3 Burst results for "Collaborative Conservation"

"collaborative conservation" Discussed on The Glenn Beck Program

The Glenn Beck Program

06:50 min | 4 months ago

"collaborative conservation" Discussed on The Glenn Beck Program

"They may have access but they don't have the money to fight against these big businesses. Even if you win in court it still has to go back to the patent office and these administrators look at it and wow they have found some real injustices being done. They have found that. Eighty percent of the patents. Claimed you know by the by the people of either small people eighty percent of those people. Were wrong it actually belong to the big question industry So they're cutting the legs off of now are inventors the small inventor who has his own little workshop by the way everything that was in that endless frontier act is exactly almost word for word. What eisenhower spoke about and warned us against it wasn't just the military industrial complex. It was the scientific and educational industrial complex that when government started funding research. There would be trouble. Well here we are gang. Are we awake enough. So that's what was started. That little administrative body was started under barack obama. What is joe biden. Oh joe biden now is just openly saying we're gonna take your patents if it's for something important we just have a right to take them. What does that do. But does that do to the companies that invent things that spend millions and millions and millions of dollars just to try to come up with something if the government can take it. If it's important it kills that now. What else is happening. Well they're killing private intellectual property rights. But if you go to the white house in you. Search for biden harris administration outlines america the beautiful initiative. You will also find that they are now going to preserve conserve and restore the lands the waters and the wildlife that support and sustain the nation. The recommendations are contained in a new report released outlining a locally lead and voluntary nationwide conservation goal to conserve thirty percent of us lands and waters by twenty thirty and to conserve fifty percent of us lands and waters by twenty fifty. Oh that's fantastic. So the report submitted to the national climate task force was developed by the us department of the interior agriculture commerce. And the white house council on environmental quality. But it's a very local kind of program. I want you to remember that remember. This is voluntary and very very local. Even though it came from the national climate task force the us department of interior agriculture and commerce in the white house council on environmental quality. Don't forget it all depends on you. ha now. It outlines eight principles that should guide the nationwide effort including a pursuit of collaborative approaches a commitment to supporting the voluntary conservation efforts of farmers ranchers and fishers and the of tribal sovereignty and private property rights. Now how do you take thirty percent of the property of america and make it federal property. How do you do that and keep in mind. All the property rights the private property life rights. Well it's all going to be. It's all going to be local support it. It's going to be it's gonna be you know people that just want to protect the lands and the waters and to boost the economy and support jobs. Nationwide that's because they're going to create more parks and more safe outdoor opportunities in nature deprived communities boy. Have i've seen one nature deprived community. I've seen them all. They're gonna support tribally lead conservation and restoration priorities. They're going to expand collaborative conservation of fish and wildlife. Habitats and corridors. So you know there might have to be some voluntary action with the fishermen saying. I'm not gonna fish these rivers anymore but those will be done voluntarily because people will just love it. They'll eat less fish. They'll eat less meat because it's just the right thing to do. There are also going to incentivize and reward. The voluntary conservation efforts officiers ranchers and farmers and forest owners. It's really going to be great. And then there create jobs by investing in restoration and resilience projects and initiatives including the civilian climate core. That's gonna be great. You know what we should take the climate core and if we could get young people involved in it we could get them to dress up little uniforms and give salutes and stuff and we could call them like the biden youth because he loves youth and it could be all voluntary. And if your family doesn't want to volunteer maybe you're biden. Youth could just say hey. I've got a problem in my family. Mom and dad don't wanna volunteer and then the government can maybe take them away for their own safety because it's getting dangerous out here. That's why they're trying to create a safe nature atmosphere. How are they going to do that. Because the only thing. I'm afraid of in nature are bears and mountain lions. I want a safe experience. Well then i should probably just go to a park not a national park not one where those big barriers live. Those should be off limits entirely because hey we can't disturb nature and they're very very dangerous And not everybody can go. It'd be inequitable Because there's a lot of people who don't have access to the outdoors you know kids in bubbles and things.

thirty percent fifty percent joe biden Eighty percent eighty percent millions twenty thirty twenty fifty white house council biden eisenhower millions of dollars eight principles one of the interior agriculture co national climate task force department of interior agricul house administration harris
Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

Museum Archipelago

08:36 min | 1 year ago

Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

"The field of conservation was created to fight change to prevent objects from becoming dusty broken or rusted but fighting to keep cultural objects preserved creates a certain mindset the mindset of protector a mindset. It's too easy to imagine objects and cultures. In the state of stasis. This is how it always was and will be forever. Often I mean just given the colonial oneal had an imperial histories of museums. It was because people were going to be gone forever. That culture was gone. And so this is the last trace but in fact. That's not how cultural heritage works it. It's transformed it's changed. It continues on in different forms and a lot of the way the Conservatives think about cultural heritage is is about out mitigating that change. which makes it a little bit fossilized but to me that changes where things are really vibrant exciting and people are so closely connected to cultural cultural heritage that it really feels alive? This is since Cheetah Bala Chandran Associate Director of the John Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Hello my name is Cinci Bala Alexander. I'm conservative and I'm trained in the conservation of archaeological materials in particular and my day job is the associate director of the Archaeological Theological Museum at Johns Hopkins University. Bala Chandran founded untold stories a project that pursues conservation profession that represents and preserves a full spectrum of human cultural heritage for the past few years. The project has been hosting public events at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation Conservation Untold Stories emerged of bollocks hundreds frustration with how narrowly the field of conservation has been defined at felt that there were literally early too many untold stories in the field of conservation. I wanted to find ways to actually start to think about what else cultural heritage could mean other than say the things we typically think of as belonging in a museum or many of us cultural heritage means going to this important looking building that has paintings and sculpture and has labels labels next to it and I think we kind of decided in some ways at that's cultural heritage and preservation means taking care of those things and really I've become more and more aware error and curious about the fact that cultural heritage is much more complicated and diverse set of practices. It's often not necessarily about a single object or a thing but rather how that thing might function within a community or communities as as part of a series of practices and exchanges and storytelling and I just wanted to have a way to kind of work with people who are really doing that work outside the museum and doing it in ways that I think preserved Europe but also change cultural practices since untold stories takes place at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation. A lot of professionals in the field Are already gathered there. The meetings attract over one thousand conservators blake many professional conferences. The meetings are often held in a nondescript hotel how setting but untold stories makes it a practice to conceptualize where attendees are sitting and the history that preceded them an example of this is the twentieth nineteen eighteen untold stories event titled Indigenous Futures and Collaborative Conservation. How many times have you been to a conference and you could be anywhere right? I mean you're in this big room and you never leave the hotel or the conference center and part of what I was interested in was trying to actually place a somewhere so twenty one thousand nine since we were actually meeting at the Mohegan Sun which is a Mohegan owned casino. We were on native land. It seemed like a really important opportunity. -tunities to talk about native sovereignty kind of history of genocide in our own country. The fact that anyone who's non-indigenous in this country is a settler settler colonialist but to really think about what this means in terms of how we take care of collections that have come to us as a result of historical happenstance stance but also a very violent past and to acknowledge the fact that museums which for most of us who work in museums are very safe. Welcoming and joyful places uses are evidence of this history of of pain and removal so the opportunity to work with the commod educational initiative was really exciting. Because because it's a partly native co-founded and they do a lot of educational work around questions of how even think about the history of this country story and to me. That was really important to be able to say in native space as opposed to you know in a place somewhere else. Part of of Bala. Hundreds point is that there isn't such a thing as a textualist cultural material. The intentionally nondescript conference ballroom has a lot in common with deliberately sterile museum environment episode. Sixty eight of this show features an interview with Ed Wanda's spears director of programming and outreach at the adamant educational initiative and one of the convenors of the twenty nineteen untold stories event in the episode. She discusses her presentation about how native native narratives are violently presented through White Lens in museums. It was in Donna spheres of Who suggested the title she had worked in museums? She's very familiar with these questions. And she's the one who suggested indigenous futures which forces you to recognize that this is not something of the past. We really wanted to do something. The thing that felt like we were going to push. This had to be uncomfortable but it also had to be aspirational. Where do we go now? And how can as conservatives servers we actually be part of this very kind of collaborative supportive mission to ensure futures. We can't make it happen by ourselves. It's it's not like we're saving anybody and that's another big concern of mine. There's a real sort of savior mentality that I think conservation has ask we save objects and I certainly came out of graduate school thinking that I was going to save everything and to me. That's a very problematic way to think about it because frankly if the objects still survives it didn't need me it made it thousands of years without me somehow. We've decided that we're the ones that making the that make these things live live forever which is pure arrogance so part of this event was really to think about how as conservatives can come up with action items and by action items. It was practices but more than anything of kind of Shipton in a mental framework for working much more equitably and more humbly to really have a sense of respect for this notion that there has already been a history before you and so when you enter into this hopefully collaborative relationship you need to acknowledge alleged. Things have survived for a long time without your intervention. And they don't need you but you could actually provide some sort of service some sort of benefit that could actually really help the untold stories team. True to their mission is careful not to present the workshop as a single solution or even a set of solutions. The team wants wants to counter the assumption within the profession. That all you need to do is go to one workshop and then you're all done you know. Unfortunately this doesn't change the working working practices it doesn't change the mindset. It doesn't change the way an organization functions and what happens is then marginalized people are called upon again and again to kind of keep performing this vulnerability and this discomfort for themselves in order to educate people who are unwilling to do the work that consistent like every single day for the rest of their lives work that will be required to make transformative change possible part of what in the twenty nineteen in conversation we. We felt very strongly we had to say is if if you really believe in equality if you really want to do something that is truly collaborative that does not assume some sort of hierarchy. It means being really uncomfortable the entire time and maybe at the end of it things will change but you you still have to kind of follow through on it when it gets really uncomfortable. And the fact is most marginalized communities. People have done this entire lives so it it just feels like it's time for you. Know I think in general the museum community to say we're willing to engage in these kinds of difficult ongoing perpetual natural

American Institute For Conserv Collaborative Conservation Cheetah Bala Chandran American Institute For Conserv Bala Chandran Bala Cinci Bala Alexander John Hopkins Archaeological Mu Archaeological Theological Mus Mohegan Sun Johns Hopkins University Associate Director Europe Blake Ed Wanda Shipton Director
"collaborative conservation" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"collaborative conservation" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"But on the other hand, writes on the economic impact considerations because both sides can easily manipulate manipulate these studies and then you waste a lot of time that could be used for species that are in need. Thank you for your phone call. Thanks for your phone call to on point today, Rebecca and Jonathan. I wanna go back to the tone of the previous caller talking about people who are wearing sandals and. And tie-dyed shirts, which will never do again, that tone to me seem symptomatic of the the arguments from both sides or at least tone of the arguments, both sides, devout in their beliefs, no doubt, but kind of talking at each other. Do you get any sense, and we'll start with you, Rebecca, that there is any not middle ground, shall we say, but any notion of, okay, that is a serious point. We can look at that that or and it's not just all black and white. So the Endangered Species Act is actually overwhelmingly popular law eighty to ninety percent of Americans say that they support the law, and I think there's this general sense among the American people that we omit to future generations to prevent species from going extinct. Jonathan. How about your take from again, the individual landowners point of view when they hear the shouting for want of a better term between the side of environmentalists and the side of people and indistinct about industry economics and such. I think it's undeniable for that for years. The political debate has been controlled by the two extremes. People who during the Obama administration, the Bush administration, this administration, any change was accused of gutting the act and from the other extreme any change wasn't going nearly far enough, but I'm actually hopeful in some of the coverage of interiors propose reforms. There seems to be growing middle. That recognizes that there's some things we like some things we don't, but there's an opportunity here promote more collaborative conservation, I believe in giving credit where do I think that's largely due to efforts during the Obama administration to work with states environmental groups and property understa find different ways to protect species. They that the greater sage. Grass less period chicken and many others. And I think several of these reforms, I document this in a report that I wrote with perks over months ago. Several reforms forms actually allow us to have more of those type of conservation efforts. And finally start recovering species. It's a comment from our Facebook page, John Amherst rights, there's a price to pay for changing societies, profligate practices to a more sustainable lifestyle that preserves the environment. We can pay that now in measured and controllable ways like protecting ecosystems by limiting industrial agriculture practices, we know to be harmful or we can pay much more later.

Obama administration Rebecca Jonathan Facebook John Amherst ninety percent