36 Burst results for "Collection"

Fresh update on "collection" discussed on Politics and Public Policy Today

Politics and Public Policy Today

00:33 sec | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "collection" discussed on Politics and Public Policy Today

"For being with us for having Also the confirmation that the U. S. Census Bureau is ending. All counting efforts for the 2020 cents is on September 30th instead of October 31st that is a month sooner than previously announced, according to the bureau's director, the latest update to the bureau's plans part of an effort, he says to accelerate the completion of the data collection and the apportionment counts by statuary deadline of December 31st 20th Of 31st of this year. The statement from Census Bureau director Stephen Dealing him. But Democrats critical of the move more details on that story at the hill dot com Well, the Trump Administration has awarded more than $35 million in grants from the Justice Department to organizations that provide safe housing for survivors of human trafficking. The grounds will be shared by 73 organizations in 33 states, providing 6 to 24 months of help for transitioning or.

U. S. Census Bureau Director Trump Administration Stephen Dealing Justice Department
Census Bureau Set to Close 2020 Data-Collection Window a Month Early

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:36 sec | 11 hrs ago

Census Bureau Set to Close 2020 Data-Collection Window a Month Early

"Collection of data for the 2020 census is ending a little earlier than originally scheduled. Census Bureau says door knocking and the ability of households to respond to the question error will stop at the end of September, a month earlier than planned. The bureau says it's making the move to meet an end of the year deadline to submit the numbers used to redraw congressional districts. The change concerns researchers, politicians and civil rights activists. Who believe the data collection process will miss hard to count communities, including minorities and immigrants, and produce less trustworthy data. I'm my company.

Census Bureau
When Covid Subsided, Israel Reopened Its Schools. It Didn’t Go Well.

The Takeaway

13:57 min | 12 hrs ago

When Covid Subsided, Israel Reopened Its Schools. It Didn’t Go Well.

"Since its debut and twenty seventeen, the Chinese APP tick tock has become one of the fastest growing social media tools with more than eight hundred, million active users. The APP lets users make short videos that are often shared across the Internet, but Tiktok isn't all fun games for months. Now, a lot of the attention about the APP has been focused on the national security concerns and the collection of user data, and as a result, the platform has been banned in India, by multiple branches of the US military and by Wells Fargo employees most recently however, president trump took aim at tiktok himself by threatening to ban the APP. We're looking at Tiktok we may be banning TIKTOK. We may be doing some other things, a couple of options, but a lot of things are happening. So we'll see what happens but we are looking at a lot of alternatives with respected dictum. Those remarks were before reports surfaced that Microsoft was pursuing a deal to buy TIKTOK in a press conference at the White House yesterday president trump claimed Microsoft or any other company would have to wait until September fifteen to acquire the APP and would be expected to give a percentage of the profit from the sale to the US Treasury. Joining me now is Graham Webster editor of digit China Project at Stanford University's Cyber Policy Center and a fellow at New America Graham thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me. And Cowan Rosenblatt is a youth and Internet cultural reporter for NBC, News. Dot Com callen thanks for being with us as well. Glad to, be here. Cowen who is the average tiktok user? The average tick tock user really is is a dynamic question because there is a huge range of different people who are using the APP but I'd say the most common person you're gonNA find is someone who is either at the tail end of high school or College who is definitely a solidly in generation the Gen Z. and he was using me APP mostly for fun to do dance challenges trends an engaged with communities that serve to their world. Graham. All of that sounds pretty basic I mean it doesn't sound like there's anything to be concerned about so far what type of data does tiktok collect from its users Graham? We'll TIKTOK is like a lot of social media companies these days It's using an AI driven or machine learning driven algorithm to figure out which content to to individual users. So to get this accomplished, they pay attention to obviously whatever you post that also you know what posts on your feed you look at how long you look at them where your device location is They also tried to track individual users like many apps do by looking at things like screen size and operating system and of course, they have a fair amount of information about your social graph, your your connections to friends and other people that you follow. And so what were some of the concerns around the data collection that way Graham given that it feels like there's a lot of, as you mentioned, other social media platforms and advertisers and the like that are tracking everything that we do already. Why? Why is Tiktok being highlighted here and banned in some of the institutions that we mentioned at the top Well, the basic reason is that tick tock is owned by a Chinese company named Bite Dance and they're a fairly new social media company. They had a breakout a few years ago in China with an APP called junior Tokyo that that is a you know an algorithm, IQ news feed and this is China's first big breakout internationally in terms of social media APPS and really getting take-up in in many different countries around the world not just the United States. So there's A concern that data collected by Tick Tock could end up in the hands of the Chinese company or the Chinese government and wild tick. Tock says that it stores all US user data in the US or in Singapore we don't really have a good way as a society right now to check that type of thing and to make sure that companies commit you when they commit to you know storing data and the Safeway making sure that they're actually doing that. Doesn't sound like we have a lot of that in the United States either though Graham. I mean, we have constant security breaches left and right Right. Well, the United States doesn't have a central data governance or data security or privacy Regulatory System the most prominent example of one globally as Europe, which has the general data protection regulation called the GDP are, and that governs things like when an apper services going to collect your personal information they have to gain certain types of consent and follow certain types of rules and there's also kind of limits the. Idea that if you collect data for a certain reason that you got consent for you shouldn't be able to use it for other reasons and that type of governance is just not that prominent in the US partially because the big US social media companies are not especially keen to have their practices heavily regulated they. They find GDP are in Europe to be burdensome and You know get in the way of making money. Kalland back in June president trump organized a rally in Tulsa Oklahoma and rumor has it that tiktok users promoted buying tickets for the event and didn't show up so that the event would be empty. What do we know about how that rubbed of the administration? So, what we know is it seemed to sort of frustrate the administration. Now, there's no evidence that the Tiktok users and K pop stands who are fans of Korean pop music that they had any impact on turnout. We are going through a global pandemic. There are a lot of factors going on right now. So it is really hard to know sort of what that impact was. But what we do know is it likely inflated expectations for turnout. The administration was planning to have a second rally after the main rally in Tulsa. which they then had to cancel, and so we think that it really messed with them. It was a it was a real genuine troll on the part of these tic TAC users against the president, and it really seemed to rub him the wrong way and there are lots of Tiktok users young first time voters who are telling me that when trump said, he wanted to ban this APP that was a retaliation for what they did the stunt they pulled the prank they pulled in Tulsa most what they think is happening. That's what they think is happening why there is no evidence that that's the president's line of thinking but that's what these eighteen to twenty two year olds are telling me that that's their beliefs. Cowan, we talked about The you know whether or not talk users actually had any effect on the trump rally in Tulsa back in June but more more directly here wondering if you're seeing any more political movement on the APP, whether it's a pro trump or pro biden or anti-trump anti, Biden has it started to move away from dance and song and move towards more political leaning so far. It can do both things at once actually. So there are still the dance trends. There are massive accounts that are just enjoying music on the APP but we see a lot of politics on Tiktok now maybe more than ever some young people are telling me they feel that because their home in quarantine and because politics ramping up nationally as we get closer to this election that they're seeing more and more politics in their feet, and what we're seeing is a not so much pro by content, but a lot of anti-trump content and I WANNA be clear. There is Republican Todd Democrat tiktok liberal Tick Tock conservative Tiktok. But what it appears to be is a lot of generation. Z.. Has a anti-trump sentiment and that does not mean they heavy pro biden sentiment. But things that we see our young people say, Hey, on this day, everyone go to president, trump's campaign store and put these products in your cart. But don't check out because allegedly that messes with their inventory or everyone on this day go to president trump's twitter account and report account, and let's see we can get a taken down. So we're still seeing these sort of organized movements sort of Troll, the president and a lot of discussion of politics but whether or not that is in in favor of vice, President Biden or in favor of president trump is sort of yet to be seen. Graham LE. Let's talk a little bit. But I mean, it sounds like tiktok users are for the most part having fun on the site sort of trying to do the things that Collina's talking about here but. On a more serious note, the trump administration has been trying to ban the APP. They're citing national security concerns, concerns over censorship by the Chinese government. Valid are any of those concerns really given what you know about China US politics Well I think it's you have to separate them out So the the concern about censorship I think is legitimate there was there was an example a little while ago where it looked like some of the censorship that they would do in China restricting conversations about things the Communist Party doesn't like discussed had bled over into the international product Now, Tiktok said that they were addressing that wasn't intended again, we don't really. Have a good way in the United States to check up on that and to kind of make sure that speech isn't being censored one way or the other the national security issue I think requires a lot more imagination Now, you know as was mentioned, the the military has has told service members to not use the APP and I think that makes a good amount a sense you know if if you're concerned about an APP Having links to a potential adversary There's all sorts of possibilities of ways that it could be exploited even just using location data of of service members or people who work in sensitive facilities. But if you don't work in sensitive facilities, if you're just sort of going around and and and doing the fun things and engaging in some of the political discourse that Cowan was mentioning you know there's not. A real big national security issue there a I will say that some people think that collecting the full aggregate totality of US Tiktok users could be used later in a analysis to try to do something, but it's really imaginative at this point whereas I think the censorship concerns a real and could be checked on and data privacy concerns are real but should be able to be checked on as well. What about the fact that we we just heard from Ian Bremmer, the president of the Eurasia Group in the previous segment talking about how the United States is viewed internationally in terms of our response to the corona virus. But I did ask in also about his thoughts on what this Tiktok dust up between president trump and China what seemed to Be Rooted in and he said, you know this is also part of trump's sort of relationship with how he views China and Chinese technology he's gone after while way he's gone you know talked a lot about five G. technologies. So do you see that I mean? Do you see that as a pattern in how the president views technologies specifically that's coming out of China. Yeah I think the you know the trump administration's been. Pursuing a campaign of you know escalating what could be a new type of Cold War approach to China and a lot of it is wrapped up in technology and and I think the focus on Tiktok really makes the most sense. If you consider it a distraction from two things I is a distraction from actual problems with China you know the the trump administration got this phase one trade deal which didn't really get to the deep issues of subsidy and market access and intellectual property protection. And, on the other hand, it's distracting from the fact that a lot of these security concerns should apply across many apps. Why just tick Tock you know you're talking about including American made apps like facebook and twitter. Yeah I mean the concerns are different when the parent company is in China but there are really unaccountable data collection methods going on across ad networks and data brokers are building profiles of Americans and people in other countries that can be purchased just with money and you know it's not only add companies that by this data governments can get it to. Callan, as we sort of touched on this earlier. But of course, we I, say this all the time we're heading into one of the most consequential presedential elections in my lifetime at least social media is constantly changing is tiktok going to be a thing and twenty twenty and November, or is it going to be eclipse with something else or it'll change the? Will it change the election? Calvin what are your thoughts on that? I don't see Tiktok going away anytime soon, as long as the president allows it to operate in the United States I think we're gonNA see more is eight organizing on the APP among young people and I think we're GONNA see. TIKTOK. As long as Microsoft buys it or another company comes in to allow it to operate in the US I think it's going to stick around for a long time. I mean the president did Callan has also asked that Microsoft give money to the Treasury. If it makes this sale, we is anybody else interested in buying tiktok or is it just Microsoft right now? I don't think anyone else has come out as far as I'm aware and said that they are interested in purchasing Tik. Tok I think Microsoft even just recently confirmed that they were interested in this conversation, but it appears a deal needs to be made by September fifteenth. So if someone's going to buy it, it has to happen soon. Well you heard it here I guess I callan Rosenblatt is a youth internet culture reporter for NBC News Dot Com and Graham Webster is the editor of the digit China Project at the Stanford? University Cyber Policy Center and he's also a fellow

President Trump Tiktok United States Donald Trump Graham China President Biden Microsoft Tulsa Graham Webster Callan Rosenblatt NBC Us Treasury Chinese Government Stanford University Cowan
Michael Kors on Why He Left Fashion Week

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:59 min | 13 hrs ago

Michael Kors on Why He Left Fashion Week

"Hi this is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business fashion and welcome to the podcast. This week our editor at large sits down with the American designer Michael Kors discusses his plans for Fashion Week September in fact Michael Kors won't be doing a normal show at all like some of his counterparts in Europe including salary in Gucci Michael is questioning. The efficacy of the current fashion show drill calendar, and so he's decided to present in a completely new format launching globally on October fifteenth on the brands social and digital platforms. He talks to Tim blanks about all of this including the confusion around the nomenclature various seasons and how he wants to clean up to. Here's Tim blanks with Michael Kors inside fashioned. Hello everyone and welcome to the live today with told me to micro-costs from New York. Hello Michael Hello. Bear Ray to cedar great to see you and we are doing this instead of actually seeing each other in September. Yes. That's that's that's the God's honest truth. Unfortunately, what are you planning to do in September when we would have been seeing each other? Well I have to tell you long before. The pandemic. I really kept thinking to myself. I'm screeching in next year to my fortieth anniversary. So it. It has been time me to sort of reassess think about things and I and I just after forty years Tim I've seen that I really think the system has certainly been broken. We can't always just do things the way we've done them in the past. I fake. You, know everyone I think realizes that the whole systems mixed up doesn't make sense. So I certainly have my wheels turning about that prior to the band. And then of course, being in lockdown, you really start to analyze and I go back as someone who has been doing this for so long and once in a while back to the future is a good thing. And you know for many decades the New York collections were after the Paris collections ended. In fact, they were a week after Paris ended. And I think we never whenever inundated the consumer with too much information just as in September. Here, in the states, we have Labor Day, and it's you know the world opens up again hopefully, right? At why are we confusing the consumer? And the press with a new season when they haven't even absorbed the one that has just arrived in the shots. Adjusted it makes sense to me. And you know more than ever of course where people are they're not planning months and months ahead. You know we really are living in a time where fashion is very much always has been though it's about the emotion that you're in. So. Are you starting to land your wardrobe in May I? Don't think so I don't know who you are. You don't have a life. So I thought to myself. Well, we used to do this after Paris it allowed or journalists and retailers. And consumer to have a breath. And then. In October, it really became the perfect moment. To show a new collection without cutting off the previous collection that had just arrived shots.

Michael Kors Tim Blanks Gucci Michael Founder And Ceo Paris Michael Hello New York Imran Ahmed Europe Bear Ray Editor
EU regulators investigate Google's plan to buy Fitbit

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 14 hrs ago

EU regulators investigate Google's plan to buy Fitbit

"Data European collection Union for the regulators twenty twenty census say is the ending opening Rowley an in depth investigation the census bureau into says tech door giant knocking Google's in plan the ability to of buy households fitness tracking to respond device to maker the questionnaire Fitbit will the stop E. U.'s at the end concerned of September the Fitbit a deal month earlier with entrenched than planned Google's position the bureau in says the online it's making the move market to meet by and ended increasing the year deadline the already to submit vast the numbers amount of data used to that redraw the company could congressional use to districts personalize the ads change concerns its probe researchers aims politicians to ensure and the control civil rights by Google activists the such data who believe collected the data through collection wearable process devices will miss does hard not distort to count competition communities the including E. U. worries minorities that and such immigrants an advantage and produce would raise less barriers trustworthy for rivals data to match I'm my company Google's online services well the probe on the schools the E. U.'s role in global efforts to regulate big tech I'm Charles the last month

European Collection Union Rowley Google E. U. Charles
Worries about 2020 census' accuracy grow with cut schedule

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 14 hrs ago

Worries about 2020 census' accuracy grow with cut schedule

"Data collection for the twenty twenty census is ending Rowley the census bureau says door knocking in the ability of households to respond to the questionnaire will stop at the end of September a month earlier than planned the bureau says it's making the move to meet and ended the year deadline to submit the numbers used to redraw congressional districts the change concerns researchers politicians and civil rights activists who believe the data collection process will miss hard to count communities including minorities and immigrants and produce less trustworthy data I'm my company

Rowley
Census Bureau confirms plans to end data collection early

Joel Riley

01:11 min | 17 hrs ago

Census Bureau confirms plans to end data collection early

"Announcing last night. That it is ending Field Data collection a month earlier than had been plan. They were going to shut it down September or October 31st But now they say households have to complete the census by September 30. The date Census Bureau says that they're knocking on doors of households that haven't done the census that's coming to an end changes likely to raise new concerns about how the Census Bureau possibly undercounts. Population, and when you talk population in this country, babyboomers have kind of been the £800 gorilla generally regarded as the largest part of humanity in this country, But now not the case. New Brookings Institute analysis. They checked the US population with regularity, and they say it's the younger folks that are edging out the baby boomers, baby boomers right now 162 million. And when you look at millennials and points younger, it's 166 million. So the oldest millennials are now 39. Gen Xers be born between 65 80 Gen. Z after 96. So right now, younger populations are the lion's share of US population

Census Bureau United States
The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

Gastropod

05:55 min | 1 d ago

The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

"To start our watermelon adventure, we called one of the world's great watermelon. Harry Paris he has worked on watermelon science per years as part of Israel's agricultural research. Service. Well, I think the first thing that comes to the first two syllables water right? This is a true rich table. which has a lot of water and which actually probably the first use by people of this particular natural products. Was To quench thirst I've spent summers in Israel, and it is basically watermelon paradise but that's not actually were Harry I fell in love with a watermelon it all started when his dad grew watermelons in the backyard in their home in Brooklyn in the nineteen sixties then Harry gave watermelon farming himself fifteen years old and there was a new variety called Crimson sweets that came out and plans at a few seats in the garden and Lo and behold by the fall we got one nice big sweet high quality watermelon fruit. That we grew in the backyard in Brooklyn and from then on I was just hoped. Harry was well ahead of the local war hipster curve in Brooklyn but the watermelon is neither from Brooklyn nor from Israel, in fact, its origins are a little bit of a mystery. One of the big headlines was back in the mid nineteenth century when the British explorer David Livingstone went to the southern African deserts and low and behold. It was the year in which there was more rain than average and he found a large areas just covered with wild watermelons. He's wild watermelons were hard but does the name says have water say to pound them and so on and so forth but you could squeeze the water out of them David Livingston was searching for the source of the Nile. But apparently, he was also as a side hustle looking for other sources like the source of our sweet watermelons and people thought he'd founded the wild ancestor but Livingston was wrong about the source of the Nile and as it turns out now. We know he was wrong about those wild watermelons to now that scientists can examine the DNA of melons. They found that the Kalahari desert wild melon that Livingston came upon is not the ancestor of our sweet watermelon. But DNA is just one of the tools that scientists are using to try to figure out where and when the watermelon was domesticated, you can't just use one approach. You have to use an archaeology approach you have to use clients science you have to use. Linguistics you have to go into literature some of it'll some of an ancient. And even more than that. Of course, with the latest that we know genetics and genome can assist us first of all the plant Science Livingston was at least on the right continent because there are wild watermelons of various different species all over. Africa. So the wild relatives watermelon their fruits are smaller and rounder not elongate. They have often perfectly round it small fruits the outside looks like a watermelon like little, green and white. But inside they all have this extremely bitter and usually white. Whitish pulpits azan Renner is a professor of biology at the University of Munich and she's another one of the world's watermelon expert Suzanne's as you could boil these Super Beta watermelons for jam or you could use them medicinally as kind of a purge to clean out your insides. Basically, the wild watermelon wasn't a tasty thing to eat raw at all. So where the desert watermelon comes from, there are two things that have to happen to these bitter wild melons to turn them into the watermelons. We love today to specific genetic mutations. The first one is a mutation. That switches off the production of bitchy chemicals and so this mutation occurs in nature as bad for the plan because the plant of course has this bitterness to defend itself not eaten so that the fruits would not be yeah for the plan is better to lose the bitterness but for us, it's good and we can only imagine that native people every once in a while tried one of these melons maybe for what may be hoping for something to chew on and found some that wasn't bitter Suzanne's scientists know what that mutation is and how to find it in. A melon they just to look and the second mutation is the one that turned it red inside rather than white the red colors also well understood this is well studied and it's a completely different set of teens. This is and other scientists know exactly which two mutations they're looking for. Those mutations aren't common and wild melon. So when did they happen? When were watermelons domesticated Harry says the place to look for those clues is archaeology in ancient Egyptian tombs. Archaeologists have found paintings of whole watermelons on a platter there oblong and striped watermelons today not round like the. Wild bitter ones but did those ancient Egyptian watermelons taste like the ones we eat did they have the mutations for sweetness and maybe for the red color the painting can't really tell you that. But fortunately, some other watermelon evidence has showed up in a four thousand year old Egyptian tomb complex the seeds and leaves from the tomb ended up at the q Royal Botanic Gardens in England Suzanne wanted to find out if those remains held any clues about whether the watermelon had already been domesticated by them. So she wrote to mark Nesbitt who coincidentally starred in our tonic. And who runs the economic botany collection at Q. and she asked if she could borrow a watermelon leaf from the tomb, it was in a glass box encased in a box and he opd mark opened it, and he said it hadn't been opened since eighteen seventy one or whenever singles arrived there then and her colleagues analyzed demand the leaf and I they were thrilled the watermelon leaf DNA did in fact, have the mutations that would have made the fruit sweet and read but then when you see fourteen Dating for this material that we had received for Mark Nesbitt, it turned out it was much younger than we thought it turns out the watermelon material in the two had been left there by a later visitor carbon dating showed it was from the late eighteen hundreds huge bummer.

Harry Brooklyn Israel David Livingston Suzanne Mark Nesbitt Harry Paris Science Livingston David Livingstone Kalahari Q Royal Botanic Gardens Africa Harry I LO University Of Munich Azan Renner Professor
Trump wants to ban Tik Tok

This Week in Tech

14:06 min | 2 d ago

Trump wants to ban Tik Tok

"Actually let's talk a little bit about Tick Tock today I performed this morning. An Act of rebellion. I downloaded installation talk on my iphone because who knows how much longer I'll be able to do it it's very confusing I don't know what's going on. Tick Tock, which is owned by the Chinese company Bite Dance Safest that committee. Or foreign investment in the United. States apparently is investigating I. Think they actually issued a ruling saying that like, wow away tick tock was a threat to the United States One of the ways tiktok became really big as by acquiring a couple years ago musically, which is really I think from what I see on. tiktok kind of the backbone of what Tick Tock is these days, which is lip synching or acting or dancing to an original track It's it's very entertaining. It's a it's probably the most engaging social network out there. But apparently, it's a threat to our way of life. On Friday the president on Air Force One. said that he was about to ban it as soon as yesterday. From the United States I'm not sure under what law safest can do it I think. But I don't know if the president can by executive order banning application. then for the last week Microsoft Been. Negotiating to buy the American rights to talk to kind of create a tick tick Tock America that would be separate from the Chinese bite. Dance. TIKTOK. But then the president says I'M GONNA ban it but I don't want anybody to buy it. So, micro-. Microsoft said. Threw their hands off and said figure it out and there. They didn't end the conversation with bite dance. Apparently, they were fairly close but they're not forwarding it until they find out what happens I'm GonNa make a prediction. Nothing is going to happen except now people are going to download and use TIKTOK. Brianna is tick tock a threat to national security. It's not a unique threat to national security. We need to have a conversation about the kinds of information social media APPS are able to download from our phones. We all remember the scandals of facebook on android downloading your tire phone list gang everyone you've ever called. We need to have a conversation about that, but there's there's really no evidence that what Tiktok is pulling is any greater than what you know facebook instagram these other social media sites are. Pulling so far. So we need a wider discussion about that. How's it just want to say I wish I could tell you this was just trump in the Republicans that would make me very happy. My heart broke today to see Chuck Schumer on the Sunday morning shows advocating the same thing tech talk. So you know it's it is we need to have a conversation about national security and the amount of information were giving up but it's I think. To just focus on TIKTOK. Sign of. Phobia. Or Zena Phobia Paris, you seem like a Tiktok user. I that's only because you're younger than. I. Did recently re downloaded when this whole. Wanted to make sure that I had it. I'm sure is a common response. I agree with everything the Brown said in the sense that I don't know I've been particularly disturbed by. The reactions to take talks, data collection both from the left and right and just. Experts in the tech field generally over the past couple of months because it is definitely coming from a place of seeing phobia. I mean, we have so many different. American. Made APPS that. Do many of the same things I mean one thing that I've seen noted quite often as to talk has the ability to see what you've. You know copied near Clipboard when guests so do most of the apps you have on your phone. Is Operatives. It's not a tiktok specific problem. This came up because of Iowa's fourteen, which is in public Beta now so people are suddenly using it and dozens of applications. I. Think must be a library that they all subscribe to infect somebody a couple of weeks ago. Somebody told me that it was. Ad Library I use of what a clearly noninvasive program from panic software Call Code editor, which lets me log into my Server. with SSh and and edit files and things like that and it was. I got the same thing that you get on Iowa's fourteen O, coders looking clipboard every time I typed to character. Now I don't think coded only panic software famous for an FTP program and this H. Program is at spying on me obviously, they're not. they're using the same code library. So it's a, it's a, it's a bug. That's what Lincoln Microsoft's linked in said as well. So. I think it's also just one of those things where if you're building an APP especially in. The Tom I. Don't know there was a time when absence of for being built were there wasn't this conversation about security and privacy. Why would map designers not take the position of? Yeah. All the things maybe we'll need that information talk said quite credibly. We're just looking to see if you put a url on your clipboard so we can pasted in. That seems credible I. Don't know if you need to do it every single time I type of character that seems like more that book I can tell you firsthand from developing an Iowa it's often easiest just to get it submitted to the APP store to take a bunch of permissions and It's just it's like you're trying to debugging in. Store, to accept it is just quirky. I can't tell you how many times I in other APP developers have. Just it's a very, very quirky system. So I, think this is just in Beta. I think it's really important to point out as far as the impetus for this I personally do not think it's a coincidence that tiktok was widely credited for disrupting trump's Tulsa rally a couple of weeks ago and Sarah Cooper is so famous for she's making five star she's she's amazing and those videos are brutal to trump and I I don't. That's a coincidence. She does trump limps licks lip sync. And I was talking to a friend said you know is the trump on TV I can't understand what he's saying but then I watched Cooper and that makes sense Sarah ads expressions and Gestures and all kinds of makes sense all of us and so I don't think the president should be so quick to to not like Sarah purchase he's adding context Might have something to do with it certainly in his mind because we know. You know. I don't know what he's going to do to Cape Pop stands because they were the other the other group that apparently figured out that you could register took on trump's team has got to be wise enough to know you can't take on the capons stands. Being. The capon stands the United States would crumble. Yes. That would be it would be over right. You just can't win against the K pop stands So. They were both advocating people sign up for the Tulsa Rally and not not show and Honestly the fault lies with Brad Par Scout trump's former campaign manager and his campaign team for believing all those registrations and building a giant outdoor stage. Giant parking lot so that the millions of people who are going to be coming because they all registered would have somewhere to be, and then I loved. Well, I shouldn't say that that sounds partisan was interesting to see the one person with the baby stroller in that giant area and the rest of the arena half full or third full So I could see why he might be a little angry about that. Is there. No, Matt. And I'm not putting you in the position of speaking for the government I want to say that in fact, we should have said that. That Nazi for the. Federal government but you also having worked Akiko Google you understand how you know a little bit about how this stuff works the the there's not any proof that while way for instance, has ever done anything. Particularly Evil they've done some commercial espionage apparently, but nothing could particularly evil but there's the potential if they run the entire five G. Network that at some point, they could inject malicious software to the network or shut it down. Is What could Even even sounds stupid asking it. What could take time do? It's the forbidden APP. If you think about it if you don't have it on your phone, it could disappear at any time. No I think it's it's less about that although you do see companies like Amazon saying, Hey, on your work phone or work device please don't install. And they did it. Because they realize Oh we do business with these guys. Let's not this them off but wells Fargo did that I think the Department of Defense I don't know about you sds, but it's reasonable if you've got a company phone. Probably shouldn't have facebook or instagram on it either you right? Yeah. I keep my twitter and all that stuff very far away from work phone. It's my it's my personal account, but you know it's I can understand why people want to have just a a sense of okay. Let's be careful. Let's see what's going on and then You know just making sure that you can depend on the. Tools all the way down reflections on trusting trust. You can put things into a compiler, which then you can remove it from the source code and turns out that thing can stay in the compiler for years and years and years. So you know you don't WanNa be load bearing on any particular technology that you can't quite vouch for his guesses what people are thinking, what would be the legal? How could a president ban an APP in the United States I was thinking about this in the one thing the United States government is very effective at is We we we went after Isis in I sell at a very effective way instead of this Ip address to a recruitment site you can't access it. So my my guess would be the executive order would basically grafter the ISP's and say you can't go to this particular ISP but think about that I know of VPN products is sponsor show sponsored mind and to know how few seconds would take the average teenager together VPN account to just keep their tiktok going. Yesterday I downloaded the tiktok cap the first video that came up credit account 'cause I forgot my previous password was a if Tiktok it's banned. Here's how to get around it. You don't Vpn you can go into the settings, your phone, change your country of origin to Canada and then You're great. Exactly I mean it's not enforceable basically So I mean one thing Leo I think. Matt and I would probably agree that we do need to. I don't know if it's more oversight from the point of sale like on the APP store or Google play I I don't know if it's kind of an External Code audit policy for these kinds of APPs on their own by countries I. Think we agree we we need more oversight and we need to make sure all of these are not stealing data from people and just to get people very brief history lesson you know Edward Snowden had some very serious allegations about our own spying agencies using. Facebook to gather intelligence on people all around the world there's evidence for that. There's no hard evidence at this point the Tiktok is doing any of this. So if we're serious about doing this, the answer isn't to further balkanize the United States from the rest of the world the answers to form coalitions with other countries say look if you're going to operate here in, you know if you're gonNA have the software operating in our country here, the rule you have to follow you can't just arbitrarily download people's Phone books, there's going to be You know civil fights. That's clearly the way to go is got to be bigger than just tiktok. I'm just looking at Tick Tock on my iphone. It has access to my photos because I gave it access to my photo so I could put a profile picture on there. it gives me notifications I could turn that off. That's that's a push though that's not a poll. Background APP refresh means it can run in the background and cellular data doesn't ask for. location data doesn't ask for I mean facebook asks for ten times more. That's why I don't have it on my phone. I. mean the worst thing Tiktok does is waste millions of hours a productivity, and maybe that's a recent ban I don't know. But I, just I don't understand how it could be used. If it's not getting location permissions, how could it be used maliciously and I think it is getting location position. I know that I've know anecdotally at least from a couple of friends whenever they let's say go to Connecticut to visit family or something they will suddenly get Connecticut. Themed Tiktok content or something similar. Okay. that could just be from. Connection you can get that from the IP address so they could get a Geo location through IP address without asking APP without telling apple that they're doing that that would make sense. Okay. So they're getting them. Every cannon probably, I hate to say it probably does do that.

Facebook United States President Trump Tiktok Microsoft Iowa Tulsa Sarah Cooper Matt Executive Donald Trump Zena Phobia Paris Chuck Schumer Connecticut
Microsoft to 'move quickly' on TikTok deal following Trump talks

This Week in Tech

06:06 min | 2 d ago

Microsoft to 'move quickly' on TikTok deal following Trump talks

"The last week Microsoft Been. Negotiating to buy the American rights to talk to kind of create a tick tick Tock America that would be separate from the Chinese bite. Dance. TIKTOK. But then the president says I'M GONNA ban it but I don't want anybody to buy it. So, micro-. Microsoft said. Threw their hands off and said figure it out and there. They didn't end the conversation with bite dance. Apparently, they were fairly close but they're not forwarding it until they find out what happens I'm GonNa make a prediction. Nothing is going to happen except now people are going to download and use TIKTOK. Brianna is tick tock a threat to national security. It's not a unique threat to national security. We need to have a conversation about the kinds of information social media APPS are able to download from our phones. We all remember the scandals of facebook on android downloading your tire phone list gang everyone you've ever called. We need to have a conversation about that, but there's there's really no evidence that what Tiktok is pulling is any greater than what you know facebook instagram these other social media sites are. Pulling so far. So we need a wider discussion about that. How's it just want to say I wish I could tell you this was just trump in the Republicans that would make me very happy. My heart broke today to see Chuck Schumer on the Sunday morning shows advocating the same thing tech talk. So you know it's it is we need to have a conversation about national security and the amount of information were giving up but it's I think. To just focus on TIKTOK. Sign of. Phobia. Or Zena Phobia Paris, you seem like a Tiktok user. I that's only because you're younger than. I. Did recently re downloaded when this whole. Wanted to make sure that I had it. I'm sure is a common response. I agree with everything the Brown said in the sense that I don't know I've been particularly disturbed by. The reactions to take talks, data collection both from the left and right and just. Experts in the tech field generally over the past couple of months because it is definitely coming from a place of seeing phobia. I mean, we have so many different. American. Made APPS that. Do many of the same things I mean one thing that I've seen noted quite often as to talk has the ability to see what you've. You know copied near Clipboard when guests so do most of the apps you have on your phone. Is Operatives. It's not a tiktok specific problem. This came up because of Iowa's fourteen, which is in public Beta now so people are suddenly using it and dozens of applications. I. Think must be a library that they all subscribe to infect somebody a couple of weeks ago. Somebody told me that it was. Ad Library I use of what a clearly noninvasive program from panic software Call Code editor, which lets me log into my Server. with SSh and and edit files and things like that and it was. I got the same thing that you get on Iowa's fourteen O, coders looking clipboard every time I typed to character. Now I don't think coded only panic software famous for an FTP program and this H. Program is at spying on me obviously, they're not. they're using the same code library. So it's a, it's a, it's a bug. That's what Lincoln Microsoft's linked in said as well. So. I think it's also just one of those things where if you're building an APP especially in. The Tom I. Don't know there was a time when absence of for being built were there wasn't this conversation about security and privacy. Why would map designers not take the position of? Yeah. All the things maybe we'll need that information talk said quite credibly. We're just looking to see if you put a url on your clipboard so we can pasted in. That seems credible I. Don't know if you need to do it every single time I type of character that seems like more that book I can tell you firsthand from developing an Iowa it's often easiest just to get it submitted to the APP store to take a bunch of permissions and It's just it's like you're trying to debugging in. Store, to accept it is just quirky. I can't tell you how many times I in other APP developers have. Just it's a very, very quirky system. So I, think this is just in Beta. I think it's really important to point out as far as the impetus for this I personally do not think it's a coincidence that tiktok was widely credited for disrupting trump's Tulsa rally a couple of weeks ago and Sarah Cooper is so famous for she's making five star she's she's amazing and those videos are brutal to trump and I I don't. That's a coincidence. She does trump limps licks lip sync. And I was talking to a friend said you know is the trump on TV I can't understand what he's saying but then I watched Cooper and that makes sense Sarah ads expressions and Gestures and all kinds of makes sense all of us and so I don't think the president should be so quick to to not like Sarah purchase he's adding context Might have something to do with it certainly in his mind because we know. You know. I don't know what he's going to do to Cape Pop stands because they were the other the other group that apparently figured out that you could register took on trump's team has got to be wise enough to know you can't take on the capons stands. Being. The capon stands the United States would crumble. Yes. That would be it would be over

Tiktok Iowa Microsoft Sarah Cooper Donald Trump President Trump Zena Phobia Paris Facebook Chuck Schumer United States Brianna Cape Pop Lincoln Microsoft Brown
Philadelphia will hire 120 temporary workers for trash pickup as big delays drag on

KYW 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 2 d ago

Philadelphia will hire 120 temporary workers for trash pickup as big delays drag on

"Those trash bags out on the curb this week. On your normal day, The Philadelphia streets department says collection will be on a regular schedule, although they admit there could be some delays. Re cycles through, though, are a different story. The department says. Those will not be collected Wednesday through Friday, Monday and Tuesday. Recycling collection will resume this week. After it was suspended last week

Philadelphia Streets Departmen
How the pandemic is affecting music venues in Chicago

Nocturnal Journal with Dave Hoekstra

05:12 min | 3 d ago

How the pandemic is affecting music venues in Chicago

"It's great to talk to you. And for people who don't know Joe Shanahan, he is the man behind Metro Club Chicago and also G Man Tavern. And smart Bar. And Joe. You're the man that we need to talk to about the health of our music venues. And what's happening with this pandemic? How you how you holding up? Good morning And thanks for having me on Bob, You know, I think about the history that I've had with you. You were the first interview I did almost 40 years ago. That man you're with. A local affiliate. When I ran my first club here in Chicago, so you know here we are. You know Metro's going to celebrate its 38th anniversary and 2020 and Not quite the way that we wanted to, you know, basically tell you straight up, You know we need and trying. We're trying to figure out funding and relief from the state, the federal and the city level. We were state mandated closures on the march on March 13th trying that their team was the last Basically day of business at Metro, Um, and it is called all the music venues across the city to close their doors. We will be that we were the first to close and we will be the last to re open. Um, we don't see opening until we have some kind of Immunisation Andorra vaccine, So it's imperative that we protect the great music community. The great music venues right here in Chicago, and, uh, just so you know, quickly. I mean, my my list call if every day was managers, agents, bands, you know, creatives. My call is now is, you know might quickly Dick Durbin. You know, Doc words. You know, we're calling on the governor's office. The D O e B A G P. I know more initials for Ah, people here in Chicago, Illinois. Washington lawyer thought I wouldn't know. But that's really what it's all about, is just trying to figure out a way to keep the venues in mothballs until we can safely reopen because no one part of civil, the Chicago Independent venue League or never, the National Independent venue Association wants to be open until we can do it safely for the public. Yeah, I was reading about the Chicago Independent venue League and the hashtag save our stages and very important, important. That's a collection of more than 20 local music venues and Joe your place there, 37 30 North Clark and your long established and not that you don't Have to struggle through these times with some of these other clubs are not going to be as fortunate. How many do you think will not be able to reopen? How many are we going to lose? How many music venues around Chicago are going to go away for good? Well, first. I don't think that we're sitting on a pot of gold at 37 30. We're in the same fight as you know the hideout. Lincoln Hall, Sheba's Value Hall. You know, Rose's lounge across the city, you know, sleeping village So many of the great new and established then use such as the Big Theatre. The Riviera. You know, Jam Productions is involved in our fight, too. You know it. It's not easy to look at a business where you have no revenue. And you're trying to pay utilities rent mortgages insurance license. Now we've gone to the city of Chicago on ask for some kind of rebate or mention painting even on our licenses. You know, there's been some help. There did not help we need. We need a longer runway. For most of these businesses. We did nothing wrong. There isn't a business failure here. This's a state mandated closure. A public health issue were very much aware of how serious it is, and we're looking to your audience and everyone would be listening. To help support state of our stages Single, the Chicago Independent venue League as well as the National independent, then you association across the board, even small businesses like, um, help that we get from the hospitality Business Association in Chicago, the H back group. They're hoping the bar side that you're helping the talent side of things. But Bob Honest, $1 that expend every single ticket Metro or any of the venues. $12 goes into the local businesses around the bank used for food for bar uber from public transportation. We've done a study on this and quite honestly, the impact He's not just a concert or going to a club, the impact all of the businesses around and surrounding us.

Metro Club Chicago Chicago Independent Venue Leag Joe Shanahan UM Metro Bob Honest National Independent Venue Ass Dick Durbin G Man Tavern Washington Illinois Hospitality Business Associati Jam Productions North Clark Lincoln Hall Rose Big Theatre Value Hall
Tommy Orange Reads Louise Erdrich

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:58 min | 3 d ago

Tommy Orange Reads Louise Erdrich

"This month we're going to hear the years of my birth by Louisa Drake, which was published in the New Yorker in January of two thousand eleven growing up in the midst of a large family I had never registered visitations from my presence. At those rare moments when I was alone as something strange. The first time I was aware of it was when I was taken from Betty and putting the White Room. After that occasionally had the sensation that there was someone walking beside me or sitting behind you. Always, just beyond my peripheral vision. The story was chosen by Tommy Orange whose first novel there there was published in two thousand eighteen and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Hi Tony. Hey Deborah. So what made you choose a story by Louis urging for the podcast so you had published, I think last year. Short story of hers called The stone is a pretty short short story and is it was a strange story and it just struck me So when you asked me to choose a story I went looking for another one of hers. She's actually published a lot in the New Yorker because I haven't known her for Short Sir she only as one collection of short stories you don't with pretty massive career, most of her stories started stories and end up in her novels. Yes. That's what I've heard her say and this one just struck me I think it's such a perfect story. In what way is perfect for you. You know what I love that fiction can do is the way it can get inside a consciousness and the way it can push mystery. There's something. So mysterious in this story and I don't necessarily always like magical realism but what Lewis does so well, in a lot of her work is sort of pushing boundaries of reality where it still believable still realism you never are asked to believe too much sort of realism's magic. There's something so strange and mysterious about it and really powerful the sort of cultural touchdowns that she does. So subtly though a native culture plays into it in the way, white culture comes up. Yeah. It's interesting because there is a supernatural component, but it can also be read as almost completely realistic. You can kind of how much you WANNA. Think of this as a kind of allegorical story and how much you want to think of it as real. Yeah. This is exactly what what I love about this story and what Louise doesn't work like I said. And if you've been reading, Lewis worked for most of her writing career at least. I mean, she's definitely one of my favorite writers of all time but I came to her a little bit later in my reading path. It wasn't until I was going to the Institute of American Indian Arts Getting my MFA a lot of native literature I didn't come to until getting into the program I. Sort of came in through a back door reading. Wise. I read a lot of work in translation, but I read love medicine I and just completely fell in love with her work. And do you feel the connection for you is that you have shared native American heritage? Definitely when I first started reading actually was a little bit turned off to some native fiction because it was. So reservation based and I, I have this urban experience but that was just sort of at the beginning of me thinking about native representation what it would look like in my own work the way that she handles bringing in native culture I think is so perfect. There's a clumsy way to do it and she never does it that way. always comes across really organically. and. Do you think that this story the the years of my birthday this characteristic if that main character as we'll discover is actually not native. Yeah I. Think the way that that works for the reader to something. Really Cool. Sort of putting you into a native family as a white character does a lot of work for the story I think. We'll talk more after the story and now here's Tommy Orange reading the years of my birth by Louise urge. The years of my birth. The nurse had wrapped my brother and a blue flannel blanket and was just about to hand him to his mother when she whispered. Oh God there's another one and out I slid half dead. I then proceeded to diner ernest going from slightly pink to a dull grey blue at which point the nurse tried to scoop me into a bed warm by lights. She was stopped by the doctor who pointed out my head and legs. Stepping between and the mother, the doctor addressed her. Mrs Lascher I've something important to say your other child had a congenital deformity and may die. Shall we use extraordinary means to salvage it? She looked at the doctor with utter incomprehension at first then cried. No.

Louise Deborah Tommy Orange Lewis Louis Louisa Drake White Room Pulitzer Prize Institute Of American Indian A Betty Mrs Lascher Tony
Joe Biden's Potential Running Mate: Who Is Karen Bass?

WTOP 24 Hour News

03:19 min | 4 d ago

Joe Biden's Potential Running Mate: Who Is Karen Bass?

"Campaign Campaign 2020. 2020. We We don't don't have have long long to to wait wait for for Joe Joe Biden Biden to to announce announce his his running running mate. mate. It's It's expected expected to to happen happen next next week. week. As As the the list list is is narrowed. narrowed. California California Democratic Democratic Congresswoman Karen Bass is considered a key contender. She's 66 chairs the Congressional Black Caucus. We talk about Bass with Washington Post political analyst and data columnist David Beiler, who has continued his Siri's looking at various potential Biden. Runningmate. Karen Bass would be governing choice rather than election choice. You know, she's a representative from California, California is not exactly a swing state so she doesn't have exactly those advantages. But her advantages would really come into play. Actually, when buying is in office so fast is widely known as someone who is a compromiser who sort of an incrementalist, not someone who is necessarily a purist, which really sets with Biden's governing style. He talks a lot about wanting to negotiate and compromise with the Republicans as much as possible. She is the head of the Congressional Black Caucus. On DSO. Dominating paths would be a real nod to multiple different groups that have been important to the buying campaign. There's black women who are the most Democratic demographic group in the country. There are black congressional leaders like Jim Clyburn, who helped revive Biden's campaign when it was really on the ropes in late February of this year. Andi. She's someone who I think you've seen in recent interviews has some instincts that are a little bit Biden esque When asked about the defund the police slogan she sort of did to step that. I think you reminded me. A fine one was to say, I don't like defund the police as a slogan, which is smart because that collection of words does not pull well. At the same time, we're sort of able to say they're these elements of the plans that I support. And those are elements of the plans that her constituents like so she kind of has a lot of stylistic things and a lot of talents and abilities that I think makes her sort of governing pick if you well, you alluded to this about the fact that she's from California, and you're not gonna get a Republican victory in California at least on this level. Is that the one downside to abiding bass ticket or are there others? I think the other downside is that the vetting Been relatively minimal compared to some of the other candidates. Now, Obviously, the buying campaign is doing their own betting with every candidate right now, and you know, putting him through the paces and seeing if there's something going on That they wouldn't want on their ticket. But Bass within the last couple months has come under fire for remarks where she called Fidel Castro commandant and Hef and sort of had a tone that lot of other people. Democrats from Florida in particular did not appreciate so the question with passes. Is there more baggage? When you look at someone like Kamala Harris or Elizabeth Warren? They've already been through the wringer and a presidential primary. Susan Rice has already gone through a Senate confirmation hearing. So the question with bass is also just Is there anything that you don't know that might be harmful, and the answer might be know that by knows everything and that there's nothing else there. But You know, there's some amount of risk in a pick that hasn't been in the public eye so much. David Beiler, political analysts and data columnist for The Washington Post, joining us on Skype.

Joe Joe Biden Biden Congressional Black Caucus Representative California David Beiler The Washington Post Jim Clyburn Fidel Castro Susan Rice Senate Kamala Harris Political Analyst Siri Florida Elizabeth Warren
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 4 d ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. 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These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Marilyn Nelson  Communal Pondering in a Noisy World

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:32 min | 5 d ago

Marilyn Nelson Communal Pondering in a Noisy World

"Maryland Nelson is a storytelling poet. She gives winsome voice forgotten people from history and from her own family. She shines a light on the complicated ancestry. We have in common and can help us in the work we have to together. Now she's written for both adults and children. She's taught poetry and contemporary practice to West, point cadets, and alongside the gentle, but mighty steam. Maryland Nelson Commands in the communion of modern poets. She's a voice for all of us in the work in the privilege of what she calls communal pondering to sit with her is to gain a newly spacious perspective on what that might mean and on why people young and old are turning to poetry with urgency. Poetry consists of. Words and phrases and sentences that emerge like something coming out of water. They emerge before us and they call up something in us, but then they turn. US back into our own silence, and that's why reading poetry reading it. Alone silently. Takes us some place where we can't get ordinarily poetry. Opens us to this otherness that exists within us. Don't. You think we read a poem and you say. And you listen to what it brings out inside of you, and what it is, is not words, it's silence. I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on being. Maryland Nelson is professor emeritus of English at the University of Connecticut and a former Chancellor of the Academy of American poets. I interviewed her at the University of North Carolina Asheville in two, thousand sixteen. So, here we are and I'm just delighted to be here with Marilyn. Nelson. It's been such a treat to be reading your poetry these last few days. missed. You were born in Cleveland of a teacher mother. And a father who was a member of the last graduating class of the tyskie airman. I wonder any, we're moving around a lot a lot. Yeah. You and your sisters always imagined that when you left each place. Disappeared cease to exist. And you did. This book how I discovered poetry. It's a memoir in poems a and I just wondered. So I WANNA say I said to Maryland I have a few books here and I have some. We'll read some poetry throughout I'm going to ask her to read some things. We'll read some at the end, but I also said to her that if she just feels called to grab one of these books and read she can. But I wondered if you would just read the last poem in this in this collection how I discovered poetry. Yes. Okay. This one is called thirteen year old American Negro girl. On each of these poems has a little byline of choir. We were at the time. This we were on an air force base in Oklahoma in nineteen, fifty, nine, thirteen year, old American Negro girl. My face as foreign to me as a mask allows people to believe they know me. Thirteen year old American. Negro girl headlines would read if I was newsworthy. But that's just the top of the iceberg me. I could spend hours searching the mirror for clues to my truer identity. If someone didn't pound the bathroom door. You can't see what the mirror doesn't show. For instance, that after I closed my book and turn off my lamp, I, say to the dark, give me a message. I can give the world. Afraid. There's a poet behind my face. I beg until I've cried myself to sleep. Thank you. That's my sister banging on the bathroom. And I don't know what me to talk about it. I for me. The. The. Crux of this poem is the fact that I really did pray. Give me a message that I can give the world. If you give me a message that I can give the world I promise, I'll be true to it. I'll be honest to it. That was. That was my thirteen year old. Prayer. Let me be a poet. Give me something to share. So.

Maryland Nelson United States Maryland Krista Tippett Academy Of American Poets Cleveland University Of North Carolina A Oklahoma Marilyn Chancellor University Of Connecticut
Volcanoes of Life

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:56 min | 5 d ago

Volcanoes of Life

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe McCormack in today, we're going to be talking about something that I've been thinking about doing an episode on for a while ever since I read an article while back that really interested me, and that is the surprising and kind of counterintuitive link that has been proposed by many geologists now between life as we know it. It on earth and the fires of Mount Doom, specifically, the the most violent and scary of geologic processes like volcanic eruptions on the movement of tectonic plates. Yeah. This is a great topic to get into. We kind of had a I guess a preamble to this a couple of episodes ago when we were talking about eggs and we talked about the volcano birds and the idea of a volcano being seeming. Almost. Paradoxically to be something that can nourish. As opposed to something. That's just a purely destructive force. Oh, I. didn't think about that comparison at all. But yeah, the the way that the volcanic sand babysits the egg for for the megapode so that it can just run off and do its own thing. Yeah. Raised by a volcano. But so I thought a great place to start here might be with a brief reading from volusia. It is a famous old norse epic poem from the collection that is known as the Poetic Edda. Now, this is a synonymous work. The author is unknown, but the volusia tells the story of the norse Gods culminating in their destruction in the fiery doom of Ragnarok can I'm just GonNa read a couple of Quad trains here. In Anger Smites, the water of the earth forth from their homes must all men flee nine paces fares the son of Jurgen and slain by the serpent fearless. He sinks the Sun. Turns Black Earth sinks in the see the hot stores down from heaven or world fierce gross. The steam and the life feeding flame till fire leaps high about heaven, itself Nice and one fun thing about this poem. It's bit of Tolkien Trivia Robert Tell me if you've heard this before, but the name of the wizard Gandalf that first appeared in Tolkien's. Tolkien's the Hobbit and then of course, the best character in Lord of the Rings, the name of Gandalf comes from the Veloce token, actually borrowed the name from a section known as the tally of the dwarves from this epic poem. Originally, he was going to apply it to the character in the Hobbit, who became thorn oaken shield the leader of the Dwarf Party. But then he decided later on that, it made more sense to apply the name of Gandalf. The wizard. I think because again, Dal means something like magic staff l.. and. I think he made the right choice like, Gandalf. That makes more sense for the wizard than for Thorin. Think. So but cool thing that happens in this poem sort of part of the RAGNAROK. Myth is that there is a rebirth that follows this fiery doom know after the fire leaps high heaven and the Kingdom of the Gods is destroyed. Earth is not just left in cinders instead, there is a renewal from the fire and the author writes now do I see the earth new Rizal Green from the waves again, the cataracts fall and the Eagle flies and And Fish, he catches beneath the cliffs. So there's this great link between Fiery Cataclysm and rebirth and renewal of life in norse mythology, and and of course, you know these are symbolic elements. I'm not suggesting that they had some kind of scientific insight with this is something that I think is taken as a metaphor largely about human life itself, but coincidentally, it ends up kind of ringing true with things. We're finding out about geology and nature. Well, it's something you see in a lot of different mythological cycles, right I. mean you see it in Hindu mythology? In. Various. American mythologies. Thinking about. Meslin. South America in particular society that things will rise things will fall that there will be cataclysm that whole world will be destroyed, but new worlds will rise out of them and have risen out of them before. Yeah. I was thinking about themes of fiery eruption in the greening of the earth together or sort of a creator destroyer duality. One that came to my mind that that I thought, you might know something about because I know I've heard you talk about Hawaiian mythology before was the Palay myth. Yeah. Yeah. The Hawaiian got his Palay is an interesting example, a deity of fire and Volkan Ism I was reading a book titled Pay Volcano Goddess. Goddess of Hawaii by H are low nemo, and he points out that when Polynesian voyagers I arrived in Hawaii, they brought their gods with

Volusia Robert Lamb Tolkien Mount Doom Joe Mccormack Hawaii Hobbit Thorin Jurgen South America Rizal Green DAL Dwarf Party
Should we trust our gut?

Tai Asks Why

08:53 min | 6 d ago

Should we trust our gut?

"My Gut is this big pile of intestines that digest my food I. Don't really know what to be trusted. They're they know that I get these feelings in my got like butterflies when nervous. Or. When I'm hungry like my struggle, I crank feel like squeezy. But like why is my gut able to make decisions like tell me what to do? That seems pretty crazy because I means it has a brain. And that that seems glad you know it's just like it's my intestines but like maybe there is a brain my gut. But at the same time, it's kind of farfetched and wacky. So I decided to take this theory to the park and see what live friends There's a break. In your stomach. Know. What what? Who had your brains in your head? I, think your brain makes. Everything you feel possible. There could be a brain because there wouldn't be space or else you'd have like a big lump on ever side. My feelings and anxieties and stresses they become from here. My God your stomach does not. It set when it's hungry I think there is some sort of connection Fram Magin by cells. As Like wow. You, know I think hires onto something. It is like really complicated and I did a little bit of research. Apparently, there are little creatures in our guts and they're called microbes are remember reading this one factoid from science center saying that all the microbes in your body where about a kilogram. That's crazy. These microbes, their apparently lake all over our body in there like inside US everywhere therefore supposed to trust our gots. Then does that mean that we have to trust all of the little microbes do the microbes have grain? Are they sent? And as was doing this research I saw the scientist called Dr Embry at Hyde. For My pc I studied the microbiome. So I decided to call her up what is microbiome so you can't see it because well, for one it's inside of you but for to they're invisible to the naked eye. So as all of the microbes that live in an on your body so that includes bacteria, viruses, fungi, some parasites, and it's not just the microbes, but it's the things that they do in your. Body. So the micro Byron or God is responsible for a lot of processes in our body. But I wanted to know do the collection of microbes form like a brain. Your Gut is full of neurons which are the same exact cells that are in your brain, and there's this amazing nerve called the Vegas nerve which connects your brain to your digestive tract and your brain can send signals directly to your gut. And your gut consensus directly back to your brain through this nerve, and they're always communicating talking to each other. And because of that, a lot of people like to call this system, the second brain in your gut but I think is probably more appropriate just to call it an extension of your nervous system. Does our gut brain have like a conscience? Sent you. We don't fully know the answer to that. Yet microbes live in your gut and they help affects this communication between your gut in your brain and people are wondering if maybe microbes have a mind of their own and if they do then maybe you know you could extrapolate a little bit and say, well, if the microbes have a mind of their own and they're affecting how my is talking to the brain, then maybe that could be the conscious aspect of it but we just don't know yet. What do you think the brain and the gut are communicating is the Gulping like We're able to process that pizza that you. A couple of hours ago now bring on more and they send it to your brain and then your brain tells you hey, I'm hungry. Grammar. Word is out. It's like. Well, that's definitely part of it but I, think it's just a little part of it. So have you ever I don't know you seem like a very good podcast or interviewer but maybe if you've ever gotten nervous before giving an interview or having to talk to somebody and maybe felt butterflies in your stomach, that is a result of your brain in your gut talking to each other. In addition to giving signals about whether or not, we should eat or whether we're hungry, there's a lot of emotional input as well at between your brain and your gut if you are stressed out or you're really sad about something, you'll notice that you're not quite as hungry It's really amazing. The ways that your brain and your gut can talk to each other. Yeah because like you know if you're sad then the guts like, oh, man, my partners bombed-out. No, I'm bummed up. Remember seeing my best friend at spirit of math new looked bummed out some. Oh Dude what happened and then he said, Oh, my hamstring. Then, he was just green me the whole time interest made meekly music ono. When he said. So. If my gut brain my head brain relic close friends. Do I make my head brain. Sad when I eat something, you know kinda nasty. Let me ask you a question. Have you ever eaten a food that you used to like and now you don't Wanna eat it at all ever again just thinking about it makes you feel sick no. Well, that's happened to me and it's happened to one of my best friends. She hates macaroni and cheese which I think is crazy but she just doesn't like it anymore because one time she ate it made her sick. And this has to do with really intricate and elegant way that your memories are formed. In how they make you react to certain situations and the gut brain axis has a very important role in that. So our eyes and our senses are tied to our head brain and those will help make us recognize the MAC and cheese. Right? Right. So the GUT brain needs to communicate with the head brain 'cause they head brain can recognize it. Yeah. So the next time, the food goes into your brain will say last time I. Am you system it told me this. So maybe just have bad memories associated with this, and then completely affects whether you want to eat that food or not. You know when like your own don't WanNa buy the candy bar or save money you're stuck with the indecision and then like if you're with like your parent or a friend, they'll just be like, Hey, do trust your gut Do you think that's like scientifically accurate? Any think scientist was actually like I am smart scientists. Your has brain trust. Your Gut because it has brain you know a lot of it has to do with this memory formation. Sometimes, we don't remember the memory, but our brain subconsciously remembers it and our gut awesome remembers it and so together, they are able to tell us that, hey, trust us on this point and you know make this decision versus that decision. When you say trust your gut do you think that's the brain thinking and then the message get sent to the got? Or do you just think it's the GOP itself? Your Gut doesn't come up with it on his own. Your brain sends a message Cheer Gut. You're just not aware of it, and then you're then response sends a message to your brain and you're aware of that one. and. Then you get that feeling from it and and you make your decision whatever it is that you decide you know sometimes people fight against their gut feeling. And they go with just their head brain half the time it works and halftime the time it doesn't does that mean? Do you think you should trust the got it self or the brain if you take one away, you break that whole. Cycle of communication, and then the messages you get are Gonna be different. They're not going to be full. You're going to be missing part of the story and so I really think it's both you have to trust both. and. Then if your gut brain is gone on your head brain is sad because he does never friend yeah. Exactly. Maybe, the gut brain is the head brains only friend and only possible friend. It's a very interesting way of putting it I liken. They've been with each other through. So many are Chitty half. Grumble grumble saying.

Scientist Fram Magin United States Byron Chitty Dr Embry GOP
How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

Science Magazine Podcast

06:53 min | Last week

How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

"Now, we have contributing correspondent Dennis normal. He wrote this week on how seventy five years later. The survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki have transformed understanding of the effects of radiation exposure on health. Hi, Dennis Arthur we're talking about study. Now. Run by Ari are asked, which is the Radiation Effects Research Foundation this is a very long-term study as I mentioned almost seventy five years. Years and included many many survivors over one hundred thousand. How exactly did this study get started all those years ago? Virginia's Harry Truman authorized launch of the study was in nineteen, forty, seven. They were pretty much should have a full team on the ground in Yoshii Nagasaki. By nineteen, forty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred fifty. The US Navy realized that there would be a bathroom studying the acute impact and. And the long term impact of what happens to humans when they are subjected to the detonation of Tom These survivors involvement in such a long-term study has yielded an amazing array of results, important results for health for anyone who's exposed to radiation and work or an accident. What are some of the key findings from this work us? Not just one study. They actually have a collection of different studies. Studies, they have carried out the most notable one. Is this enormous life span study where they have as you mentioned one hundred twenty thousand people who were enrolled at the outset? If you put together the combination of number of participants and the length of the study, there's probably nothing else like the RRF in his predecessor ABC city simply gathered data on how radiation has long term effects on health. Health of those who were exposed to radiation the Rif previously ABC gathered that data mix epidemiological connections between the amount of radiation. Someone gets and their risk of developing cancer later in life, other or decisions take that data and data from other studies as well, and they turn those into recommendations for the amount of exposure that people should be allowed to get if they are patient for medical imaging. Imaging, or if they are, the technicians were if their nuclear pact workers this gives away how old I am, but I went to the dentist pornography child. You sit in the dental chair and the dentist would real office machine thick x rays of your teeth, and those were go bouncing all over the room these days for dental x Ray. They put you in a special room which shielded technician. Technician is wearing a badge to track how much radiation he or she is exposed to. You're also wearing that vest to protect your organs from straight X rays all those recommendations shielding around the x ray rooms, dosimetry badges with technicians, where and the vest the patients where they all grew out of basic data that was produced by the long term studies by RRF INC with the survivors we talked. Talked about how this research got started very soon after the bombings, US government, Edna Japanese, government, and boasted research with survivors, but with different purposes. How are they different? Hauer their intentions with the studies different. The ABC was very much an American stony when the ABC's got started was so under America's occupation, and the Japanese scientists had difficulty publishing their observations amount of information that was released Japanese. was very much controlled by the occupation of Nargis, so there were real restrictions on what the Japanese scientists could do, but that initial collection of data by the US groups was over within a few months later there was a decision to set up a long-term study of the effects of radiation and at that point yet. Of the Japanese scientists in the American scientists were pretty much aligned. You mentioned in the story that the survivors weren't treated by the US scientist when they were involved in the study. Initially, that's right. Basically for political reasons, the decision was made that the ABC said he would not offer any treatment to the people who were being examined by the ABC physicians. They concern was that if the ABC city which at that time was very much? American funded American. If. They offered treatment. It might be taken as an admission of culpability in their condition, because misunderstandings and friction between the survivors, many of whom believe that they would get some help for doing with their illnesses with their injuries. Yeah, why would a survivor become involved in the study? If they weren't going to get treatment, even decades later if that was the history of the study. Initially. There was a hope that they would get some sort of medical benefit from participating in the study, the didn't get zero. In particular children that were born to survivors got medical checkups that there would not have received not been part of the study later as one of the survivors told me he has continued to cooperate with the study because he hopes that it will help the world recognize how devastating, the effects are of attack using atomic weapons, and so that is what motivates him to continue to cooperate. It's not clear whether there are. Are Health Effects for the offspring of survivors, but this survivors children are obviously concerned about their health. Can you talk about about this tension with the scientists say is that their studies so far have not identified any affects the question is. Are there no effects or are statistical data simply not detailed enough to spot affects the friction arises. Is that some of the children of the survivors? But we've that they are facing health issues that are not faced by big response were not subjected to the. It's on bond radiation, so the children what? As survivors as second-generation survivors, and they now have to court actions going forward, try to force the the government to recognize that the children of survivors should be recognized, says survivors as well, and that should also be entitled to medical support it just as their parents are

ABC Radiation Effects Research Fou Technician United States Abc City Us Navy Yoshii Nagasaki Dennis Normal Dennis Arthur Hiroshima Nagasaki ARI Virginia Harry Truman Tom These Edna Japanese Rrf Inc Hauer Nargis
"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

03:06 min | Last month

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"Having said all that. Sometimes we identify so strongly with certain things that we can't understand the difference between offending the thing. And defending ourselves in other words, we can't distinguish between a harsh critique of a certain thing and a harsh critique ourselves for instance religion. Political affiliation nationality. When I can't see myself as distinct from my religion, no matter how I respect it or regarded I will ignore, even defend terrible things done in the name of that religion. For instance molestation in the Catholic Church. It's an epidemic racism sexism abuse in the Evangelical Church. It's far more pervasive than we want to admit. These kinds of things exist in every single religion. It doesn't mean all religions are bad. It doesn't mean we need to throw them away. It just means if I so identify with that thing that I can't see important and needed critiques of that thing. I'm unnecessarily offended. When I can't see myself as distinct from my political party of choice, I become blind to its missteps, it's errors and contradictions. I ended up trying to defend the indefensible. It's just the truth. Cognitive dissonance in politics is a hell of a drug. The same stuff I deny in my party I see running rampant in yours. That is a major issue that we all have to grapple with. When I can't see myself as distinct from my nation. I never stopped to question how it behaves as a neighbor to other nations. National. Pride is one thing. But dogmatic nationalism is like cancer. We just have to call it for what it is. It not only destroys those around us. It actually destroys itself. There's so many more examples I can give, but you get the point. The attention collection exists to remind us that we are never not being formed. We are formed by the things that inspire US absolutely. But we can also be formed by the things that enrage us. The. Goal is to eliminate accidental formation. The aim is to partner with the things that shape us, and this includes the stuff that rubs us the wrong way. Perhaps one day we will become the rocks epic tedious envision. Until then if we're going to be offended. and. That's almost a guarantee. We might as well get something out of the.

US Evangelical Church Catholic Church partner
"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

03:47 min | Last month

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"Four. Three. Two. One. We have the ignition and we have liftoff. We have liftoff of the Titan. Centaur killing the first of two voyager spacecraft to extend man census farther into the solar system than ever before. Reports coming back into those. Hello from the children of planet Earth. What if I told you that your life right now is worth noticing. This is the attention collection. I'm Anthony Garcia..

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

02:20 min | Last month

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"To us. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> The third silence <Speech_Music_Male> I want to address what <Speech_Music_Male> I'll call <Speech_Music_Male> the silence of <Speech_Music_Male> platform. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> There's a movement <Speech_Male> happening right now. <Speech_Male> On social media <Speech_Male> called share <Silence> the Mike now. <Speech_Male> It's <Speech_Male> were influential. <Speech_Male> White women <Speech_Male> in every public <Speech_Male> sphere <Speech_Male> are sharing their <Speech_Male> platforms <Silence> with black women. <Speech_Male> The stepping <Speech_Male> aside, they're passing <Speech_Male> the Mike <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and they're introducing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> these powerful <Speech_Male> voices to <Speech_Male> their audiences. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> To quote <Speech_Male> author and researcher <Speech_Male> Brown on <Speech_Male> the project she <Speech_Male> says <Speech_Male> the intention <Speech_Male> of this campaign <Speech_Male> is to magnify <Speech_Male> black <Speech_Male> women and the <Speech_Male> important work that <Speech_Male> they're doing in <Speech_Male> order to catalyze <Speech_Male> the change <Speech_Male> that will <Speech_Male> only come <Speech_Male> when we truly <Speech_Male> hear <Speech_Male> each other's <Silence> voices. <Speech_Male> There <Speech_Male> a time to use <Speech_Male> your voice to make <Silence> <Advertisement> a difference. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> But <Speech_Male> there's also a time <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to hand your microphone <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and your platform <Speech_Male> over to <Speech_Male> someone else. <Speech_Male> Someone who's experiences <Speech_Male> different <Speech_Male> from yours someone <Speech_Male> who can add <Speech_Male> layers to the conversation <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> that you don't <Silence> have access <Speech_Male> to. <Speech_Music_Male> Listen. <Speech_Music_Male> The world <Speech_Music_Male> is a noisy place. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> We are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all having a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> very hard time <Music> <Advertisement> hearing one another. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Davitti. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> But you and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I have a choice to me. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We can add <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to the noise <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with the screeching <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sounds of our <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> silent indifference. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Or we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> can speak truth <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to power. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We can stand in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> solidarity with <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> those seeking justice <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and equity <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and demand <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> same. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We can <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> continuously spray <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our opinions around <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like tear gas. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Or we can practice <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the sacred <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> art of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> listening. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we can guard our platforms <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in order to elevate <Speech_Music_Male> our own voices. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Or weaken intentionally. <Speech_Music_Male> Step aside <Speech_Music_Male> from time to time <Speech_Music_Male> and share <Speech_Music_Male> the Mike with someone <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> else. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Silence <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> can either <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a powerful tool <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or a deadly weapon. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The, question <Speech_Music_Male> is how <Speech_Music_Male> will you choose <Music> to

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

04:56 min | Last month

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"What if I told you that your life right now is worth noticing. This is the attention collection. I'm Anthony Garcia..

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

04:08 min | 2 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"Most people these days would not identify as racist. In fact, most people I encounter run as far away from that label as possible. But racism doesn't care if you have black friends or family members, racism isn't always as blatant as an outward aversion to people of Color. Racism is found in the subtle inequities between racial groups. It speaks to who gets favored. who gets a fair chance who is truly valued in society? It is possible to a spouse, racist ideas and prop up racist systems without feeling hate for a people group because it's just in the water. Speaking of the word racist. Professor Abram Candy writes in His book. How to be an anti-racist? which if you haven't read it? Read it. He says it is not the worst word in the English language. It's not the equivalent of a slur. It is descriptive and the only way to undo. Racism is to consistently identify and describe it and then to dismantle it. Think about that the only way to undo. Racism is to consistently identify and describe it in other words. You have to listen when someone swims by and Asks House the water. The quick answer sir. It's poisoned. We have to pay attention to our formation. Because people's lives actually literally depend on. We have to be willing to get uncomfortable to be challenged to be criticized to be stretched. You have to be willing to speak out against systems of injustice. That is unless you truly believed. The water's fine. My guess since you're listening to this is probably more thoughtful than that. and Dr Ebrahim Kennedy also reminds us that racist antiracist peel name tags that are placed and replaced based on what someone is doing or not doing supporting or expressing in each moment. These are not permanent tattoos. He says no one becomes a racist or anti races. This means it requires ongoing awareness. At all times I have to stop and ask myself am my part of the problem or my actively demanding a solution? Am I listening or am. I checked out am I, using my voice to raise the collective consciousness, or am I sitting in silence? And, in many cases to sit in silence is to sit in a place of privilege. Please, hear me. The question is not am I bias. The question is where are my biases. They exist they are there. What stereotypes and broken stories are running in the background? Who Am I seeing? And who am I not seeing? Who Am I becoming? You can't change what you refuse to see. So what books are you reading? And who are the authors? Where their stories coming from who stories are we listening to? The days of believing you can simply be non-racist are over. That's done. You are either actively supporting systems of equity for all. People or you are complicit in systems of racism. It's that simple, and it's that complex. We are never not being formed. Fortunately. We have some agency in our own formations so I'll ask one more time. How's the water?.

Professor Abram Candy Dr Ebrahim Kennedy
"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

04:40 min | 2 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

03:55 min | 3 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"Changes <Music> because you <Music> are <Music> an alchemist <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> reading the same <Speech_Male> books or <Speech_Male> analyzing the <Speech_Male> same data as <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Warren Buffett <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> won't turn you into <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a billionaire <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> just won't <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> may get a glimpse <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> into his perspective. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> You may <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> expand your <Speech_Male> own <Speech_Male> but you are mixing <Speech_Male> compounds <Speech_Male> that Warren Buffett doesn't <Speech_Male> have access <Speech_Male> to because they <Silence> <Advertisement> lie within you <Speech_Male> and <Silence> vice versa <Speech_Male> the question <Speech_Male> then <Speech_Male> becomes <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which elements. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Can I find <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> to help me? <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Become the most <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> fully realized <Speech_Male> version <Silence> of myself. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> This is why <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I've learned to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> not even try <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to finish books <Silence> <Advertisement> I'm not into. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I've <Speech_Male> learned to accept <Speech_Male> that it simply <Speech_Male> isn't for <Speech_Male> me no <Speech_Male> matter what <Speech_Male> so and so thinks <Speech_Male> about it no matter who <Speech_Male> else is reading <Speech_Male> it no matter how <Speech_Male> influential it <Speech_Male> was for <Silence> other people. <Speech_Male> Now <Speech_Male> that doesn't mean <Speech_Male> I don't stick <Speech_Male> through some dense <Speech_Male> or difficult sections <Speech_Male> of a book <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Gore given <Speech_Male> album two <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> or three listens <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> before I <Silence> <Advertisement> form an opinion. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Sometimes <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you have to give <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> something chance to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sink in <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> but sometimes <Speech_Male> a piece of <Speech_Male> art <Speech_Male> just isn't for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> or at least <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> not in this season <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of your life <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and that's <Silence> <Advertisement> okay. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'm <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> also learning something <Silence> <Advertisement> else. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'm learning <Speech_Male> to be more mindful <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of my recommendations <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> to others. <Speech_Male> I don't do as much <Speech_Male> even jellicoe <Speech_Male> endorsement <Speech_Male> as I used to. <Speech_Male> I tried to share <Speech_Male> things with people <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that I believe will <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> resonate specifically <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with <Silence> <Advertisement> them. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> But this <Speech_Male> means I have to <Speech_Male> actually care <Silence> about them <Speech_Male> enough <Speech_Male> to know what moves <Speech_Male> them. <Speech_Male> What piques their <Speech_Male> interest. What <Speech_Male> inspires <Speech_Male> or challenges <Speech_Male> them. And I'll <Speech_Male> be honest. <Speech_Male> That doesn't always <Speech_Male> come easy <Silence> for me <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> because it involves <Speech_Male> the next layer <Speech_Male> of actually <Speech_Male> seeing <Speech_Male> another person <Speech_Male> looking past <Speech_Male> the myself <Speech_Male> long enough <SpeakerChange> <Silence> to care. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But it opens the <Speech_Male> door <Speech_Male> for meaningful communion. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> If you're willing to engage <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that's what <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we're all doing here <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> isn't it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> looking <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for ways to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> feel less alone <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> find inspiration <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> through community <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to <Speech_Male> find other people <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> who see in us <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the person we <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> hope we are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or at least <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> hope to become <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the truth is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> out there? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> You just have to know <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> bring just as <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> much to these exchanges <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as anyone <Speech_Male> else. <Speech_Male> This applies <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to the books <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and music and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> art and film <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> conversations. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You engage with <Speech_Music_Male> so <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> yes take the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> recommendations <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as they come <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> take <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from celebrity <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> bookcases <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you have to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> zoom <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> person. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That's creepy go <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to events <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and connect with new <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> people just <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> know that you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are co creating <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> every story <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you read <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and every <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> relationship you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> encounter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> because you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are an alchemist <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you take <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the materials <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you encounter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and transform <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> them into something <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> special <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by mixing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> them with your <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> experience <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and with <Speech_Music_Male> your unique <Music>

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

04:46 min | 3 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"In many ways? This is the perfect attention collection question. What shaped you. What were your influences? Which voices did you give ear to? And which did you ignore. Outright full disclosure. I have purchased many books based simply and solely on the blurbs or endorsements of people I respect or whose perspective I admire Oprah has steered me in the right direction many times and I'm not ashamed to say so. Shout out to Oprah if you're listening and how. My life has been enriched by the many times people have opened up their attention collections and shared them with me whether directly or indirectly and for that reason. There are a couple of lines in that piece in the New York Times. That really got me thinking about all this Gal. Beckerman rights bibliophiles do not approach bookshelves. Lightly. A strangers collection is to us a window to their soul that resonates so strongly with me getting the chance to see which authors and ideas had a hand in shaping. Someone's life is not something. I take lightly fascinated by all the ingredients that make up the dish so to speak. It's an honor. Frankly with the idea that if I read the same books and studied the same concepts as person X. It's going to make me like them or put me in the same position as them is a little misguided and that wasn't at all the thesis behind gals article but I believe it's an underlying assumption that many of us carry around. I wholeheartedly believe that. No two people ever read the same book. All the words might match up the cover might be the same. We may even be in the same book club. We might even live in the same house but my experience reading the book will be different in many ways from yours. We may have some overlap and we may come to similar conclusions but it just isn't the same book if you don't believe me ask an author or better yet. Read the book reviews on Amazon. You will leave the page wondering if the people in the reviews are even talking about the same writings. So what's the point for me? There's something magical that takes place when a person opens a book and I don't think magical is too strong. A word here is ideas that have been percolating for years. Even decades that someone crafts into sentences and then paragraphs stories and imagery and then an author pours her soul onto a page and generously offers it up to the world that is an act of vulnerability because someone is going to take it and receive it and love it and someone else is GonNa rip it to shreds perhaps even literally and then you and I walked by the title in an airport or scroll past it on an instagram account or we see it on celebrities bookshelf and something about it stands out the title or the cover art the author's name and so we give it a chance. We offer a stranger our time many times our money and we sit with their ideas. Their stories their longings their fears and aspiration and it gives us language to the innermost thoughts. We've been carrying around or it bores us to death. We never know until we dig in its alchemy. It's a risky. It's a sacred experience in my opinion and it's not just the book. It's what happens when that book is filtered through our lives through our experience through our frame of reference you bring something to the work and then it's transformed an exchange takes place. This is why someone can read religious text and go out and build a shelter for the marginalized and the forgotten and another person can read the same text and go out and blow up a mosque or shoot up a church. No Two people read the same book. No two people listen to the same song or watch the same movie when you engage a creation. It fundamentally.

Oprah New York Times Beckerman instagram Amazon
"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

02:17 min | 3 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"Years ago. The Pulitzer Prize snubbed publication. Us Weekly started this feature called stars. They're just like us. It was basically Paparazzi pictures of celebrities. Being Human People Unaware these moments were being captured on film. Of course the images would be placed alongside tag lines like they pay for parking. They pump gas. They pick their wedgies. I would always joke in ad tag lines. Like they chew their own food. They breathe using their noses and mouths. It was ridiculous. I think it's still might be a thing. Basically it was an excuse to follow famous people around twenty four seven under the guise of showing the public that they're just like the rest of us well in the time of Corona. There's a new albeit more wholesome version of. They're just like us. People are watching these zoom interviews that are popping up all over with celebrities. And they're checking out the celebrity bookcases checking out the scenery in their homes. Oh that's a piece of artwork. Where's that from? What are these books all about? And then they're freezing the footage zooming in on the titles to get a feel for what these notable figures are reading. I read a piece about this in the New York Times. And I'll be honest. I'm impressed to know that Kate. Blanchett has all twenty volumes of the Oxford English dictionary at her disposal. And if you listen to her interview with Colbert. It's clear to me that it's actually a collection. She puts to use not simply decoration but it begs the question. Why do we care what public figures are reading in the first place while I suppose for the same reason we wanna know where they shop what they eat in which exercise routines they're currently using? We admire these people. They've reached positions of authority or notoriety. That many of us aspire to we want to know. How did you get.

Us Weekly Blanchett Pulitzer Prize Colbert Corona New York Times Kate
"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

01:48 min | 3 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"Actor Cate Blanchett was on the late show with Stephen Colbert recently via zoom of course because corona but the conversation was actually lovely. They chatted about homeschooling her kids. They swapped Bob Dylan lyrics. They were smiling freely. It actually felt very organic which is one of the things strangely. I appreciate about this time. We're living in right now. They're no stage lights. No MAKEUP TEAM. No hyped up studio audience. The in house band was nowhere to be found. Just human beings being human. But let's be honest. We Still WanNa know what are up to which is why they are still attempting to film. The shows right now and yet. While many of Colbert viewers had their eyes fixed on Kate. Smile and the fancy pajamas. She chose to where there were a number of people fixated on the bookshelves directly behind her. Yes we know. Kate's film and Television Catalogue. They thought but I wonder what she reads on her. Downtime what characters does she get lost in? When the camera isn't rolling they leaned in and thought. What is that book right there? Should I be reading it? What if I told you that your life right is worth noticing? This is the attention collection. I'm Anthony Garcia.

Kate Stephen Colbert Cate Blanchett Bob Dylan Anthony Garcia corona Television Catalogue
"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

03:02 min | 4 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"So unless you're listening to this from some hopefully not too distant utopian future where we've got this pandemic sorted out chances. Are you're right here in the weeds with the rest of us? Sheltering in place and working from home or something close to that and trying to figure out what tomorrow looks like just trying to put one foot in front of the other and maybe just maybe change out of your pajamas for the day. It's in times of crisis and uncertainty like this that I looked to one place for hope and inspiration for both insight and information in that place. Is the romantic comedy. That's right the ROM com and at the peak of that mountain of wisdom. This cinematic Gold Mine. Is the movie hitch. Starring Will Smith in case for whatever reason you have yet to put that film in front of Your Eyes. It's a film about a matchmaker who helps bumbling men get over themselves so that hopefully they can find a partner to share their lives with and there's an exchange in the film that takes place with Will Smith's character Alex Hitchens and his new client fumbling Albert Brennaman. Who's nervous and neurotic and freaked out a little bit paranoid. And he's talking about his first date and so Alex Hitchens's walking him through what it is that he should expect what it is that he should look forward to how it is that he should present himself and so he asks Albert. Did you get the shoes that I picked down and Albers? Yes but I don't think they're mead. An Alex Hitchen says something very interesting. He says you is a very fluid concept right now. In other words you air quotes can be molded to fit the needs of the moment. You can be changed like a pair of shoes. This episode is about how your context can actually change who you are the you that shows up in the world. But it's also about a deeper you are you. That is flexible but steady a you that is open to growth and change but is very much grounded in the present moment. What if I told you that your life right now is worth noticing? This is the attention collection. I'm Anthony Garcia..

Alex Hitchens Albers Albert Brennaman Alex Hitchen Will Smith Anthony Garcia partner
"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

03:23 min | 7 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"I. There is a mountain then. There is no mountain than there is. Are you tracking with that? Someone actually wrote that Song Down. And then get this. They recorded it. They performed it in front of actual human beings. I love that I brought this up in a conversation not too long ago which is not uncommon for me and the two friends I was talking to. Of course they'd never heard the song so I had to play them a snippet and afterwards we started talking about how even though this is a bizarre obscure song. It's probably someone's favorite song. It's their classic. It's their Goto. It brought them through a rough time in their life. You know the story and it reveals something significant to me. No matter what you're into regardless of how odd you fear it may be someone else out there. Loves IT TO. My thesis was confirmed today when I read the comments underneath a live concert. Recording of there is a mountain sure there were comments. Like what does this even mean or that audience shirt looks thrilled to be there but there were others like Donovan is singing about the Buddhist concept of embodiment or the chorus of this song. I there is a mountain. Then there is no mountain then there is may sound incomprehensible or silly but the lines are zen saying Donovan borrowed and which have a meaning the lines are intended to succinctly describe three stages of Zan. The comment continues. But I'll stop there this song. Believe it or not even pops up in Stephen King's time travel novel. Eleven twenty to sixty three. Here's the line because there was no step a snatch of some old pop song drifted through my head. I there is a mountain then. There is no mountain than there is. If you don't believe me it's on page. Forty one of that book. Check it out now. Listen I'm not convinced. This song has some deep spiritual meaning for all. I know it may be the result of one too many mushrooms but it doesn't really matter does it. In fact is there a difference between deep spiritual meaning in one too many mushrooms? That's for another podcasts. Here's the truth. There are people out there mining this song for gold when Donovan went out on a limb and put this song out there in nineteen sixty seven. It didn't melt the charts it didn't blast them to superstardom but there's a small group of people enjoying it even to this day. I don't know perhaps you are one now if you ever feel like. You're living on the fringes Mike. You're out there somewhere. Relax.

Donovan Stephen King
"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

05:16 min | 7 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"All right so let's come to a close rounding things out with where we spend the bulk of our time online. So let's talk about the collection of influences. I found on the web and in social media this year that I think are actually helpful. There's so much noise and clutter but there are some beautiful things that always make their way through the cracks. And here's just a handful of them for you to check out. One is the website. Swiss missed DOT COM in. Put the link in the show notes below. Its from Tina Roth Eisenberg. She's a designer a business owner entrepreneur speaker and it's basically a blog rolling on of things that have influenced her things that have inspired her things that have stopped and made her think this could be quotes. This could be artwork. This could be products. It's just all of the good things. And She's cure rating inspiration putting it on her website daily and who couldn't use just a little bit more of the good stuff in our lives. Next is an instagram account. From Nathan W pile and it's based on his Comic Series Strange Planet that started as instagram account but became such a phenomenon that now. It's actually a book that you can buy something that you can actually hold in your hands if you can imagine and strange planet is looking at life on earth through the eyes of these quirky blue little alien creatures and you see life from a different perspective and it's funny it's ridiculous it's profound and it's beautiful as all of those things and it makes me laugh makes me smile every time scroll down and find another one of these comics. So if you aren't already following Nathan. You should definitely do so and speaking of instagram accounts. You should follow Nicholas Smith. He's an artist and illustrator and he primarily focuses on people of color. And what I love so much about this account. Is that when you look at these images? It's pure celebration. It's exuberance it's joy and they come across in every single one of these images and so while we're scrolling through our instagram feeds while we're bumping up against people's curated expressions of the good life when you come across just pure joy it stops you and it makes you lean in a little bit so you should definitely put him into your collection this next year. I'm there's a handful of podcasts. I would recommend and we'll put all that in the show notes. But lastly as we close out this episode and as we close out this year. I need to say thanks to some people number one. I want to thank my wife. Tanya for being in my corner for everything and this podcast is no exception. You know when I told you I was going to be taking time out of our already. Busy lives to make this show or reality. You were supportive from day. One from before the first episode was even recorded you words biggest champion and that remains the case. And I couldn't do this without you. So thank you so much into Tim. Bieler my attention collection co-conspirator and collaborator. It's been a true partnership and I look forward to the next year. You don't hear his voice in these podcasts. But I promise you. His influence is there and he is the driving force behind our social media accounts and everything that we do online. So thank you so much man. I look forward to what the future holds and to you. You who has carved out moments of your time to listen to this podcast to take a chance on this podcast. Thank you in speaking of formation the practice of making this show has been one of the most formative things of two thousand nineteen for me. It has helped me to crystallized my thinking it has helped me to figure out what. I really believe about the world around me. I really believe about humanity and architectural and our capacity and so it's been an encouragement just in the act of creating. I hope it's been an encouragement to you in the listening and I hope you'll show up again next year. Got Big plans and I hope you'll be a part. Please take the time to join us on social media if you haven't already because this show is not meant to be a monologue truly is meant to be a conversation so I would love to know over the things in two thousand nineteen moved to you. Shake help to be a part of your formation because as we've said we don't become ourselves by ourselves and the truth is our lives are worth noticing all the.

instagram Tina Roth Eisenberg Nathan W Nicholas Smith Tanya
"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

07:16 min | 7 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"Books. I can't tell you how important books are to me but I took a different approach to reading this year. I intentionally slowed down. It wasn't about quantity. It wasn't about getting from one book to another because I like to read a lot in a given year but it was about taking the time to slow down to take notes I actually had notebooks alongside the books I was reading and I was jotting down thoughts as I read and that in and of itself was amazing practice this past year so I wanNA give a couple of the books that I loved. And it's by no means an exhaustive list but these are the ones that stand out the most to me book. I read toward the beginning of the years. A book called the art of possibility from Rosamund. And Benjamin Zander. Rosamund is a therapist. Benjamin is the conductor of the Boston Philharmonic. And they co wrote this book really about creativity but it's about more than just creative output like artistic output or expression. It's actually about how to bring creativity to your everyday life and I'll read a quote from the book. That is just one of about a thousand that I saved. Attention is like light and air and water shine attention on obstacles and problems and they multiply lavishly in. Isn't that the truth? The more we pay attention to the struggles into the problems. They seem to just pop up everywhere but the opposite must also be true. The more we shine the light of our attention on the good things on the helpful people on the kindnesses that we encounter in a given day. Those things seem to multiply as well and then as kind of a companion to the book that came out many years later rouse them in wrote a book by herself called pathways to possibility. And it's kind of like the workbook for the art of possibility it takes to a deeper level. It's much more personal while the art of possibility goes into your working life and into your other endeavors this one kind of really hones in on the personal than here's a quote from that book. It's a problem for all of us. We are not trained to think of ourselves as governed by stories made up by younger iterations of ourselves frozen in time. And isn't that true? We don't often stop to think that some of the ways that we view the world were created at a younger more immature more naive version of ourselves that we are actually free at any time to grow up and change our outlook of ourselves and of other people we can actually grow up emotionally mentally spiritually and see the world differently but the training process and it doesn't just come by itself so I would read both of these books side by side beginning with the art of possibility. And if you're not someone who likes to read per se but you would listen to an audio book. This is actually one of the better audio books to listen to. They did a great job producing it. There's featured music from the Boston Philharmonic. And both of the author's swap the roles reading the book and they did a great job doing it so. I highly recommend next. I didn't read much fiction this year. But one of the books that stands out is elevation from Stephen King. Now I talked about Stephen King's work with it a little bit earlier in the film section but this book kind of deviates from what he's known for the horror in the thrills and chills. It's actually quite a departure. But it's worth your time. In fact they won't take you nearly as much time as normal Steven King book takes. It's a Novella. It's not an actual full length. It could have been a short story within another collection of short stories. But it's sold on its own. And here's the premise. Although Scott Carey doesn't look any different he's been steadily losing weight and there are a couple other odd things to. He weighs the same in his clothes and out of them. No matter how heavy they are and Scott doesn't WanNa be poked and prodded. He mostly just want someone else to know. And he trusts. Dr Bob Ellis and this is where the book jumps off and IT GOES IN FASCINATING DIRECTIONS. And it's really a book about acceptance and tolerance in a world of division. It's almost like the world we live in. Currently but I digress. Check THE BOOK. Out and lastly this could have been a long list but the book that was single handedly. The most impactful book I read this year came out of nowhere. I was walking through. My libraries used book sale and I bumped into this copy of a book called the Zen Commandments. And I don't know why but the titles interesting to me so I picked it up and I looked at the cover and that too was intriguing and so I put it under my arm with a collection of already about eight or nine books and I finished up and checked out at about fifteen books less than a dollar apiece and later that night sitting next to the stack of books. I decided to give one of them. A chance in my eyes fell again on the Ten Commandments. So I picked it up and decided. I'm going to read the introduction and see what this thing is all about and honestly about midway into the introduction. I knew this book was GonNA blow my mind. I knew it was exactly what I needed to be reading in this moment. And this season of my life and so I started in in about an hour later I came up for air. Already underlined a thousand passages in the book. I had already clutched my forehead at the profundity of it. All and that sounds like hyperbolic statements. But it's actually how I felt now. I can't guarantee that you'll have the same experience. Your mileage may vary but contact your physician and then go ahead and give it a shot. I WanNa read a passage from the book. That is one of many that I keep coming back to on our journey through life. We think of say stopping for gas or going to the bathroom as time out. From the main event from our real activities we think of the time we spend walking down the corridor from office aid to office be as intermission. Dead Time Mir connective tissue but there is no intermission the show never stops. Every moment is the only moment every moment is.

Rosamund Boston Philharmonic Benjamin Zander Stephen King Scott Carey Dr Bob Ellis Steven King
"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

04:41 min | 7 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"Now onto film. I love movies. I love the art form. I love going to the movies. The whole experience stuff packed out theater full of strangers the popcorn. The smells the responses to the plot whether it be scares or laughs or someone being so beside themselves so captivated by what's happening on screen that they actually respond out loud. I love the whole thing and I didn't get out to many films this year but the films that I did see moved me in a profound way. Take it part to for instance. I know on the surface. It's a creepy movie about a shape. Shifting Demon clown who terrorizes a small town in every twenty five years? He comes back to eat. More kids is kind of ridiculous. But it's not really about that at all in this film in the book that is based on is about what happens when we try to run away from our childhood demons than how we so often bury our past deep in our subconscious. But the truth is we never really escape it until we face it head on and this film especially part two is about the power of love and friendship and for me as the film ended in. The credits were rolling. People were leaving the theater. I just kind of wanted to sit there and take it all in. I wasn't ready because I was still processing the layers of that film. It's a monster story. It's a horror story but really it's a human story. I loved it another film that had an unexpected impact on me was peanut butter Falcon. And here's the premise. A young man Zach runs away from his care home to pursue his dream of becoming a professional wrestler. As you do and Tyler runs away from his job to escape arrival. He screwed over the two men collide and adventure ensues. It's like a modern day. Mark Twain Story is how I think it's best described. It's grimy and sweaty and entirely human and I love that the characters Zack who runs away from his home is played. By Zachary Got Sagan. Who's a man with down syndrome and yet it isn't the focal point of the film. It's not treated as a disability or something to feel sad or sympathetic about. It's a story about breaking out. It's about what happens when you don't give up on people it's about forging friendships even unexpected friendships. And that how those chance encounters can change the trajectory of your entire life was great and lastly I've always been someone who's fascinated by the process of filmmaking. I love the behind the scenes stuff. The director's commentary. I've listened to interviews with film. Writers have always been interested in that. And there's this series right now on net flix called the movies that made us and one of the episodes is a deep dive in the making of home alone. And it tells kind of all these backstory things. A lot of people don't know for instance. The movie was canceled while in production. The studio just totally backed out in another studio had come to the rescue. The day people found out they were losing. Their jobs is the same day someone else came in and said no. Actually keep doing what you're doing. We're still ago or that. The scenes that take place in the house all of the gags the pranks that Kevin is pulling on the burglars weren't actually filmed in a house. They were filmed in a swimming pool. In the same high school that Ferris Bueller and Uncle Buck were filmed in and so they made. They knew they were going to have this scene. Where the basement is flooded and so they used a swimming pool. They built the sound stage right in this high school. I love that kind of stuff. Because it tells you that stuff that you love things that you cherish didn't just drop out of the sky that someone had to sweat and toil over them and there's hiccups and those bumps along the way. So why should we expect anything that we want to work on it that we want to build to just go smoothly? It gives us all permission to take deep breaths and keep going and that's the.

Tyler Zachary Got Sagan Mark Twain Zach Zack director Ferris Bueller Kevin Uncle Buck
"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

05:21 min | 7 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"So why don't we begin our two thousand nineteen collection with music? To be honest. I didn't spend as much time with music this year as I normally do. A new kind of always in the background and there were some important moments with music but it wasn't as central as normal any yet. There was some artists. There were some albums and there were some songs that were absolutely essential to this year The first of which is a band called bird talker based out of Nashville and someone attempted to tell me about this band. More than a year ago They they were seeing the band's praises and they said you have to check them out and I'll be honest I stalled on it. I didn't immediately jump on it and then I came across. This song called one off of their album. One and you need to check it out. All this stuff will be in the show notes available to find but I'll just read. The chorus of the song says burn the scorecards balanced out the scales. We are one wind. Distracted by our different sales underneath what's detectable with is every particles vibrating with the same life. I don't even need to say any more than that. If the course didn't sell you maybe just skip it but it is fantastic in all of the songs on that album are worth your time so Bert Talker. Checkout second is a Michigan based artists. That you've probably heard of. Mike posner whether you liked him or you don't like him. I came to this album because of the story behind it. He was embarking on a walk across America. Something like two thousand five hundred mile walk and He just randomly was dropping songs along the way putting them on youtube and making them accessible online and then he finally released an entire mix tape and one of the songs on. There's featuring rapper called logic and it's called fun up here and it is. The song itself is just fun. It's light it's airy it's kind of a celebration of coming into your own of being yourself and and how just checking out. It's worth your time and as I said at the START I didn't carve out is much time for music this year but one thing that was a staple for me you know when I was writing reading studying working whatever. It was just having people over for dinner just being at home and relaxing. There was music that seem to always gravitate towards. It's called chill hop or Lo fi hip hop and it's something that I came too far too late but something that I absolutely love. I've always been a fan of hip hop from day. One hip hop and RB is my childhood. It's that simple. And so this is instrumental music with beats. And it's sent and it's There's kind of this airy ambience to it sometimes you'll get little clips from old films and it's perfect to study to. It's perfect when you want something in the background. But you don't want to be distracted. And lastly there's an album that I just came across at the end of the year in fact within the last few weeks or so but I think it deserves an honorable mention for the story alone. Let alone the fact that the music is so beautiful is called the colne concert from Keith. Jarrett and it's from nineteen seventy five and it's still the number one jazz solo album of all time the number one piano album of all time and it's beautiful but the story behind it is so much more fascinating it actually deserves. Its own attention collection episode. And maybe that will happen in the future but it's an album. That almost didn't happen a seventeen year. Old Girl in Germany is putting on a concert lands. Keith Jarrett who is this rising star twenty nine years old amazing musician? He asks for certain piano. She promises but the concert hall does not come through. They give him a much smaller piano. That's not quite in tune. The sustain pedal sticks. It's just a nightmare. He walks away. She pleads in prods gets him to come back and due to the limitations of what the piano was capable of he had to play it in a different way and what he was able to play the the notes in the tones that he gets out of this piano and then the cool thing is you could hear him throughout the performance surprising himself with what he's doing because it's improvisational and it's fantastic. Check it out. That's my music collection. Twenty nine.

Keith Jarrett Mike posner Nashville Bert Talker youtube Michigan Germany America
"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

The Attention Collection

01:45 min | 7 months ago

"collection" Discussed on The Attention Collection

"If you listen closely you can hear of Ryan. Seacrest warming up his vocal cords. That's right two thousand nineteen is coming to a close and believe it or not. Two Thousand Twenty is happening. It's thing and so I thought it might be interesting to do the attention collection version of a year in review so the show is based around two things. One that your normal everyday average life is anything but and to that. We don't become ourselves by ourselves that we have other people and other inputs to thank for our formation so I thought perhaps it would be interesting to close out with the last episode of the year dedicated to the things. That had a hand in shaping me this year the things that had a hand in my formation. The music the film the books the PODCASTS. All of this stuff and I share it because I want to put it on your radar as well. It's stuff that I think you might benefit from that you might enjoy. That might move inspire challenge stretch whatever it might be so if this is interesting to you stick around two thousand nineteen attention collection. What if I told you that your life right now is worth noticing? This is attention collection. I'm Anthony.

Seacrest Ryan