17 Burst results for "College Of Fashion"

"college fashion" Discussed on Distorted View Daily

Distorted View Daily

07:51 min | Last week

"college fashion" Discussed on Distorted View Daily

"Well and again. Thank you guys so much. Support the program okay. Three quick stories. Then we'll get the hell out of here. We were just talking about the avian. Vn expo where new and exciting sex products are shown. I've got another one here. I don't know if this was actually shown at the expo but it is a new product you might be interested in it's called the true love tester. It's a bra that can't be unhooked without true love. Well that's the end of sex as we know it it'll be decades before man. He's another ted in his life. Loveless flings can never happen and unwanted. Gropers don't stand a chance as llamas. The lady is wearing the true love. Tester a built in sensor monitors the wearer's heartbeat making sure. The front class remains locked in less. Genuine excitement is detected. If it is the bra will automatically spring open an alarmingly violent fashion like flies offered chest the take out an ir something. If the is like in front of her there. I could smell lawsuits. The in it smells like boobs. The science behind. It is rather less scintillating grade born with the details now. What excited the adrenal. Oh jesus madurai love secretes for the fuck sake. Catecholamines which affects the automatic nerve in stimulates the heart said japanese lingerie maker ravi. Jor a sensor. Read the woman's heart rate and send it to a special app via bluetooth or analysis. Yeah then calculates the true love rate based on changes in the heart rate over time where the true love rate exceeds a certain value. The broad hook is surprisingly the device was invented by two men. It won't be going on sale anytime soon though perhaps owing to the dubious science behind it instead it's being offered as the top prize of a competition held to celebrate ravi zhores tenth anniversary. All you have to do is purchase thirty dollars or more of lingerie and you'll be entered to win this amazing true love. Dr bra second-story. We have for you today. I think on monday we were talking about mannequins at american apparel that actually have pussy hair. Fake push birkin's if you will. Well the one size fits all mannequin. Is getting a much needed makeover now. Wings beach wears mannequin in miami sport flower tattoos like some of the women who shop there the mannequins at american apparel downtown new york city store have pubic hair. Peeking through the lingerie and at david's bridal mannequins soon will get thicker wastes saggier breasts and back fat to mimic a more realistic shape. This will give a shopper. A better idea of what the dress will look on her says bitch. Michelle von plato. A vice president at the nation's largest bridal chain stores are using more realistic versions of the usually tall faceless mannequin in windows and isles. It's part of retailers efforts to make them look more like the women who wear the clothes. But that's not what women want to see. Fat broad looks at a mannequin thin mannequin wearing a an outfit. Like i'm gonna look amazing in this don't codes. And then they buy it and of course they look horrible in it but the point is they made the sale. Do you actually think some woman looking at a mannequin. That has fat rolling over the close seeping through like muffin tops. And shit right. Do you actually think women are going to look at the address. I wanna look like that. No pubic hair peeking. Out of the sides of some lingerie as one thing but back fat and saggy tits. You've gone too far all right where we at here Stores are using more realistic versions of usually toss. Felt face was mannequins and windows isles. It's part of retailers efforts to make more like the women who wear the clothes that means not only adding fat in hair but also experimenting with makeup wigs and even poses this career slump. I want a woman like slumped over a hot dog in one hand. All right this comes after two decades of stores cutting back on mannequins to save money many have been using basic white headless no arms. No legs torsos. That can cost three hundred dollars compared with the more realistic looking ones that can fetch up to fifteen hundred dollars. Now as shoppers are increasingly. Buying online stores are seeing mannequins as a tool to entice shoppers to buy forty two percent of customers recently pulled by market research group. Npd group say something a mannequin influences whether they buy it in fact mannequins ranked just behind friends and family. In terms of influence. People are dumb. Mannequins are the quinta quintessential silence sales people said eric saying bomb chair of the visual merchandising department at l. Im college fashion. College new york city stores were over a century. Robert mugabe who the fuck cares. Mark my words. This will be a huge disaster for the merchandising industry. I can pussy hair mannequins. go for it. That's gonna work because that's that draws your attention to the product right. oh i see pussy here. Oh what's this lingerie. That's kind of covering up the pussy hair. That looks kind of good but fat back. Fat and saggy tits. No never work all right final story. We have for you today parks. Oh yonne to the table. Dishes of korean beef. Kimchi casserole and rice. Sounds delicious switching. On her computer and camera she begins to eat alone as thousands of viewers watch and chat with her in real time over the internet. Is she naked. No is she hauling at her pussy. No she's just eating dinner and she's making nine thousand dollars. South korea's latest fad gastronomic voyeurism offer surprising amounts of money to thousands of online diners while serving up a sense of community in the wealthy asian countries increasingly solitary society. So this is like you don't have to eat by yourself because this is about as dumb as fat mannequins that being said if i thought for a second that a service like this would fly in america. I would be like so long assholes. And i'd be setting my own dinner table and webcam known as the diva part broadcast up to three hours. Every day from her apartment outside seoul driving during the show viewers sent her virtual balloons worth nine cents giving her an average monthly income of about nine thousand. Four hundred dollars. monthly. Yes park thirty. I'm moving south. Korea park fifty four said. The moshi she earned in one sitting was one thousand dollars. She began her show as a hobby three years ago but has since quit her job at a consulting firm and plans to get into retailing. People enjoy the vicarious pleasure when they can't eat this much or find that food at night or on a diet so we will just watch her eating. They don't even necessarily eat with her. She checked on the chat room while eating a korean style. Beef tar tar. Let's eat together. Park said responding to viewers message. That said i just rushed off and picked up. You co another.

Robert mugabe Michelle von plato thirty dollars Four hundred dollars america nine cents one thousand dollars three hundred dollars forty two percent nine thousand dollars monday today tenth anniversary Three quick stories Park three years ago two men thousands of viewers South korea about nine thousand
"college fashion" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

04:32 min | 3 months ago

"college fashion" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"That was the second time in the game that I believe the Bears got home was Donna Call Jalen Johnson picks up the pass interference when, late in the fourth quarter there BJ more along the sidelines, Johnson just making a play on the ball. Howard and D. J. Moore's arm got locked up with Taylor and Johnson through no fault of Jalen Johnson and the The refs feel the need to throw the flag and it was a brutal call, which sets the Panthers up on the one yard line and essentially put them back into the game because at that point They were trailing by two scores, and that one made it a touchdown game. And that was after Kyle Fuller got flagged for unnecessary roughness call When I don't understand at this point, I understand that you're trying to protect defenseless receivers. But at a certain point, I don't think there's any defensive back in the league who's better at being aware of putting their shoulder down and that their head than Kyle Fuller, he's done it time and time again, and he got flagged for unnecessary roughness call earlier in the game. What is going on? Because I think the bear's got hosed on both calls. Well, I'll say this being offensive guy. I mean, you can't lock his arm down. Going down the sideline, You know, he looked. It looks like the bad, called with the fact that he could not reach up to grab him to put his hand up because his on was being killed. It's part of, you know, I think that's passing. But I'm in Austin's gone so I looked at it that way. Your biases your biases showing through how absolutely absolutely That's what I mean. Council is doing everything did everything right on the play. Did everything right on the play? You know, unfortunately, part of anything when you go back and take a look, It wasn't at the head. No, I mean he kept his head out of it was shoulder and you know it's unfortunate, but I think that's something they have to continue to tweak. Because that that that that was a horrible call, So you know, and ultimately it affects the team. And, you know they've got to be able to figure out a better way to be able to make that call and get it right, because that's what they have to be able to get the calls, right? Yeah, and listen, I I know I'm not necessarily somebody who wants more replay in the game. But is that something that you know and similar to the college fashion where you've got the targeting rules where they could go back and look at him? Is that something the NFL really needs to do At this point, I think they did it. I mean, you know, it'll be interesting to see what the numbers are. His bar is targeting calls and how many of them, you know have been reversed or how many. You know just how many have taken place, But that's something you got to get right and we have the mechanisms in place to be able to make sure that that call was made correctly all the time. Because you know, it's it's a tough call. I understand that you want to protect the defense's players. But if a defensive players doing everything he can To keep his head out of there. He's using his shoulder. What else is he supposed to do? Next thing you know, he pulls up in the receiver catches the ball and you're not trying to hit him, then received runs for touchdown. Fuller looks like Ah, bad football player because he didn't make the tackle. So that's something I think they have to continue to take a look and continue to tweak. It's and it's one thing to that drives me crazy. And I understand you know the I understand that the NFL you love the offense. It's you know, and a lot of ways things air driven by fantasy football like they know that people who are watching want to see guys scoring points, so I understand that aspect of it, but it's maddening to when the Bears are so talented on defense. But it's like you're playing with one hand tied behind your back because those are huge calls, you know, 15 yards and a first down those air game changes in a lot of ways and the bear's credit to their defense because they're able to overcome it and God with a huge effort today, But it's just it can be so destructive to a team that is giving you a good defensive effort. I think at the end of the day you've got to keep playing. Players gotta keep playing and kind of let the chips fall where they may and not let a bad call happening again. Right? You make a bad play or was considered a bad play. You get penalized for it, So you got to come back out and play again. You just have to continue to play, Not harp on that. Turn the page. Don't let one bad play.

Jalen Johnson Kyle Fuller Panthers Bears NFL football Austin Howard D. J. Moore Donna Taylor
"college fashion" Discussed on How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

13:06 min | 1 year ago

"college fashion" Discussed on How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

"The K.. What's his as the? Yes we have a couple of weeks ago So what happened with John. We outgrew tall six JESSOP and there was a big Kuni unit on the same straight Straight so there was a big corner shop off the for ages on a funding on my hands on it and that is German car now is that's H.. As we don't utilize oldest spice is not maxed out on Big Table in the middle of chairs. Around around with people hanging out. You know you know. Go up a bar in the the whiskey or gin and tonic and a bear and is far more is very spacious a icon failing It's really nice environment. And then what happened was always had the the the original John Still and doing different portraits Undecided the we need more Chaz so I was like Whoa Bob Shop site came up. You don't spend a lot of time to sites working and traveling and the whole thing of Y'all style where people sell the stuff on a straight almost all kind of achy they will anita Three chip shop. My passion is music close fashion all sorts of different things that have create a trend and so we The outside John and we have three four weeks ago. The concept is that his. Bob's shows the three bulbs chesnut isn't that having their now because our lost much John Expertise and with Charlie and jody Billabong for it to get a chance. I had in that now. of Gods A couple of guys with me and that kind of And then we have Some dot granted aging about twelve. Thirty Thousand Breakfast in storage. We had a friend of mine saw him in Scott big background in music he he has some time. We decided accountable soap. nope vintage vinyl and some new issues So they're available online as much orange Shawl Three decks and united peyton coming in this imply and then the other side of his clothing so very lucky to have access to quite a big Ol card collection from lights. His nonsense thousands of compact modular gauge briskly commodity surreal high end design a Web site of an enormous collection of Of My hands on so what we do is we do two weeks leaks rotation so two weeks one designer so the moment. We're doing two weeks of nineties profitable for example and that finishes next week and then we're going to two weeks a Majella. The finishes let me do two weeks and menswear is very specific. Look then in terms of having yes we hoped left We always stop in the middle of you know so. We went allies. Life's in Palestine supreme and pots ever know that kind of administration in which a lot of those kids than guys that buying that all Saipan cotto piccio because it will cost over now so not only that we did when we first the first two weeks we we saw lots of vintage rough laurent work where to teach him. You know we have guys is getting the heck out centered around seven. Hundred close is actually happened. It would be like guys will come in the hack and live. I have because the clients are on on the same wavelength disaster degree. And I don't mean us and I think that and also why we get the guys who can pass it and they come in and the same with the vinyl you know we we you know we saw because some albums that were lost six hundred quit down to one town depending in what is and and it's really interesting because the immediacy settled on a couple of websites of online as well so the company on case from London college fashion. The West may help you price. It they will the postal staff and they helped me on that side of it. You know dependent Dipaolo and at the moment I mean there are no more more because it's just we just get funding. I'll say making sure they will assistance. What correctly heat unsalted Monday? I don't have to think about it. We have to think about stalk might be in six months time we saw clearing down but you know it just it just works and sometimes you get a couple of guys come in dropped Fontes under quitting some guys you get nine one come in but you so twenty paces. This is online at another year. I just it just seems to. Have you ever done any pay our press about it. We got coming up next month but you know it seems to be working pretty well. Oh I love that. Because you've taken your passions and put it into a shop. I think that's the case. I think that most people the majority of people are neither either mental or the torch to that industry. That south shops must've devos a creatives. The haven't got massive business. Acumen guns to gun study business or anything like that. Why caught one day when only longer addresses opened up shop and then and then guy? Oh we'll take a what's limited company. What's you know? We fumbled around and in some of the surviving. Some of his some of struggle to survive. Still when you know. Don't get me wrong. This is not every every month you have to keep a truckee cash like this is not something. Mike and Fortunate doesn't work your could use badges Mark Monteiro is train than you put the. It on the top Pi some months. You did she sit in the gang war an automobile today but you get through. It is what it is as Business but so we will fall winds this business. We will fall into being business people and then you have to catch up and you have to learn and is the only place we don't you know you can't detain goes. You don't understand what it's like you know they do. But they don't WanNa hit the leader will the person they look up to or they follow you can be vulnerable and type but you also need to. You have to take the rough with the smooth. That's the deal. Yeah Avenue for people to really understand and yet he share Nice Berlin brilliant. Actually because it's tough. It's not easy certainly you. You talked about partnerships as well when and that in itself can be challenged on it you can have a pond isn't always easy but partnerships is a marriage and you have to understand that if the two of you that that means conflict because if two of you are not on the page same page one hundred percents that will be a conflict at some degree done how people small it will be otherwise conflict conflict this three of you either to gang up on one or you can have somebody made you is between you. Know the K is the to form the pollen you can you can support. Even you need supporting. Hold you back when you need holding back being courage you he needs to be encouraged and that was both of you and you know I you know I was very fortunate to get the business off the ground on my with with the packer. It wasn't invested of them financially and then she really supported that will be drive business. What was in that was a massive benefit? Because you know I wouldn't have been you know wouldn't have got where I go in in certain elements of what I do without that support for that now moving forwards from that. I've now got off on on a slightly different tangent and opened up yard sow and then offset on third brand. Which is mills and would we have done? That's probably not needed that needed to be made on my meals because so it was about a year ago where we know about a year ago on been nominated to this jake coupon for the year and I would spread first thing and came out of it and someone else me for my information this thing and then shortly after that contacted by someone who was interested in doing a some kind of Bob Shop project originally and I was very much. Thought Sean on much apply you know getting divorced. Took stuff going on at a young son. You're out you know at that time. The two shows two different brands that they're very unique individual an individual under one umbrella and I was like Whoa. How am I supposed to be this is punk is now? I'm not interested in politics. The came back again and I kind of look today and for okay. How do what they wanted to do it? How we're GONNA do it so I needed a more parents than fifty magnum moment out about and she want get involved? Because obviously you know you never to chat with doubt about it in my life. Well it sounds sounds like a jet you WANNA get invested investment this the snow this talk about not about to it and it trickled along a bit longer and then someone else had been fishing me speak accountable of the big a European franchise Greek the bishops going. To come into the guy looks a little. I could put by prime all instead. Make put my name on it. Didn't show show wipe did the work and couldn't might that deal. That just didn't add up those things about it didn't feel why this has happened to me throughout my lingerie opportunities common I was gonNA COP failing New tends to be right most the time about you know about stuff like this and our cards white and Then sought Louisville. I'm going to do it. And they were interested in using Commit some degrees That's today this but you know on on h. e. goes to succumb in Showers to just you know type A type of the brunt of it because you what you want to invest in it then you have the site own never talked on board title trusted much on. We created a Stanley Brian. Coop meals and then Soviets Mills Prime Alkyl Milstar sparkle. Have if you WANNA do or whatever and the conversation started and the idea was that they were the largest during world which is in Bam one hundred sixty thousand square face enrollments as they wanted to they wanted per stomach Bob shopping and they they don't even talking to other people and for various reasons it happened so we picked up a a kind of an because at this point the build was the whole stores long on almost coming to Ed so that was version of a stall offset. The we had C- adopts in China Japan trying to make it failed it fitted audio night and not a great tape will help with the Bryan out of massive brainstorming session. Probably January lost year. Everyone what is the really respected for a very close friend of mine. He's involvement in the industry. But this could brian another might monies from a marketing foxing background someone who reads about ground. Somebody's interior design my jaw my counseling Lychee Si- everyone in the room. And just when what do we do with this. How GonNa do this between us? We thrashed out. We ride not to and we. We decided what it could be how it would fit. I I didn't know about what does it mean by May aligning myself with with a high street brand. Not What is it aside from wanted. Say when she it was quite scary. You know you know go off to work with you know goup a great you know. That's how it fell. And then I sat there Ashley. How would have access to on straight out? I've I've access to a second store on Manchester History on never would it would never antoine into my brain to even consider it how we renew America the summit of potential spice over that I wouldn't have those opportunities to to be to attach myself to the highest rate with Al to support all someone I primarily. It just doesn't exist. How does it also dealings like when you're dealing with a huge corporation business? Promise that's a huge rather than dealing with a landlord on a high straight. I.

Bob John Stanley Brian JESSOP John Still Chaz Bob Shop Majella truckee Saipan Dipaolo peyton Scott Fontes Manchester Louisville London Ashley
"college fashion" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

10:26 min | 1 year ago

"college fashion" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

"Easter amy eleven i first met her when she had any in her apartment and we didn't interview and she was literally just starting out and i thought here is a girl who is going to be beyond successful cut to being pregnant she's had her baby since we did this episode soldier company the click media they own who elsewhere and i invite you to take a listen to amy on similar women i'm with amy eleven the founder and executive director of college fashion easter who i had the pleasure of meeting probably five years ago so again i i mean i think longer i feel like i met you when i first moved to new york which is in two thousand twelve okay so then that's where you're at and i went to her apartment yup we didn't interview yup a lot has changed even like thinking about my style and the way i had the apartment set up i can't go back and look at pictures yeah to in around that time 'cause i think i looked so fashion forward and i looked like an aide whole basically yeah no that's how i feel i obviously because of college fashion easter the girls always wanna see photos of me from college and i thought i was the coolest you know i had like a very grunge phase like very long hair flannel and i i also cringe when i look at the photos and like what was i thinking yeah for emitted i thought that if i had bleached bangs that were longer than the rest of my short short hair that would be cool and guess what it's not no now a crash that's that's the new kind of thing i'm going yes so you launch college fashion east and when you were in college and you probably had a lot of friends who were partying in goofing off an did you ever find that how card you know launching a business i launched early to and watch my friends party and have a great time but did you feel that tug you know i went to a really big greek university and i are you greek no like greek as in greek life okay now i'm not like a very greek life based university indiana on you know the kind of campus like the surrounded by the different sororities and fraternities and i feel like i got that out of my system pretty early on and you know going into my junior year i was no longer interested in those type of activities whereas my friends were still very much a typical college student so i you know studied abroad in london had this incredible experience came up with the concept called fashion east a and came back my senior year in launched it never felt like i was missing out i think for years is such a long period of time where i kind of got to do the best of both i got to have the college experience but also start to work on my career and so i never never he's kind of felt faced with that challenge and so as a woman 'cause you hear about all these young upstarts that are men you know who started war be or harry's you know did you find that pressure as a woman launching something that that was harder breakthrough or it didn't it might not even been something you struggled way yeah so i'm one of four two girls to boys and i have to say my father mother were very encouraging and kind of encourage just all four to do in become whenever we want it to be it wasn't based on gender and so i think i had that instilled in me that it didn't matter that i was a girl like i was amy move in and i could do whatever i wanna do and i think the age played moronta factor than me being a female i think when you're twenty two you have natural natural insecurities and especially when you're sitting in a meeting with men are people you know twice you're age you're gonna feel that tons of intimidation so that definitely came into play but i have to say been very lucky throughout my career that i've never felt like i couldn't do what wanna do because i was a female or i couldn't get the support i wanna get because i was a female i've had been incredibly positive experience and have had a lot of support from both males and females along the way that's awesome that's my experience too i mean i empathize with the people that have had those experiences and says greatly but i think you know my mom when i was born to to you know older brother two older brothers right like i gotta make this girl tough so whatever she did i'm like trying to instill that in my in my daughter now yeah exactly and you're mama's probably talk because i feel like you learned through example i totally she's probably you know showing you that to her actions without even telling you needed to be tough but it's true so what i love is that you established a grassroots network hundreds of writers style gurus is what you call yeah we have twenty thousand no no crazy you establish this incredible grassroots network of hundreds of writers actually you just corrected me earlier twenty thousand twenty thousand no big deal style gurus each with their own following so how did you build that community 'em and why did you think he was important to build the college fashiony so that way you know it was something that i want it to happen when i was in college they said like my first two years were more of the typical partying exploration phase of life and then the second two years where okay i need folks on my career what do i wanna do and i felt really you know isolated just being in bloomington indiana an assumed that students at other schools similar to mine also probably shared similar feelings and so it was something that didn't exist that people want it so it naturally grew and i still believe even today what social media everything that word of mouth is the best way to get information in art community really up until this point has grown through word mouth and i think if someone has a positive experience and get value out of what they're doing with you and what they're getting from your brand why would they not wanna tell their friend annex especially when it comes to careers like in college that is you know primarily what you're focused on so are bread is so impactful to students and so helpful with their careers that you know why would they not wanna share that with their friends and have their friends be a part of the same experience totally so one of the things that i sort of i don't lose sleep because i'm so tired i definitely get asleep but i worry about is there's so much research indebted about social media anxiety or depression or the isolation can cause and here i am a brand promoting it and using it to grow my business and ticket acting like customer and more importantly so i always wanna ride the line of i don't don't ever wanna create anxiety or depression and someone yeah do you sort of knowing that you have a younger demographic being that their own college how do you sort of deal with that with what you're doing on your platform i think that's so hard i mean i will say ars current students which are jen's ears definitely posts less frequently it's hard for us to know how frequent they are on their channels because you know we can't track that information but i the older more millennial bay students were definitely posting way more i so i think maybe they're conscious of this balance of not being on it too much but you have to understand in use the platform for what it is i think at this point everyone's well aware of what instagram use for in the kind of skewed reality that is created on it and if you understand that and you knowledge that then i think you can be like oh okay that's just an image of whatever and i'm not gonna get so worked up or get such anxiety over because i know that it's the kind of fake innocence but it's really hard and i mean i think everyone struggles at the end you know i'm about to become a mom and i can only imagine that i'm gonna experience a different set of anxiety watching all these people post about their kids and how amazing they make their kids look in their home looking at everything so i think that's just a part of life whether it's in front of you and social media you're hearing about it in the class you kind of just have to have confidence and take what you wanna take and not take what you wanna take i think that's a good that's a good way to look at it as you know you're looking at something that's not always real totally i mean some these moms i'm sure you know like how come you're kid always look like they don't they don't yeah it's very hard to actually get 'em to look good so i'm actually like talent there she got that perfect image unreal but it took a lot because kids do not listen and yet mind blowing to me so you start it small in indiana now you have a global platform what were some of the biggest obstacles to this growth in or pain points i majored in business and apparel and college answer so i had those kind of skills from my university experience and then i grew up with a very entrepreneurial father who is very financially german so i understood kind of finance certain extent marketing on opposite business but had no tech experience and i was trying to build a media company so that has always been the biggest struggle for me is finding good developers are reliable speaking the same language on managing timelines and the same way that they manage timelines and getting the functionality that i to get out of our platform that i thought would be best for are readers and are members finally i'd say like two years ago we found a developer that it just totally clicked you know he understood what i was trying to do where i want it to go and we just really got on the same page but that was definitely a huge pain point throughout the whole business and something that i wouldn't change anything because i i've been so fortunate have loved my experience but i do wish i had a little more kind of understanding of coding and development and in the basics of it so that i was more well informed throughout the process now you're in a family business yes you're siblings all of her siblings are business partners so they were until are acquisition like klay got it so two brothers and a sister and they were all part of the business up until two years ago and now my sister's just so in the business okay and so what were some of the challenges in the great parts of working my family 'em i think the great part there that a there's a sense of trust and commitment it meant that is on comparible when you're in a family business it's deeper than any work relationship i'm and i think that's really incredible when starting a business 'cause you definitely need that there is more flexibility and there's no better above this role because you're all in it together and you all just wanna see it success so i'm everyone kind of chips in in help support the different areas of the business that need it and i think that you're able to make changes quicker similar to the flexibility you're able to make changes quicker because the decision makers are kind of on the room and also there's a sense of being in it for the long haul i think when you're a family business you don't necessarily need to like me numbers quarter over quarter you know that if you set something up great and then has long jeopardy that that's gonna be a success so those things.

founder and executive director amy two years five years
"college fashion" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

10:44 min | 1 year ago

"college fashion" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

"Rebecca, you're listening to superwomen. Today's guest is the founder of college fashiony STA Amy Levin. I, I met her when she had in her apartment, and we didn't interview, and she was literally just starting out, and I thought here is a girl who is going to be beyond successful cut to the pregnant. She had her babies. We did this episode sold her company to click media. They own who aware, and I invite you to take listen to Amy onsumer women. I am with Amy Levin. The founder and executive director of college fashion, east to who I had the pleasure of meeting, probably five years ago sunrise, eight together. I mean, I think even longer I feel like I met you when I first moved to New York which was in two thousand twelve okay? So then, that's when we met and I went to your apartment. Yep. We didn't interview. Yup. A lot has changed that apartment, even like thinking about my style and the way had the apartment setup. I can't go back and look at pictures. Yeah. To in round that time, because I think I looked so fashion forward. And I looked like an a hole, basically. Yeah. No, that's feel. I obviously because of college freshness. Still the girls always wanna see photos of me from college. And I thought I was the coolest, you know, I had a very grunge phase like very long hair flannel. And I also cringe when I look at the photos on what was I thinking. Yeah. For a minute. I thought that if I had bleached bangs that were longer than the rest of my short hair. That would be cool. And guess what? It's not. No classic is. That's, that's the new kind of thing I'm going with. Yes. So you launched college fashion east it when you're in college, and you probably had a lot of friends who were partying and goofing off. And did you ever find that tug hard launching a business? I launched early two and watch my friend's party and have great time. But did you feel that tug, you know, I went to a really big Greek university and Greek no like Greek as in Greek life. Okay. No, I'm not a very Greek life base university, Indiana. You know, the kind of campus life is surrounded by the different sororities, and fraternities. And I feel like I got that off my system pretty early on going into my junior year, I was no longer interested in those type of activities. Whereas my friends were still very much a typical college student. So I studied abroad in London had this incredible experience came up with the concept of college freshmen STA and came back my senior year and launched it. And. Never felt like I was missing out. I think four years is such a long period of time, where I kind of got to do the best of both I got to have the college experience, but also start to work on my career. And so I never never really kind of felt faced with that challenge. And so as a woman because you hear about all these young upstarts that are men, you know, who started Worby, or Harys, did you find that pressure as a woman, launching something that, that was harder to break through or didn't might not even been something you struggled with. Yes. So I'm one of four two girls two boys. And I have to say my father and mother were very encouraging and kind of encourage just offered to do and become whatever we want it to be it wasn't based on gender. And so, I think I had that instilled in me that it didn't matter that I was a girl like I was Amy Levin, and I could do whatever I wanted to do. I'm I think the age played more than two factor than me being female. I think when you're twenty two you have natural insecurities, and especially when you're sitting in a meeting with. Men or people, you know, twice your age. You're gonna feel that sentiment. Timid ation, so let definitely came into play. But I have to say been very lucky throughout my career that I've never felt like I couldn't do what I want to do, because I was a female, or I couldn't get the support. I wanted to get because I was a female. I've had an incredibly positive experience and had a lot of support from both males and females along the way. That's awesome. That's my experience, too. I mean I empathize with the people that have had those experiences greatly. But I think, you know, my mom when I was born to, to an older brother tool brothers, like I gotta make this girl, tough. So whatever she did. I'm like trying to instill that in my in my daughter now. Yeah. Exactly. And in your mom was probably tough because I feel like you learn through example. And hopefully shoes probably, you know showing you that to her actions without even telling you needed to be tough, but too. So what I love is that you established a grassroots network hundreds of writers style gurus you call them. Yeah. We have twenty thousand no scrapie. You establish this incredible grassroots network of hundreds of writers. Actually, you just corrected me earlier twenty thousand and twenty thousand no big deal style gurus each with their own following. So how did you build that community? And why did you think it was important to build college fashiony so that way you know, it was something that I wanted to have when I was in college has a sad like my first two years were more of the typical partying exploration phase of life. And then the second two years were okay? I need to focus on my career. What do I wanna do? And I felt really isolated just being in Bloomington, Indiana and assumed that students at other school similar to mind. Also, probably shared similar feelings. And so it was something that didn't exist that people wanted. So it naturally grew. And I still believe even today with social media in everything that word of mouth is the best way to get information and our community really up until this point has grown through word of mouth. And I think if someone has a positive experience and gets value out of. Of what they're doing with you and what they're getting from your brand. Why would they not want to tell their friend, and especially when it comes to careers like in college that is, you know, primarily what you're focused on? So our brand is so impactful to students and so helpful with their careers that, you know, why would they not want to share that with their friends and have their friends. Be part of the same experience totally. So one of the things that I sort of I don't lose sleep because I'm so tired. I definitely get asleep. But I worry about is, there's so much research, and data about social media, and the anxiety, or depression, or the isolation. It can cause and here I am a brand promoting it and using it to grow my business. And to connect with my customer, more importantly, so I always want to ride the line of I don't ever wanna creating Zayed, your depression, someone at us sort of knowing that you have a younger demographic, being that their own college. How do you sort of deal with that with what you're doing on your platforms? I think that's so hard. I mean, I will say our current students, which are jen's ears. Definitely post less frequently it's hard for us to know how frequent, they are on their channels, because, you know, we can't track that information, but I the older more millennial bay students were definitely posting way more. So I think maybe they are conscious of this balance of not being on too much, but you have to understand, and use the platform for what it is. I think at this point runs while aware of what Instagram is used for in the kind of skewed reality that is created on it. And if you understand that new knowledge, that, then I think you can be like, okay, that's just an image of whatever and I'm not gonna get too worked up or get such anxiety over, because I know that it's kind of fake, in a sense, but it's really hard. I mean, I think everyone struggles with it, and, you know, I'm about to become a mom, and I can only imagine that I'm going to experience a different set of watching all these people posted about their kids in, how amazing they make their kids look in their home, looking everything. So I think that's just a part of life, whether it's in front of you and soc. No media, or you're hearing about it in a class, you kind of just have to have confidence in take what you wanna take not take what you wanna take. That's a good. That's a good way to look at it. So, you know, you're looking at something that's not always real totally. I mean some of these moms, I'm sure, you know, like how can your kid always look like that. They don't they don't. Yeah. It's very hard to actually get him to look good. So I'm actually like talent there. She got that perfect image. That's not real but it took a lot because kids, do not listen. Yeah. I'm blind to me, so you started small in Indiana. Now you have a global platform. What were some of your biggest obstacles to this growth, and or pain points, I majored in business and the payroll in college. And so I had those kind of skills from my university experience, and then I grew up with the very entrepeneurship father was very financially driven. So I understood kinda financed, an extent marketing ops of business, but had no tech experience and I was trying to build a media company. So. So that has always been the biggest struggle for me is finding developers that are reliable, speaking, the same language on managing timelines in the same way that they manage timelines and getting the functionality, that I wanted to get out of our platform that I thought would be best for our readers are members. Finally, I'd say like two years ago, we founded developer that it just totally clicked. You know, he understood what I was trying to do where I wanted to go. And we just really got on the same page, but that was definitely a huge pain point throughout the whole business and something that I wouldn't change anything because I, I've been so fortunate have loved my experience, but I do wish I had a little more kind of understanding of coating development, and the basics of it. So that I was more wall informed throughout the process. You're in a family business. Yes. Your siblings, all of your siblings, business partners. So they were until our acquisition with click got it. So two brothers and a sister and they were all part of the business up until two years ago. And now my sister's just own the business. Okay. And so what were some of the challenges and great parts of working family? I think the great parts are that there's a sense of trust and commitment that is uncomfortable. When you're in a family business, it's deeper than any work relationship, and I think that's really incredible. When starting to business 'cause you definitely need that there is more flexibility. And there's no better above this role because you're all in it together, and you all just wanna see it success, so ever kind of chips in and help support the different areas of the business that need it. And I think that you're able to make changes quicker similar to the flexibility are able to make changes quicker, because the decision makers are kind of on the room. And also there's a sense of being in it for the long haul. I think when your family business, you don't necessarily need to meet numbers Cordover quarter. You know that if you set something up great, and it has long jetty that that's going to be a success. So those things, I think are all incredible. And I'm not sure your thoughts on that. But I think those are all really powerful things of family business. But of course, there's negatives on negatives are, you know, there's natural conflict that occurs that is also deeper than conflict..

founder and executive director Amy Levin Indiana Amy onsumer depression Rebecca founder developer New York London Instagram Bloomington Worby jen Zayed Harys two years five years
"college fashion" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"college fashion" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Kiss. FM PI in riana live your life, Seacrest and assisting with you this morning. So this training report tiny says it modern women have new Queen, who is it, it is Jennifer garner. And when you guys hear this, I'm not even kidding you, you're gonna wanna have it on repeat today because it was literally that good. So Jennifer garner spoke at Denison university's commencement ceremony. Because she graduated from there twenty five years ago, which in her speech, she said his one Ariana GRANDE day ago. Oh, just so funny, but anyways. So these people were coming and they were introducing Jennifer Gardner. And she actually said, one of her, like friends and mentors that she met in college will still check up on her like every year and he calls her on her half birthday. That's really smart half birthday. Yeah. I've never done a call and a half birth. Everybody's calling you on your birthday to catch up and wish you happy birthday the hammered that you have all the time in the world. Catch up, you have a do you really feel like you're celebrating? I've never celebrated a half person to celebrates just to, like, no, but I'm thinking further. Maybe we should be celebrating should should Christmas even around. Birthday be like June who wants to do that. Twenty-fourth marquan birthday so keep going. Okay. So, so then student when then Jen comes out, and I have just a little audio of her speech that I want you to your because I have watched the speech now three times, this is a really good nuggets. So here you go when it comes to Halloween. Costumes go funny over sexy. Why would you dress like a flirty nurse? When you could be a mailbox. Nothing looks better in your fifties been sunscreen in your twenties. Don't smoke and don't vape. I'm sorry. Somebody has to say it mixed signals are not mixed signals there. No, if you're a woman in pardon me for being binary for just a second. This stage has been set the world. Is yours to grab go out and get it girl? She's great. That's a great messages. The entire thing is fantastic. And then I'll sum it up for you. She basically said by for what makes you optimistic about the world. Find it insist on it dig into it, and go after I feel like she really has maintained that. I think she's tremendous. So twenty nineteen Jen garner. Great great commencement speech. Great messaging. They're Morehouse college Robert F Smith paying people's college fashioned debt during his speech forty million dollars. Could you imagine at Morehouse college? Yeah. That was like that shattered the that was crazy, right? Colorado college got Oprah and those are words of every thought out of her mouth is word of wisdom. It makes you want to go back and take classes, just to be at a commencement speech, again a little bit coming up next thirty minutes.

Jennifer garner Morehouse college Robert F Smith Ariana GRANDE Colorado college Seacrest Denison university Oprah forty million dollars twenty five years thirty minutes
"college fashion" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"college fashion" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"Absolutely. Yeah. Yeah. The balance shifted, and it was a. I suppose it was a confidence thing I got there with the help of her therapist at any 'cause I was. Measurable, and I took a term off actually it's funny things you kind of right out of your history book by took term often ours. Yeah. Just trying to find myself again had the unique counselor, and it was so helpful bike. I wasn't able to verbalize before. Why are we so miserable? Because I hated what I was doing. And it was really like. My creativity was completely stunted. And it was horrendous horrendous to my. Sense of self and my spirituality like I was just. Awful. Do you? Remember, how the counselor shifted the way you were thinking. So you could see that. I remember. I've off I wish I could trace her. I'd love to be like. And she said to me what what do you want to do? And what I said back to how is what I wanna do wanna go to London, college fashion and study make up and she's like, then then then do that. And was. I couldn't possibly I didn't. But the fact that she was like. But you can buy Dayton. Why? Why don't you why don't you? Because in my head. I think I was I was panicking that my future was now this career path that made me intensely miserable. And I got myself into this got myself into this mass how I can't get out of it. And I think I thought I couldn't get aspects. I couldn't let my parents down and it goes money money risk factor. And I'd have to start from the bottom, whereas with nursing is going into a guaranteed income and a guarantee kind of vocation and lifestyle, and there's a huge risk that make up wouldn't work potentially. So yeah. That was kind of the key things holding me back. I'm curious, then if when you started to when you moved away from nursing turn makeup, whether it felt like work, or whether I think there's this myth that if you do your side, if you do your passion, you know, if you do what you love you'll never work a day in your lungs something. I don't subscribe to that. But I do think there's a different it's a bit like. Who's going to say the walls have been greased? Where do I live? Like, everything everything's smooth. Everything's easier. If your pursuing something that's true to as opposed to. Yeah. So I remember writing a piece for Bobby Brown as part of a global roundtable about product development and stuff, and I just checking the workout on the computer, and I was up at something like something bunkers like eight and a half thousand words, and I was like I was like what is happening to me like unit I'd have three thousand word count and eight hundred where I was done. I was like how do I love this up? Like, I like, it least calls me such great stress and anxiety. And they're just it wasn't it wasn't. Whereas suddenly, I'm writing about a subject matter that I love, and I'm passionate about and like someone real me in big is kind of no end to this. And that was that was. Mazing? Remember being like, this is there are people unit. You have this same feeling writing about their degree? I just didn't have that. So this is what it feels like to be working in something that you absolutely love. I'm trying to encourage my sister to work in the sphere of life that she is most passionate about because I wanted to know what this feels like a not sanctions to job. I'm just saying that in her. Yeah. It's like I again, really got say speaking about someone else's life. But there's someone I'm incredibly close to he believe is incredibly talented and do in unbelievably amazing things. They just took that step outside of what they're doing. But fundamentally they've chosen security and safe which is also completely fine. I've got this thing in my brain where I see so much potential in that person. And I see so much magic in that person that I can't help but see unfulfilled potential, and that's really hard, and I oversee don't vocalise it to them because that's not fair..

Bobby Brown Dayton London product development
"college fashion" Discussed on One Shining Podcast with Titus and Tate

One Shining Podcast with Titus and Tate

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"college fashion" Discussed on One Shining Podcast with Titus and Tate

"Basically when that happens, I'm gonna just tweet as expected Mark few. Yeah. Okay. Probably not Mark fused running a program to actually a college Tom Izzo. Probably not. And then K probably. All right. Never mind. Coach Katy UCLA coach K. Yeah. My favorite thing. They'll do like you did with the Lakers four just gonna say, that's my favorite coach. So coach K's offered the Lakers job probably fifth after four other people were offered, and he would be the one because everyone else is like, you know, George Karl deans, but everyone else would say, I'm not going to leak that. Because like, of course, I'm getting asked because I mean, look at me coach K leaks says like, you know, coach K turns down Lakers job and then two million dollars. Onus to stay at Duke. Yeah, we'll let it wasn't the one in. Oh, four like some kid wrote him a letter, and it was like Kay, please. That was the story that put forth in cases. Like, I I was going to take it. And then this kid this one kid seven was the kid you the kid the kid was Josh mcroberts. It's my dream to play do that kid went on to be Alex O'Connell. All right. That's a show games. Are starting today. For listening to this at Saturday. There are games today. There is Texas Tech Virginia Purdue. You're going to have a final four. We'll be back Sunday night. We'll we'll where we posting the pod Sunday night. Yes. So media sues the games are over. We're gonna we're gonna record the pod. Put it up for the final four. All you have at your have your hand raised Kyle's guy poor one out for torn Dohrn. Great game in the United lost Lipscomb NC state decided to pull their poor one out first week. We'll be back Sunday reminder. Don't forget we we are going to Sunday the final four we will be at sneaky Pete's put that your calendar. Put that your planners. I know that everyone the listens to us probably super plant and organiz people. So put that down. We will see you guys at the final four can't wait for that. And we will see you on Sunday. Thanks again, Diese Mero, the brand is stronger than ever with their new late night talk show, which is now on Showtime. Thanks to the great Tommy alter friend of our program. And we are we are the diesel marrow of college fashion. Oh, a fashion Okay. would be. I think that would be the most offensive I told told Tommy Tommy. marrow fashion. Just basic bitch stuff all the time that would really offend up. So we'll go with that one or influencers. Yeah. Influencers seems like a that's a touchy subject goes to the phone. Yeah. Yeah. That goes all the way the top..

Lakers K. Yeah Tommy Tommy. Josh mcroberts Mark Tom Izzo George Karl deans Texas Tech Virginia Purdue Alex O'Connell Katy UCLA Kay NC Kyle two million dollars
"college fashion" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

The Ross Bolen Podcast

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"college fashion" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

"But if you think let's take out of three. Hundred NFL players. Maybe maybe a few have something even close to what Lattimore had here. Most of those don't have any of your and the other thing is I mean, you know, I don't know what the rates are exactly. But if you think about like, insuring, your one point seven million dollar house you make payment. That's a big premium. Hang people. Always pretend. It's like. Yeah. Lattimore got this insurance. Do you know insurance where you pay towards it? It's not as if they're just like. And now if you get hurt you get one point seven million, you're giving them money every month or whatever right to so. It's right. That's how a policy work in his case. It it worked out it paid off. Like, that's how it works though. It'll be definitely was paying a big some for that four rim that not everybody can afford. I'm sure and then the way insurance works is all of the other people who got policies that never paid out. They pay that that money goes in helps pay the Lattimore payout. Right. And then the insurance company keeps the other six. Hundred billion dollars that we've given them over the course of whatever. Yeah. It's an incredible system. It sounds like you guys had a condo about the college or like college players a little bit. Yeah. Getting paid in just how. We talked a little bit about like. Okay. If you're a Zion. What are you doing? Why are you back on the court like just the amount of money that's at stake every day for these guys? And how it's for the big one again. Obviously this applies to the top five percent of players mostly the rest of the everybody else. Just go get normal jobs, but for a guy like Zion. When you've got your talking about potentially hundreds of million like it's it's not about him anymore. It becomes about generational wealth. Literally. That's not. What what percentage of the population gets the opportunity to make that much money in their lifetime? It's point zero zero zero one or whatever the thing with the player like Zay on and especially in a sport like basketball, where injury is not as likely as it isn't football. Is it like they were talking about when when's I did get injured. He could've blown up the still probably would have been the number one pick. Yeah. Emasculate? And he's also a special case these guys can cover from anything in basket. What this much on this subject though, since we're right here. The proposal that I that I think I like the best out of everything to pay the athletes shit out of the pay the athletes stuff is you stop limiting their ability to make money off of their likeness. There's no reason that like if you're a college student right now right here college student there is nothing stopping you from like taking endorsement deal. Like, let's say, you're let's say you're college student in your big like, your college fashion blogger right in your big in your big deal and the local in the local sandwich shop or the local art gallery wants.

Lattimore Zay Zion NFL basketball football Hundred billion dollars seven million dollar five percent
"college fashion" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"college fashion" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"A bit more where did you work, and what was your experience there? My my first working experience when I left the London college fashion was on on the industry bible Drapers record. I stayed there for about eighteen months. I had a very brief so to freelance period, then in my life where I did the Daily Mirror woman's journal, which I'd be no longer exists anymore and a very brief stint on miss London magazine, which used to be given away at the stations. I was then head hunted onto the Daily Mail, and I actually spent fourteen years there, an twenty six I became their fashion editor, and I stayed for another decade are than decided to take a very different path, and I wanted to be free, Lance. So I I had to contract working on Tatler magazine, which was a huge change enroll the wonderful, very different from the immediacy of newspapers. But I think people think that you have all the time in the world magazines to put them together. Actually, you don't you spend weeks and weeks and weeks trying to get hold of a celebrity to photograph. And you actually work on collecting information about a feature that you'll do. So I did that. And I also had. A contract with Acadia as an adviser to them for about six or seven years, which was fascinating. And then I've been freelance ever since mazing wouldn't what an experience what about you? My first job was at British vogue. And I worked there for two or three is firstly for the executive fashion editor of whom I was absolutely in all day. I started someone straight into the office, and she fix them with the Gimblett stare and said dotting, I love that song her jacket and I- quake in my Jan thought how on earth can she identify salary jacket without having looked at the label. Anyway, after you know, if you weeks months, I was got up to speed, and I see what the characteristics of the wide Lebel and everything and then is incredibly fortunate to be working for the late editor in chief Elizabeth Tilberis the time that she was approached to go to New York. Unreal. Chopper's bazaar, which is the oldest fashion magazine in the world. And that was the beginning of the nineteen ninety s and so I had the opportunity to go to new what with her and that was super exciting because we had more or less a clean slate. And we forged associations with incredible photographers. Peter Lindbergh patch Masha llah, and that was a very exciting period and on my return to London fees later, I to what. And then went back to British vogue where I spent quite a long time as executive editor. And then off the birth of my daughter, I took a step back, and I've been doing very freelance project since then gale Ralph and Anna cry talking to finance and Vogel central's hills and voca central's lingerie are out now published by Coronado Tebus. And that's it for this week's show. My thanks, of course to produce. If no no shake. Oh. And editors Kenya. Scarlet Sarah miles and Nora who come in so queries. Suggestions are. Welcome jumping out to finance on f p at Monaco dot com. And I've got to join us at the same time next week before we go a little song for you. Mulkey mo- remember him. The current Mark Wahlberg was only cover of interview magazine way back in nineteen Ninety-two peak Calvin Klein time, if you're a member here he is with his band Machi mock the funky bunch. This is good vibrations. Thanks for listening. Swearing.

British vogue executive editor London London magazine Daily Mirror Tatler magazine editor editor in chief Mark Wahlberg Kenya Peter Lindbergh Elizabeth Tilberis Acadia Calvin Klein Chopper Monaco dot Sarah miles Lance executive Coronado Tebus
"college fashion" Discussed on Scrubbing In with Becca Tilley

Scrubbing In with Becca Tilley

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"college fashion" Discussed on Scrubbing In with Becca Tilley

"Yeah. Well, I want you to talk about just a little bit before. I know. Thank you so much for calling in because I know this is like obviously not like super fund to relive relive. But you have a great company now support your friends in your proceeds are going to March for our lives, which I thought was really awesome, though, person fischel a person fischel partner. But yeah, I mean, I it's all it's all part of this story. You know what? I mean. Like, I I'm like a a religious guy. Like, I know that everything happens for a reason, I know when sometimes everybody individually go through starting difficult challenges or Chinese in their life. It's difficult at that very moment understand why certain things are happening. But I'm I've always been been blessed to have the faith mine tire life that I know. No one day. We'll call where you know that light bulb go off. And you'll be like, oh, I know I got or whatever you believe in put me through you know, that situation. And I mean, if you think about like that was in NYU, I worked in fashion all four years of college fashion had always been my passion. You know? Brandon was always my passion, you yourself. You know, our branch who you now with how you dress. How you talk all of it makes you as a brand. And I just think that was kind of funny, or at least, you know, I was kind of blessed at that light bulb went off really quickly for me after this was like, hey, you've always wanted to we've always dreamt. You're starting your own brands like you went through all of this about to go to business school. And then you go through this crazy crazy experience where no business school in the country. I don't care how good of a business school. It is teach you what you just experience, you know. And you also learn the most through your experiences. So here, I am, you know, I guess what is it? We're almost coming up. Two years. Somebody actually brought it up today. Like this whole thing is almost two years old now. But luckily that happened when like April two thousand seventeen like within within the year, you know, unfortunately, there was a lot happening in the world not shootings. I mean, just so much happening in society. And I think it was just an accumulation of things and went those not shooting happened in parkland, Florida, February fourteen o also almost coming up in the one you're on -versity of that kinda was like how can I get involved at the youth? I was determined to get involved with the youth. I think March far lives students really where the epitome of showing us coming together together under the same idea, whatever it may be or whatever organization that we ended up partnering with I'm just coming together to really just kinda propeller safe for tomorrow in terms of March for our lives so wanted to get involved, but also wants to pursue my passion. And you know, kind of ask myself how could I? Fine. The to support your friends was always this personal slogan of mine's dog kind of setting up. Okay. Run with this guy. Bring everyone together under this like I d of support your friends what it means to me what it means to different things. But that's kind of the purpose for everyone's come together. And really just share what it means to one another. So yeah, I mean, we successfully launched the brand past November. It's been super exciting. The reaction has been super exciting. The press has been great. And you know, we're really really just running with it. And you know, the goal is to bring awareness to start in causes within each collection March for our lives being our first official partner, and hopefully, you know, continue to collaborate partner with other creatives artists photographers video log, whoever it may be somebody like Tanya, maybe you know, and. And.

partner Brandon NYU Florida Tanya official four years Two years two years one day
"college fashion" Discussed on Tony the Movie Guy

Tony the Movie Guy

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"college fashion" Discussed on Tony the Movie Guy

"Do predominantly. I do I can fashion and print. I did work for a few years and film. I've got a couple bega films next year that I might even be doing. But right now, I definitely would say that my bread and butter and main workers, commercial and fashion editorial, and this kind of thing and walking in the beauty and cosmetic industry. Most fantastic. And you love it. Right. I love it. It's it's very fun. It's nice. I really liked it. With fashion. It's very different to film in in makeup in it's constantly constantly, changing trends and having to constantly be new. Whereas in film, not so much in the make. Single day. But I said for me personally, I find that very stimulating right now. But. I have the biggest love for film. That's awesome. Did you start in England? Like yet major way over to Hollywood. I started in England. I studied. I was doing my my fine aunt to gray in London. And then I ended up doing another degree in London studying painting, and then I ended up finishing that. And I was like way I dunno. If I wanna be a painter alone in a room. Interact with other people. Then you know, kind of came across me at one point. And I say, oh, maybe, you know, someone else in the room with me that would be okay. What if we got rid of the canvas altogether and someone's face someone's face that was kind of the conclusion? And so I've actually I ended up taking another big United various other small things along the way. But I ended up doing a film degree in in London. There's one school London. College fashion the offers. Bachelor's degree and make up for filming TV, and I took that and it was in wig making process. Yeah. So I was that three years doing that. And that was it was like the most for the most incredibly legit legit. My first jobs were in the Whigs department in the in the West End opera house in London, Berlin. Yeah. That was it was great. I was I was. Offered like a paid scholarship at one point at Juilliard. Yeah. To do that wigs. You. I didn't take it because it was like that was the big thing. Do I go to truly do I go to LA? It's like incredible thing. And I was like, and then I go off a film in a, but I got like key may couple something. I said, I got this film and got a Cam gonna I'm gonna take the film because actually I hate wigs. So that kind of choice. Right. I think was the best choice for for. Me wicked and you've been here for a couple of years. Now, I like three goes on full, and you opened up your own company as a result of Olea walk, right? Yeah. That's right. I did my an what my will make up sevice company his company Inc. And what's your website Ramsey dot com?.

London bega England Whigs department company Inc gray Hollywood LA Berlin three years
"college fashion" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"college fashion" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

"And so even though that's next on housing and with like on workspace, that was a will to come up with an economic model that maximized the benefit to the community of creative professionals and particularly the fashion industry. Whilst at the same time, satisfying people is requirements to generate a reasonable income from the site. But it took two years to work the financial model out. It was a phenomenally complex undertaking, but it'll be worth it other actually enough fashioned brands, emerging fashion brands in London to take on that space. I mean, I assume there are, but I, it's one of those things where you do kind of create the market yourself or are they already there waiting and looking for spaces and not finding it in two thousand thirteen. When we were doing original research that led us toy champion and feels very. I, that equated fashion facility. We found something like three thousand emerging labels within a mile radius of the location. Van numbers growing looking at Hackney wick specifically the growth rate of fashion related businesses in that community, which obviously, one of London's most important creative clusters, the growth rate for the fashion businesses is ten percent a head of the the London baseline. So we know the markets than and we working closely with the bitch fashion council and the London college fashion, both him continuously research that market. So we know the need is the and I think in part because there are so few affordable facilities within in two with not really in competition with a lot of other providers, we know that the needs there and there's a scarcity of provisions. Imagine that that building is going to be route that series of buildings in east London is gonna. Open starting from the end of this year. Do you have other things in the pipeline that your now moving onto, or is this kind of do? Do you have to be there at the beginning of fish, oil in village and make sure that it kind of goes of sort of starts smoothly you already moving onto the next project, or are you looking at this one? Still for a while? Fishermen village is by far the largest project that where the where executing at the moment, but somewhat like the famous London voices. We had a bunch of seeds that we'd signed and somehow they will ended up coming to fruition at the same time. So just last week we announced another project in Hackney wet called the time pre owned the gantry which is providing ten thousand square feet of Steeler space for the creative industries and not. We're doing that with here east the innovation destination and the architects Hawkins Brown, and that's really experiment project. He's actually using prefabricated timber housing technology as. To provide affordable studio space in locations where conventional construction page wouldn't work. So that's one project that's happening right now. We're also about to announce pretty large project up in Tottenham that will be squarely targeting entrepreneurs in the the communities up the the unemployment rate is amongst the highest in London. Then we are also working with poplar Harker to develop a facility in poplar that will be for earlier stage fashion labels in a way will operate in conjunction with the fish island site. And besides other couple more projects as well, that that we able to talk about. Yes, but yes, it's been quite a juggling act, but always fish. Island village has been the the real center of save. Go to keep you busy over the next few years. Sounds like. Yes. And I think it had reached the point where where the team at the time for. Pretty much shackled me if I gave any hint of of another for Jack on the horizon. I think this is probably enough and I'm afraid that's all we have time for on today's show. Thank you very much to Charles Armstrong for coming in and sharing the story of the trampoline. This show is produced by Daniel beach and makes netted point Karen, Matthew Banerjee. I'm Matt Aleka. Thanks very much for listening. Goodbye.

London Hackney wick Hawkins Brown us Hackney Matt Aleka Charles Armstrong Daniel beach Tottenham Jack Matthew Banerjee Karen ten percent two years
"college fashion" Discussed on Women Worldwide

Women Worldwide

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"college fashion" Discussed on Women Worldwide

"As a force for good but there are absolutely downsides to social media as well with on mental health issues for shar absolutely social can contribute not something that we work hard to fight against yeah no it's good that you're doing that and if people ever post them a concern or i don't know if it's ever happened to stay are unhappy would you just jump into address that or you're basically seeing a lot of happy people in that's not affecting you we'll certainly get negative feedback to end it is nice because you can you can reply to someone we might put up a post and it doesn't sit well with people for some reason our followers will diaz about that in on instagram and we condemn them right back it has great you know hate us sweat we did this or hey you know what you're right with taking down so it's really nice to be able to have that you know super close feedback loop in super close connection because then people can feel hurt and either we can explain why posted whatever riposted or say hey you're right thanks for bringing star attention yes gift of feedback rachelle comes you're gonna love what they say and even when you don't it is a gift because like you said you can move forward do something with it make it better and when you don't ignore it you have chance of making a better relationship so maybe you could just give some parting advice to all those spiring entrepreneurs out there what would you say to them you know if they're thinking about going out on a cheating their goals in their dreams i think our biggest piece of advice is always to just get going on right now don't feel like you have to wait until you have enough time or until you've done enough planning in researching or until you saved adopt enough money i mean financially it needs to be a smart decision for you and your lifestyle but there are so many things that you could just kind of see as obstacles and reasons that you can see to delay getting going on it or oh aww much more time for this future the as you're probably never gonna be less busy than you are now you're never really gonna have time to start something new especially if you're doing it on the sideline you're still doing something else fulltime so just yet going on now don't feel like it needs to be perfect from the getgo because in fact once you have something up in live there's that that you're getting ends up probably informing your idea much better than any amount of research planning ever could so it's really kind of just just start taking steps in just get going on it because there's never gonna be a right time when you really have enough time to start a business and it's it is smart move to do it as a side hustle i even though that might be crazy hours wise and time wise it is to be able to test it out like that get going on it in don't feel that you have to wait for xyz things to fall into place before you'll be able to make it happen i love get going on it i believe in that eighty percent rule doesn't have to be perfect seventy where can people find out more about you and her campus so everyone can go to her campus dot com as well as her campus media dot com which is our to be client facing site if you're in the marketing media advertising worlds as well as follow at her campus on all the major social media platforms an her conference dot com in college fashion meek dot com are the best places to learn about those upcoming events very cool thank you so much for coming on the show you shared a lot of helpful advice and great tips we really appreciate you sharing your journey with us so thank you thank you thank you for having me i really appreciate it my pleasure i also want to thank all of you for tuning into women worldwide and if you can please just take a moment in rate women roll wide on itunes we would love to hear your feedback okay w w friends until our next episode stay focused energize and feeling empowered thank you

eighty percent
"college fashion" Discussed on Women Worldwide

Women Worldwide

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"college fashion" Discussed on Women Worldwide

"Nice because no one's stepping on each other's toes and at the same time we really kind of play off each other well in that one person strength might be another person's weaknesses in vice versa and we enjoy doing different things as well so i think that kind of division of labor has been super helpful for a really productive fall effective founding partnership for shar because it's very clear what each person oversee jeez what they don't absolutely in in when it comes time to take a break to take a vacation to your partners step in you have absolutely nothing to worry about or you still on when you're on vacation how does that it's definitely improved a lot over the years in the first years there is just no possible way to take any big asian you could physically be in a different place but there was really no way to kind of light up your workload even for any amount of time now it's gotten better somewhat because of mclovin but really more so because of the incredible team that we've built beneath us now so i would say we are able to take vacation now i kind of go on vacation either delegator or put on hold maybe meeting ninety percent of things if i'm going away there's probably that i just need to keep up within i mean i'm i'm always checking my email i'm always kind of on in the loop because i like to be but it's really because of the incredible teams that we'd be built beneath us that are able to kind of jump in and help support us that we can take a little bit of a break whether it's honeymooner maternity leave or justification bite on vacation is a relative term when it's your own business so we're never never truly unplugged is i guess can relate to that although i must say that i did recently take a trip to spain for two weeks much more vacation than it was worked with that way of out so wanna talk about your transition into physical events so online magazine and now it's physical events as well why don't you talk a little bit about your upcoming events i think it's her conference and college fashion week yes so one thing that we've spent a lot of time on over these past years since we launched is really growing company from being centered on.

spain ninety percent two weeks
"college fashion" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"college fashion" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"Okay this is not good oh that's even better there's about this that's the perfect kind of confession but i'm ready elected think of it as me being head of time okay good you like my spin on it i put myself in a positive spin zone the right way oh god i don't know i don't know no it's not that bad it actually is really bad but it's not i don't know okay you don't want people to see me in the wrong way you just like did a upside down canadian flag all seeing an american actually i wasn't on purpose but all right here's what happened okay and if in college you can tell me oh well then enough said here you're gonna hear you really it's not that bad but i know but to me as like a man's man thing this is not one of my proudest moments but before okay back in the day when when i was in college fashion trends were different than they are now course the fashion trend went from comfortable loose loose fit fit to everything's ciampi everything's fitted in real tight which is cool back then i was trying to do something different because i was like i don't know artist i don't know i don't know i i guess i was just looking for some kind of fit with some jeans that i could not find yeah except for girls jeans right okay i and this is i found out the there was a girls cut yeah that was what i was looking for did they didn't make in the guy's got which incidentally is now the guys cut yeah is basically it was skinny jeans yeah they didn't have that for guys in college when i was in college so now they've got skinny jeans and it's a normal thing but back then look no not knowing that was probably just a weirdo but i but i was looking for a tighter fit gene at the time didn't have it so i turned to the to the chick one one time it only happened once i got rid of him because i was ridiculed i was honest with my buddies got rid of guilt for not thrilled out but but nowadays it's basically going to shop in the girls section it really those jeans literally like you're shopping in the girls these days with guys on time.

"college fashion" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"college fashion" Discussed on 1A

"It is an extension of childhood instead of the beginning of adulthood now that has tradeoffs there's both good things and bad things about it but i think just focusing on always as good or is as bad misses the big picture of the whole path of development slowing down and the consequences of that pressure twenty i get the sense from reading a book i did read the book that part of the challenge with smartphone social media today's technology is that there is no precedent for this that young people are navigating a world that they don't know how to navigate peak as their young because their new their learning everything a fresh and their parents don't know how to navigate it because they didn't grow up with iphones and android phone so everybody's groping in the dark yeah i mean smartphones were adopted faster than any other technology and there's a lot of adults who are struggling with these issues as well about how much time they spend on their found how much time they spend on social media uh how it affects them how much to share and not share we're all in this together in this new world so that's what are the reasons why i think it's so important to consider these questions listened to teens listen to their parents listen to everybody and about their experiences indeed some young people have responded and do believe this conversation is worth having including this young lady who left a message in our in bucks binding of meriva and i'm a college fashion from chicago an iphone or about five years and i really really believe that if a great tool to connect with my fanned across the country answer read about news event as the happen which is crucial for me of the journalists my mother sent me in atlantic article about how smartphone have destroyed a generation.

social media iphones chicago atlantic article android five years