35 Burst results for "Colon Cancer"

The Nutritional Advantages of Oats

Diet Science

02:27 min | Last month

The Nutritional Advantages of Oats

"Week. We're talking about oats. Oh so very good. I always feel that everyone needs to know oats. Yes absolutely so. What would you like to share about oats well other than than the the typical health benefits votes. There's actually two compounds in oats that i don't think very many people know about and so wanted to talk about those today but then also talk about the various types of oats. I think a lot of people have heard of these different types but they don't really know how they're prepared and what makes them different from each other. Good good good topic all right. Yeah so. I think most people probably know that oats Help lower cholesterol. He also helped to lower blood pressure and stabilize blood. Sugar levels have also been known to help people with diabetes. So that's a one of the important things and a lot of these benefits In the past were attributed to a particular type of fiber that's in the oats called beta glue can And that has really kind of gotten most of the attention in previous studies on oats and their health benefits. But we're coming to find out that Oats contain more than twenty unique polyphenol compounds which are like phytochemicals Called evanston reminds have strong antioxidant anti inflammatory and anti itching properties which is why people can use. Oats says a bath like if you get poison oak or poison ivy. Get that itchiness on your skin. The compounds and oats are known to reduce that. Oh so that's why that you know they're known for that And then there's a couple of other compounds called avino kocides that Together with the of the ninian through reminds and the venacuro sides. Which are i mean. Both of them are really hard to say. Yes but these are just polyphenol compounds They've also been shown to prevent colon cancer And also heart disease because they help to reduce the the production of nitric oxide in the artery and And also help with the smooth muscle in the artery. So they're they've been studied widely for this now.

Diabetes Evanston Oats Colon Cancer Heart Disease
Husband of 'Real Housewives' Star NeNe Leakes Dies at 66

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

Husband of 'Real Housewives' Star NeNe Leakes Dies at 66

"A cast member of one of the real house wives shows is facing a personal tragedy back in twenty eighteen many leaks of the real housewives of Atlanta told her Instagram followers her husband had colon cancer and now he has died a family publicist and friend says Gregg Leakes died of the disease at home peacefully and surrounded by his wife and children he was sixty six years old the rep says the family is in deep pain with a broken heart Greg and many leaks were first married in nineteen ninety nine two years before their son Brett was born they split in twenty eleven but reconciled and remarried a second time a couple years later I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Gregg Leakes Colon Cancer Atlanta Greg Brett Oscar Wells Gabriel
The Dangers of Sugar and Children

Food Issues

02:09 min | 2 months ago

The Dangers of Sugar and Children

"We all know that sugar isn't good for us but really let's take a deep dive into why we really need to limit it in our kids diets. Oh absolutely well. I think you know. Sometimes we forget that during times of rapid growth like in childhood and adolescence that you know kids bodies are really sensitive to the influence of dieting activity. Because they're growing so fast they're seltzer turning over rapidly and that makes them especially vulnerable to the effects of food of physical activity and weight and even environmental damage that can occur and so we really need to put an emphasis during this time of rapid cell growth to make sure that the genes that are being activated or turning on towards health not towards a genetic susceptibility and sugar can actually displace some of these high value. Nutrition foods that play in essential role not just in growth but an immunity but also cognition and genetic expression okay. That's something that we don't typically hear about. And so what about the things we do hear about a lot in terms of childhood obesity. Type two diabetes like these things. We should be concerned about. Oh absolutely i mean first off anytime you look at childhood obesity wolf whether you know kids are really actually normal weight or an overweight. Too much sugar again. Just places. high value nutrition and micronutrients that can increase the inflammatory process that leads to chronic disease over time. Even kids who were teenagers who are overweight and adolescents have a significantly higher risk of colon cancer later in life. I mean we're even seeing precursors in heart disease in children. I mean if you look at like obesity in preschoolers. I think it's risen from around five percent in the early seventies like nineteen seventy two up to close to fourteen percent

Seltzer Obesity Diabetes Colon Cancer Heart Disease
"colon cancer" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

All Talk Oncology Podcast

04:45 min | 3 months ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

"It's funny you and another person or the only people talk about it because there were so many questions about how i made it why i made it if it was. If it wasn't it was for sure Skeptics they're like at eight years old. Why but because of megan in my dad was tested for colon cancer and head kohlhaas squeeze every year. My dad ended up getting colon. Cancer in his fifties and my dad was tested and found out. Because i was still getting colin oscrise and still to this day every year. I do my grandfather. My dad's dad ended up getting colon. Cancer i was the first in my family chain at eight to strike the conversation and imagine. If i didn't have an imagine my dad just would have passed it as a Oh no just a torn visit. Pick up a second potatoes and he just rips up is normal and tear blah blah blah blah blah on. So i remember this. Give italy and don't get into it a lot because it's it's this is the last time my parents weren't together too much longer after this. This added a lot of stress on to my family. My parents i think at the worst. I think three years after this. I can't my parents insurance so bad. My mom told me after the fact that the insurance bill was creeping up and to three quarters of a million dollars in one thousand nine eight or the time of all the time i kept going and kept going and kept going in. I missed a lot of school. So i ended up having to miss school that year and restart so i was a eighteen year old nineteen year old senior in high school. I graduated because. I'm just a lot of time on story short. Is i sitting out in front and our yard with my dad and my mom and my dad was spraying us with a hose. That was our Country version of pool. My dad was just stand there and he expressed as poor poor man's pool and just the job done and i remember. My dad had to go to work. And i refuse to take the medication that night refused to take it. I refuse to take it and my mom was. She had an older daughter son. And i went to bed i we. I slept in the trailer. Read a trailer in front of my parents in the house and they slept in the trailer and my brother. And i and i'll never forget this. I'm woken up by my dad was short. Do you talk about human. You remember that little human character had the shoulders that will bounce around with the sprang up. Legs he was like a like a guard like fierce fierce kind of a bouncy really strong mighty guard like very ken shamrock. My dad was very And i woke up to my.

colin oscrise Cancer colon cancer megan italy ken shamrock
Alonso bests Mancini, Ohtani for 2nd straight HR Derby title

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Alonso bests Mancini, Ohtani for 2nd straight HR Derby title

"Peter ones are combined his power with warm temps and Colorado's thin air to win the twenty twenty one home run derby with the victory the New York Mets first baseman successfully defended the derby title he won in twenty nineteen Alonso ripped a derby record thirty five homers to beat Salvador Perez in the first round then eliminated Juan Soto before winning the final against Baltimore Orioles first baseman treatment Saini whose presence was its own miracle he missed the twenty twenty season battling stage three colon cancer Bruce Morton Denver

Salvador Perez New York Mets Juan Soto Peter Colorado Alonso Baltimore Orioles Saini Colon Cancer Denver
Trey Mancini to Participate in Home Run Derby a Year After Cancer Diagnosis

Papa and Lund

00:23 sec | 4 months ago

Trey Mancini to Participate in Home Run Derby a Year After Cancer Diagnosis

"Fun the home run Derby is going to be in a few weeks. Defending champ Peter Alonso Back Shohei Otani has opted in and now cancer survivor, Trey Mancini has also accepted the invite. He's overcome. Colon cancer after missing all of last year with chemotherapy has been an inspiration will come back to the Orioles slugger and knowing that the mid summer Classic will have something good to focus on is exactly what we all need. This is Damon,

Peter Alonso Shohei Otani Trey Mancini Colon Cancer Cancer Orioles Damon
Remains of Alaska Native Student to Be Returned to St. Paul

Native America Calling

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

Remains of Alaska Native Student to Be Returned to St. Paul

"The remains of an alaskan native student buried more than one hundred years ago. At the carlisle indian school in pennsylvania will return to alaska the us army starting the process to return the remains of ten native students buried at the school. According to a us army press release nine students from the rosebud sioux tribe and one student so fia titov is identified as valued so entered the school in nineteen hundred. One died in one thousand nine hundred six w itf reports. Sofia's remains will be returned to saint paul island. the school operated from eighteen. Seventy nine to nineteen eighteen.

Carlisle Indian School Us Army Rosebud Sioux Tribe Pennsylvania Alaska FIA Saint Paul Island Sofia
Clarence Williams III, 'The Mod Squad's' Linc, dies at 81

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Clarence Williams III, 'The Mod Squad's' Linc, dies at 81

"The veteran actor who is in a ground breaking old school TV series has died no matter the generation of the medium Clarence Williams the third left his mark his first big break through was as Lync haze on the mod squad one of three undercover cops one black one white one belonged his appearance as a member of a team of equals back then was an inspiration at a time when there were relatively few positive black role models on TV Williams also played prince's father in purple rain and more recent TV audiences will remember his work in Williams manager says the actor died this past Friday at his home in Los Angeles after a battle with colon cancer recurrence Williams the third was eighty one I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Clarence Williams Williams Prince Colon Cancer Los Angeles Oscar Gabriel
Howard Names College of Fine Arts for Chadwick Boseman

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Howard Names College of Fine Arts for Chadwick Boseman

"The man who starred in Black Panther is being mounted in a big way at his alma mater when Chadwick Boseman was a student at Howard University he helped lead a student protest of plans to merge the college of fine arts into the college of arts and sciences recently the arts college was re instituted and now the school says it will be named after Bozeman Donna comes less than a year after both men died at age forty three of colon cancer and it re establishes a tide that he had with the newly minted school's dean Felicia Rashad the two met when both men was an undergrad and he considered her a mentor both men rose to prominence playing this year was a black icons in movies like Jackie Robinson James Brown and Thurgood Marshall he was nominated for an Oscar in his last movie role in ma Rainey's black bottom on Oscar wells Gabriel

Chadwick Boseman College Of Fine Arts Into The Bozeman Donna Howard University Dean Felicia Rashad Colon Cancer Jackie Robinson James Brown Thurgood Marshall Oscar Ma Rainey Oscar Wells Gabriel
How To Treat And Prevent Colon Polyps with Dr. Elizabeth Boham

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:57 min | 5 months ago

How To Treat And Prevent Colon Polyps with Dr. Elizabeth Boham

"What's the big deal with pulse because we're told to get colonoscopy every two years five years ten years bidding on who you are. We're told that you know. These are big deals but really never talked talked to about how to really think about them from a functional medicine perspective in terms of prevention or treatment. It's just about going to the kospi. Cutting it out or if you have colon cancer. Cutting that out and taking chemo and radiation. But there's a whole nother world of thinking around this that allows us to to be much more targeted in our approach to preventing and treating these things so talking about whether polyps why did we get him. How how common are they in. Like the general thinking about them. Yeah absolutely so you know polyps are these growth. That occur in the inside of your intestine. So in your colon you can get these growths that are polyps and there's all sorts of different shapes types of polyps you know from at a no most hypoplastic pileups and you know all of that really influences. How risky the polyp is in terms of it. Turning into colon cancer so a percentage of these polyps can become cancerous and caused colorectal cancer. And as you mentioned unfortunately there's there's an increased rate of ecole rectal cancer. It's the second leading cause of cancer death in the united states and unfortunately we're seeing real precipitous increase in young people getting colon cancer and it's hit home for unfortunately a few times on with some of some really close friends of mine and And so it's something that you know we wanna think about you know. How do we prevent these abnormal growths from occurring especially the ones that can become dysplasia or cause

Colon Cancer Cancerous United States Dysplasia
Trey Mancini's Struggle and Strength

The Lead

03:36 min | 8 months ago

Trey Mancini's Struggle and Strength

"Sedan baseball fans. Probably know trae mancini as this really good power hitter on a not so good team but can you give us a quick snapshot of his career before he broke out under the scene in major league baseball. Yeah he was never thought to be the guy so he had to keep working every single level to prove himself. He started out in high school in florida. was when a really good team there but he was the first baseman he was right handed hitter and so he didn't get a whole lot of looks. His name and number is up at his high school. You own the big placard but the numbers wrong. It's actually number eighteen instead of number sixteen which is number there. That's kind of almost indicative of the things that he is going through that he's always been kind there but there's always been a player on his team or something and he's always been kinda overshadowed basically. He went from rung to rung to wrong in the minor league. Ladder finally made his debut in september of twenty sixteen and basically exploded those first few games that one in the air left-center field has dave sadegh first major league at his mom beth getting your round the basis faster than anyone this year. Who is in a home run and then in two thousand seventeen was fantastic and ended up being third-place rookie of the year behind. Aaron judge andrew benintendi in the american league. And just how good was he during the twenty nineteen season. Oh he was by far the best player. Understand you thirty five home runs. You really broke out. Towering fly ball left center field. Hit hard by trae man's cd way back in the wall. Hey goodbye homerun. He should have been there all star but when your team is bad as your only get one all star pick and john means was having a good season for the orioles as well so they went with a picture instead of manzini but he was absolutely breakout. Star back goes that god does get on the board. O est back cd hot getting four point seven five million so a huge jump and he is poised to be one of the better younger players in the american league so heading into the twenty twenty season. It sounds like his baseball career really his life. Were just in a great place. Oh yeah it was going exceptionally well for him in pretty much every aspect of his life including he started dating a woman who had been one of the on field reporters for the orioles. Forget this you home runs for infield heads for you. What's on the difference maker up to this point last year honesty. If you'd sarah perlman she's now works for nbc sports. She had left the orioles in july. What does it mean to close out. Games like doesn't get the w. carnival. Not exactly how he drew it up towards the end there but and that was going really well at the beginning of a new relationship he just become a millionaire for the first time. Everything was going perfect for him. Going into two thousand twenty and dan walk us through what happened in march of twenty twenty so like all baseball players. They get their annual physical when they get to the spring training camp and he did his regular physical bloodwork everything else and then around march. I the athletic trainer came to him and said. Hey your blood's a little wonky like your iron levels are pretty much low you all the way throughout and basically you saying you know. I don't want to scare you. But i think you're having some sort of internal bleed that's causing. It could be stomach older. It could be healy activities. Or you know there. An can't that I remember them. Asking if i had a family history of colon cancer and i said yeah my dad had obviously they did some more tests and they decided you know what we need to get your co nas copy. Because things don't look right. They had the colonoscopy and they told me found a major mass in his colon

Trae Mancini Baseball Dave Sadegh Aaron Judge Andrew Benintendi Orioles American League Manzini Trae Sarah Perlman Beth Florida Dan Walk John NBC Colon Cancer
'Nomadland,' 'Borat' win at a socially distant Golden Globes

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 8 months ago

'Nomadland,' 'Borat' win at a socially distant Golden Globes

"The seventy fifth golden globes were handed out last night despite being socially distanced and costly distant there was still some drama at the golden globes one of the most poignant moments was when Chadwick Boseman won for Best Actor eight months after his death from colon cancer his widow told the world what her late husband would've said after his win for monitoring these black bottom he was thank god he would bring his parents thank insistence for their guidance and their sacrifice the night's top award Best Picture went to know mad land director Chloe's all saying this award belongs to the whole no management team she's the first woman of Asian descent to win Best Director at the globes and only the second woman ever to do so I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Golden Globes Chadwick Boseman Best Actor Top Award Best Picture Colon Cancer Chloe Oscar Wells Gabriel
Chadwick Boseman earns 2 nominations for NAACP Image Awards

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 9 months ago

Chadwick Boseman earns 2 nominations for NAACP Image Awards

"A popular actor who died last year was in line for some posthumous awards Chadwick Boseman's final two movies have earned him nominations at the end of laci P. image awards he has been nominated for his acting in ma Rainey's black bottom and the five bloods Bozeman who starred in Black Panther died last summer of colon cancer at age forty three his work in those last two movies have gotten increased attention since his death both movies also nominated for Best Picture at the image awards other nominees for Best Picture include one night in Miami that boys for life and jingle jangle AT Christmas story the ceremony is set for March twenty seventh and will air on CBS I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Chadwick Boseman Laci P. Ma Rainey Bozeman Black Panther Colon Cancer Best Picture Miami CBS Oscar Gabriel
Dr Fata: Seeing Yellow | 4

Dr. Death

05:00 min | 10 months ago

Dr Fata: Seeing Yellow | 4

"Patty hester was helping a patient at work in the emergency room on the morning of august. Sixth two thousand thirteen. It was busy morning. Her colleague came in the room with a patient and tapped patty on the shoulder. Come here right now come here. I'm rock with her towards break room i to have time what she said. Patti catch your doctor. Patty walked into the break room and stared at the tv quote. We are michigan. Hematology oncology here in rochester hills. Were fbi agents are executing our search warrant. My sources are also telling me that a doctor has been arrested on charges related to healthcare fraud s fbi helicopters. They swarmed in on this morning. And i'm looking at this news. It has named goes across then. Then i have my cell phone in my pocket. and it's like this. you can feel it vibrating. All my dad from that point on her cell phone wouldn't stop buzzing all day. One call was from the fbi. You'll be getting your chart than the news. Said we'd like to interview you. Patty went home. Her husband was in front of the tv. Federal agents say in court records that doctor for allegedly kept patients on chemotherapy. Longer than necessary to cash in on the billings agents allege for da also directed that patients be diagnosed with cancer in their medical charts. Even when they did not have the disease patty wondered. Was she one of them. She didn't have to wait long to find out the next day a dark. Suv with tinted windows. Pulled into the driveway. An agent stepped out of the car and patty opened the door. Her whole family behind her. He said i'm very sorry and handed me my chart in the disk. I just sir cry. My family sobbing sobbing. It was horrific. She put the disk into her computer and began to scroll through. It was just lie after lie after lie. The also gave her a list of oncologist that she could see to get a second opinion. Ten days later patty saw a new doctor for the first time she brought with her. The disc at the fbi had given her. After the dr ransome tests she came into patties exam room hugging. And i am so sorry and saw sorry. You don't have it you don't have a patty began to cry. Her doctor said that she wasn't yet sure what had made her sick in the first place but she was sure that patti didn't have cancer. You need to live your life. You need to live your life. You not gonna die. I said if you do anything for me could you just please write it down town. She's forty where you want me to write it. And so she whipped out a prescription pad. And that's when she wrote a tricia has has no evidence and diaz in the weeks that followed other fatah patients or their loved ones sought their medical records. Saint joseph mercy. Oakland hospital filled these requests free of charge but crittenden had a different policy in some cases. The hospital asked for more than a thousand dollars to fill. The requests fought. Victims protested outside the hospital eventually crittenden relented and waive the fees but the victims and their families still needed someone who knew the technical lingo to look over the records. That's what i did for my fun. Time in the evenings nurse angeles won tek. I would go through the patient's medical records in a way. I feel like for me anytime. Somebody reached out to me. I said yes i didn't. I felt that that was something that i could do. And maybe you know. Help with the guilt of i should have done more. I wish i could have done more. One of those requests came from michelle mannarino. Her mother joan had died in two thousand ten six months. After angela's visit fatah had treated joan for breast cancer but when they met at a hotel in a banquet room angela had some news from michelle. And i remember looking at her records and the chemotherapy and i remember one thing that struck me was one of chemotherapy. Drugs that she was given is typically given for colon cancer. And i thought with this is odd like why would you give this for a breast cancer diagnosis.

FBI Patty Hester Patty Rochester Hills Dr Ransome Patti Crittenden Cancer Saint Joseph Mercy Michigan DA Tricia Diaz Oakland Michelle Mannarino Joan Angela Angeles
'Ma Rainey's Black Bottom' could put Chadwick Boseman in select Oscar company

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:45 sec | 11 months ago

'Ma Rainey's Black Bottom' could put Chadwick Boseman in select Oscar company

"Film is called Ma Rainey's Black bottom. It premieres on Netflix. Michelle Pelino has more Ma Rainey's black finding premieres on Netflix, starring Viola Davis, says the title character and Chadwick Boseman in his final performance. The film is based on the 1982 August Wilson play. It takes Place one single afternoon in Chicago, 19. 27 in its studio where the great blues singer has come to make a record will be ready to go in 15 minutes already going, Madam says. We're ready to go, and that's way go around here. Tensions rise between rainy and her ambitious horn player played by Bozeman, who has big dreams, but racial unrest at the time, feed their frustrations. The film is dedicated to Bozeman, who died in August set 43 of colon cancer. Movie

Ma Rainey Michelle Pelino Netflix Chadwick Boseman Viola Davis Wilson Madam Chicago Bozeman Colon Cancer
Craig Melvin's brother Lawrence dead from colon cancer at age 43

Bloomberg Best

00:10 sec | 11 months ago

Craig Melvin's brother Lawrence dead from colon cancer at age 43

"Is dead because of colon cancer. Melvin posted the news on his instagram account Saturday. His brother was diagnosed four years ago and died Wednesday. I'm at Madison

Colon Cancer Melvin Madison
Marvel won't recast Chadwick Boseman's role in "Black Panther 2"

Fred + Angi On Demand

00:38 sec | 11 months ago

Marvel won't recast Chadwick Boseman's role in "Black Panther 2"

"Boseman to challa will not have a successor chadwick castaway in august at the age of forty three following as private battle with colon cancer. The head boss at marvel said that his role in black panther was so iconic transcends iteration of the character in any other medium from marvel's pass black panther too will be written and directed by ryan. Kugler it's set to be released on july eight twenty twenty two so long live to challa. No one else could have stepped into that role. And they're just leaving it where it was Hopefully they use some sort of. I don't know memorial or something when it

Boseman Challa Chadwick Castaway Marvel Colon Cancer Kugler Ryan
Tasmanian Devils May Overcome Transmissible Cancer That Nearly Wiped Them Out

Science Magazine Podcast

08:52 min | 11 months ago

Tasmanian Devils May Overcome Transmissible Cancer That Nearly Wiped Them Out

"You might have heard of the plight of the tasmanian devil. These carnivorous marsupials have been afflicted with a transmissible facial tumor a cancer that jumps from one devil to another when they bite each other in the face not as uncommon as you might think and as a result their populations have gone into steep decline despite these extreme population losses. The devils have been holding on and may even be turning a corner andrew store for and colleagues wrote about this potential turnaround in this week science. Hi andrew hi. Let's start with the downfall of the devils. This facial tumor disease. Dft when did arise and what has been. It's trend in it. Spread among the tasmanian devils. The devil facial tumor disease according to our new study originated. Probably in the late. Nineteen eighty s. It was actually discovered in the mid nineteen ninety s in far northeastern. Tasmania where people started discovering devils with large facial lesions that seem to grow. Initially that wasn't much of a concern because they've seen these types of lesions new places back since the nineteen seventies however when animals started dying in large numbers. People really started paying attention that this was some sort of transmissible disease shortly thereafter. A genetic study was done that showed that these lesions were actually a clone oil transmissible cancer. They were genetically close to identical so since its discovery the disease has actually swept across tasmania and sort of an east to west us. Fred and is now just reached. Some of the last uninfected populations on the west coast has media. Cancer is different from pathogens like bacteria or viruses. How's that affected our ability to understand the transmission of this disease in tasmanian devil. One of the big challenges has been its large genome size so studying. The genome of a virus is fairly straightforward because viruses like sars he'll be to only about eighteen to twenty eight thousand base pairs long. However the tasmanian devil genome is three point two billion bases about the size of the human genome so trying to track. The spread of the disease is much more challenging. In terms of computational power and genomic sequencing methods which weren't really available at the scale they are now when the disease was discovered. So in the study that we're talking about today. You apply to technique that has mainly in the past been used for viruses. What did you have to do differently to get this to work for transmissible cancer. We did complete genome sequencing of fifty one tumors than that being in our final analysis finding parts of the genome that are measurably evolving that is evolving at a regular rate or what we would call them. Killer clock is pretty challenging and in the end we screened about eleven thousand genes which took several months on the computer and found twenty that were measurably evolving clock like fashion. And the reason you want to do that is then you can look at how these or changing over time as the disease has spread and this allows you to estimate epidemiological parameters like the transmission rate and the proportion of the population. That gets infected overtime. So this is how you figured out that it came out in the eighties right. The disease likely originated in the eighties which is consistent with its discovery in the bid nineties because when a disease like this i started taking off. In a wildlife population it might be at fairly low prevalence and so people don't really notice it until it really takes off and our epidemiological parameter which is called our savvy which is equivalent to the transmission rate started to peak in our analysis just before the discovery which makes sense because the disease was rapidly increasing or exponentially increasing in the population. Let's talk a little bit about that transmission rate. That's something that you know using this analysis you're able to show it changed over time. Can you describe that trajectory we identify tumor lineages and in wanted around the mid nineteen ninety s in the other it peaked around two thousand and the really encouraging results of the study showed that in both major tumor lineages that seemed to be across. Tasmania now that the transmission rate declined to just about one at present and this indicates that the disease has reached some sort of stable state that is for every devil that's infected only one additional devil is infected and thus the main conclusion of the paper which is the disease is transitioning from an epidemic state in which it's exponentially moving across populations to an end state where it's just kind of at replacement is the kind of analysis you did hear able to tell you what has changed. Is something different about the tumor. Cells are the devils different. What's going on. We did find some mutations that seem to explain variation in transmission rates among the different tumor lineages and these are related to other types of cancer however these are candidates for downstream discovery at this point so they serve as good hypotheses for future research. And what's different about the devils. We have some other studies that show that also the devils seemed to be evolving in response to cancer. We see changes in the devil genome. That are also seem to be associated with possibly disease resistance. We've also seen spontaneous tumor regression in an increasing number of devils wild populations and we show that that might be related to regulatory changes in the in the devil so perhaps some jeans are up or down regulated in response to the tumor and we also found a mutation in the tumor. That seems to cause the tumor to shrink so a mutation actually when turning on a gene and this gene is implicated in human prostate and colon. Cancer the tumor growth actually slows in laboratory studies when we transact wild type tumors. Don't have this gene with the. Does this suggest that the disease will go away or that. It will coexist peacefully with tasmanian. Devils people really thought that tasmanian devils or on their way to extinction. I think this provides us cautious optimism about the future of the tasmanian devil. This transmissible cancer which is nearly one hundred percent lethal has caused a dramatic decline of this species of process. Entire range has me so they are certainly not out of the woods yet. However because this disease is socially transmitted early models predicted disease extinction because even if you have low densities of individuals the disease can still be transmitted because devils congregate and bite one another. Which is the way. The disease is transmitted for purposes of mayday or scavenging food however a growing number of studies from our group has shown through ecological modeling for example devils are predicted to persist on most scenarios. Some of those involve lower population densities than where they were initially but yet the devils will persist and in the subset of those cases. The tumor will also persist and we may see sort of endemic dynamics where there's populations like this study adds to the growing number of studies that the disease itself also seems to be evolving perhaps lower transmission rate because there may be evolutionary pressure on disease to be less lethal to the devils. Are people trying to figure out how to preserve the devils and will that strategy change with this understanding of the switch from epidemic too endemic. We certainly hope that our new study will help. Influence hearth rations strategy so when devil started declining there was captive breeding to maximize genetic variability in captive populations which are maintained in wildlife parks and some zoos and actually an island offshore from tasmania album. Riot island. where there's a free roaming population of not quite captive devils but devils were introduced there. These were referred to as captive insurance operations with the intent that if devils went extinct on the mainland they could be reintroduced or if devil population sizes or inbreeding reached really high levels. They could perhaps be introduced using a technique called genetic rescued increase genetic diversity in the wild populations

Tumor Disease Devils Transmissible Cancer Facial Tumor Andrew Hi Cancer Tasmanian Devils Tasmania Tumors Disease Resistance West Coast Fred Colon Riot Island
Chadwick Boseman honored with 'Hero for the Ages' award at MTV Movie and TV Awards

WBZ Morning News

00:32 sec | 11 months ago

Chadwick Boseman honored with 'Hero for the Ages' award at MTV Movie and TV Awards

"Touching night at the MTV movie and TV awards ceremony. More from CBS is Debra Rodriguez. What happens now? Relate Chadwick Boseman was honored with MTV s hero for the ages award for films like Black Panther. On Keitel and Robert Downey Jr presented virtually Mr Boseman truly embodied what it meant to be a superhero. The way he lived his life united people behind a higher purpose, and that will be his legacy. Bozeman died of colon cancer in August. He was 43 Deborah Rodriguez CBS

Debra Rodriguez Chadwick Boseman MTV Mr Boseman CBS Keitel Black Panther Robert Downey Jr Bozeman Colon Cancer Deborah Rodriguez
"colon cancer" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Diagnosed with colon cancer and why He's a big meat and potato eating. You would tell you that straight up. And he had had colon tumors and polyps before he was president. Even before he was governor of a state of Texas. He was a young guy at that time. Increasingly, this studies show mostly males, not so much females. Don't worry about this kind of figure out, but you gotta worry about it hits their own millennial Brian Mongol luch. Younger and younger man, a developing colon cancer even in the thirties and early forties. Why? Because consuming so much meat, which many of the medical authorities say is directly proportionate to people who get colon cancer, and I tell you I've known a lot of many women diagnosed with colon cancer. And they think it's a death sentence because they remember their moms and dads if they have a propensity, many of them and no longer here because of that, so they have an epiphany and right away. They want to stop eating any meat whatsoever and just eat fruits and vegetables become vegetarians. Vegans more so than any other cancer. Colon cancer does that to people and, hey, that's great. Change your life. But how many of you can think that you're going to eat fruits and vegetables each and every day, especially as you climb the ageing chart the demands on more and more fruits and vegetables each day. Look at me. I'm 66. The analytical charge says. You have to have the equivalent of 32 31 different fruits and vegetables a day. I don't know my there's just no way. I can't chop duel that, plus it's expensive. Think of it, as opposed to getting them in tablet form with balance in nature dot com is already crushed them pulverize them, sanitize them. And give you all you need in a tablet for my pop two in the morning to a night I'm good to go and so can you, But you can mooch.

colon cancer president Texas
"colon cancer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But you can't be blinded and you need to be wary of what could go wrong and where the costs are and the peril of our actions. So when you think about people who deferred to things happen for a reason, people who Who hand that back to someone in a bad place like Kate, who has stage four colon cancer. What's your response? I just watched my brother leave the world with colon cancer. You know, Harry, thank you. Been thinking about this for a couple of years is In some sense, That's the question of life, which is What's the reason I'm here? And why do I go when I have so many precious relationships and things to do in the world? And I know you've thought a lot about this. Kelly like When we asked that question was the reason for this the end of life for This disease. We get to the rial essential inquiry, right? It gets us to like why my Here and that in our own what William James really encourage us and it's a great tradition in American thought of find out the answer on your own, you know, and you will arrive at your philosophy of life. But I worry about when we turn over the answers to other people and to institutions as a lot of people have Yes. So when you say things happen for a reason, it can almost feel like You're adapting a posture of passivity. I agree. I agree. And and you know, that is a deep worry that we handed over Teo ideologues or two institutions that provide answers, which is ah, deep tendency. The other thing that that phrase everything happens for a reason. Denies us. The opportunity to think about is is that well, you know, parts of life are really complicated and chaotic and unfair and unfair and unpredictable. And that's part of the game, too. There's a lot of science that says, you know, as I encountered grappling with my own brother's passing is which was unfair and he was way too young is We have to face that stuff squarely, too, and not just handed off. What was your brother's name? Ralph? It's for you off. Thanks, Doctor. Thank you. Kelly took a lot of notes during that conversation. Here's what I jot it down. Pain comes to everybody. All our specialness. All the particularities of our lives. Don't exempt us from suffering, and that should make us much nicer to each other. When tragedy hit someone you love better to listen more and talk less. May we count ourselves lucky If we have only had one belly button. There's no cure to being human Kakarrot E is the theater of life..

colon cancer Kelly Kate Harry William James Ralph
"colon cancer" Discussed on Thrive Bites

Thrive Bites

08:43 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Thrive Bites

"Invasive type of screening options for patients. So you know there are stool based tasks that look for microscopic amounts of blood in the stool most recently, one of the newer tests not only looks for blood, but it also looks for. Certain proteins or parts of DNA that are shed by large high-risk polyps and colon cancer, and so if any one of those things is identified, it kind of flags it as a positive. So, those are options for people that are less invasive than a colonoscopy. But let's say if you choose the the the the stool test route, the immune, a chemical stool test route whether it's simply looking for blood in the stool you're looking at needing to repeat that test every single year if we're talking about the other tests, the that incorporates the the stool DNA which is known as Cola guard Then if it's negative, you would need to repeat that in three years. So it really depends on. What type of test you're doing which will determine the the timing of your next? Screening. So, let's say you have a patient for example that would opt for the less invasive you stole tests right like could they go for you? That screening period from fifty, the seventy five for example, just on the stool tests or would you recommend like? Hey, you know I think it might be a good idea. We throw in scope you know somewhere in there like could they go theoretically from fifty to seventy five without having to do A scope, would you recommend that if it's someone who is average risk without any symptoms than that is an option for them to to only have to do annual stool tests, but it's really important I emphasize the importance of this if someone decides to go that route, it's really important not to miss not to prolong the the test, the duration between tests. It's very important that every single year that that tests get done. yeah, and we can be so busy in our lives that we can put it off for forget about it. So but what's the importance of emphasizing these choices? Is that many options rain and we have? Enough knowledge and experience and data. You know to be able to say like, Hey, you know this works you know but we just have to educate the patients educate and reinforce that relationship between patients in healthcare provider to be able to say like, Hey, here's your options. Let's get this done. You know in review their history. Which is a nice segment to you know as we close out like what are the things that you would recommend like looking out for like what are the signs and symptoms we talk about this in the beginning but like you know, what are what are things like you know someone was curious like? I am really distraught with you know Chadwick Wolfson's death. You know I know a lot of people that had colon cancer like how can I? What are some things I need to look forward to be like, Hey, you know this is a red flag I need to go see my doctor for things to ask them when they see them. So it's yeah, I'm glad you kind of brought us back to. To the the different symptoms that people should be looking for. You know you know typically when we're talking about colon cancer screening were thinking of someone who's completely symptomatic right someone who based on their age and their family history requires a screening. But when we deal with a systems alarm symptoms that require a diagnostic evaluation that's completely different. So you know for heat for especially the young. Population under fifty. It's really important that if anyone is having rectal bleeding, please don't attribute it to just hemorrhoids. It's very, very important to have that evaluated by a gastroenterologist. Even your primary care doctor start the conversation. Let him know how often that the bleeding you're seeing the bleeding it's really important to to be mindful of maybe changes in in your bowel habits whether. Regular let's say with with not having destroyed and all of a sudden you know you're you're going several days without a bowel movement it's not getting any better. You try to modify your diet. Don't wait months and months to let someone know about that. It's really important that you start that conversation. With your with your primary doctor other healthcare provider yeah. I'm so glad that you brought that up because a lot of people you know from my experience working with these patients is they attribute to hemorrhoids basically it's like, oh I just ate a bag of you know flaming hot cheetos and you know it's bleeding and I haven't pooped in a few days and those are just attributed to that. Young and older and and I'm just like, no any type of blood you know we gotta make sure that you know we. Do our due diligence and follow through like you said. So you can't over overstate this enough on really really glad that you brought that up. So. Absolutely, and especially now that we're seeing this the slow rise incidents and younger people know in the past, we would just say you know less likely anything dangerous anything significant. Probably hemorrhoids work on your fiber for several months and let us know but. It's really hard for someone to just attribute the that rectal bleeding to simple hemorrhoids. So it really is important that people. Get out talk to your doctors listened to your body's and and really kind of start that conversation. Yeah. Yeah. Definitely and so you know as much as we love Chadwick Bozeman how much you brought to the world I would hate to. See other people not actually talk about this and go to their doctor and and and start that conversation. So Tom, thank you so much for being on the show today I, really appreciate you taking the time and sharing your expertise on any follow up. You know a finishing thoughts on you know to give to the audience. Well. Thank you very much for the opportunity? It's it's always a pleasure. It's always great talking to you Colin. I'm really excited for what you're doing and you know the audience you're trying to reach. I think. As. Far as any last minute thoughts, really my suggestion is just to emphasize that colon cancer is a big problem here in the United States it's a very common problem and it's very lethal if caught Leo. So really start that conversation listened to your body's if something's not right if you're having abdominal pain, erectile bleeding or changes in your all habits just and it's not going away after a few weeks. It's really important that you reach out and. Medical. Attention. So yeah. Yeah. Yeah definitely. Yeah. Thank you. Again for those lasts last thoughts. Guys again you know this is a special episode. Forthright Bites on please as much fun and conversational. We tend to get in the previous episodes in over time you know the information comes across says, you know we want you to be well, you know we want your family to be well, you know these are tough times were in the together and but don't. I. Don't want to overstate You know see your doctor and see your healthcare provider and get checked health is wealth thin I always emphasize health is priority. So thank you again, guys this has been another episode three bites. If you'd like this, you know please subscribe and follow on if you feel like this is. Of importance to someone else please share this as well, and we will see you on the next episode. Thank you, everyone. Hey, guys. That was another episode three bites. If you like that episode, please describe and follow for new episodes and don't forget to rate us on apple podcasts..

colon cancer Cola Chadwick Wolfson Chadwick Bozeman apple United States abdominal pain Colin Tom Leo
"colon cancer" Discussed on Thrive Bites

Thrive Bites

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Thrive Bites

"Process meets as well. Hey guys be taking a short break but don't go anywhere. We'll be right back. Welcome back to thrive bytes. Let's get back to the interview. And that's definitely an increased risk of curing meets. US high salted type of food that SORTA thing. Bar Type Foods definitely increases the risk there yet not to mention the saturated fat in the Trans Fat that comes along with this and like you say, you bring up a good point with the how it's prepared because you know when you're grilling when you're frying something, it increases the. Which is the Silicon and products basically fancy way of saying you know adding towards that oxidative stress. So you know we talked about the risk factors. So let's talk about the screening options you know getting hitting hitting this back home. You know what are what are they available screening options that we have and you know what would you recommend people that? Are. Curious. That WanNa talk about talk to their healthcare provider or gastroenterologist or GI provider like where we start. Yeah so So I think it's important that everyone just start the conversation with a healthcare provider whether that your primary care doctor or South someone that you're seeing for any other type of condition that can then lead you to to either a GI doctor someone else to give you these other options that are available but. I WANNA make sure my goal for today is to to really get get awareness out there and make sure that you know at least help make people feel more comfortable with the idea of colon cancer screening number one like I said, it's just really being able to start the conversation. If you have questions, please talk to a a healthcare provider whoever that may be and they'll be able. To Guide you in the right direction at least give you some more information about when it might be a good time to start and then number two, a colon cancer screening doesn't necessarily mean you're going to need a colonoscopy per se. It's an option out there. Colonoscopy is a great tool that we use but there are some other types of tasks, stool based tests that are also great. I always say to my patients the best screening tests that is available is the one that actually gets done by the patient and I'm so as long as we're doing the screening tests that are options for every single person. As long as we're doing them in completing them and following up on them, that's the most important thing. Yes. So for me as a family care provider you know we talked mostly about the stool test annual stole tests and colonoscopy and I know there's a lot more you know back in the day it was more sigmoidoscopies writing, and then now we have more like DNA tests and things like that. But my my my observations over time is that patients have been skittish about like the procedure rain and what goes down with the procedure tell us the pros and cons with getting the stool tests, which is correct me if I'm wrong in recommended depending on which age you you work with your healthcare provider starting to which age but you get this annual leave with stole test and the pros and cons to that what are the steps for that in the pros and cons for the scoping. So I mean. I like to break it down into kind of the more invasive type of options and the the less invasive type of options. So when we talk about kind of our quote quote gold standard. That's your colonoscopy You know the the the pro of the colonoscopy or the benefit is that you know it's a great screening option that allows us to visualize the colon wall but in order to do so we need to kind of cleanse the the bowels and a lot of people just don't want to have to deal with that type of cleanse. And then the second part is it usually involves some sort of sedation. So it can sometimes be a little bit difficult for people to find You know, let's say a ride home after the procedure. And try to schedule around other people's schedules if you will but it's a great test because not only do in are we able to visualize the coal in wall able to take away or remove polyps or precancerous growths at that? Point in time. So it's therapeutic at the same time. You know as far as you know, the the other options that are available if someone says, you know what? I really don't WanNa go through anesthesia and the idea of colonoscopy I know is not pleasant, but you'd be surprised how. Relieved people are afterwards because we do make sure that people are completely comfortable. They don't remember thing they're completely comfortable. They do not have any pain or tenderness down below afterwards even if we remove large polyps they, they feel you know for the most part great they may have a little bloating from the air that we instill in the bowel but usually that bloating is very short lived, and by the time they really wake up from anesthesia that sensation is completely gone. But you know that's you know as far as the the noninvasive type of options that are available. You know we we have other options and depending on which test you do. For example, if you know depending on which test you do will determine the timing of your next colonoscopy. The timing of your next colon cancer screening. So I I, you know I started by talking about the colonoscopy. You know some people ask me when will I need another one? While you know if we don't, if you're considered someone average risk and without a family history of colon cancer as symptomatic, no type of Gi symptoms that sort of thing. I, don't find any polyps. Then you don't have to bother with screening for for another ten years but let's say if. You have one or two polyps. The timing of your next colonoscopy will be determined based on the type of policy, the number of polyps and the size of those policies. So we really individualized the screening or the surveillance in that instance. Based on based on what we find yeah. Yeah. But for the in between so you're referring to like the scoping right. So the inbetween would you suggest you know getting the stole tests in between on an annual basis? No so once someone goes through a colonoscopy the findings of the colonoscopy. Again, it's individualized but the findings on the colonoscopy as well as their family history is kind of taken into account and that determines the timing of the next step procedure for the surveillance. So as I mentioned, you know if someone's average risk without any symptoms, no findings on colonoscopy again, they don't. have to worry about repeating any colonoscopy or any type of colon cancer screening for a minimum of ten years. So a lot of people like that option because they're busy, they don't WanNa have to deal with you know going to their primary doctor and having to to submit stool samples, and I guess that's a good segue into the less invasive type of screening options for patients. So you know there are.

colon cancer bloating US GI cancer
"colon cancer" Discussed on Thrive Bites

Thrive Bites

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Thrive Bites

"We're in September. We're in the in the pandemic. What I what I found you know as we talked about, you know the past slash few months. We did UH during we're in season three and season at the season two when the pandemic hit I started highlighting a lot of covid related like when I started a wellness series with that and then throw it over time. You know we just heard a lot of health disparities. The reason why we're being making you know we're talking about the stats is because you know people of Color Black and browns and you know they are disproportionately affected. With colon cancer. But with like Diabetes Heart Disease you know all these different things and I don't know Tom in relation to colon cancer. Why people of color are more but in terms of other disease processes, you know you have health access contributes to it. You have poor quality diet contributes to it and you know just so many different reasons and it's just it really sucks. You know and this this been hitting the news over and over and over again and you know we need to, we need to work hard to kind of you know not. Blacks, but like across the board be, would it help as many people as possible? So I don't know from a coin transit perspective like. Is there a reason why in religious say like you know y you know there are affected absolutely the whole goal is to raise awareness and. That's a great. We. Really don't understand why the there's this such a disparity within. The different races however we assume at this point that it has something to do with the socioeconomic status and their access to health care as you mentioned. As, well, as access.

colon cancer browns Tom
"colon cancer" Discussed on Thrive Bites

Thrive Bites

10:55 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Thrive Bites

"CHEF DOC on every episode I talk with health and wellness experts from all over the world such as doctors, chefs, Dietitians coaches in many more. And I, sit down with them and have casual conversations about plant based lifestyle, how to elevate our emotional resilience and what it really means to thrive and I bring all of this to you. So. Let's get to this week's episode. Okay guys. So welcome to another episode of Thri Bytes. I'm your host, Collins Zoo and thank you for listening on today. We have a very, very, very special episode for you guys today I would loathe to introduce to you my good friend POW in medical colleague Dr Tom Split up those say hide everytime I everyone good afternoon. How are you? So. So glad that you're here, today and You know thank you so much for coming on. Well, thank you for having me and giving me the opportunity. Yes, Yeah So for those you who do not know who Dr Tom is Tom is a practicing gastroenterologist out in Olympia. Fields. Illinois He works at Cuny located twenty five miles southwest of downtown Chicago, and He's very actively involved. In Graduate Medical Education Program at Franciscan has. Olympia, afield teaching, internal medicine residents, and gastroenterology fellows He received his medical degree from the West Virginia School Vasu Medicine, both of our Alma Mater and shuttled to them. And completed his internal medicine residency out and Lutheran General Hospital and his Gi Fellowship through mid Western University, and he's board certified in both internal medicine and gastroenterology. So super excited for you to be here. Thank you once again, we are such good buddies and pals I remember the days where you know before I went super plant based like six years ago. We would you know be out in Pittsburgh and. Doing, our Sushi runs from our rotations and just having. Such a ball. I think your favorite role was like, was it like spicy tuna hand roll was your like your favorite role. You remember that it's hard to go wrong with that. So Definitely was one of my favorites. And Your family's originally from Greece, right? That's right. Yeah. So why tell us like a typical? Typical favorite dish. You know because I remember coming to your place having to do a rotation and you know like you know most people when they think of Greek Greek food they'll think of legs spinach pie. They'll think of like you know lamb his your go-to dish. So I, you know my go-to dish tends to be a fresh salad We call it than a village salad and that just includes basically some cucumber fresh tomato times. People will add a little bit of lettuce to that some fettuccine oil and vinegar, and it's just it's one of the best things you can ever eat. The Oregano to on that so Yes ma'am I can't forget that too Yeah. It's always good good fine and Tom, and I go way back and we always we always really gather around food and community you know that's. Usually how our friendship kind of blossom from there. So and I'm so happy that he's doing his thing. So the reason why we're making this special episode is You know today is September seconds. I can't believe it September already and Last last Friday. We just heard about the recent passing a Chadwick Bozeman who for those in the audience know as the star of Black Panther and many many great black iconic movie roles like Jackie Robinson James. Brown. Sir serves good Marshall and he just did these acting roles like you know fantastic and stupendous lead us guest gifted actor. As I was heartbroken knowing his passing because he was such a great human being. But what was more surprising to me was of the reason why passed and the reason why past was from colon cancer you know a lot of people didn't know a lot of. You know a lot of Hollywood didn't know he was. Diagnosed Stage three. About four years ago in twenty sixteen. And what was more impressive was that he was able to act in these great movie roles throughout. His diagnosis. And, the reason why I've asked Tom, the beyond was we really wanted to highlight kind of like a public service announcements with. With colon cancer with gut health and all things relating to that and. really bring it to light because it's something that we could definitely talk about Definitely you know there's a lot of great screening options and we can talk about you know how what are the things you know increasing the likelihood of getting this Really. Terrible condition and what are the things that you know that decrease the likelihood of getting this disease and I think it's a very important thing to talk about. You know, and that's why I have come on. And my own personal journey with this I had a had a grandmother on my mother's side that pass from this and I was actually in school. I don't know if you knew this Tom but I was actually in school doing the West. Virginia at the local Five K trump run in I. Think Spin More than few years ago now but I was doing this five k when actually heard. Of that, my grandmother was in the hospital and my parents are actually there to support the. yes. So we weren't there to kind of you know see your pass unfortunately but my my my takeaway was that you know her death was you know quicken painless but she was diagnosed a lot. You know a later in stage. Cancer. So I'm sorry to hear of that about your grandmother and I think a lot of people can relate to a similar story Colon cancer is very common unfortunately and either you personally have been affected or someone that you know definitely has. been affected by some someone with colon cancer. So thank you for sharing that story. Yeah Yeah I, appreciate it So let's get down and dirty with it and Let's go over like quick facts and figures. You know like where where have you seen the numbers in terms of where Raton twenty twenty or maybe like eighteen or nineteen data in terms of you know how does calling chance to rank with the other? You know you know cancer is that kill off? America's stick with the United? States. Colon. Cancer is the second leading reason why people die from cancer? So it's it's a very big problem here in the United States it affects. Roughly a hundred thousand people every year who are diagnosed with colon cancer in roughly fifty thousand people every year will die from the disease. Yeah so that's almost like if you break down the math that's almost like a thousand per week that's it's it's crazy. You know What I what I you know I was looking into this as well. When I was listening to an expert say like almost if you break that down even further, it's almost like one out of twenty people that you will meet. You know we'll be diagnosed with it and You know like he says almost like one out free of that. You know will. Die and keen we talk about in terms of like you. You had talked about males and females. You know does males get this more or do females like who which gender? Gets affected more. So that's a really good question. So in general, we're looking at about four percent of both women who will be diagnosed with colon cancer. In their lifetime. We consider this this number based upon kind of average risk person someone who? Doesn't have any family member in their family history with colon cancer high risk type of colon polyps I own. So the incidence of colon cancer is about thirty percent higher though in men when we compare it to compare them to two women however the lifetime risk is similar because women tend to live a little bit longer than Matt. But in general when we think of Gender affecting the the incidents for sure males have about a thirty percent higher incidents compared to women's and for those an honest that doesn't know what that means. That means like the number of new cases that are presented. By the number of new cases within a specific period of time. Yeah, yeah, exactly I definitely want to highlight the ethnicity, the color background with this and you know from my and you can correct me if I'm wrong like from what I got was you know Africans American, you know China would bozeman was black you know. We found that for like twenty percent higher than like Hulk Asians do you find that to be true? Yes so studies demographic studies have shown that the incidence rate for. For Having Colon, cancer is twenty percent higher in African Americans compared to a occasions at least here in the united. States out as why in the past we recommended that all African. Americans who are average risk again. Start their colon cancer screening at around age forty-five. Age Fifty for everyone else Yeah Yeah, and you know what you know..

colon cancer Cancer Dr Tom Colon cancer Dr Tom Split Collins Zoo Olympia Franciscan Lutheran General Hospital Pittsburgh Greece Cuny West Virginia School Vasu Medi bozeman United States Chadwick Bozeman Chicago Western University
"colon cancer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Not only politics and I think the big news in addition to all the big new news because we have ah protests and what the president has done and more shootings and more killings, but also The fact that Chadwick Boseman ended up dying of colon cancer at the age of 40, three's a star of Black Panther. We have a member of the cake if I family Who is suffering from Ah colon cancer and is going to share the story with us. And it's a her And you don't often see Ah, someone of that age. Time. So anyway, she'll be joining us a little bit later on, and that's a nine o'clock and I had no idea What Alex come in and said this person has colon cancer and is willing to go public. Remember Katie Couric, who was on NBC for a million years was on today's show and known as she hated it. She was a good journalists, and the only way people describe her was perky. She hated perky anyway, Her husband died of colon cancer, horrible death, and she took care of him and so too Publicized the importance of a colonoscopy. She had a colonoscopy done live on TV. Her colonoscopy. And it was extraordinary it wass. Ah, it just was. I mean, what I would you do a colossus be live on television. I doubt it. I don't know. Ah, I would do the sound effects. Ah, I don't know. Actually, you're out. If that's happening, you have a terrible anesthesiology. That's true. Ah, today you are, you know, they used to do it under gentle twilight sleep ah at Dr Cummings office and then decided that that's not the place. Wrong facility wrong Place period. So anyway, we're going to talk a little bit later on about her colon cancers. Very moving story and good for her for going public. This person by the way, just heard you in your intro. And she wants me to tell you Well, she might not. But she says she's not suffering. She's beating it. Good for her. She is so freakin optimists good for her, And she has a very, very good chance. I'm sure her prognosis is excellent. And, uh, I'm giving her to go forward. You know what in her case? Heck? Yeah. Okay. That was very sexist of you to admit that. All right, guys, let me say a quick Hello, Jennifer Jones. Legal and weighing Good morning. Yeah. Alex. Good morning, Marin. And John is out today. We do have Tony who is in so we went from the mad Hispanic to the mad Hispanic. No, no, Tommy Italian. I'm sorry. Yeah, Yeah, yeah. Yeah. So we always do try to get some kind of ethnicity going on this show. That's the story. We're going to cover a little bit later on boards of on Boards of companies and a law that has already been introduced to make sure that people of ethnic people of color and across the board so to speak, joined the boards. So Tony of a very good chance of staying here, No Italians, they're not part of it. Italians are not considered ethnic ethnic minorities. Tony, you're history about the French. Are they good? No French or not good French another and they're always leaving anyways. Quickly possible Canadians. Ah, yeah. Yeah, The French were trying to get on the list, but they gave up. That's true. Well, said all all right, guys, let's do it. We have a lot to cover. Handle on the news, Jennifer Jones, Lee, Wayne Resnick and me. Lead story..

colon cancer Katie Couric Jennifer Jones Tony Alex colon Chadwick Boseman NBC president Dr Cummings Marin Tommy Italian Wayne Resnick John Lee
"colon cancer" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"With colon cancer. He was 43 merger, Jordan and this is Fox News from the Cremation Society of Minnesota Weather Center. A beautiful day today with lots of sunshine. Some clouds in the afternoon and behind the upper seventies showers and storms developing tonight Low near 60, then clearing out Monday afternoon high 72 I meteorologist Mace Michael's on Twin Cities News, Doc Am 11 30 currently 57 degrees I. Heart radio is the number one Choice for music, radio and podcasts. All in one. No one makes it easier to hear everything you love in one free act. It's alright here. My favorite radio station. It's every song that I've hit that thumb up button thing That's a perfect next. My favorite song. I like listening to my station back home, So I feel like I'm going somewhere is the only way I get a vacation I heard has it all. If you're not one of the tens of millions who have the APP, download I heart radio for free today and start listening. Justice. True Information and entertainment 86 Twin Cities News Talk Am 11 31 3.5. Thiss program has been pre recorded. Greetings, Mr Mrs Middle America and all the ships at sea Coast to coast Am this.

Cremation Society of Minnesota Mr Mrs Middle America colon cancer Fox News Mace Michael sea Coast Jordan
"colon cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"For free informative booklet and DVD Hey doctor Lieberman were back we are back in a few weeks ago I talked about my own colonoscopy I always advise people to have colonoscopy if you haven't had it or if you have symptoms and I had cost could be a few weeks ago and it was really very important to have you from the midst of this crisis each one of us has our health and our health is so important even during this crisis and had my colonoscopy and I spoke about it because I think it's important to understand for people that it's an easy procedure and safe procedure in capable hands and there's a preparation the day before we take things to clean out our bio sore about was as clean as possible we want the ball to be as clean as possible so as much can be seen the idea of colonoscopy is to find pre cancerous lesions that can be removed before they grow to cancer and in America the risk of colon cancer and rectal cancer is falling precipitously because a lot of people are getting Colin Oscar peas and I've had two dear friends who died from colon cancer sad to say because they didn't have colonoscopy one man collapse of his daughter's wedding he had bleeding he had a colon cancer was diagnosed and then succumbed after a treatment a brilliant doctor another doctor from Italy the first one was from South Africa another woman from Italy linguist and physician good friend died of colon cancer also diagnosed only after it traveled the idea with colonoscopy is to find cancer early find it early and most likely will never become a cancer find.

America colon cancer Italy South Africa doctor Lieberman Colin Oscar cancer
"colon cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Colon cancer than ten years ago she had surgery should surgery for the colon cancer is all public record you can go check it out if you want there's an article today in the Wall Street journal by Brett B. R. E. N. T. candle K. E. N. D. A. L. O. and well she had three weeks of radiation for cancer of the pancreas now the wallstreet journal which is usually a print two good paper or was it goes on to say in the one two three four fifth paragraph justice Ginsburg was successfully treated for colon cancer in nineteen ninety nine and then thank Chris cancer ten years later well I would dispute that if you stood for pancreas cancer was surgery and then the cancer comes back in the pancreas and there were seven was biopsy positive in the pack christening every three weeks of radiation sounds like the treatment wasn't successful in cancer successful treatment means the cancer goes away and stays away so how can you call Rick current cancers successful so I wouldn't call it that at all number one number two had she come to us ten years ago or anyone in many people dead we should pancreas cancer ten years ago in twenty years ago and more with radio surgery the success rate where we aim to beam is over ninety percent where we attack the cancer of the pancreas and with us is no opening there's no cutting there's no spread of the cancer cells and it could be that the surgeon spread the cancer cells when here she operate on the patient so that's possible wiles to this cancer seemingly come back in the same spot the pancreas where should certainly ten years ago now should weeks and weeks of radiation of course with us they're only be a few treatments pinpoint radio service allows there's high success rates much more than the standard radiation fewer treatments more precision this is the work that we do every day first of America when all the other hospitals and facilities and doctors were doing their thing.

Wall Street journal K. E. N. D. A. L. O. colon cancer Chris cancer America Brett B. R. E. N. justice Ginsburg Rick
"colon cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"This past year she dropped a colon cancer in the C. compute a mass of the cecum shed some lymph nodes involved at some symptoms should a massive starting mass and some bleeding and some in the media and she refused all the surgery refused all the chemotherapy says this terrible fear of anesthesia and this fear of surgery and just the refusal to go in the hospital and she came to me with his colon cancer the cecum part of the colon where the large file the small bowel meat and she chose our treatment and we treated I talked about all the options she was very eager says such good experiences with the kidney cancer when our surgeons twenty years ago she had to remove the kidney well obviously she live twenty more years doing well cancer free in remission with their two kidneys like god intended and now she intends to be treated to those seek the sick colon cancer and Richard last year and she came for the first follow up and got a skin and you can already see the cancer mission the masses already shrunken by eighty percent she's in remission she's moving bile she's had no blood transfusions she's doing great no chemo no cutting those surgery for her she co colon cancer treatment takes minutes she lays down in the frame we make a mold around the body it's all old phone there's no claustrophobia there's no cutting there's no pain or stolen decisions we send an invisible beams from thousands of angles to attack this seco colon cancer and she is so pleased and she's so please of I'm so pleased for her this mass is already shrunken down this is the work that we do.

colon cancer kidney cancer Richard
"colon cancer" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Today visit stop colon cancer now dot com right now doctors without borders medical teams are operating in some of the most remote and dangerous corners of the world one front yards become front lines when disaster rops when disease rages when communities collapse under crisis at the crossroads of conflict an epidemic with no hospitals that's where we operate we go where conditions are the worst because that's where we need it most he nearly seventy countries we're saving lives threatened by by disease in catastrophic events donors are vital to our mission your response is critical to our response in places for a few others will go that's where we operate learn more doctors without borders dot or American war fighters going to battle if all goes well they'll come home but not everyone makes it all the way home it's estimated that over half a million current war fighters will return from service diagnosed with PTSD for over forty five years help heal veterans I'm not for profit organization has crafted a way to help returning veterans create their way back help us heal fats to learn more visit he'll that's dot org that's he'll that's dot org Sean.

colon cancer
"colon cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

11:54 min | 2 years ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"Do we know how often polyps are missed? I imagined musty tend on the size and the degree of flatness of them. But what do we know about that? We don't we don't really know there are some sobering statistics though, that can kind of give us a sense of the an estimate of the magnitude of the problem. Anywhere from about three and a half to in some series as highest thirteen percent of all colon. Cancers are diagnosed in patients who reportedly had a normal screening colonoscopy less than ten years ago. So that's that. That's one starting point. We also know that there is tremendous variation among individual colonoscopy, providers at their rates of finding these lesions in the colon famous series out of Indiana University suggested that there may be as much as eighteen fold difference between the top detector in their program and the bottom detector and their program. So that gives you some sense of the spectrum. Interesting out. What do we do with patients who are on chronic adequate, relation say, with or friend, or one of the newer products? And we'd know they've had polyps in the past. And so we're expecting some polyp or sections. Can they remain on the antiquated? We need to bridge them. Excellent question in one, we encounter in practice virtually every day for the most part, our, our management of patients when when we're pursuing to me removal of Apollo were increasingly trying to lean towards the use of cold methods. Meaning those that do not require electric, Audrey to be placed through a snare or other device to actually remove the polyp, and we're increasingly reserving the that, that approach for lesions that are larger typically nine ten or, or, or greater millimeters in diameter or ones that have a, a large broad base stock where there may be a feeding vessel. So we're increasingly trying to use cold approaches to try to prevent post polyp to me bleeding, and we would generally say that for a patient coming in for what we think would be a low risk procedure. A diagnostic coal NAS copy with biopsies, for instance, an upper endoscopy with biopsies we generally as long as patients on medicines, like warford or in the therapeutic range, we would actually not stop them. We are, are traditionally not stopping Plavix, or, or the newer, thrombin inhibitors, either unless we end -ticipant that there's going to be a high risk intervention. So dilating stricture using a needle knife, or a, Kanye leading, the, the Bill airy tree placing a peg tube and then the use of hot techniques for polyps to me. Those would be good indications to have the patient off their medicine during the time of the procedure. And there we'd tipping. Cly insist on an I in our of one and a half or less struck about the current available screening tests. When I first started practice, basically, if we were gonna screened for colon cancer, we did a rigid practice copy examine a barium enema don't do those anymore, but what adequate tester out there right now. So currently the endorsed methods where there's fairly broad consensus in guidelines colon. Aw, Skippy is, is still probably the most commonly used screening method in the United States. Fecal immuno chemical testing, which is a newer method of detecting. Occult blood, flexible sigmoidoscopy is still endorsed, but probably only visualizing about half the colon. And so has some drawbacks there rigid proctology copy has gone, and berry is, is going. There are now increasingly few people that. Can interpret that. And it's, it's never been a particularly sensitive test, the newer, modalities like CT colon. Aw, graffiti are our endorsed, but maybe difficult to get covered, and then probably the newest test is the, the, the multi target stool, DNA test, which is also available and broadly, covered. Let's talk about that test who is a candidate for using the DNA based, fecal, fecal test short presently, the, the FDA labeling is approves the use of the test for average risk patients. So, you know, we talked earlier about those with family history. So those people who have first degree relatives with diagnosis of colon cancer in their fifties or younger, or who have advanced adenomas in young relatives. Probably would not be good candidates. Those genetic syndromes, and inflammatory bowel disease patients that we talked about earlier would would not be good. Good candidates. Or if you were personally known to have had prior polyps, especially advanced at enormous that, that would also be an off label use of that test if it were performed. So in general, it's the big the big basket of everybody else. And in particular, the hope with introducing that test into an already crowded field is that as you mentioned earlier, we try to encourage those one in three adults in the United States who are not participating in regular screening to, to come in from the cold, if you will that one in three number comes from survey data, if you actually do chart review and figure out whether or not people actually had the tests that they're reporting they head in the surveys. The answer comes down to probably one in two or not getting screened. I've had this happened with one of my patients where I did the fecal based test, and it came back positive at colonoscopy was negative. What do I do with that patient? Great question. One were asked every day. Keep in mind that the, the multi targets tool DNA test was designed to have a false positive rate of ten percent. And that was calculated from people who had completely normal structural colon. Aw skippy. Exams in a very large study prior to the pivotal trial that was conducted for FDA review that number probably is holding up in, in routine clinical practice. So there will be a substantial number of people now that over two million people have used that test who will be in the same position as the patient, you describe having a positive stool DNA test report. But a negative colonoscopy, the first thing that we need to. Do in that situation is to look at the colonoscopy report carefully is their clear documentation of intimation of the seek them with photograph, the appendices orifice or intimation of the terminal Ilian is there. Good or excellent quality, bowel prep to make sure that the dos campus was able to see everything he needed to or she needed to and was the withdrawal time during the coal NAS copy adequate by definition at least six minutes of inspection of the colon Yukos. In order to be sure that the every chance was offered to see any lesions if all those criteria are met at that point, we do not have any evidence to suggest that there is benefit from additional diagnostic testing that information comes from a couple of sources, we have three published abstracts and published manuscript showing that long term follow up. Of patients with discordant stool DNA and colonoscopy results are no more likely to develop cancer than a person with a negative stool, DNA tests, or Anna, negative colonoscopy, and that came out of chart review and data from both our practice here at mayo, and also from other centers participating in the average risk screening trial that got the test approved, we have a manuscript under review looking at that with a total of more than I believe, more than two hundred apparent false positive exams in comparison to more than a thousand true, negative exams, the rates of cancer, whether that's anywhere in the body, but particularly in, in areas that could exfoliating biomarkers into the GI track such as the lungs or the Pat ability, tree, or the GI Lumine those cancers, not more likely between the two groups and. Both lower than what would be expected from the general population as estimated by the, the seer project. What's in the horizon, we have screening tests for colon cancer? But that's pretty much the only organ, we screened for her a screen test with what else is out there that we may see in the future. Yes. So I think the, the research community is incredibly enthusiastic about blood based screening tests, so the concept, there would be a patient would go in for their annual exam and have a vial of, of blood drawn and some of the same markers that we look for in the stool, DNA tests might also be present in the bloodstream in patients who have an early stage cancer, and that would be one, you know, very exciting approach the big challenge with this so-called liquid biopsy approach is that we need to know in a human being who could have cancers arising anywhere in their body, where that marker came from, and that's a, a major point of emphasis in, in our laboratory to try to develop liquid biopsy screening tests for common diseases, such as colon cancer, but also to be able to. Detect multiple cancers at the same time, which would allow us to screen for diseases that we currently don't due to their lower relative incidents in the population. An important example, there would be pancreatic cancer, which will become more fatal than colon cancer, very soon, but it's not screened for in the general population because it's quote unquote, too rare. The other application for liquid. Biopsy type testing would be in diseases that predispose to cancer, where patients again or in a surveillance pathway, one particular example, where there's a lot of research interest right now is in the detection of Pata cellular cancer in patients with psoriasis. For instance, our current surveillance tools ultrasound, alpha beta protein, probably only about sixty three percent sensitive for curable stage, h c c the Pata cellular carcinoma a liquid biopsy test may be a big advantage over that performance. So that's I in development as we speak finally one big question I have to ask, and I don't know if you've probably like an answer to this, but why can't we get a prep that tastes decent at probably the most common thing that people are reluctant to have colon cancer screening? I wish we could have. Something that tasted a little better, I think that's universally in demand. We do have, you know multiple new choices to us. There are..

colon cancer Cancers United States FDA Apollo Indiana University Audrey Kanye Cly psoriasis Anna Pat sixty three percent thirteen percent six minutes ten percent ten years
"colon cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

15:01 min | 2 years ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"I'm your host Daryl Cheka, a general internist at mayo clinic in Rochester, Minnesota colon. Cancer is the second leading cancer killer in men and women in the United States. One in twenty will develop colon cancer during their lifetime, and it's predicted that over one hundred forty thousand new cases will be found in two thousand nineteen colon cancer screening is affected and colon. Cancer is preventable. According to the American Cancer Society colon cancer, incidence has declined as a result of screening, yet it's estimated that one in three adults from age, fifty to seventy five years have never had screening for colon cancer. Today's topic is colon cancer screening in our guest is Dr John Kissel, a guest Renner allergist add male clinic in Rochester. Minnesota, welcome John Darrow. Thank you for having me. Well, let's start. By talking about the patients who should be screened for colon cancer who when, when should this start happening? So there is broad agreement and endorsement by multiple guidelines that virtually all adults in the United States, who are at average risk for colorectal cancer should start screening at age fifty and that recommendation is supported by guidelines from the United States preventive services task force, the multi society task force for colorectal cancer screening, which includes the American gastroenterology association and the American college of gastroenterology, there are guidelines were issued about a year ago from the American Cancer Society that suggested that based on some modeling studies, and computer simulation, that there would be benefit to starting screening as early as age forty five even in the general population that recommendation has been met with some con. Traversee. I think the benefits are clear, but there may be substantial additional costs and there are some risks associated with screening. And so there's been a general call to develop evidence in support of changing or keeping the current guideline. There are some suggestions from, from other societies that we could start screening African Americans as early as age forty five but in general, I think there's broad consensus on age fifty patients who are younger than fifty and interested in starting screening. Early should talk with their doctor. And they should also probably talk with their insurance company to make sure that, that test would get covered. So that's the recommendations for average risk individuals. How about those who may have a family history of colon cancer, or a family history of colon polyps, do they need to have different recommendations? Yes. Now the evidence supporting those recommendations is. Is is, is low quality, but and there, there are recommendations from guidelines, especially the multi society, task force document from 2017 that suggests that patients who have a first degree relative with colorectal cancer, who was younger than age sixty or younger. When they when they had that diagnosis, or an advanced at enormou- that would be a large polyp one that contained villas or high-grade architecture. So I agree relatives of patients with young, onset colon cancer, or young, onset advanced adenoma, defined by age sixty should start colon cancer screening at age forty or ten years before their relative was diagnosed, whichever comes first, and it's specifically recommended that those individuals be screened with colon. Aw Skippy instead of other screening modalities, and that. They would receive their screening tests more frequently as often as every five years, if you have a first degree relative age, sixty or older with colon cancer or advanced adenoma guidelines have suggested that they start screening at age forty as well. But they can have any of the modalities, and they can be screened at the standard intervals for each of those tests. So no modification to how often so any change in recommendations for those who may have had like a grandparent, who has had colon cancer. No so presently, if, if you don't have a genetic syndrome, and we can talk about that later a second degree relative grandparent, or a first cousin or a an uncle or an aunt. Those individuals would not be believed to be at such increased risk that they would alter their screening pathway. Okay. All right. Well, who's it? Increased risk for getting colon cancer. So there are variety outside of, of family history or rather within family history. There are patients who will be recognized to have a hereditary cancer syndrome. The most common of those is a disease called Lynch syndrome in which patients, lack and one of four enzymes that repairs DNA damage during that, that may occur as part of proof reading errors from normal cell division and Lynch syndrome. Patients can have a very high lifetime risk of colon cancer upwards of seventy percent, depending on the mutation patients with familial ad Nomex polyposis. They will form literally hundreds if not thousands of polyps that will carpet, their coal, and during their teenager early adult years and they have virtually one hundred percent lifetime risk of colon cancer. Rare diseases, such as juvenile polyposis or point Yeager 's these are the syndrome it cancers. And oftentimes those are picked up by a very careful and detailed family history. Those are for the most part, autosomal dominant diseases, where you start recognizing not just a first degree relative. Like, you know, dad had colon cancer, but dad's dad had colon cancer or other cancers occurring in women such as those of the, the, the guy neca logic tracked would be a red flag for for provider to consider Lynch, syndrome, or other hereditary disorders. We are increasingly when we find a person who has colon cancer. It's also been recommended by USPS Tf that we test that tumor for either protein expression or DNA proof proofreading errors that would suggest the presence or absence of Lynch. Syndrome, and now we're increasingly testing all colon cancers that way to identify families who may be missed by the, the older pedigree based methods so outside of those genetic mutations. We also have over a million Americans, the United States who have inflammatory bowel disease Crohn's disease of the colon or all sort of colitis for ten or more years place. Those patients at increased risk, and that's actually, the one of the clinic environments, I practice in commonly, so each of those patients with inflammatory bowel disease, or these hereditary syndromes, fall well, outside of the standard colon cancer screening guidelines, and they now fall into a pathway that we call surveillance because of their increased risk. They're going to have a customized often very intensive and infrequently colonoscopy based testing regimen to try to spot those cancers early or remove high risk polyps. Okay. Well, most of my patients are elderly and. And I need to know. When can I stop colon cancer screening? Is there some general guidelines that absolutely USPS Tf broadly states that screening should be stopped around age, seventy five unless there are extenuating circumstances? There are also models that have been conducted that, that try to demonstrate where a number needed to screen and a number needed to harm intersect. Meaning winter, we actually doing our patients disservice by performing screening abroad rule of thumb for an older patient would be that if they had co morbidity that you thought would would reasonably shorten their life span that you should be thinking about that. And, and typically a rule of thumb for a healthy patient would be deciduous, have at least ten years of very high quality, high functioning life. So, you know, I think as we start to have conversations with patients who have COPD or heart failure, poorly, controlled diabetes, chronic kidney disease. It's important for, for people to understand that the colon cancer screening starts to carry increase risks both for sedation. And also the procedure itself. I've had patients look at me when I have this conversation and say, but are you canal condemning me to, to die of colon cancer? And the answer is no, I'm, I'm trying to avoid harming you with with screening test. That could ultimately result in an invasive exam, or well, the dilemma, I often have is a patient, who has had a history of colon polyps at minutes, polyps with the each colon us copy, and they're now getting into their eighties. Do I continue doing colonoscopy is and this despite their advanced age? But given the fact that they've had polyps I think, again, that needs to be an individualized conversation with the patients and again, their age, especially their medical coolmore biddies more so than than a numerical value for age begin to dominate the conversation. What do we know about how long it takes for a pile up to actually develop into a malignancy? So, you know, dogmatically we've thought that it takes about ten years for a garden variety polyp to arise from completely normal tissue to get all the way to the point of an invasive cancer. But that is essentially an empirical estimates, and the answer the realistic answers that actually nobody really knows. We are very interested when we're doing colonoscopy at making sure that we're finding large and small polyps because the success rate with, which we find polyps predicts, how likely we are. Prevent cancer. But it's not a one to one relationship for polyps that are smaller than five millimetres diameter, probably five out of every six of those polyps might invalid and go away. So I think advocates of a non invasive screening tests stool based tests are focusing, mainly on, you know, the, the success with which we identify advanced or high risk pre cancers as more likely to contribute to the prevention of the development of cancer over time. Right. Do all Flynn cancers, develop from polyps. We think that they do the question is whether or not, we're actually able to recognize the polyp when we're when we're doing an exam. So we think in general that all lesions will proceed through some form of a dysplasia transformation into what we would call. Athle- Apollo up before proceeding to cancer. But. We'll probably need to talk a little bit about the different types of polyps that can be found. And how likely we are during a screening program to find, and remove those, we traditionally think of polyps as the, the adenoma polyp, which in many persons minds, I would be sort of a mushroom cap or a polyp on a stock. However, we also know that probably a third of colon cancer is a rise from Sarid precursors. The, the sessile serrated polyp or sessile, serrated adenoma, the antiquated name are, are flat, and they don't have a particularly large raise surface, they can often be obscured by poor prep and can be very, very difficult to see as a community. We probably didn't even recognize these until less than a decade ago when. We started reporting them through our, our pathology group and actually started trying to devote attention to training and dos campus to recognizing these lesions. Their present predominantly on the, the right side of the colon for the most part. And they probably account for about a third of all colon cancers. So do do the Cecil pilots have an increased propensity to turn into cancer? Or is it just that they're often missed because they're harder to see? I think it's the latter. I think the time line with which the lesions would progress to cancer is probably similar for conventional adenomas our post Pollock to me, surveillance recommendations are similar in terms of the, the intervals for follow up based on features under the microscope. But I think it's actually the case that we tend to miss these more often it's been shown in large observational studies like the Nici har- paper from the New England Journal in. Twenty fourteen that the majority of cancers that occur between colonoscopy, the so-called interval cancers, actually bear molecular features of the series had pathway, and so that makes the argument that they were missed about hyper plastic polyps. Do they carry any malignant potential? They really don't now hyperplasia polyps. We tend to think of as a rising in the, the rectum or signaled colon. And when you have a pathology report that tells you that you have a hyper plastic Pol up on the right side of the colon. Typically, you know, proximal to the splendid Fleischer that might wanna give you pause, especially if the daas copy report says it was large and the daas COPA spent considerable time wagging it out and have a photographic features that would otherwise support the diagnosis of sessile to polyp. So the, the two may be subject to some inter observer. Disagreement by pathologists and the, the.

colon cancer Cancer American Cancer Society cancer syndrome United States Minnesota Rochester Dr John Kissel Daryl Cheka mayo clinic Lynch John Darrow USPS Tf New England Journal COPD bowel disease Yeager Renner
"colon cancer" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Your screening today. Visit stop colon cancer now dot com. You're listening to coast to coast AM on talkradio six eighty WCBS..

colon cancer
"colon cancer" Discussed on Fore Play

Fore Play

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"colon cancer" Discussed on Fore Play

"Now, I looked at. It's a colon cancer screening made easy. The only reason I could possibly imagine that Tyler would Email us. This is like do you shove the color guard up your ass or something? I'm I'm confused by the question colour guard cola guard sponsored a was the new sponsor of champion's tour event. I believe this past weekend. Okay. And all his Email said was you guys have to discuss cola guard as the new sponsor of this past weekend champion's tour event on the podcast this week. That's all he wrote, which leads me to believe based off his podcast, the type of listener that we have the type of things that we discuss this thing has to be something you like show is you have to insert it somewhere. I mean, there's just no way. You don't have to own like, it's got a cute name. It's got a very cute mascot. I'm looking at the website right now, they made it like this friendly guy that you shell up your ass. That's like, I don't know. If that's the case. I know nothing about this. No clue. However, there's just like if I'm putting together we don't get that Email for somebody unless something like that has to happen with this thing in this website has all the makings of. Yeah. It's going to be fine. You do this. It's very cute. That means. Something uncomfortable is going to have a hundred percent. And it's it's a what a champions tour sponsor. Oh, you start getting up to that point where they check your colon. Stick a couple fingers up your, but which we're not there yet. Right. No. I don't think. So. Okay. Say forty forty forty. That's not that bad actually, stick older that. So anybody look, I don't know exactly what the deal is. I looked for like two seconds at the, you know at the at the website. And like you said it looked like they're trying to make this fun friendly thing not harmful not a problem, not painful now, just your little buddy. And I guess based off what I saw I think, you know, my my show of the thing, you know, you're it's like when you're a kid, you don't know you collect the DNA through your stool. You gotta go digging through your shit like address apart. Yes. When what's his name sick the rhino?.

colon cancer Tyler hundred percent two seconds