You share some thoughts with us or maybe you recently to had an appointment or the procedures done. You can give us a ring. If there's anything else you'd like to share go ahead and give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. We look forward to your calls as we kick off the week. Large part of the western united states is experiencing a mega drought. That's a drought. That lasts twenty years or more and according to the us drought monitor. This year's dry conditions in the west are the worst on record. Hear about how. The drought is affecting tribal communities and economies on the next native america. Calling if you're hurting in your relationship or have been affected by sexual violence. Strong hearts native. Helpline is a no charge. Twenty four seven confidential and anonymous domestic dating and sexual violence helpline for native americans. Help is available by calling one eight. Four four seven six to eighty four eighty three or by clicking on the chat now icon on strong hearts helpline dot org. This program is supported by the national indigenous women's resource center. You're listening to native america calling. I'm tara gatewood promise slow pueblo and we're talking about screen for colon cancer today and we've got some experts on the line. If you have questions you can give us a call. The number to join us is one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight and with us. Today is alexandria rawson She is a senior case manager for family medicine at ten and achieve conference and pleasure to have her here and also joining us today. Out of fairbanks. alaska is dr lisa alexander. And she is a family physician at the chief. Andrew isaac health center and the senior medical officer at ten not chiefs conference and dr alexander. Is vincent guerin our pleasure to have her here with us. Dr under welcome to native america calling. Thanks for having me in. So dr alexander. Hearing alex's story how common is it even some of the apprehension Tell me more. I it's very very common and We have as alex mentioned in. Alaska are recommendations for our native alaskans. are to get screened earlier than the national guidelines currently recommend so for many years we have started screening at age forty and when we talk to patients about the need to get screened and what it entails and what the most effective form of screening is It it's really intimidating and mortifying for people that this type of procedure is going to be done But as alex mentioned it the fear of it beforehand is More than The actual procedure itself and how people feel after that they have they've had it done It actually you know goes by fairly quickly. It's very fast chris. The is the most intimidating part of it and And usually they're fairly relieved that they've had it done because they either know if they've had polyps had pre- potentially precancerous polyps removed or they've had none and then they know what the next step is in the clan and so It's it even though upfront. It's intimidating People are usually really you know happy and relieved that they've had the procedure done and so thinking about a change in guidelines nationally What are your thoughts in. Con- congratulations to the efforts. That are going on there with alaskan natives as well but your thoughts on these new guidelines or any thoughts on. Why you've changed your. I think it's a really great thing to start greening people earlier. So just for audience Previous recommendations were screaming everyone at age. Fifty colon cancer with colonoscopy and they Us ups store national body. That i'm put those clinical guidelines for clinicians follow recommended that got age dropped the forty five and the reason is because they're starting to see a more more cases of colon cancer and people younger than age fifty five and so I get say freight recommendation They mentioned you know. We see an alex actually mentioned in her story Especially in our last name population. Vc high rates of politics and and and younger age group and so Getting that dinner earlier important.

Alex Today alexander forty five Alaska today This year twenty years kapika alaskans western united states Eight hundred one alaska alexandria rawson eight alex eighty more than two things two little things
Remains of Alaska Native Student to Be Returned to St. Paul

Native America Calling

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Remains of Alaska Native Student to Be Returned to St. Paul

"The remains of an alaskan native student buried more than one hundred years ago. At the carlisle indian school in pennsylvania will return to alaska the us army starting the process to return the remains of ten native students buried at the school. According to a us army press release nine students from the rosebud sioux tribe and one student so fia titov is identified as valued so entered the school in nineteen hundred. One died in one thousand nine hundred six w itf reports. Sofia's remains will be returned to saint paul island. the school operated from eighteen. Seventy nine to nineteen eighteen.

Carlisle Indian School Us Army Rosebud Sioux Tribe Pennsylvania Alaska FIA Saint Paul Island Sofia
Clarence Williams III, 'The Mod Squad's' Linc, dies at 81

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Clarence Williams III, 'The Mod Squad's' Linc, dies at 81

"The veteran actor who is in a ground breaking old school TV series has died no matter the generation of the medium Clarence Williams the third left his mark his first big break through was as Lync haze on the mod squad one of three undercover cops one black one white one belonged his appearance as a member of a team of equals back then was an inspiration at a time when there were relatively few positive black role models on TV Williams also played prince's father in purple rain and more recent TV audiences will remember his work in Williams manager says the actor died this past Friday at his home in Los Angeles after a battle with colon cancer recurrence Williams the third was eighty one I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Clarence Williams Williams Prince Colon Cancer Los Angeles Oscar Gabriel
Howard Names College of Fine Arts for Chadwick Boseman

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Howard Names College of Fine Arts for Chadwick Boseman

"The man who starred in Black Panther is being mounted in a big way at his alma mater when Chadwick Boseman was a student at Howard University he helped lead a student protest of plans to merge the college of fine arts into the college of arts and sciences recently the arts college was re instituted and now the school says it will be named after Bozeman Donna comes less than a year after both men died at age forty three of colon cancer and it re establishes a tide that he had with the newly minted school's dean Felicia Rashad the two met when both men was an undergrad and he considered her a mentor both men rose to prominence playing this year was a black icons in movies like Jackie Robinson James Brown and Thurgood Marshall he was nominated for an Oscar in his last movie role in ma Rainey's black bottom on Oscar wells Gabriel

Chadwick Boseman College Of Fine Arts Into The Bozeman Donna Howard University Dean Felicia Rashad Colon Cancer Jackie Robinson James Brown Thurgood Marshall Oscar Ma Rainey Oscar Wells Gabriel
How To Treat And Prevent Colon Polyps with Dr. Elizabeth Boham

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:57 min | 1 year ago

How To Treat And Prevent Colon Polyps with Dr. Elizabeth Boham

"What's the big deal with pulse because we're told to get colonoscopy every two years five years ten years bidding on who you are. We're told that you know. These are big deals but really never talked talked to about how to really think about them from a functional medicine perspective in terms of prevention or treatment. It's just about going to the kospi. Cutting it out or if you have colon cancer. Cutting that out and taking chemo and radiation. But there's a whole nother world of thinking around this that allows us to to be much more targeted in our approach to preventing and treating these things so talking about whether polyps why did we get him. How how common are they in. Like the general thinking about them. Yeah absolutely so you know polyps are these growth. That occur in the inside of your intestine. So in your colon you can get these growths that are polyps and there's all sorts of different shapes types of polyps you know from at a no most hypoplastic pileups and you know all of that really influences. How risky the polyp is in terms of it. Turning into colon cancer so a percentage of these polyps can become cancerous and caused colorectal cancer. And as you mentioned unfortunately there's there's an increased rate of ecole rectal cancer. It's the second leading cause of cancer death in the united states and unfortunately we're seeing real precipitous increase in young people getting colon cancer and it's hit home for unfortunately a few times on with some of some really close friends of mine and And so it's something that you know we wanna think about you know. How do we prevent these abnormal growths from occurring especially the ones that can become dysplasia or cause

Colon Cancer Cancerous United States Dysplasia
Trey Mancini's Struggle and Strength

The Lead

03:36 min | 1 year ago

Trey Mancini's Struggle and Strength

"Sedan baseball fans. Probably know trae mancini as this really good power hitter on a not so good team but can you give us a quick snapshot of his career before he broke out under the scene in major league baseball. Yeah he was never thought to be the guy so he had to keep working every single level to prove himself. He started out in high school in florida. was when a really good team there but he was the first baseman he was right handed hitter and so he didn't get a whole lot of looks. His name and number is up at his high school. You own the big placard but the numbers wrong. It's actually number eighteen instead of number sixteen which is number there. That's kind of almost indicative of the things that he is going through that he's always been kind there but there's always been a player on his team or something and he's always been kinda overshadowed basically. He went from rung to rung to wrong in the minor league. Ladder finally made his debut in september of twenty sixteen and basically exploded those first few games that one in the air left-center field has dave sadegh first major league at his mom beth getting your round the basis faster than anyone this year. Who is in a home run and then in two thousand seventeen was fantastic and ended up being third-place rookie of the year behind. Aaron judge andrew benintendi in the american league. And just how good was he during the twenty nineteen season. Oh he was by far the best player. Understand you thirty five home runs. You really broke out. Towering fly ball left center field. Hit hard by trae man's cd way back in the wall. Hey goodbye homerun. He should have been there all star but when your team is bad as your only get one all star pick and john means was having a good season for the orioles as well so they went with a picture instead of manzini but he was absolutely breakout. Star back goes that god does get on the board. O est back cd hot getting four point seven five million so a huge jump and he is poised to be one of the better younger players in the american league so heading into the twenty twenty season. It sounds like his baseball career really his life. Were just in a great place. Oh yeah it was going exceptionally well for him in pretty much every aspect of his life including he started dating a woman who had been one of the on field reporters for the orioles. Forget this you home runs for infield heads for you. What's on the difference maker up to this point last year honesty. If you'd sarah perlman she's now works for nbc sports. She had left the orioles in july. What does it mean to close out. Games like doesn't get the w. carnival. Not exactly how he drew it up towards the end there but and that was going really well at the beginning of a new relationship he just become a millionaire for the first time. Everything was going perfect for him. Going into two thousand twenty and dan walk us through what happened in march of twenty twenty so like all baseball players. They get their annual physical when they get to the spring training camp and he did his regular physical bloodwork everything else and then around march. I the athletic trainer came to him and said. Hey your blood's a little wonky like your iron levels are pretty much low you all the way throughout and basically you saying you know. I don't want to scare you. But i think you're having some sort of internal bleed that's causing. It could be stomach older. It could be healy activities. Or you know there. An can't that I remember them. Asking if i had a family history of colon cancer and i said yeah my dad had obviously they did some more tests and they decided you know what we need to get your co nas copy. Because things don't look right. They had the colonoscopy and they told me found a major mass in his colon

Trae Mancini Baseball Dave Sadegh Aaron Judge Andrew Benintendi Orioles American League Manzini Trae Sarah Perlman Beth Florida Dan Walk John NBC Colon Cancer
'Nomadland,' 'Borat' win at a socially distant Golden Globes

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

'Nomadland,' 'Borat' win at a socially distant Golden Globes

"The seventy fifth golden globes were handed out last night despite being socially distanced and costly distant there was still some drama at the golden globes one of the most poignant moments was when Chadwick Boseman won for Best Actor eight months after his death from colon cancer his widow told the world what her late husband would've said after his win for monitoring these black bottom he was thank god he would bring his parents thank insistence for their guidance and their sacrifice the night's top award Best Picture went to know mad land director Chloe's all saying this award belongs to the whole no management team she's the first woman of Asian descent to win Best Director at the globes and only the second woman ever to do so I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Golden Globes Chadwick Boseman Best Actor Top Award Best Picture Colon Cancer Chloe Oscar Wells Gabriel
Chadwick Boseman earns 2 nominations for NAACP Image Awards

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Chadwick Boseman earns 2 nominations for NAACP Image Awards

"A popular actor who died last year was in line for some posthumous awards Chadwick Boseman's final two movies have earned him nominations at the end of laci P. image awards he has been nominated for his acting in ma Rainey's black bottom and the five bloods Bozeman who starred in Black Panther died last summer of colon cancer at age forty three his work in those last two movies have gotten increased attention since his death both movies also nominated for Best Picture at the image awards other nominees for Best Picture include one night in Miami that boys for life and jingle jangle AT Christmas story the ceremony is set for March twenty seventh and will air on CBS I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Chadwick Boseman Laci P. Ma Rainey Bozeman Black Panther Colon Cancer Best Picture Miami CBS Oscar Gabriel
"colon cancer" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

05:59 min | 2 years ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"You doing? Good. Um I played softball in college. I was serious at athlete and, um, lost one of my very good friends to colon cancer. I'm sorry, and she was very, very young. So I started donating my hair, right? Um And People need to know not to donate two lakhs for love, because People have to pay for that. You have to actually make sure it goes to kids for wigs. Kids, right? So you don't eat your hair, Tonto kids from who have cancer and need wigs. How long you been doing it now? Since you were insured athlete how long Ah, over 10 years. I don't know your age. I'm just saying robbery blond hair, too. So How long do you grow it? How long do you grow it? And how close do you shave it like a good 14 inches, but keep it healthy and Uh, diet. Yeah. I mean, do they have like restrictions or rules? If you go to donate your hair? Yeah. You can't die it okay? Other than that, nothing. No. But I also have two types of skin cancer, which had found out about September of 2019, right. And, um so Does that inhibit 30 doing that? Yeah, And you know what I mean? So like you, you grow it out to be like 14 inches. And then when you cut it down, you go all the way down like you're bald. Or you leave. So like your chin. Okay, so you grow it long. I mean, because there's no like shock thing Where you walking around with, like no hair and trying to get used to that. Did you? Or do you? The skin is an organ and so is you know the hair that grows out of it, right? No, I get that. But I'm saying, like, how long do you How long do you grow it? And then? Like when you cut it can so that I can give as much as I can have short. Do you cut it? Sure it is. I can So you shave it off. No, like to my like to my chin or something. You know what that kid deserves that absolutely. And everyone is always telling me how great It is. It is great. And you know what? You keep doing it and you keep growing your hair and people get people He used to seeing you long hair, short hair, long hair, short hair, but you don't understand. From October 1st. That's my birthday like 2nd 3rd. I spent two days getting most. From that on. I spent Several weeks. Getting war more. Taken out. That's terrific. You're really, really good person Any thank you for calling New Jersey one a 1.5. She grows her hair to make wigs for kids dealing with cancer. You know so many different ways to donate Jamey's and Galloway under Jersey one on 1.5. Hi, Jamie. Hi. How are you? I'm good. How you doing? I'm good. All right, Tell me your story. All right. So February 6 last year I was coming home from my Christmas party. I'm a nurse. And there was a bird bird for the type over a nation and it went into work the next day, and I'm like, you know. I could do this, and I'm telling my coworkers about it. And it just so happened that one of my patients which is ready my patients or end stage renal busiest, oral on dialysis. They come to us so that we can access their officially Graham, um or the graphs and the white turned around of the patient, she said. You know my husband, the typo. And I said, OK, let's go to test it, and she's agreeing. Serious. And like, Well, yeah, I got to ever Mike. I really need one. And she's like I have a really good feeling about this. But are you really sure about this? And I'm like, Yeah. Let's start this. So that was a Saturday morning and by Tuesday we were on our way to Lourdes. The starter testing I'm during covered. We found out I ended up being his match. Everything had gone. Postpones recovered and August 11th. We ended up having our surgery. Um it was done at our lady of Lourdes. Which and awesome thing that they do for the donor is the neighbor. The surgery, they actually light the Statue of our Lady board on top of the hospital in green in memory of the person who's donated their kidney for three nights. Yeah, me and the simple as it sounds. That is definitely something that I was excited about, because that was for me is great, very excited about that. I got to know my daughter over the time him and his family. They have been super supportive. I had a lot of support from work and friends. On defacto, unproven list up that I would like to start doing it advocacy locally to help people and guide them. If they're interested in it on, give him support. It was awesome that I got a chance to be on your show tonight. You know what? It is awesome for me, too, that you called Because these are the stories we need to hear. I mean, look at this sort of despair of the moment. You just decide to do it. Did you ever have any kind of repercussions? Or did you have have any kind of second thoughts or anything? No, not at all. I would do it again. My kidney and him is doing fabulous. Um Ah. Lot of people don't understand that when you have communities a lot of times, you don't urinate. Um And it's the simple things like that that we take for granted. You know, urinates, just like the rest of us do he does not need dialysis. Um, patients who on empty dream the disease there on dialysis.

colon cancer Lourdes New Jersey robbery Jamie Graham Jamey Mike Galloway
"colon cancer" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on KTRH

"Better consumer of health care means, you understand? How to take care of yourself how to stay out of the doctor's office. How to Understand the signs and symptoms of a disease or a condition. Where if you know you can seek help. Really early. And I'm sure everybody knows if you have a particular problem, minor or serious, The sooner you get in The sooner you raise your hand and say Excuse me. I think I have a problem. Please, let's look into this. You you, you call attention to your physician or you're doing things in your life. That you realize are going to be beneficial to you. We know that don't smoke, don't drink, exercise and eat more zucchini. We know that story. But there are so many more things. That would Constitute good health, understanding your weight, Understanding your blood pressure, your cholesterol, understanding your family history and risk factors that you may have. It's that level of alertness. That you know, you've got one leg up to say I am at risk for a particular disease. I'm at risk for colon cancer. So I do not wait until I'm 50 years old to start getting screened for colon cancer. I'm going to start five or 10 years earlier. Or I'm going to be extra cautious about the amount of red meat or my weight because that will contribute to a higher likelihood of colon. Cancer, and the list goes on and on for all these conditions, but that is what.

colon cancer
Dr Fata: Seeing Yellow | 4

Dr. Death

05:00 min | 2 years ago

Dr Fata: Seeing Yellow | 4

"Patty hester was helping a patient at work in the emergency room on the morning of august. Sixth two thousand thirteen. It was busy morning. Her colleague came in the room with a patient and tapped patty on the shoulder. Come here right now come here. I'm rock with her towards break room i to have time what she said. Patti catch your doctor. Patty walked into the break room and stared at the tv quote. We are michigan. Hematology oncology here in rochester hills. Were fbi agents are executing our search warrant. My sources are also telling me that a doctor has been arrested on charges related to healthcare fraud s fbi helicopters. They swarmed in on this morning. And i'm looking at this news. It has named goes across then. Then i have my cell phone in my pocket. and it's like this. you can feel it vibrating. All my dad from that point on her cell phone wouldn't stop buzzing all day. One call was from the fbi. You'll be getting your chart than the news. Said we'd like to interview you. Patty went home. Her husband was in front of the tv. Federal agents say in court records that doctor for allegedly kept patients on chemotherapy. Longer than necessary to cash in on the billings agents allege for da also directed that patients be diagnosed with cancer in their medical charts. Even when they did not have the disease patty wondered. Was she one of them. She didn't have to wait long to find out the next day a dark. Suv with tinted windows. Pulled into the driveway. An agent stepped out of the car and patty opened the door. Her whole family behind her. He said i'm very sorry and handed me my chart in the disk. I just sir cry. My family sobbing sobbing. It was horrific. She put the disk into her computer and began to scroll through. It was just lie after lie after lie. The also gave her a list of oncologist that she could see to get a second opinion. Ten days later patty saw a new doctor for the first time she brought with her. The disc at the fbi had given her. After the dr ransome tests she came into patties exam room hugging. And i am so sorry and saw sorry. You don't have it you don't have a patty began to cry. Her doctor said that she wasn't yet sure what had made her sick in the first place but she was sure that patti didn't have cancer. You need to live your life. You need to live your life. You not gonna die. I said if you do anything for me could you just please write it down town. She's forty where you want me to write it. And so she whipped out a prescription pad. And that's when she wrote a tricia has has no evidence and diaz in the weeks that followed other fatah patients or their loved ones sought their medical records. Saint joseph mercy. Oakland hospital filled these requests free of charge but crittenden had a different policy in some cases. The hospital asked for more than a thousand dollars to fill. The requests fought. Victims protested outside the hospital eventually crittenden relented and waive the fees but the victims and their families still needed someone who knew the technical lingo to look over the records. That's what i did for my fun. Time in the evenings nurse angeles won tek. I would go through the patient's medical records in a way. I feel like for me anytime. Somebody reached out to me. I said yes i didn't. I felt that that was something that i could do. And maybe you know. Help with the guilt of i should have done more. I wish i could have done more. One of those requests came from michelle mannarino. Her mother joan had died in two thousand ten six months. After angela's visit fatah had treated joan for breast cancer but when they met at a hotel in a banquet room angela had some news from michelle. And i remember looking at her records and the chemotherapy and i remember one thing that struck me was one of chemotherapy. Drugs that she was given is typically given for colon cancer. And i thought with this is odd like why would you give this for a breast cancer diagnosis.

FBI Patty Hester Patty Rochester Hills Dr Ransome Patti Crittenden Cancer Saint Joseph Mercy Michigan DA Tricia Diaz Oakland Michelle Mannarino Joan Angela Angeles
'Ma Rainey's Black Bottom' could put Chadwick Boseman in select Oscar company

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

'Ma Rainey's Black Bottom' could put Chadwick Boseman in select Oscar company

"Film is called Ma Rainey's Black bottom. It premieres on Netflix. Michelle Pelino has more Ma Rainey's black finding premieres on Netflix, starring Viola Davis, says the title character and Chadwick Boseman in his final performance. The film is based on the 1982 August Wilson play. It takes Place one single afternoon in Chicago, 19. 27 in its studio where the great blues singer has come to make a record will be ready to go in 15 minutes already going, Madam says. We're ready to go, and that's way go around here. Tensions rise between rainy and her ambitious horn player played by Bozeman, who has big dreams, but racial unrest at the time, feed their frustrations. The film is dedicated to Bozeman, who died in August set 43 of colon cancer. Movie

Ma Rainey Michelle Pelino Netflix Chadwick Boseman Viola Davis Wilson Madam Chicago Bozeman Colon Cancer
Craig Melvin's brother Lawrence dead from colon cancer at age 43

Bloomberg Best

00:10 sec | 2 years ago

Craig Melvin's brother Lawrence dead from colon cancer at age 43

"Is dead because of colon cancer. Melvin posted the news on his instagram account Saturday. His brother was diagnosed four years ago and died Wednesday. I'm at Madison

Colon Cancer Melvin Madison
Marvel won't recast Chadwick Boseman's role in "Black Panther 2"

Fred + Angi On Demand

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Marvel won't recast Chadwick Boseman's role in "Black Panther 2"

"Boseman to challa will not have a successor chadwick castaway in august at the age of forty three following as private battle with colon cancer. The head boss at marvel said that his role in black panther was so iconic transcends iteration of the character in any other medium from marvel's pass black panther too will be written and directed by ryan. Kugler it's set to be released on july eight twenty twenty two so long live to challa. No one else could have stepped into that role. And they're just leaving it where it was Hopefully they use some sort of. I don't know memorial or something when it

Boseman Challa Chadwick Castaway Marvel Colon Cancer Kugler Ryan
Tasmanian Devils May Overcome Transmissible Cancer That Nearly Wiped Them Out

Science Magazine Podcast

08:52 min | 2 years ago

Tasmanian Devils May Overcome Transmissible Cancer That Nearly Wiped Them Out

"You might have heard of the plight of the tasmanian devil. These carnivorous marsupials have been afflicted with a transmissible facial tumor a cancer that jumps from one devil to another when they bite each other in the face not as uncommon as you might think and as a result their populations have gone into steep decline despite these extreme population losses. The devils have been holding on and may even be turning a corner andrew store for and colleagues wrote about this potential turnaround in this week science. Hi andrew hi. Let's start with the downfall of the devils. This facial tumor disease. Dft when did arise and what has been. It's trend in it. Spread among the tasmanian devils. The devil facial tumor disease according to our new study originated. Probably in the late. Nineteen eighty s. It was actually discovered in the mid nineteen ninety s in far northeastern. Tasmania where people started discovering devils with large facial lesions that seem to grow. Initially that wasn't much of a concern because they've seen these types of lesions new places back since the nineteen seventies however when animals started dying in large numbers. People really started paying attention that this was some sort of transmissible disease shortly thereafter. A genetic study was done that showed that these lesions were actually a clone oil transmissible cancer. They were genetically close to identical so since its discovery the disease has actually swept across tasmania and sort of an east to west us. Fred and is now just reached. Some of the last uninfected populations on the west coast has media. Cancer is different from pathogens like bacteria or viruses. How's that affected our ability to understand the transmission of this disease in tasmanian devil. One of the big challenges has been its large genome size so studying. The genome of a virus is fairly straightforward because viruses like sars he'll be to only about eighteen to twenty eight thousand base pairs long. However the tasmanian devil genome is three point two billion bases about the size of the human genome so trying to track. The spread of the disease is much more challenging. In terms of computational power and genomic sequencing methods which weren't really available at the scale they are now when the disease was discovered. So in the study that we're talking about today. You apply to technique that has mainly in the past been used for viruses. What did you have to do differently to get this to work for transmissible cancer. We did complete genome sequencing of fifty one tumors than that being in our final analysis finding parts of the genome that are measurably evolving that is evolving at a regular rate or what we would call them. Killer clock is pretty challenging and in the end we screened about eleven thousand genes which took several months on the computer and found twenty that were measurably evolving clock like fashion. And the reason you want to do that is then you can look at how these or changing over time as the disease has spread and this allows you to estimate epidemiological parameters like the transmission rate and the proportion of the population. That gets infected overtime. So this is how you figured out that it came out in the eighties right. The disease likely originated in the eighties which is consistent with its discovery in the bid nineties because when a disease like this i started taking off. In a wildlife population it might be at fairly low prevalence and so people don't really notice it until it really takes off and our epidemiological parameter which is called our savvy which is equivalent to the transmission rate started to peak in our analysis just before the discovery which makes sense because the disease was rapidly increasing or exponentially increasing in the population. Let's talk a little bit about that transmission rate. That's something that you know using this analysis you're able to show it changed over time. Can you describe that trajectory we identify tumor lineages and in wanted around the mid nineteen ninety s in the other it peaked around two thousand and the really encouraging results of the study showed that in both major tumor lineages that seemed to be across. Tasmania now that the transmission rate declined to just about one at present and this indicates that the disease has reached some sort of stable state that is for every devil that's infected only one additional devil is infected and thus the main conclusion of the paper which is the disease is transitioning from an epidemic state in which it's exponentially moving across populations to an end state where it's just kind of at replacement is the kind of analysis you did hear able to tell you what has changed. Is something different about the tumor. Cells are the devils different. What's going on. We did find some mutations that seem to explain variation in transmission rates among the different tumor lineages and these are related to other types of cancer however these are candidates for downstream discovery at this point so they serve as good hypotheses for future research. And what's different about the devils. We have some other studies that show that also the devils seemed to be evolving in response to cancer. We see changes in the devil genome. That are also seem to be associated with possibly disease resistance. We've also seen spontaneous tumor regression in an increasing number of devils wild populations and we show that that might be related to regulatory changes in the in the devil so perhaps some jeans are up or down regulated in response to the tumor and we also found a mutation in the tumor. That seems to cause the tumor to shrink so a mutation actually when turning on a gene and this gene is implicated in human prostate and colon. Cancer the tumor growth actually slows in laboratory studies when we transact wild type tumors. Don't have this gene with the. Does this suggest that the disease will go away or that. It will coexist peacefully with tasmanian. Devils people really thought that tasmanian devils or on their way to extinction. I think this provides us cautious optimism about the future of the tasmanian devil. This transmissible cancer which is nearly one hundred percent lethal has caused a dramatic decline of this species of process. Entire range has me so they are certainly not out of the woods yet. However because this disease is socially transmitted early models predicted disease extinction because even if you have low densities of individuals the disease can still be transmitted because devils congregate and bite one another. Which is the way. The disease is transmitted for purposes of mayday or scavenging food however a growing number of studies from our group has shown through ecological modeling for example devils are predicted to persist on most scenarios. Some of those involve lower population densities than where they were initially but yet the devils will persist and in the subset of those cases. The tumor will also persist and we may see sort of endemic dynamics where there's populations like this study adds to the growing number of studies that the disease itself also seems to be evolving perhaps lower transmission rate because there may be evolutionary pressure on disease to be less lethal to the devils. Are people trying to figure out how to preserve the devils and will that strategy change with this understanding of the switch from epidemic too endemic. We certainly hope that our new study will help. Influence hearth rations strategy so when devil started declining there was captive breeding to maximize genetic variability in captive populations which are maintained in wildlife parks and some zoos and actually an island offshore from tasmania album. Riot island. where there's a free roaming population of not quite captive devils but devils were introduced there. These were referred to as captive insurance operations with the intent that if devils went extinct on the mainland they could be reintroduced or if devil population sizes or inbreeding reached really high levels. They could perhaps be introduced using a technique called genetic rescued increase genetic diversity in the wild populations

Tumor Disease Devils Transmissible Cancer Facial Tumor Andrew Hi Cancer Tasmanian Devils Tasmania Tumors Disease Resistance West Coast Fred Colon Riot Island
Chadwick Boseman honored with 'Hero for the Ages' award at MTV Movie and TV Awards

WBZ Morning News

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Chadwick Boseman honored with 'Hero for the Ages' award at MTV Movie and TV Awards

"Touching night at the MTV movie and TV awards ceremony. More from CBS is Debra Rodriguez. What happens now? Relate Chadwick Boseman was honored with MTV s hero for the ages award for films like Black Panther. On Keitel and Robert Downey Jr presented virtually Mr Boseman truly embodied what it meant to be a superhero. The way he lived his life united people behind a higher purpose, and that will be his legacy. Bozeman died of colon cancer in August. He was 43 Deborah Rodriguez CBS

Debra Rodriguez Chadwick Boseman MTV Mr Boseman CBS Keitel Black Panther Robert Downey Jr Bozeman Colon Cancer Deborah Rodriguez