7 Burst results for "College Holy Cross"

"college holy cross" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"college holy cross" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"N. p. r. this the indicator from planet money. I'm stacey vanik smith. The olympics is wrapping up this weekend and this has been a strange olympics. Nobody in the stands kovin spreading through the olympic village protests in tokyo while. I'm in my tiny tiny hotel room which I can't even stretch my arms out to yoga in the hallway. It's only a few steps away. it's It's very very tiny. Our own mandalay. Del barco has been reporting on the olympics for npr from tokyo. It's been very interesting and strange and kind of humbling to be here as a journalist as well. There's not a lot of us here kind of a lonely olympics. I should say mandalit says these olympics have also been marked by all these protests a lot of them over the cost of this olympic games which is one of the most expensive olympics on record. I know cost a lot to put these Olympic games on and the some of the venues were or the venues were paid for by tax dollars here in japan largely so i think there was a lot of feelings about that but here tokyo is in the majority cities that host the olympics. Almost always lose money on it. So why did they do it today. On the show we take a look at the costs and benefits of hosting the olympics. Right after the break this message comes from. Npr sponsor fund rise making investing in private real estate as easy as investing in stocks bonds or mutual funds build a more diversified portfolio today at fundraise f. u. n. d. r. i s. e. dot com slash indicator. This message comes from npr sponsor capital one capital one auto navigator can help you find a car get prequalified instantly and see your real monthly payment without impacting your credit score capital one. What's in your wallet. Terms and conditions apply more at capital. One dot com slash auto navigator. We're joined by kenneth shropshire. Ceo of global sport institute at arizona state university and victor matheson professor of economics at college holy cross in massachusetts. So victor let's start with you. How much did the summer games cost. The olympics in tokyo were hugely problematic from an economic standpoint way before kovin hit so they originally had a price tag of seven point. Three billion dollars. That's a lot of money just to start with. But those numbers had risen to fifteen and a half billion dollars officially and over twenty five billion dollars. Unofficially by december twenty nineteen so before a single person in japan ever got sick from cova. Did we already had an olympic games that we were looking at a twenty five billion dollar price tag and there's just simply no way that the money amount of money generate from the olympics can possibly cover those sort of classes. Okay kenneth. i'm gonna throw this question to you. Which is i think the question that always comes into my head about the olympics. Why does anyone want to host the olympics. This is extenuating circumstances but it seems like almost every single city that's ever the olympics has lost money sometimes. There are like political issues that happen. I mean why does anyone want to host the olympics. Chroma sofas devil's advocate. I love it. Devil's advocate but it is the or of that brings to your community. It's what it brings to your city. You are mexico city in nineteen sixty eight. And you want the world to know that. Latin america's a place to go to your tokyo and sixty four where maybe it made more cincinnati does today and you wanna know twenty years after world war two. This is a city. This is a country that part of the global community. If you're los angeles in eighty four. We're not just hollywood. Were part of the pacific rim. So it's so it's big issues like that and it's infra cities who are the ones had been on this. It is like building infrastructure. It's like building roads and highways and parks. And the like but this is this is not a mutual fund where there's a return on investment and victor. What is your take on this issue. I mean from what i understand. It's very rare for cities to be able to make money on the olympics. I think one of the few was los angeles in nineteen eighty-four right so first of all los angeles was just a very remarkable and unique situation. And what had happened. There is that los angeles was left as the only bidder. Back in one thousand nine hundred four for the games and when you're the only bidder of course you can dictate the terms of the bid to the i o c. Rather than the other way around and so they said. Hey we'd we'd love to host the games but we're not building new facilities you can use the rose bowl you can use the coliseum. These facilities that even then we're already over fifty years old and when you do that you can really keep those costs down. A worth of the info four olympics in my youth. I ran the sport of boxing initially sponsorship in licey. yes. I did sponsors licensing. I am forced gulf so. La was that unique situation. Ironically there was one city that was still bidding theron and that was during the hostage crisis so wisely there was the decision. Well we will include them in this conversation and so la have this tremendous leverage. Is there a kind of kenneth mentioned. Is they're kind of like a softer sort of pay off. I mean is there like a payoff in like maybe not right away but in like visibility for your city long-term tourism on the answer for that is yes and that's of course what we call the legacy effect right and you can have a couple of kinds of legacy here number. One part of this is actually real infrastructure. You you make your roads better and you build your airport. Expansions and and both greece in rio have expanded subway systems. Thanks to the olympics. And then there's that lasting there's that intangible thing about becoming a major league city right or putting you're sitting on the map but even there requires a very unique situation. I think the best two examples of this. We have our barcelona which was kind of in the shadow of madrid and lesser known as a tourist destination it was about tenth or twelfth in in europe in tourist destination before the early nineteen ninety s After the olympics it's jumped into the top five and tourism in europe and so there's a good example Salt lake city also following the olympics. Ski visits to utah. Significantly outpace ski visits to colorado. So there's some legacy effect that you're getting out of these things. Are you guys going to be watching the olympics. I'm a big fan. I have devolved away a little bit. I was caught up old enough. Where the medal. Count things a big deal and we get more this. This media presentation the athlete back story than we had in the past. And you got so many options of ways to watch the good or bad thing now is you can almost watch every event if you want to as opposed to just wait and see what. Abc would share with you on a given day again. Some of these great powerful moments that you get from sport. That again is worth something. But the question is whether it's worth twenty five billion dollars. This episode of the indicator was by julia. Richie engineer huxtable. It was fact checked by michael Our editor is kate coyne cannon and the indicator is a production of npr and the results are in so on friday. We had a little contest. Family feud style on indicators of the week and had alone jacob goldstein. Mary childs and robert smith and me. We all competed to see who would win. the prize. for indicator of the results are in. Check him out on our twitter feed at the indicator or on instagram at planet money..

olympics tokyo Npr stacey vanik smith Del barco mandalit kenneth shropshire global sport institute victor matheson college holy cross olympic games los angeles japan Olympic games kenneth arizona state university
"college holy cross" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"college holy cross" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"I'm super excited to have mike as with me today now. Mike was a teammate retired. And thirteen as a commander extraordinary career. I'm really excited to talk about it. And i learned really about mike because he put a book out recently. I'm gonna hold up. Cover called never enough when a phenomenal cover and subtitles. Abc commander on living life of excellence agility meaning which are the three major themes that he kinda digs into and and helps kind of elucidate through great stories of time in the seals as times white house fellow as time has now heading up digital operations. For vm ware. Anyways yeah mike. I mean i could read. I was gonna read what my producer put together. But i think it just kind of get into the stories i want to hear about negotiating with the russians on the start treaty about your time in bosnia. I mean just strawberry lee cool career so at any rate. Let's talk about that stuff than who you are. You know kind of your ideas and leadership and see what else comes up superstock to have your friend. Hey mark thank you brother. I really appreciate the opportunity. Be here in. I'd be remiss. If i didn't pause i say thanks to you. All the incredible positive impact that you had on people the nation in the planet so millions and millions of thanks to you and you've got an incredible reputation for for a great reason. And so i'm i'm more stoked to be here. My friend has mentioned to you. That is really good to hear. I'm in my own little bottle. Sometimes i don't read the label very well just like one day at a time you know get up but the pants on rinse and repeat and you never know right. 'cause early on is you know it's you know. Especially after the bin laden raid in those books came out about that. There's a lot of angst about people who have written books that i know you hesitated. I read in your ford. You hesitated to write your book. Probably for similar reasons and so i never really known i knew i was having an impact with special operators and the trainees because we we kind of introduced a whole different way of training through the mine mine training we do in buzzes now using those techniques. And you're having impact. But i didn't know if i was like everybody wants to be like man and it's really it's a great connection. Actually to the title of the book never enough. You know a lot of people think it's it's it's about fame and fortune and all these things and in reality as you know because you've read it it's about meaning and impact and one of the key thing themes which you know better than anybody in the beginning is is about excellence and you say well. Gosh you know. The real path to excellence is trying really hard things and then you know. It's really only i like to say failure is only failure. If you fail and don't learn if you fail and learned you've just succeeded and you say we'll you know what. Why did i. Why was i slightly. Hesitant to write a book over the years. It's a cetera. When i really boil down. I think it's it is like what you just alluded to it. We are we care a lot about what our community and just people who never even met. Think about sin. And i got to the point where i said you know what i've got a lot of great stuff to share and if anybody thinks less of for sharing any of this which by the way i haven't experienced but are chasing me than Than so be it. If somebody thinks less than that's not somebody. I need to be around so forget them exactly i. I'm with you on that. you know. I've gotten the feedback from people. I respect like megs. Who's you know former massive. You probably know. Mike my my jockey. Great guy and others like bob schultz. People stay in touch with who still involved on a buds and that they are they actually appreciate guys like you and even me and even jaakko who've written books that are actually very useful for young leaders and for actually leaders of all stripes within the community because it helps still lessons learned in knowledge that otherwise would be kind of bottled up somewhere and someone's head. They don't appreciate you. Know the guys who go out there and beat their chests and talk about how cool they were they were they. Were the reason that you know that the team on the day you know taking credit credit was not do and i think you and i can share that markets One of things also as you know wrote about is thinking about confidence in humility not as a point on a single line. But there's two axes degrees of confidence in varying degrees of humility. And i haven't met too many any seals at lack confidence in so the thing that sometimes i i find. People confuse confidence and they. They can flake confidence with lack of humility. And as i wrote the book. I really tried to separate the the humility part. Always come into a room with an idea. But i'm also very open that i've i rarely have the best idea. The power of the all. The experience in the room is always getting out thinking out. Think or outclass or out. Act me and so you know it really that that was that was i. Think one of the key themes in as you know if you write a book where you're the president of your own fan club. That's not a book and sell so high really tried to open up and share more of the things that i've done wrong over the years in what i've done right. Yeah i'm with you on that. And that's a great model. Tell us your journey into the seals. Like how did that come about always very interesting and and what were some of the formative lessons you learn even at buds. Well i i. I have to start with grandfather who is. Us naval academy class of nineteen forty was at pearl harbor on the day of infamy december. Seven forty one. And while i grew up in a family That had an indelible mark of service through the generations and so nobody ever pushed me into the military as the oldest of four. I said you know this. Rotc scholarship than. I can leave some room for my younger siblings to go to college etcetera. It's that's really where it started was at holy cross college. Holy cross in worcester mass in the rotc program but You know i was a freshman mark win in nineteen eighty nine when we invaded panama. In there was a seal. May john connors who. Just ask you about him. Yeah giancana across sky. What yeah. He was holy cross. Rotc wooster polytech was his his college. And of course. I never met him he. He graduated the year before i entered. But there is a memorial service for john. After after the invasion of panama the freshman. I saw really what the community was about. And then i didn't walk out of that service and say i want to go be a deal but three years later as i was needing to make my selection what to do in life i was like like many of us. Perversely attracted to the challenge of okay. What this really hard thing in front of me and and but but also the definitely attracted to the sense of community. Yeah i love that. In fact i was at officer candidate school when the panama invasion went down and i remember staring up at a tv looking at johns name and there were three other seals who passed away in that in that operation and thinking. Wow this is real right there. By the grace of god go i because i'm going to budge and two months. John was not much older than me. It was really kind of a seminal moment in my My careers to succumb to face to face it that was real and it reaffirmed my commitment you know to the teams and that i was doing the right thing so it didn't scare me it just kind of woke me up interesting yeah. I had a similar experience. I mean you. We lost guys in training here and there over the years in every single one of them really rocks the community and post nine eleven it it even got a lot more real as Every seal of of a myra who did twenty years in you know. Got our friends and colleagues. We've all buried forty or fifty friends and teammates and so at this point there are a really good number of guys that i know when i should say you knew better than my own brother and i'm very very close blood brother so it's a it's really been a. It's been a challenging. Nope fifteen twenty years.

mike lee cool bob schultz jaakko Mike bosnia Abc white house bin laden ford panama john connors giancana Rotc wooster polytech Us naval academy holy cross college pearl harbor Rotc worcester johns
"college holy cross" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"college holy cross" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"A regulation infiltration. Mayor Wall said last week that the city could fall into the red category. As it continues to battle the Corona virus. A college in Massachusetts is forced to go remote after more positive test for covert 19. W B C's Matt share spoke to some of the students there less than a week after an entire residents all went into lock down. There's a second Corona virus outbreak at Merrimack College. The school announced on Sunday that 12 new positive cases were discovered on campus, but they don't appear to be connected to last week's cluster. For that reason, classes will be remote until Monday. Students like Drew aren't too upset about. It is better for me. I get to stay in my big what? Despite his sense of humor, Drew knows the seriousness of this virus firsthand. I had Earlier, so it's a high risk is being around here around people and stuff like that. And so, his message to fellow students where you mash Unit Sergeant, Brush your teeth Wash your body in north and over. Matt Shearer w B Z Boston's news radio. I'm feeling U U mass. Amherst says seeing 13 students test positive for covert 19 over the past week all live off campus and are believed to have attended the same party. Officials at Salem State are looking into a couple of off campus incidents over the weekend where students violated health guidelines. There have also been cases at Boston College. Holy Cross, Northeastern and UNH Providence College has had more than 100 Cobain, 19 cases and ur eyes canceling spring break help reduce the spread of the virus by cutting down on student travel. California Governor Gavin Newson wants the people of his state to get a flu shot. He he drove that point home today as he got a flu shot while giving an update on wildfires and the Corona virus. I've done this every single year. As long as I can remember, it is.

Governor Gavin Newson Matt Shearer Drew Boston College Merrimack College flu Wall Massachusetts Boston Providence College Salem State Holy Cross California Amherst Northeastern Cobain UNH
"college holy cross" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

15:34 min | 2 years ago

"college holy cross" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Was dealing with the HIV aids epidemic in the United States and this segment he's talking about that experience if you ever had the feeling that something was going to get away from us when it came to one of these crises and disease not that it was going to get away from us but that it was going to be much more serious than anyone anticipated and that really started off right from the very beginning of my career as the director of the institute when I first started seeing in taking care of HIV infected individuals before we even knew was HIV in the very early eighties nineteen eighty one before winter of eighty one in two eighty two it was very clear that this was something we had never seen before and it was completely unpredictable what was gonna happen and I got involved very early on and was concerned that many people in and out of government but considering this just a fluke among game and that's kind of strange disease but the way I sort of Ralph and following it it was quite scary and unfortunately my concerns were well founded because it turned out historically to be and is today one of the most devastating historic pandemics that we've ever experienced civilization has ever experienced when did you personally recognize this and and not yeah maybe it was her but I'm not a ha moment it was an aha moment the aha moment was it was the early summer of nineteen eighty one and the CDC the centers for disease control and prevention every week puts out something cool morbidity and mortality weekly report which is a almost a pamphlet which gives you a heads up on diseases or patterns of disease like a flu is coming or little outbreak of this and they reported on their June fifth nineteen eighty one M. M. W. R. five men from Los Angeles who presented with a very unusual kind of pneumonia that you only see in people who have dramatically suppressed immune systems and I looked at it said wow five gay men why old game and then why this strange disease that you're almost never see in healthy people in the they were supposedly completely healthy other than that I thought it was a fluke and I put it aside and then one month later on that July fourth of nineteen eighty one the next M. M. W. what appeared on my desk at the end I H. I was sitting there reading it and they said now twenty six men not only from LA but from San Francisco in New York with not only this strange ammonia but this strange kind of cancer that you only see in people remain a suppressed and the thing that blew me away is that all of them were game man and I said whoa something's going on here that's really bad and this is likely a new disease I had no idea what it was I didn't mind yeah it's it looked very much like it was an infectious disease because when you look at the patterns it seems to have been spread by sexual contact and that's when I really had a combination of the aha moment and an anxiety reaction where I was saying this is going to be bad and I made what I consider the transforming decision in my own career I decided I was going to stop what I had been doing rather successfully for the previous nine or ten years and devote myself completely to studying what I felt would be an enormously difficult disease and it unfortunately turned out that that was the case when you look back at that period I know I've read that people were mad at you and in your own operation who got mad at you for what reason that you took gays and add them involved in the discussion well it was a combination first of all in and well meaning way a my mentors the people who had cultivated me in science and academics thought I was being foolish throwing away a very promising career in one area of the medical research to go after it something that they thought was going to disappear this is just a fluke it's going to go away later on as on E. began to take a leadership role in not only the research but when I became director of the institute of the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases in nineteen eighty four there were people who were concerned and and I would say bordering on being angry with me in that it was clear that I wanted to put more resources in this because even though it was still very early in the history of the pandemic I want to get more government resources I wanted more research and it became clear to me that we needed to embrace the gay community the activists to get a better feel for what was going on in the trenches with them and it was a lot of resentment towards me on that resentment on the part of the scientists because they thought I was going to divert resources away from other important areas of infectious diseases and I was arguing I want to divert resources I want to get new resources I want to argue before the Congress and before the president about why we needed more resources for this disease so that was that area resentment and then the idea of activists playing a major role in some of the decision and policy making in a research program was completely foreign and antithetical to many scientists there at the time it was well this is where purists think scientists will make the decisions about what needs to be done we don't need to involve the community in this and I thought that that was not a good idea because the community had a lot to offer they were the ones that was suffering was an unknown disease the rigidity of the regulatory process of getting drugs approved quickly that were experimental drugs that showed some efficacy was old a changing paradigm we hadn't experienced that before here you are nineteen ninety are at a town hall meeting in the nineteen nineties when we'll be seeing some revolutionizing the way we look at the treatment of HIV because the end of the nineteen eighties has created the concept that you'll see in the nineties and early intervention namely training people early on before they develop full blown disease prophylaxis against opportunistic infections to hopefully have the goal of the decade of the nineties convert HIV infection into a chronic manageable infection we have are you contest someone councils and get them into the care of a physician and treat them with a combination of drugs early enough on a course of infection so that you might have a situation like many other chronic diseases with as the feasibility of a reasonable comfortable life span twenty five years later here we are what happened it happened it happened we we were fortunate we have drugs right now that when given to people who are HIV infected if someone comes in and and I could show you the the dichotomy in the early eighties if someone came in to my clinic with aids the median survival would be six to eight months which means they would be half of them would be dead in eight months now if tomorrow when I go back to rounds on Friday and someone comes into our clinic who's twenty plus years old who's relatively recently infected and I put them on the combination of three drugs that cocktail of highly active antiretroviral therapy I could accurately predict look him in the eye and say we could do mathematical modeling to say that if you take your medicine regularly you could live an additional fifty five zero years so to go from knowing that fifty percent of the people are gonna die in eight months to knowing that if you take your medicines you could live essentially a normal lifespan just a little bit a few years less than normalized band that's a huge advance as he did with the HIV aids crisis and later epidemics doctor felt she has to negotiate the politics of the coronavirus response as he deals with this latest crisis in this next clip we see him at the White House podium trying to avoid the political Frasier street here if you'd like to talk about the world WHL but the fact is that I have heard for years that that is very much biased toward China so I don't know if you already get in this political mess no I don't want to do that but I will so the tendrils is really an outstanding person I've known him for the time that he was the minister of health of Ethiopia I mean obviously over the years anyone who says that the W. H. O. has not had problems has not been watching the WHL but I think under his leadership they've done very well he's been all over this I was on the phone with him a few hours ago meeting a W. H. O. call I'm not sure I'm not talking about China US me about tendrils will help organisations praising China for its transparency and leadership on the response that I can't comment on that because I mean I I don't have any point into it I mean I don't I don't even know what your question is I want to apologize to my current response to you when you asked me about the China deal because I should have done that that's not my style but what I really want to say is that my job is that I'm a scientist from a physician and I'm a public health person and I don't like to get involved in that stuff so anyway I'm a scientist I'm a physician I'm a public health person so where did Dr felt his desire to serve the public come from he provided some insights on the answer to that during his twenty fifteen Q. and a interview let's watch the first dock in your family was your father who is a pharmacist right tell us about it where did where did all this happen where did you where were you born well I was born and raised in Brooklyn New York in the Bensonhurst section which was a back then and maybe even now Brooklyn if you took a aerial photo and look to different sections athletically ethnically divided it was Italian American section of the Irish section the African American section the Porto Rican sections that are so I was in an Italian American section called Bensonhurst and it was a very family oriented very warm and nurturing area to live in my father is first generation whose father was born in Italy came to the United States at the turn of the century of the turn of the twentieth nineteen the twentieth century my father was raised early on in Little Italy section of of New York in Manhattan moved to Brooklyn and then our family was raised in Brooklyn he went to Columbia University College of pharmacy became a pharmacist and that's what he did for the owner's wife so that's how I got the name doc right they call them doc back then pharmacist will call doc because it a little bit different than it is now many people who either couldn't afford to go to a doctor or didn't want to take the time to making an appointment would go in to that neighborhood pharmacy and explain their symptoms and my father never overstepped his bounds if somebody needed to see a physician he would say you better go see a physician but often he would give them the advice they needed to take care of what minor ailments they had mom was my mom's background she my mother went to Hunter College in in New York City and got married at a very early age in fact my mother and father interestingly got married right out of high school so my father went through pharmacy school and my mother went to Hunter College both married and as soon as they had my mother gave birth to my sister who's three years older than I am than me she became a homemaker for her whole life the Jesuits taught you high school college Holy Cross right Regis high school in Manhattan what what impact what does it mean to be taught by Jesuits we hear about graduates all the time well it's it's it's a great experience that I have to say they combined intense intellectualism with discipline not in the sense of you know smacking you around but intellectual rigor discipline in how you handle yourself as a person as a human being and they have a a general model of and I think this had a major influence on me and what I did is the issue of service to others that's very big that doesn't mean that people who don't go into public service are doing anything a lesser with their lives but they tend to have a I wouldn't say a pushing bred a leaning towards something about what you do is public service either everything you do which turned out what I did by going into public service or at least a part of your life so it was a it was an interesting combination of concern for mankind as well as a good intellectual rigor when did you want to be a doctor can remember this time I think it was early high school I I'm I'm very interested in people I'm a very much of a people person and probably as part of the Jesuit training which is very steep in the classics and the humanities so when I went to Regis high school we took three years of Greek for years of Latin a romance language and ancient history and things like that when I went to Holy Cross which is another Jesuit school as a college I took kind of a hybrid pre med course it was cold it's almost an oxymoron it was called eight B. Greek classics dash pre med you were majoring in the humanities and the classics with a lot of philosophy but she took another science to get into medical school and the idea about one on one to become a doctor I like science I like discovery I liked the challenges of science but I also so much liked mankind in the humanities that it was just a natural fit that where do you put science and people in the same bucket into me that was medicine who was an early mentor probably some of the very young Jesuits in Regis high school in the Jesuit training it's a long long training before you become a Jesuit priest and back then they were had what's called scholastics with people who weren't yet ordained as priests but they dressed with the garb of a priest and a court in in the high school and there were a couple of those scholastics who had a major impact on me just great people highly intellectual and highly nurturing of you and what you want to do queuing day on C. span radio with a profile of Dr Anthony Fauci director of the National Institute of.

United States HIV
"college holy cross" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

12:05 min | 2 years ago

"college holy cross" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"On the other side of the glass along with Paul Rosenberg but in order out so again something look for to amber Frye's very very imaginative order really you know I never had a burger and fries before so this will be a brand new experience formal talk about what's like that doesn't eat cheese I mean it's just there really should be a law there isn't one but there should be a lot of people don't because it just isn't right there's something about it that isn't right you heard there were waiting on any news on Aaron judge which will come tonight but could come tomorrow we didn't hear news about Buddha judge I get it mayor Pete dropped out on may be dropped out okay sure just a sports gegen haven't checked the news mayor Pete dropped out of the race not so my guess is speaking of sports they got trump on one side and you got Bernie and Joe on the other side probably I don't think worn or clover char we're gonna be able to climb the mountain so he had burning R. Biden against trump what we call whittling down the field and I imagine that's what we have for the field fortunately though on this program we don't have to discuss that which is nice you know I mentioned it in passing and then we pass and move forward eight seven seven three three seven sixty six sixty six Brandon county an hour from now we'll talk Yankees with him in spring training and what's gone on down there and obviously waiting judge but also a lot of questions you know both teams had a lot of question we talked about Jenny Davis we talked about don Smith we talked about the backup catcher which are added to Kamel told us he thinks will be needle because yes No more options so need will likely back up Willson Ronaldson and that'll be that and with the Yankees you've got to do our shallow Voigt Ford at any outfield which may take care of itself by these injuries you may see Frank Frazier and Carter and Frasier Gardner and talk man because Stanton and judge will be available but eventually we hope both will be available and they'll have decisions to make their just as the Mets if Cespedes allow re become available will have decisions to make there so there's plenty of intrigue and optimism around the baseball teams they are not settled and these days would load management etcetera even when you are subtle you're not settled because guys get a lot of days off in today's baseball return to Manhattan kicks off the eight o'clock hour on the fan hi Richard Chris I've never seen anything more ridiculous in my life Tony Romo seventeen million a year I don't think I don't think he even a guard first of all we can do is protect the players from the line of scrimmage because he was a quarterback he says nothing questioning coaches schools saying why would you do this that's what I look for in and out to someone to go against the grain why would you go one thirty ninety point if you put the boys don't talk like that they give you a friend now will very very standards you know nothing is going on the church radio station with Susan questions everything he's like a play by play and an analyst he does that this guy very staying there is nothing is getting seventeen million Chris let me ask you what would cause so be getting now I can't I can't answer that Richard I get your point though I mean I don't agree with you on a roll I think Romo is just what the doctor ordered and I think that there is always and you're right that goes sell certainly went against the grain the money was smaller back then than it is now there's always a bias with the league in how the league is presented because they're paying them you know I mean it is and they want the next contract so they're not gonna go anti the league I mean you know you all have read or heard about much neck and and him picking the way he does at the post on on so many things but most of the time so much because right it's just annoying but he's right most of the time because many of the things that we put up with we put up with because of the monopoly and because there is no way to regulate how they do things and how straight up honest they all are in their criticisms but I think Romo's very very good I think his enthusiasm his ability to relate to being a fan and a player at the same time is a unique talent obviously CBS agrees as did the other networks that were bidding for his services and he got seventeen million whether you like it or not because that's what the market bears for his quality of work you may not Richard obviously doesn't like the quality of work I do but the seemingly ridiculous amount of money is a product of what we've talked about all the time of all the players salaries and how important television is what is odd about it and many many people have made this all right is he doesn't nor does any announcer make you watch the games you're either into the games you're not sold you don't want someone who's going to make you look bad but the question about how valuable our color man an analyst is is always in the eye of the beholder I always tell young guys getting into this business you never know how much they care about quality where ever you go to work there are ratings you know in place for local radio a lot but not generally for national radio so you're dealing like an actor a little bit you're you're Saddam sort of auditioning for somebody and they either like you or they don't and you either get a job or you don't but there is a lot of proof you know you go to an art museum in one person says that's awful how could somebody get paid for that art and somebody else's that's a masterpiece I'll give you blank amount of dollars for it so there's a tremendous amount of variation in the evaluation of the talent and what the talent is worth and I get it when people say how could any analysts be worth seventeen million dollars but it shows you how deep the coffers are and how much money is being made and why it's such a big business and why it's so important you know why it's so hard to regulate conflict of interest because there's so much money involved and I'm like twenty five or thirty years ago most media people work for more than one organization now you know they have more than one job Kailyn White Plains is up next on the fan icon Hey how's it going god August so I wanted to talk about the giants quarterback situation okay okay so we thought you know I manning gone I do you think we should be looking at Kirk Seamus he is he's a guy out of a junior college bye little bit of a head case but I think you'd be doing well what do you what do you how did you find out about Kirk Seamus yeah he he's a very hurt he's a priori our guy on on average where did you play are you out of a place called Bob we cross the Massachusetts well that's not a junior college Holy Cross a division one program or certainly a one day program J. E. R. regardless of what you have heard or not heard from Joe judge they're all land on Daniel Johnson they're all in on Saquon Barkley he's trying to make the point that everyone comes in with an equal empty slate well I'm fat in all gonna Pat Leonard on tonight but I want to I don't wanna go up to show too much I will always want to give you guys another chance to come months will have passed on I'm gonna be on a lot in the next couple weeks well I'm Pat Leonard on hero's story today about you know about how much Joe judges like bill Belichick coming from bill Belichick's system and how the fear is that copying anybody won't work you've got to be yourself and the two sides of the coin there are people that believe he's copping bill Belichick and it's a mistake and people that believe he happens to be a lot like bill Belichick and he really is being true to oneself so the fact that there are similarities between Belichick's coaching and the way Joe judges handled things so far R. Maurer a part of coincidence than they are design and I'd I can't answer that and we'll talk about about it when we get the chance but but the bottom line is are you as I mentioned yesterday and for this mode of coaching I am for the clean slate one thing these two franchises have to do before they move forward particularly the giants since they made the change is to admit and nobody wants to do this in pro sports because there's money involved how far they have to go the longer you kid yourself the less chance you give yourself to change in life and in sports you know we we look in the mirror his and at one point you got to say Hey stop kidding yourself you know this is going to make it make yourself better I'm gonna have to make it better you know and and I don't follow my own advice as much as I should but the bottom line is we all know when a situation is a good one and when we should change it but we can make excuses forever if we want to and stay on the stationary bike and the giants and jets are R. until further notice on a stationary bike they haven't done the kind of things you need to do to prove that you understand what kind of hold your in Seoul Joe judge handling it the way he's handled it so far I am for that I am for we are nothing until we are something and to me the giants and jets are nothing until they are something that's how old how badly things have gone for them in recent years it was a remarkably wide open a couple of years in the NFC east in which the giants took no advantage and in the AFC east you've always had the patriots over your shoulder but the jet performance especially in a year last year whether schedule was remarkably easy it will not be this coming year both teams have been big failures and they need to admit that in order to go forward and Joe judge's sort.

Paul Rosenberg amber Frye
"college holy cross" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"college holy cross" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"On the air for sports network from where feel I am G. college presented by USAA musicians graduates only honors our academy's history with the heritage trail adjacent to do little hall remembering the role academy graduates play in the Vietnam War at the Southeast Asia for the recognizing the corrosive academy graduates at the positive and honoring those will fall the graduate war memorial visit the heritage trail today and make your airforce academy day one to remember visit you suffer dot org for more information USA in members are saving money on insurance and enjoying unrivaled service from a company that understands their needs my experience with USA has been excellent they really appreciate military family in every show with all that USA offers white go with anybody else we know the rates are good you know that they're always going to take care of us it was funny because when we will call another insurance company there was a we can't be USA eight it was instant savings I should change a long time ago savings and service it's why families have trusted U. S. A. since nineteen twenty two with the Weber family where the Chinese where the hills and we're USA members for life USAA proudly serving active military veterans and their eligible family see how much you could save on USA a insurance get a quote today ability to receive a quote depends on membership eligibility membership eligibility product restrictions apply to subject to change patient United services automobile association and its affiliates San Antonio Texas your colleagues directors because the highly recognized mark of distinction in college athletics across older versions both men's and women's sports follow your favorite teams person for excellence in this prestigious annual award through the director's Cup dot com USA today or L. director's Cup on Twitter Learfield IMG colleagues director's Cup crowning achievement in college athletics since nineteen ninety three this is extra sports thirteen hundred second intermission presented by first command financial services on the scoreboard your target center at college Holy Cross blue grass roots it over for some one to nothing and our second period intermission gas we continue on with former falcon Ryan Wigan forward on the from two thousand to three four and five and five grad the days.

"college holy cross" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"college holy cross" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Court today is facing charges of sexual assault on a teenage students comment from Joe Biden raises some eyebrows during last night's democratic debate basketball legend Charles Barkley says it intended joke is not actually all that funny and offer some an apology after telling a reporter that he would hit her Boston mayor Marty Walsh hosting an event tonight to bring awareness to the growing problem of youth homelessness in the city we spoke with labor burns dean deputy director of housing about the mayor's initiative called rising to the challenge unity action plan to prevent and used and young adult homelessness and loss and driven by the voice and the vision of young people who either are currently experiencing homelessness or have experienced homelessness and the path that takes place tonight at bridge over troubled waters this is an agency helping Boston's homeless for nearly fifty years the outpouring of support continues for the family of a Worcester firefighter killed in the line of duty last week eight colleges are now offering free tuition to the three children of lieutenant Jason Minard he died while trying to save his cruel from a burning home schools including assumption college Holy Cross in Worcester state university have pledged to give tuition waivers if and when they are accepted to college the same gesture made last year to the daughter of Worcester firefighter Christopher ray after he two died in the line of duty five seventeen now pop Warner football cheerleading squad from west Linn gets the ticket of a lifetime they're getting ready to go to Disney world to compete for a national title bods WBZ's Carl Stevens tells us the cost to send the kids might break the bank for some.

Holy Cross Disney football Worcester Carl Stevens WBZ west Linn Christopher ray Worcester state university assault Jason Minard Boston deputy director Marty Walsh reporter Charles Barkley Joe Biden fifty years