26 Burst results for "Colgate University"

"colgate university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 months ago

"colgate university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A historian at Colgate University has a new report out about how Congress did not use the results of the 1920 senses to reshape the house. Some congressional leaders push to leave it at 435 seats, which became the de facto cap. The thing that really caused the apportionment to get hung up over and over again. Was the insistence that the House of Representatives could no longer grow any larger. Those congressional leaders argued for efficiency. They didn't want to spend money to build more office space for a bigger house. It meant also, though, a sense that The House had already grown too large to have good to debates. Those arguments, apparently one out in 1929, when Congress passed a law that set up an automatic process for reapportioning Based on the existing number of House seats 435. When I started this research, I have to admit that I hadn't even thought about the fact that those numbers could change. They never seem to be so natural, and they seem so fixed. In reality, though. There has been discussion about expanding the house, but right now, it doesn't have political legs. Still, census historian Margo Anderson says she's concerned about how representative the House actually is. Because a century ago there was one member for about every 200,000 people. And today there's about one for about every 700,000. Congress has the authority to deal with this any time. It doesn't have to be right at the senses, and it might have to if, say, Washington, D C or Puerto Rico become a state Until then, there will still be a fight for the power in 435. Godzilla. Wang.

Margo Anderson Congress House of Representatives 1929 today Puerto Rico Washington a century ago Colgate University 435 seats one member 435 Wang about every 700,000 about every 200,000 people House 1920 D C one
"colgate university" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:39 min | 3 months ago

"colgate university" Discussed on KCRW

"A historian at Colgate University has a new report out about how Congress did not use the results of the 1920 cents is to reshape the house. Some congressional leaders push to leave it at 435 seats, which became the de facto cap. The thing that really caused the apportionment to get hung up over and over again. Was the insistence that the House of Representatives could no longer grow any larger. Those congressional leaders argued for efficiency. They didn't want to spend money to build more office space for a bigger house. It meant also, though, a sense that the House had already grown too large to have Debates. Those arguments, apparently one out in 1929, when Congress passed a law that set up an automatic process for reapportioning, based on the existing number of house seats. 435. When I started this research, I have to admit that I hadn't even thought about the fact that those numbers could change. They know seem to be so natural, and they seem so fixed. In reality, though there has been discussion about expanding the house, but right now, it doesn't have political legs. Still, census historian Margo Anderson says she's concerned about how representative the House actually is. Because a century ago there was one member for about every 200,000 people. And today there's about one for about every 700,000. Congress has the authority to deal with this any time. It doesn't have to be right at the census, and it might have to if, say, Washington, D C or Puerto Rico become a state Until then, there will still be a fight for the power in 435..

Margo Anderson Congress House of Representatives 1929 435 seats today Puerto Rico 435 a century ago Washington one member Colgate University about every 700,000 about every 200,000 people House 1920 cents D C about one
"colgate university" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"I I was sitting with my son watching the selection show last night after everything was done and he's nine years old. And and that that that you just said about North Carolina getting seventeen number one seed dead that's seventeen number once he's not seventeen times in the NCAA tournament. So you know for us here in Hamilton. In colgate. Small liberal arts school, you know, three thousand people in a village of another three thousand people I'm hopeful that it's a really big deal. I'm hopeful that it'll take our program to another level just this attention and exposure that nationally people will be a little bit more aware of how great Colgate university is and what our basketball program has grown into because those of us that that love this sport. This is a very special time of the year. And and we're really proud to represent Colgate university. As we as we move into this one tons of excitement this time of the year as Colgate gets ready to face Tennessee, south region in Columbus coming up on Friday. You can follow coach on Twitter at Matt underscored liangel, and I really appreciate a couple of minutes. Can't wait to see how your raiders do moving forward. Thanks coach. Now. Thank you very much for having me where Willie find our Cinderella story. This year, there's always one or two and. We try to find that we try to pick them, right? That's what we do with our brackets. We expect upsets the hard part is picking the correct one. So what is the method to your madness as you fill out your bracket in will you go as deep as picking a sixteen over a one or piggy a fifteen Colgate. Over a two-speed. I always enjoy speaking to coaches, I know I've mentioned this a couple times, but coaches and players from schools where it's not a rite of passage every spring. No, it's something that maybe once. For the seniors. They get to experience if that and the case of Colgate in the case of liberty. It's the first time for any of the guys on this roster. And so it's it's all always fun to root for the underdogs and the Cinderella's. Maybe don't want them in your brackets as much because they ruin your chances of winning at all. Unless of course, you are like Dave who pick Loyola Chicago to go to the elite eight last year. And when you told me what it why did you pick Loyola Chicago. I'm pretty sure it was their color scheme. But you said what all about the mascot? No, they're really good shooting team. And I just some teams get really hot in the tournament. And they they went on a run. And like, I said it was mostly look. Yes, I would agree with that. It always is. But that makes it fun is that we ride on the edge all kinds of drama just inherent. You don't have to no single player by name or face this time of the year, and you can still enjoy March madness. It is sheer perfection we've got one hour to go. How do you fill out your brackets? What's your advice? It's after hours with Amy Lawrence CBS sports radio. Before college hoops, mayhem hits the courts, keep mayhem at bay back.

Colgate Colgate university raiders Chicago Dave Hamilton North Carolina NCAA basketball Amy Lawrence Willie Columbus Matt Tennessee nine years one hour one tons
How is a 250-year-old encyclopedia company adapting to the digital age?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:08 min | 2 years ago

How is a 250-year-old encyclopedia company adapting to the digital age?

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. The deadline for early decision this November fifteenth. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation when it comes to mobility, more and more businesses are turning to planet, m Michigan is home to the largest concentration of auto related engineers in the nation as well as various all road and all weather Thomas testing centers to learn more head to planet, m dot com. Planet m Michigan where big ideas and mobility are born. You've spent centuries compiling knowledge now, what do you do with it from American public media? This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed Kim in for. Molly would. This week encyclopedia Britannica celebrates its two hundred fiftieth birthday. That's remarkable. But what may be more surprising to many of? You is the simple fact that it's still around the company went fully digital six years ago. No more tomes on shelves that pivot is part of the company's history of being pretty revolutionary when it began is likely pedia britannicas, founders published in English instead of Latin making it a resource for the masses today, given that pretty much everyone is hanging out getting most of their information on the internet encyclopedia Britannica is literally inserting itself. Wherever possible to provide context and stay relevant. Kartik Krishnan is CEO of encyclopedia Britannica. So what we want to do is instead of waiting for people to come to us. We want to take information to them. So on the search front we launched this product called Britannica insights, which is a chrome web browser extension. And when it's installed on your computer, and you do a search when that is relevant topic. Where Britannica has something meaningful to add our information shows up on the top, right, right? Above the Google knowledge panel. He says as a trusted gatekeeper of truth and knowledge that can help guard against fake news. So Britannica his also partnered with you to I don't know if you remember summer of this year YouTube got a lot of attention because there was a lot of fake information floating on the YouTube platform and Google rightfully said, what how do we actually provide people better context, we believe in free speech? So which means, you know, we don't want to prevent people from sharing all that information on YouTube. But how do we people provide context? So they start to Britannica and said can you help us provide relevant information on topics like moon landing for example, the Malaysian Airline disappearance. So all these key pop IX where there's a lot of fake information floating on the platform. So we created these format called what's known, and what's unknown. It's kind of an explainer format and these are now attached to the Google tiles. So if you do a search on moon landing and Cyclope DEA Britannica will show up all the way at the top providing you context on that particular topic. If you click on video that's elated to the moon landing. The Britannica panel is attached to the video itself. So that people can click on that panel and get access to trusted and verified information because you send the link to Steph curry so that he could see the man actually did go to the moon. I would be happy to write sometimes sending links to people don't work. My the text message. We can definitely work on finding the right medium to engage with people. That's our job. You know, how do we Bill as many engaging channels with our users? So that we can provide them information of value wherever they are whenever they need. It. Carsick Krishnan is CEO of encyclopedia Britannica, you know. My family had a set of encyclopedias when I was growing up as a thirteen year old. That's where I learned about the birds and the bees the clinical dispassionate birds in bees for God's sake. People have to talk with your kids. I'm jed Kim. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. Numbers alone. Don't tell the whole story. That's why. Marketplace tells the stories behind the numbers stories of real people of business both big and small and the impact the economy has on each of us. Donate today. Marketplace dot org to keep public service journalism going strong and right now your gift will go twice as far thanks to a dollar for dollar match from our friends at can Dida, thanks for your support. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation our world is becoming more hands free. Thanks to planet 'em. That will also include the future of transportation, Michigan has the most comprehensive autonomous real world testing under every road and weather condition and leads the nation and patents relating to navigation and smart mobility to learn more, visit planet m dot com. Planet m Michigan where big ideas mobility are born.

Carsick Krishnan Michigan Google Cyclope Dea Britannica Jed Kim Youtube Colgate CEO Michigan Economic Development Colgate University New York Steph Curry Molly Dida Thomas Malaysian Airline Bill Thirteen Year
Sails made global shipping possible. Can they make it greener?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:44 min | 2 years ago

Sails made global shipping possible. Can they make it greener?

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. The deadline for early decision this November fifteenth. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU 'em by lachey. Analytics Lana lyrics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner and Dresner comparing twenty-six BI vendors get help focusing your evaluation. Prioritizing features and determing what solution fits your tech stack. Visit Lana Lennox dot com slash tech. To claim your free reports, that's L O G I, analytics dot com slash tech. Sales made global shipping possible. Can they make it greener from American public media? This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed Kim in for. Molly would. The UN's international. Maritime Organization is committed to cutting shipping. Emissions in half by twenty fifty that matters because shipping moves ninety percent of global trade right now, if shipping were a country is emissions would ranks sixth in the world. It would fall between Japan and Germany, and it would fall, of course, below the biggie matters in the China, the US that's James Corbett, a professor in the school of marine science and policy at the university of Delaware. He says part of the solution will be tech. I talked to Corbett I about high-tech sales. And no, these aren't the flapping sheets. You're thinking of corporate mentioned one solution being developed in Japan, a rigid surface covered with solar panels, having the ability to create a hybrid power system that is using the opportunity to expose these rigid surfaces to light and and extract the solar power from them. And. Store that into batteries. That's that'll be located down near the engine spaces and use those big solar panels as movable sales to adjust to the angle for maximum wind assist is going to be a real exciting. Kind of innovation that will work on some vessels. And it'll work on those vessels better in some routes where they can best take advantage of both sun and wind anytime you're talking about any of these changes, we're talking about affecting potentially impacting something that's incredibly vital, which is global trade. Are there any potential risks that could come with transitioning away from fossil fuels well in two thousand seven and two thousand and eight vessels unilaterally on container ships, especially unilaterally slowed down without waiting for the world supply chains to say it was okay? And what ended up happening is we shifted to larger vessels used economies of scale. And if you look at the seaborne trade curves today, you'll see that we're continuing to increase the amount of goods we deliver per year. But we're delivering them in larger delivery units less often with a slower supply chain. So I don't see that. There will be a imminent threat to the global trade of goods ships have known since Phoenician times that their first job is to serve the world's economies. Their second job is to not saying and their third job is to be good stewards of the environment. And what's happening this century is they're paying a little more attention to that to that third goal without compromising the other two James Corbett is a professor in the school of marine science and policy at the university of Delaware. He also told me adoption of newfangled sale technology. She might bring back some of the romance to being on an ocean crossing vessel this futuristic sailing. Take could very well. Attract a new generation of c travelers though Corbett has been time on a giant boxy cargo ship, and he thought it was plenty romantic in other arguably more gigantic tech news, Google CEO's Sundar Pichai finally had his day before congress. What do lawmakers do what the chance to hold one of the planet's most powerful people accountable. Well, wired says it was three and a half hours of political posturing, a lot of accusations and essentially a wasted opportunity. We'll have a link on our website. I'm jed Kim. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. Here's an investment opportunity with a guaranteed return when you donate to support. Marketplace today, your gift will be matched dollar for dollar by our friends at the Condado fund listeners like you who give to marketplace do more than help keep the show on the air. You help us grow and get better. It's a way to directly support independent reporting and journalism you trust. And the payoff comes with what you hear every day. Don't miss out on this chance to make your donation. Go twice as far give today. Marketplace dot org, and thanks this. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by low G planning to update the dashboards and reports in your application. Lots of business intelligence vendors claimed their software is the best. But they can't all be winners. Loggia analytics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner and Dresner comparing twenty six B I vendors get help focusing your evaluation. Prioritizing features and determining what solution fits your tech stack. Visit Logi analytics dot com slash tech. To claim your free reports, that's L O G. I. Analytics dot com slash tech.

James Corbett Gartner Jed Kim Dresner Colgate University Of Delaware Lana Lennox Colgate University Japan School Of Marine Science Professor Loggia Analytics New York Lachey UN Molly Sundar Pichai Maritime Organization
Self-driving cars are racing self-driving regulations to the streets

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:25 min | 2 years ago

Self-driving cars are racing self-driving regulations to the streets

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU. Self driving cars are racing self-driving regulation to the streets from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. Earlier this week Google self driving car spinoff, Waymo launched a commercial self driving taxi service in the Phoenix area. It's limited. But it is technically a public launch not just testing. And this is actually a case where the tech moved faster than the laws. Proposed federal rules for regulating self-driving cars called the ABC. Start Act have been stuck in neutral for about a year. But this week senators updated the language in the Bill. They're even considering attaching it to the must pass budget legislation that congress will decide on before the end of the year. Arjan Marshall covers autonomous vehicles for wired magazine, we called her for quality assurance the segment where we take a deeper look at big tech story. She told me the legislation is about trying to establish responsibility and liability for self driving cars, a big part of this legislation is trying to define what part of self driving car. Regulation is going to be. In the hands of the federal government, the department of transportation, and what part of it is in the hands of the states and cities that will actually have these things on their roads. But that's a big controversial in itself. Right. I mean with this legislation supersede the state laws. Yeah. It's definitely controversial. So so the way it's been explained to me, thus far is everything the bumper to bumper car that means the design and the performance of the vehicle is all up to the federal government. And that's actually the way it works for normal cars now, they're making sure that your Toyota isn't going to kill you. And if they discover a defect they're going to create a recall so that Toyota to come in and fix that. What's left up to the states and the local municipalities are the traffic laws licensing and registration. Just like you. And I have to go to the DMV autonomous vehicles might have to go to the DMV in certain states in and get their license there. So that's the way it's kind of. Breaking down at this point. But this is just the start. This Bill is not meant to be the final word on self driving car regulation. They're just trying to kind of lay the groundwork as this technology develops. So is there any sense than of what happens now is is this Bill likely to pass if it gets attached to the must pass bending fill. There are still definitely some particularly democratic Senator holdouts who really just don't like the way this Bill is handling safety. They wanna firmer federal oversight of self driving car technology. So they're not gonna vote for this Bill that said if it does get attached to a bigger spending Bill that has to pass. So that the government doesn't shutdown is going to be hard to justify not voting for it. Just based on this tiny little self driving car part. I'd say most of the industry is really happy with this Bill. I'm hearing a lot of optimism out of Washington. But it's definitely not a done deal yet. And then this is sort of unrelated. But as we're of course, about to talk to you we saw that lift announced. That it's going to IPO. Do you have a sense based on your past coverage? How important autonomous cars are going to be to the future of companies like lift they think they're going to be really important a company like Lifton, Uber could be so much more profitable. If they didn't have to deal with those pesky human drivers that they spent so much time trying to recruit trying to keep happy. So these companies think that some and cars are really important, and they're both pouring a lot of money into into this big technological problem. It's a big open question when this technology will be ready to go out on roads in most cities. But it's it's something they're very interested. In Arjan Marshall covers autonomous vehicles for wired magazine. And now for some related links more on lift for a second. That company has had a very different approach to self driving cars than Uber, which has been trying to create its own technology in house lift partners with just about anybody letting Ford GM and Waymo all tests their self driving cars on its network and in March of this year lift made a deal with Magna international to create driverless tech. There's a good story on all this from March in the New York Times, I put that link on our website marketplace, tech dot org. But now that lift has beaten Uber to the IPO starting line. I can't stop with the puns expect a lot of discussion of the differences in the two companies and how they approached the self-driving market both of them believe that driverless cars are the key to their future business. Butt lifts approach might just be cheaper. And faster in the long run. That said way MOS new commercial service will compete directly with both Uber and lift so success is far from assured. And just an update from the world of fortnight. We talk back in October about how fortnight has borrowed liberally from artists and rappers in creating its popular emotes those little dances that players can buy for five bucks. A piece we interviewed a lawyer and a former dancer who walked us through what it takes to actually copyright a dance move. She told us it could be a high bar to clear, but lawyers for the rapper to Millie are going to try to jump that bar. He sued the makers of fortnight on Wednesday. He alleges epoch games took his Milly rock dance and renamed it swipe it in fort night. There's a link to the story about the lawsuit and our interview on marketplace tech on the website to I'm Ali would. And this is marketplace tech. This is APN. Listeners like you who give to marketplace do more than just keep us on the air. You help us grow and get better. It's a way to directly support independent reporting and journalism you trust and to make it possible for us to tell the stories of modern life through our digital economy. And when you give today the impact of your gift will be doubled. Thanks to our friends at Condado donate now at marketplace dot org to make your donation. Go twice as far and thank you.

Bill Federal Government Arjan Marshall Wired Magazine Colgate Waymo Toyota DMV Colgate University Google New York Molly Phoenix ABC Congress New York Times Condado ALI Lifton Department Of Transportation
Your landline might not be there for you when the power goes out

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:05 min | 2 years ago

Your landline might not be there for you when the power goes out

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. The deadline for early decision this November fifteenth. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU. Your landline might not be there for you. When the power goes out from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. Surprise more than forty percent of Americans still have a landline. At least according to a two thousand seventeen report from the centers for disease control, people keep them around for convenience reliability and emergencies. So they can still make calls if the power goes out because of an earthquake a fire or some other disaster. But actually only about twenty percent of households have good old copper phone lines. According to the trade group, US Telekom the rest are digital connections or over IP AT and T has been pushing for almost a decade to drop analog, landline service completely and move to an all digital network. For landlines telecom say it's a lot cheaper to operate just one network, but our phone lines as reliable as the old tech Joan Engebretsen is executive editor at Tele competitor and industry publication focused on broadband telecom. It's a totally different technology. And if the. Power were to go out your phone wouldn't work very often. Though, people do have a cell phone, and you know, maybe that might still work. Also there are batteries available that will give you eight hours of backup. And in most areas. That's plenty do consumers know that. I mean, I didn't have one of those batteries. Yeah. That is a good question to the extent that people are moved onto the, oh, I p their phone company is supposed to tell them that. And explain that to them is there a weak link in our emergency infrastructure, though. If people have a harder time making calls when the power's out that is a possibility. But there is some bigger issues that relate to moving to I p throughout the whole communications network. There's been a number of what they call sunny day outages of nine one one services around the country, and it's happening in part because of the shift towards IP communications instead of having, you know, huge numbers of public. Safety answering points around the country that take the nine one one calls. The calls are getting concentrated into a smaller number of locations, and they're often backed up by you know, software that runs in data centers. And if there's a glitch in maybe a software update or something like that, it can impact many more public service answering points compared to in the past when, you know, each answering point head its own software, and so on and so if there was a problem, it was very limited. There have been a number of pretty major nine one one outages that related to, you know, software glitches that were part of the next generation infrastructure. So there's good and bad towards moving to more based dine one one you can get more capabilities with being able to send photos, but then you also need to make sure that you've got really rigorous procedures in place for making sure that the the software remains operational at all times Joan Engebretsen is executive editor at telecomm- petty. Editor a public agency report on the fires that hit northern California's wine country last year found that almost two thirds of people. They polled lost their land line connections at some point during that disaster. And after some related links. Speaking of fires and emergencies CNN last month reported that many people in paradise California, which was leveled by the massive campfire last month. Didn't get emergency alerts about the past moving fires or got them way. Too late. Apparently, landlines were automats enrolled in Butte county's alert system. But cell phones have to opt in. In other news. Remember a few weeks ago when I told you about all those phone apps that target kids with creepy advertising largely in violation of the law. Well, Verizon owned oath was all hold my juice box, the company that was formed out of the union of AOL. India who will pay almost five million dollars to settle charges that it violated the federal law against collecting data on kids under thirteen and targeting them with online advertising, according to the settlement with New York attorney general's office AOL used its attics change to target ads to kids on sites like roablocks dot com based on their web history and location information. It's the biggest fine a company has had to pay for violating COPA. The children's online privacy Protection Act for Isan, neither confirmed nor denied the findings in the case. And Finally, I am embarrassed to admit that is seriously did not know the tumbler had become a safe place to let your freak flag fly. But evidently it had and people are not happy about the sites. Sudden. And let's be honest really open ended and vague announcement earlier this week that it would remove quote, adult content. But in retrospect, we do seem to be moving toward a future where we hold online platforms responsible for what gets posted online. And I'm pretty sure we warned you that that would lead to widespread and preemptive censorship. Didn't we? Yeah. We did. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM listeners like you who give to marketplace do more than just keep us on the air. You help us grow and get better. It's a way to directly support independent reporting and journalism you trust and to make it possible for us to tell the stories of modern life through our digital economy. And when you give today the impact of your gift will be doubled. Thanks to our friends at Dida donate now at marketplace dot ORG to make your donation go twice as far and thank you.

Joan Engebretsen Executive Editor New York California Colgate AOL Colgate University Butte County Molly Verizon CNN Us Telekom Dida Editor ALI India
Meet the company training up more diverse startup founders

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:29 min | 2 years ago

Meet the company training up more diverse startup founders

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. The deadline for early decision this November fifteenth. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU. And by the alternatives podcast. How is artificial intelligence impacting people's lives today. Find out with the alternatives podcast new series called human stories of AI, you'll meet people like a widower who talks to an AI chat bot, help him processes grief and a truck driver who fears self driving trucks are eliminating his job. Listen at all turtles podcast dot com. Or find the alternatives podcast wherever you get your podcasts. The meat company trying to train up a more diverse generation of startup founders from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. Only about one percent of venture capital backed startup founders are black according to CBS sites. Data even fewer are black women or Latino. There's not a lot of age, diversity geographic, diversity and underrepresented founders. Don't always have access to the networks or the training programs that can help them get startup funding. Mandela Dickson is a former public schoolteacher startup founder and was a mentor for entrepreneurs at the firm Cape or capital about a year ago. She created founder, Jim, which is an online only training program for would be startup founders. I talked to her the afro tech conference last week in San Francisco. Just like if you want to be a lawyer, you go to law school, if you wanna be a doctor you go to medical school, right? But there is no school for people who wanna be venture capital backed startup founders in often times the schools that are formed are informal right by your networks and a lot of underrepresented founders. Don't have the people in their networks who've raised venture capital who've Ben venture capitalists. So we're. Literally, creating kind of from the ground up this first Ebba curriculum, specifically tailored to meet the needs in how a deep level of empathy for the lived experiences of underrepresented founders. So tell me about the Taylor like what is different about the message that you give to underrepresented founders. What are the first activities we do is actually called differences as strengths, and it really is actively for founders to reflect on what makes them unique how because you didn't grow up where these other people grew up because you went to different schools and were exposed to different things that your purview is different in the world. And that you're able to see problems other people don't even know exist, and that's a competitive advantage because most people out there, are you mostly will out there are not from fluid background. And so the problems that you're going to go out and solve will actually help the majority of people since it's online only talked to me about the network building. Because I know that's a big thing that people talk about when they come out of us of an accelerator in there with a class, and they really have. It's sort of like we were all eagle scouts together. Baen it's huge. How do you create that in a in an online experience straight question? So that's actually one of the biggest things I underestimated Meyer, original hypothesis for founder, Jim was that it was a curriculum was a language barrier that the reason people were not succeeding here from certain groups was because they didn't speak the language. Well, what I grave underestimated was that people were looking for a community these individuals again, they're only in their world. They may be the only black or Brown or let LGBTQ are older founder in their circle in. So how we structure network it's in we're very intentional. We do affinity groups on a weekly basis. We also do peer trainings. So it's not just the expert trainers who have the knowledge we actually elevate the founders within our community to train each other Mandela Dixon is founder and CEO of founder, Jim incubators and exceleron for underrepresented, founders are becoming more. Common. Although experts say it'll be hard to change the industry for good until the venture capitalist themselves. Become more diverse and now for some related links. I did find some hopeful news about the tech industry, relatively speaking. An off Ed in entrepreneur magazine from about a week ago notes, a big upsurge in the number of events focused on women and investment, partly because successful women entrepreneurs are funding the next generation of founders and also because we're just talking about it a lot still only two percent of BC funding went to women at all in two thousand seventeen far less to women of color. But it's a good read binded utter website. Marketplace tech dot org, and before we go a super quick story that you might have missed and all the Amazon hubbub earlier this week. Google is not to be outdone. It said it also plans to double its workforce in New York City over the next ten years, reminding us that the ranks of the underrepresented in the tech industry are also anyone who's not in about four major metropolitan areas. A recent report on venture capital activity from pitchbook and the national venture capital association. Included what it said was a shift in attention towards startups in non coastal regions of the country. The report noted quote this trend hasn't quite surfaced in the data yet, but positive sentiment and interest are emerging. We'll see I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. Hi, I'm Zach and I listened to marketplace in Arlington Virginia. I think what I appreciate the most about marketplace's their ability to take the economic news of the day issues such as tariffs rate hikes and tax reform cut through the political noise, and clearly and concisely explained not only how these issues affect our country and the rest of the world, but how they impact people like me. I hope you'll consider joining me as marketplace investor and donate today at marketplace dot org to help make their work possible. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Amazon web services. Did you ever wonder how we're streaming millions of movies on demand or doing our banking from the beach and how we're watching a live mission from Mars smart business minds dreamed up those ideas and Amazon web services is how they built them with the broadest functionality and the most experienced leading enterprises trust the AWS cloud to build the next big idea. Are you ready to build it? Learn more at AWS is how dot com slash podcast.

Founder Amazon Colgate New York City ALI Colgate University JIM AI Mandela Dickson Founder And Ceo Google CBS San Francisco
"colgate university" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"And I'm glad I didn't go actually knows politics discussed in the house. Politics was not a big issue in my house. My parents are Democrats were Democrats, and it was just kind of Sumed, but no not not really issues discussed local issues were discussed. My mother was very involved, but politics per se, not so much. I was the editor my highschool newspaper. You'll be surprised to learn. And so I was I was very involved with the politics of my high school, but but at home, it was sort of much more traditional than the way. My kids grew up in Washington DC where politics was discussed non stop. And you you were the editor of the newspaper. You were what drew you to that? What I think I've always been kind of gossip, and I like to ask questions the Ugandan herald was what it was. And and it was we we put it out. I think every couple of weeks and so. It was it was migrate experiment because I loved it so much in high school I knew and it was crazy that early on. But I just love the reporting, and I love the writing and I love causing the faculty to get upset with what we were doing. And nothing's really changed. And I went to college. I was in my college paper. So I kinda stuck with that. And my husband always says to me, you're so lucky because you knew what you wanted to do from day one. I'm not sure I did. But I liked it. And I still do speaking of diversity you brought some to Colgate. Went to school is like an all male. Preserve? I was in the very first class of women. I'm the oldest living female graduate of Colgate university. So I was in the first class of women there. And that's that's a a bold move. It was it. Well, it I loved the school. I was afraid of being a member of the first class. I actually wanted to go to Princeton. But I didn't get in. So Kobe was my second choice, and happily it I I ended up there. But it was very strange thing. You know, when you think back on it, and I've talked to a lot of women Colgate about its since. And Colgate now fifty one percent female they prepared for us by putting plastic flowers in the urinals in the men's bathroom, and they gave us irons in Arnie boards. And I remember my father turning to my mother and saying I'm not gonna leave her here. Do you know the other night we were sitting together on election night? You saw all of these. I mean, women really were a big part of the story. Women, you know, whole class new class of women coming to the house was their three or four women elected governors and women really driving the story that women voters in the in particular in suburban areas, and when we met women candidacies, generally, so I I asked you this in the context of of your own experience. I mean, how did you process that? Well, I I love it. I always think people turn to women when they need the mess. Cleaned up in many ways works that way in my house. And I think that now. Yeah. People are turning to women because they are different and they are offensive, and they provide something something new, and I think that when you see a hundred women now in congress. It's it's very exciting. I mean, I go back long enough to recall when women could not wear pants on the floor of the Senate when there was no ladies bathroom outside the the Senate chamber..

Colgate university editor Washington Senate Senate chamber Kobe congress Princeton fifty one percent
How the midterm elections could shape tech policy

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:15 min | 2 years ago

How the midterm elections could shape tech policy

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. The deadline for early decision this November fifteenth. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU. Net neutrality broadband policy privacy, the midterms could be major for tech from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy Hollywood. I managed to avoid it for two whole days, but the mid-term elections actually could have a big impact on the tech industry because the backlash against big tech is one of the only issues out there that is actually bipartisan and on top of that a couple of newly elected legislators have specifically made tech part of their agenda Beit net neutrality privacy regulations or even whether platforms are suppressing political voices. So let's dig into this in quality assurance the segment where we take a deeper look at a big tech story is he lebowski is a senior writer for wired covering, politics and national affairs. She says both sides of the aisle have been considering ways to regulate big tech in recent years. The problem is anytime you have a split congress. When you have Democrats running the house and Republicans running the Senate and a Republican in the White House. You're going to have a hard time getting anything done. So just imagine the amount of gridlock. We're about to head into. And then you see are Democrats really going to want to hand. Donald Trump a major piece of legislation terrain in the tech industry. When in so many ways they're trying to act as a check on his administration who are some of the incoming legislators that could at least try to have a hand in shaping policy. Well, there's one incoming legislator who will be familiar to the tech industry because she was formerly a member of the house that Marsha Blackburn in Tennessee. She is sort of infamous for her ties to the telecom industry, which has often put her at odds with the tech industry on issues, like network neutrality and privacy. We also have Josh Hawley who unseated Claire mccaskill he was the attorney general in Missouri. And he as attorney general launched investigations into Google Facebook Uber equifax and a lot of it had to do with data privacy issues. A lot of it had to do with antitrust issues. I think you could expect him to continue to bring those issues to congress. And then the big race. Everybody was watching was Ted CNN. Cruise beta a work race baiter work was heavily backed by members of the tech industry. Ted Cruz has sort of been a needle in the side of the tech industry. So I think you do see this growing coalition of anti tech voices on the right? You know, it's interesting because congress in particular, the Senate hasn't always been the most well informed bunch when it comes to tech. And I wonder with all of these kind of young up and coming candidates getting elected to the house. Do you think that there's a possibility that the conversations about technology could get more sophisticated? That's a really interesting question. So on the first hand, I'll say that. I think members of the Senate are learning. But I think there's something to that. I think there's something to having people in the Senate who really understand at a fundamental level technology. I've even heard from people, you know, as critical as they are of Marsha Blackburn. And as fearful as they are of her being in the Senate, you know, at least she is somebody who understands these issues, and so maybe that's a starting point. Is he lebowski is a senior writer for wired covering, politics and national affairs. She also said we shouldn't get our hopes up for net neutrality legislation coming out of congress anytime soon, but a federal privacy law has an outside chance. And now for some related links after twenty thousand employees walked out of Google last week to protest how the company has handled sexual misconduct claims yesterday, Google agreed to some of the demands those employees are making the big one, it's ending forced arbitration. So when people report sexual harassment, the company won't insist that such claims be handled internally and more importantly, it can't prevent victims from taking their claims to court. All right back to the midterms for a minute. I already threated about this. But I think it's worth repeating even if congress doesn't get a lot tech year after the midterms. It is definitely getting scienc- year ports. That's a thing. Of course, had a nice right up on all the scientists who are coming into congress who just can't help but make it smarter and actually politicos morning tech newsletter. Yesterday had a super useful rundown. On key staffers who will probably be handling changes to telecom and tech policy. Assuming anything makes it through our divided. Congress and remember last week when we talked to Salesforce, CEO, Mark Benny off about prophecy in San Francisco the tax on big businesses that will raise money to help the homeless. Well, it passed and the ringer has a really good right up on how it's really a referendum on big tech. Basically, San Francisco just can't wait to stick it to this industry. And there you go your weekend tech reading is now complete find all those links at our website marketplace, tech dot org. I'm Ali would and thanks for listening. This is APN. Over the past few months. You've been hearing divided decade are year long project covering the great recession, and it's ongoing impact. As a nonprofit news organization. We believe this kind of depth. Reporting is essential to help people understand the economic forces that affect our lives to support this important work. Please go to marketplace dot org to become a marketplace investor with a donation of five dollars or more. Thank you. This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Amazon web services. Did you ever wonder how we're streaming millions of movies on demand or doing our banking from the beach and how we're watching a live mission for Mars smart business minds dreamed up those ideas, Amazon web services is how they built them with the broadest functionality and the most experienced leading enterprises trust the AWS cloud to build the next big idea. Are you ready to build it? Learn more at AWS is how dot com slash podcast.

Senate Congress Marsha Blackburn Google Colgate Writer San Francisco Colgate University Amazon Donald Trump New York Ted Cruz Hollywood Attorney Ted Cnn White House
A 20-year-old digital copyright law is still being fought about (and copied) today

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:12 min | 2 years ago

A 20-year-old digital copyright law is still being fought about (and copied) today

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. The deadline for early decision this November fifteenth. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU and by G, suite by Google cloud. A suite of cloud based productivity tools that includes g mail doc slides sheets and drive you can make real time updates to the same document without having to keep track of multiple versions. And since all tools are cloud based your whole team can access the same document and work on the same page at the same time make it with G suite by Google cloud. Find out more at G, suite dot com. Twenty year old digital copyright law is still being fought about and copied today from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. You know, those music videos, you love on YouTube, and the memes you love to laugh at well. Proposed digital copyright laws in Europe and other countries kinda wanna make those a little less common, and they have their roots in a twenty year old copyright law here in the US called the digital millennium copyright act. So it's a big gnarly hairball of a law. Corey doctor was a writer and activist with the electronic frontier foundation. We reached him in his hotel room and Berlin, he and the F F have been talking about and litigating over the unintended consequences of the DMCA for almost twenty years. Now, the law was written at a time when it was newly possible to rip CDs and DVD's and put them online illegally downloading music was getting more popular Napster came out in nineteen ninety nine remember that and this big copyright law. The DMCA was designed to protect companies and artists from having their works, stolen and disseminated. All. Over the internet. But almost from the beginning critic said it was too broad doctor. Oh points to one section that covers the circumvention of tools that are designed to protect copyright the idea. Here was that if you like made a DVD player and he wanted to control whether DVD's bought in another country could play on it. You could make a little like code that check to see whether the DVD was bought in the same place as the DVD player, and if not you could refuse to play the DMCA made it illegal to tamper with things like that little code. But it basically said it was illegal to break any copyright locks in any product. And that's why you weren't allowed to open up your smartphone or your tractor to fix it which we talked about earlier this week. And so here we are twenty years later, and this tactic is now being used to lock third party ink out of ancient printers. It's in voting machines. And it's being used to punish security researchers who audit voting machines because they say if you reveal the defects in the voting machines, it might help. Someone bypass these copyright locks. Now, there is a provision in the law for a review every three years to consider exemptions one of those reviews just happened. It gave you more rights to fix your smartphone and your tractor and back in two thousand fifteen the library of congress did grant a limited exemption to protect researchers who were trying to find out if voting machines or other electric systems had security flaws as long as they were acting in good faith. However, there was a large catch the researchers can break through digital rights management DRM to find out if for example, a voting machine has a security problem. But if they describe the tools, they used to find those flaws they could get a huge fine or even go to jail, which means nobody else can verify the research. The DMCA should have been raised in the most common sense way imaginable, which is to say if you break the R M to infringe copyright. You're breaking the rules. If you're breaking DRM in your non infringing copyright. You're allowed to do. Do it refining. The DMC has been a long process, and it's not just academics. And researchers who want to fix it in two thousand sixteen major music industry organization said another provisions of the copyright law was making it too easy for sites like YouTube to keep hosting copyrighted music. And they wanted reforms to kind of ironic since the music industry pushed hard for the original law. And now for some related links related to copyright issues. Google is of course, a huge target of copyright owners. And yes, has let a lot slip through the cracks over the years, not even cracks canyons, really. But it put out a report yesterday detailing. It's twenty eighteen efforts to fight piracy. Google said it's invested one hundred million dollars in tools to spot infringing content. They actually scan uploads against a database of copyrighted material, which is something the proposed EU copyright law. Wants everyone to do in fact, and then if someone uploads copyrighted content, the original copyright owner gets ad revenue. From it Google said it's paid three billion dollars to copyright owners that way and another one point eight billion to the music industry in the form of revenue in its report. Google also said if you give people a way to pay for legitimate content. They are far less likely to steal it taking note TV. On demand people. Finally, if you're totally bored with smartphone designs, and I know you are because the biggest innovation in the last five years has basically been the notch. Then get yourself to the internet and watch video of Samsung's foldable smartphone, which it showed up yesterday at a developer conference. It falls out to become a seven inch tablet, and then closes up and there's a phone screen on the front. Google said, the Android operating system will support these crazy do hickeys Lenovo and Xiaomi and LG are also working on them willa work. I don't know. Do you want it? I don't know. All I know is it wasn't about politics. And I don't think it had a notch. I'm in both of those related links are on our website. Marketplace tech dot org. I'm Ali would. And thanks for listening to marketplace tech Tele friends, so they can listen to. This is a PM.

Google Dmca Youtube Colgate ALI Colgate University New York Congress Corey Doctor United States Europe Napster Berlin EU Samsung
Britain to major tech companies: You do business here, you pay taxes here

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:14 min | 2 years ago

Britain to major tech companies: You do business here, you pay taxes here

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. The deadline for early decision this November fifteenth. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation when it comes to mobility, more and more businesses are turning to planet him Michigan is home to the largest concentration of auto related engineers in the nation as well as various all road and all weather autonomous testing centers to learn more head to planet, m dot com. Planet in Michigan where big ideas and mobility are born. Britain tells Google Amazon and Facebook, you do business here you pay taxes here from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. Europe and the UK have been coming hard at the tech industry lately. Tough privacy laws fines for anti-competitive behaviour, new types of copyright laws. And earlier this week something called a digital services tax from the United Kingdom starting in two thousand twenty the UK. We'll take two percent of online revenue from tech companies that make over six hundred million dollars a year, basically, Google, Facebook and Amazon the rest of Europe is planning a similar tax. The idea has even spread to South Korea, India, Mexico, Chile and other countries, let's dig into this digital tax idea in quality assurance the Friday segment where we take a deeper look at a big tech story. Mark Scott is chief technology correspondent at politico. Based in London. He said this is part of a larger trend. So this comes down to the complications of international tax law, which is obviously not something that your listeners can much about. But it does mean a lot to European governments many of which is still suffering from ten years of authority and Frankie sluggish growth. So they see the record profits say Facebook. Book put up and this is specifically focused on Amazon, Google and Facebook typically, they see them generating significant revenue on profit in the regard to Google Facebook. And they want a piece of that by let's talk about the fairness arguments for a second idea that it's a fair share. Like does it make sense that a Google search should pay to fill potholes in London? The view is this. So if I make a Google search, and I get advertising shouldn't on the Google results next to me, and I kick on one of those links the moment, the British government doesn't think they are getting a slice of that action. And therefore, they want that they are saying there is added value being created within the the border of the United Kingdom and therefore Google the moment through ver- variety of legal complicated. Tax structures is siphoning that money back to Ireland where there's a very low corporate tax rate, and then eventually back to the states, how might the tech companies respond. What's going to be there play if and when the tax rolls out? Worst case scenario, they could decide to leave which is not going to happen Pudi because they do generate a lot of income from these countries best case scenario, they pay up because that it becomes a Levy. They just can't avoid mid case scenario is they lobby the hell out of the British government and other European governments over the next two three years, and they water down the proposals to a point where they can live with it. Right. Is it part of an effort? It's in the UK. Now, I know the European Union is considering its own tax of big tech. Is it a comprehensive effort, I guess inclusive of GDP are and copyright technology regulations to sort of rain in the power of these companies that have so much impact and generate so much revenue. I don't think this is a protectionist effort by Europe. I think that they do generally see this is an effort to level the playing field and get these large multinational companies to pay that quote fascia domestically. The issue. Is though the I did up there is a view. Yeah. These companies are in the frame of European regulators and the coming after them Mark Scott is chief technology correspondent at politico based in London and now for related links. It is a little thin today because I have jury duty. So I had to do the show in advance. And I don't want to be too outdated. But I do want to point you to a wonderfully written New York Times book review by my friend, David Streitfeld. It's about a book called we are the nerds the birth and tumultuous life of red. It's the internet's culture laboratory. That's title the book and the book review are both relevant because of this conversation right now with all of us questioning how much different parts of the internet have been vectors for hate, speech radicalization, and just very terrible stuff and asking to what extent the platforms in question are responsible for that stuff. And the review is great for many reasons, but especially the line that says the great achievement of the social internet was to unleash jerked him for many while monetize it for a few the link to that review is on our website, marketplace dot org and wish me luck with my civic duty. I hope to be back with you next week. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech have a great weekend. This is APN over the past few months. You've been hearing divided decade are year long project covering the great recession, and it's ongoing impact. As a nonprofit news organization. We believe this kind of in depth. Reporting is essential to help people understand the economic forces that affect our lives to support this important work. Please go to marketplace dot org to become a marketplace investor with a donation of five dollars or more. Thank you. This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation our world is becoming more hands free. Thanks to planet, m that will also include the future of transportation, Michigan has the most comprehensive autonomous real world testing under every road and weather condition and leaves the nation and patents relating to navigation and smart mobility to learn more, visit planet m dot com. Planet m Michigan where big ideas mobility are born.

Google Facebook Michigan United Kingdom Europe London Amazon Colgate Politico Michigan Economic Development Technology Correspondent Mark Scott ALI Colgate University British Government New York European Union
Should Big Tech pay more to help the homeless in San Francisco?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:20 min | 2 years ago

Should Big Tech pay more to help the homeless in San Francisco?

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. The deadline for early decision this November fifteenth. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU and by G, suite by Google cloud. A suite of cloud based productivity tools that includes g mail docs, slides sheets and drive. You can make real time updates to the same document without having to keep track of multiple versions. And since all the tools are cloud based your whole team can access the same document and work on the same page at the same time make it with G suite by Google cloud. Learn more at G, suite dot com. Does he oh of Salesforce says homelessness is his problem from American public media? This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. In San Francisco next week voters will decide whether the city's largest companies most of them tech companies should pay tax that will raise money to help homeless. Families. Other cities have tried similar efforts voters in Seattle recently overturned attacks on large employers that would have funded affordable housing efforts. This city is biggest tech employer their Amazon strongly objected. But in San Francisco, the city's biggest tech employer is four the measure, Mark Benny off is the co CEO of Salesforce. And yes, the guy who just bought time magazine, he's stumping for the ballot measure called proposition c he said Salesforce recently held its annual dream force conference downtown and attendees from all over the world were horrified. I could tell you how many phone calls and emails and stories have had from people who had adverse interactions with homeless terrible situations with the cleanliness of our streets, including encountering human feces and other terrible things. And you just have to ask yourself. What has happened to our great city here? And that's why I'm supporting proposition c you know, in some ways a business tax in San Francisco is really attacks on the tech industry, which has come under fire for all kinds of problems, including the housing crisis and economic inequality. Do you think that's fair should this industry shoulder the blame for the homelessness crisis and other social problems in San Francisco or anywhere else? Well, I think you know, Salesforce is the city's largest employer, and we are also the largest company in San Francisco, we're doing just fine. Our companies worth about one hundred billion dollars other companies here at them all up its hundreds of billions of dollars and all of this. Well, it has been built on the back of our city. And the question is are you giving back to the city now in a New York Times op-ed, you argued that business half's to have a purpose beyond prophets. And that that can be good for business to the counter argument that you quoted was Milton Friedman saying that. Who get in on social issues can undermine the basis of a free society considering that we've seen a lot of CEOs across tech another industries get more involved in policy and CEO's like you and Jeff Bezos and Mark Zuckerberg increasingly control methods of communication in the media. Can you see an argument for Friedman side, the idea of undermining the basis of a free society or unintended consequences at a minimum today? I could tell you that especially here in San Francisco, you cannot separate business from our city. You know, you can't tell me that this homeless problem is not my problem is the city's largest employer. It's my employees who don't feel safe going to our transit station. It's our customers. You don't feel safe coming to our conferences? So is this homeless situation somehow separate from my business? No the business of business is about the whole world. Mark Benny off is the founder chairman and co. CEO of Salesforce. Now, plenty of tech companies don't support proposition c lift stripe NBC funds acquire capital oppose it square and Twitter. CEO Jack Dorsey has also said it's not the right solution. And now for some related links related to the tech industry and social issues. Some two hundred Google employees plan to walk out of work today to protest how the company is handled sexual misconduct allegations a report in the New York Times earlier this week said Google had paid Android creator. Andy Rubin ninety million dollars to leave the company even though he'd been sleeping with multiple Google staffers and allegedly sexually assaulted woman. He was dating and after that came out the company put out a memo and said it had fired forty eight people for sexual harassment in just two years. Another one actually happened yesterday. A director at Google x is out. He was named in that time story about inappropriate behavior. None of those forty eight people got paid for leaving though. And then Tuesday in courts, the head of Google X gave this long interview about how he thinks that gender inequality is quote the single. Biggest fixable problem humanity has and he said men need to listen and change. So that's nice. I mean props for cleaning house or whatever. Okay. Totally other topic. Check out the latest episode of the podcast. Why'd you push that button from the verge, which is about my favorite topic group chats because you know, how I think they're actually the future of social networking, and I think apple needs to release. I message for everyone and be an actual Facebook competitor for the podcast has the director of product management for Facebook messenger. And as it turns out, according to a story in wired, Mark Zuckerberg said during Facebook's financial results, call Tuesday that the news feed will be less important and ephemeral stories and messenger, and what's up. We'll be more important. So the vision Facebook has pushed on us for ten years. A big huge comments full of people you barely know. Disagree with actually makes us feel bad about ourselves and gets boring really fast. And all we really wanted was a nice day place to talk to each other. And be friends. Glad to see that now. But, you know, props for cleaning house, or whatever I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN.

Google Salesforce San Francisco CEO Facebook Colgate Mark Benny Mark Zuckerberg ALI New York Times Colgate University Ceo Jack Dorsey Milton Friedman New York Time Magazine Amazon Seattle Andy Rubin NBC
"colgate university" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Hey everybody welcome to movie crush the broken lizard takeover addition that's right everyone i'm here in pond city market atlanta and here's this one came about this was through a pr agency i am thankfully in that loop was some these pr folks where they will since stuff my way and say hey we got a movie coming out we may be able to wrangle this person or that person from the movie are you interested and i got an email about broken lizard the comedy troupe who all met at colgate university and college old college buds who made the movie super troopers which a huge fan of in club dread and beer fest and today super troopers two here on four twenty is being released and so they had the guys available in thought well you know maybe get one or two of them in here with an hour each and they went now no they're on a press tour here's the deal it's gonna be all five guys in a studio and you've got like thirty five to forty minutes so i said well why not checked with knoll deceive it was literally like realistic and if we had the technological capabilities to get six of us in a room and no because he is a ninja stud engineer said sure we can do that and he did he set it all up with help from ramsey our ninja co engineer for the show and the guys showed up downstairs i went down and met him and with these pr thing sometimes they don't even know what's going on they do so many things in a day and i said guys on the way up said you you probably don't even know what the show is to you or what the format is and they said nope and i said that's what i thought said usually deep die for an hour about a movie with a guest said i've got about thirty five minutes with five of you so you can pick a movie on the way up in the elevator and we can spend a few minutes on each.

atlanta colgate university engineer ramsey thirty five minutes forty minutes
"colgate university" Discussed on Brains On!

Brains On!

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on Brains On!

"Candle like as a candle wreaths refound her head but most schools actually don't use real candles they use fake candles 'cause it's more safer but it looks like a candles while candles and fire play a big part in winter celebrations all over the world and for good reason winter is dark and we miss the light in fact most of these celebrations occur around the winter solstice the shortest day of the year anthony of any is a professor of astronomy and anthropology at colgate university he says throughout history we see culture celebrate light during these dark days in medieval times in your it would back into the shunned by making huge weeding out of jail and would and play should at the top of the hill at alighted on fire and then a man with sticks would roll that wheel down visual toward the river imitating the movement of the sun and it's just the way this on moves at noon time it starts to weigh down and then finally it hits the horizon and then they would take some of the remaining flames and light their sticks with that fire and then carry that new fire into their household and they would use that to light the fire in the fireplace by doing that it would symbolize that they would take this new fire that comes from the sun when it turns around and comes back into the sky in the spring time and they would take a part of that fire and bring it to their heart they would own a part of the sun and you know the ass tax and mexico had a similar ritual they say that on a new year's eve they would all take sticks and contribute to a central fire they would call it the new fire ceremony they would break their cups and saucers and dishes and throw away their forks and knives they would get rid of all the impurities from the previous cycle of the sun then they would renew the fire they would get new maps to replace the old maps in their house that they sat on and slept on and they would begin.

professor colgate university mexico
"colgate university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by colgate university located at the geographic center of new york state colgate university is alive with teaching research and possibility with a student faculty ratio of nine to one colgate students work sidebyside with academia's leading professors find your fit at colgate that eu this marketplace podcast is brought to you by the orbi wi fi system from net gear wi fi something you don't really think about until you don't habit or it's not working properly and with everyone home for the holidays fighting for fi suddenly you're videos take forever to buffer and you've got wifi dead zones when did us upgrade your wife i at home if you want better wi fi everywhere check out in orbi wi fi system from net gear with orbi you'll enjoy super strong fast and more reliable whole home wi fi from your basement to your backyard change your wifi world get orbi that's o r b i wifi system from net gear visit net geared dot com slash orbi and once again that's o r b i tech accelerators how do they work when you're sutter founder you feel like you a little alone in the world most of your friends are not creating companies answered abbott community of people you can talk to about startups is amazing from american public media this is marketplace tech i'm amy scott informality would no no in the world of startups getting venture capital funding is an exactly easy it's sort of a business of who knows who and getting in front of investors can be key enter the accelerator these are forprofit business incubators that invest in groups of startups give them advice and mentoring and connect them with other investors one of the biggest tech accelerators is why combinator it's funded companies including airbnb instant cart and drop box michael saibul leads why combinator accelerator.

colgate university colgate wi wifi founder new york sutter amy scott venture capital airbnb michael saibul
"colgate university" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

APM: Marketplace Tech

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by colgate university located at the geographic center of new york state colgate university is alive with teaching research and possibility with a student faculty ratio of nine to one colgate students work sidebyside with academia's leading professors find your fit at colgate that eu this marketplace podcast is brought to you by the orbi wi fi system from net gear wi fi something you don't really think about until you don't habit or it's not working properly and with everyone home for the holidays fighting for fi suddenly you're videos take forever to buffer and you've got wifi dead zones when did us upgrade your wife i at home if you want better wi fi everywhere check out in orbi wi fi system from net gear with orbi you'll enjoy super strong fast and more reliable whole home wi fi from your basement to your backyard change your wifi world get orbi that's o r b i wifi system from net gear visit net geared dot com slash orbi and once again that's o r b i tech accelerators how do they work when you're sutter founder you feel like you a little alone in the world most of your friends are not creating companies answered abbott community of people you can talk to about startups is amazing from american public media this is marketplace tech i'm amy scott informality would no no in the world of startups getting venture capital funding is an exactly easy it's sort of a business of who knows who and getting in front of investors can be key enter the accelerator these are forprofit business incubators that invest in groups of startups give them advice and mentoring and connect them with other investors one of the biggest tech accelerators is why combinator it's funded companies including airbnb instant cart and drop box michael saibul leads why combinator accelerator.

colgate university colgate wi wifi founder new york sutter amy scott venture capital airbnb michael saibul
"colgate university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by colgate university located at the geographic center of new york state colgate university is alive with teaching research and possibility with a student faculty ratio of nine to one colgate students work sidebyside with academia's leading professors find your fit at colgate that eu then the moon be the jumping off point for a new economy in space it makes a lot of sense to make a pitstop at the moon however the question still always remains how do you pay for it from american public media this is marketplace tech amale would the us wants to send astronauts back to the moon at before aiming for mars here's president trump making the announcement this time we will not only to our flag and leave our footprint we will establish a foundation for eventual mission to mars and perhaps some day too many worlds beyond this would be the first american mission to the moon since 1973 to joining me now to space out about this as kimberly adams who covers space and politics for marketplace as washington bureau kimberly why why the moon why not i mean we were going to go to mars look the administration is basically shifting priorities a lot of the previous administration under the obama administration they were like you know what let's go to mars and the trump administration as have previous administrations including the bush administration is saying instead let's focus on a closer target them moon and do all of our research and develop.

colgate university colgate us kimberly adams obama administration bush administration new york eu president washington
"colgate university" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

APM: Marketplace Tech

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on APM: Marketplace Tech

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by colgate university located at the geographic center of new york state colgate university is alive with teaching research and possibility with a student faculty ratio of nine to one colgate students work sidebyside with academia's leading professors find your fit at colgate that eu then the moon be the jumping off point for a new economy in space it makes a lot of sense to make a pitstop at the moon however the question still always remains how do you pay for it from american public media this is marketplace tech amale would the us wants to send astronauts back to the moon at before aiming for mars here's president trump making the announcement this time we will not only to our flag and leave our footprint we will establish a foundation for eventual mission to mars and perhaps some day too many worlds beyond this would be the first american mission to the moon since 1973 to joining me now to space out about this as kimberly adams who covers space and politics for marketplace as washington bureau kimberly why why the moon why not i mean we were going to go to mars look the administration is basically shifting priorities a lot of the previous administration under the obama administration they were like you know what let's go to mars and the trump administration as have previous administrations including the bush administration is saying instead let's focus on a closer target them moon and do all of our research and develop.

colgate university colgate us kimberly adams obama administration bush administration new york eu president washington
"colgate university" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on WTMA

"Assumption up from people on the left is that everything is racist unless it involves white people of course and you know if they're the villains the bad guys the goats than it's not racist that's how you can tell it's not racist because the villain a bet is a is a white guy on monday night colgate university officials warned that there was an armed person on campus and advised people to find a safe place bad to retreat to safe spaces the whole campus for several hours the campus remained locked down it's you know like the london during the blitz and world war two everyone was safe there was no gunman police later determined but many students were angry when they learned the reason for the alarm some one called coal gates campus safety that's the campus police when they saw a black student who had a glue gun that he was using first school project now out of the person calling the police know that it was being used for a school project and how did they know it wasn't a mini lusi how did they know i mean listen these are people on college campuses now that were raised to call the police when they see a puk tart chewed in the shape of a gun if someone has a super so khor that bright yellow which happen just a couple of weeks ago on campus they're supposed to call the police you're not allowed to bring a squirt gun you're not allowed to lament but i'm not done hang hang a because it gets better it's an and he's black now if he's white is this in the washington post if he's white does this angst exist if he's white does the frightened students who saw a kach gone or a glue gun do they still call the campus police well the assumption is of course no because if it were a.

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"colgate university" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on KOIL

"Correct answer i think is probably nothing but the assumption up from people on the left is that everything is racist and lesson involves white people of course and you know if they're the villains the bad guys the goats than it's not racist that's how you can tell it's not racist because the bill and his about is a is a white guy on monday night colgate university officials warned that there was an armed personnel on campus and advised people to find a safe place badger retreat to safe spaces dole campus for several hours the campus remained locked down it's you know like the london during the blitz and world war two everyone was safe there was no gunman police later determined but many students were angry when they learned the reason for the alarm some one called coal gates campus safety that's the campus police when they saw a black student who had a glue gun that he was using for a school project now out of the person calling the police know that it was being used for a school project and how did they know it was no mini lucy how did they know i mean listen these are people on college campuses now that were raised to call the police when they see a pop tart chewed in the shape of a gun if someone has a super so khor that's bright yellow which happened just a couple of weeks ago on campus they're supposed to call the place you're not allowed to bring us squirt gun you're not allowed to outlook but i'm not done hang hang a because it gets better it's and he's black now if he's white is this in the washington post if he's white does this angst exist if he's white does the frighten student to soy kach gone or a glue gun do they still call the camp as police well the assumption is of course no because of worry white student walking across campus with a glue gun it would be immediately recognized as.

london washington post colgate university world war
"colgate university" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Correct answer i think is probably nothing but the assumption up from people on the left is that everything is racist and lesson involves white people of course and you know if they're the villains the bad guys the goats than it's not racist that's how you can tell it's not racist because the bill in his about is a is a white guy on monday night colgate university officials warned that there was an armed the person on campus and advised people to find a safe place they had to retreat to safe spaces dole campus for several hours the campus remained locked down it's you know like the london during the blitz in world war two everyone was safe there was no gunman police later determined but many students were angry when they learned the reason for the alarm some one called coal gates campus safety that's the campus police when they saw a black student who had a glue gun that he was using for a school project how did the person calling the police know that it was being used for a school project and how did they know it wasn't a mini lusi how did they know i mean listen these are people on college campuses now that were raised to call the police when they see a pop tart chewed in the shape of a gun if someone has a super so khor that's bright yellow which happen just a couple of weeks ago on campus they're supposed to call the police you're not allowed to bring us squirt gun you're not allowed to outlook met but i'm not done hang hang a because it gets better it's an and he's black now if he's white is this in the washington post if he's white does this angst exist if he's white does the frightened student to soy kach gone or a glue gun do they still call the campus police well the assumption is of course no because if it were a white stood walking cross campus where the glue gun it would be immediately recognized as a glue gun because a white guy had it that's the underlying assumption.

london world war washington post colgate university
"colgate university" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Correct answer i think is probably nothing but the assumption up from people on the left is that everything is racist and lesson involves white people of course and and if they're the villains the bad guys the goats than it's not racist that's how you can tell it's not racist because the bill in his bet is a is a white guy on monday night colgate university officials warned that there was an armed the person on campus and advised people to find a safe place they had to retreat to safe spaces dole campus for several hours where's the campus remained locked down it's you know like the london during the blitz and world war two everyone was safe there was no gunman police later determined but many students were angry when they learned the reason for the alarm someone called coal gates campus safety that's the campus police when they saw a black student who had a glue gun that he was used for a school project how did they person calling the police know that it was being used for a school project and how did they know it wasn't a mini lusi how did they know i mean listen these are people on college campuses now that were raised to call the police when they see a pop tart chewed in the shape of a gun if someone has a super so khor that's bright yellow which happen just a couple of weeks ago on campus they're supposed to call the police you're not allowed to bring us squirt gun you're not allowed to but i'm not done hang hang on because it gets better it's an and he's black now if he's white is this in the washington post if he's white does this angst exist if he's white does the frightened student to soy kach gone or a glue gun do they still call the campus police well the.

london coal gates washington post colgate university world war
"colgate university" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on KOIL

"Correct answer i think is probably nothing but the assumption up from people on the left is that everything is racist and lesson involves white people of course and in after the villains the bad guys the goats than it's not racist that's how you can tell it's not racist because the building is about is a is a white guy on monday night colgate university officials warned that there was an armed person on campus and advised people to find a safe place bad to retreat to safe spaces dole campus for several hours the campus remained locked down it's so you know like london during the blitz and world war two everyone was safe there was no gunman police later determined but many students were angry when they learned the reason for the alarm someone called coal gates campus safety that's the campus police when they saw a black student who had a glue gun that he was using first school project now how did they a person calling the police know that it was being used for a school project and how did they know it wasn't a mini lucy how did they know i mean listen these are people on college campuses now that were raised to call the police when they see a pop tart chewed in the shape of a gun if someone has a super soak her that's bright yellow which happen just a couple of weeks ago on campus they're supposed to call the police you're not allowed to bring us squirt gun you're not allowed to olivet but i'm not done hang hang a because it gets better it's and he's black now if he's white is this in the washington post if he's white does this angst exist if he's white does the frightened students who saw a kach gone or a glue gun do they still call the campus police well the assumption is of course no because of worry white student walking cross campus where the glue.

london coal gates washington post colgate university world war
"colgate university" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on KOIL

"Correct answer i think is probably nothing but the assumption up from people on the left is that everything is racist and lesson involves white people of course and you know if they're the villains the bad guys the goats than it's not racist that's how you can tell it's not racist because the bill and has a bet is a is a white guy on monday night colgate university officials warned that there was an armed personnel on campus and advised people to find a safe place bad to retreat to safe spaces dole campus for several hours the campus remained locked down it's you know like the london during the blitz and world war two everyone was safe there was no gunman police later determined but many students were angry when they learned the reason for the alarm someone called coal gates campus safety that's the campus police when they saw a black student who had a glue gun that he was using for a school project the the person calling the police know that it was being used for a school project and how did they know it wasn't a mini lusi how did they know i mean listen these are people on college campuses now that were raised to call the police when they see a pop tart chewed in the shape of a gun if someone has a super soak khor that bright yellow which happened just a couple of weeks ago on campus they're supposed to call the police you're not allowed to bring us squirt gun you're not allowed to outlook but i'm not done hang hang a because it gets better it's and he's black now if he's white is this in the washington post if he's white does this angst eggs this if he's white does the frightened students who saw kach gone or a glue gun do they still call the campus police well the assumption is of course no because if it were.

london coal gates washington post colgate university world war
"colgate university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"colgate university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good laws angels on car resolve thursday today the third of august glad as always to have you with us everybody tax reform coming up but first let's set aside for second shall we discussions of what language people coming to this country ought to speak and what that poem says on the pedestal of the statue of liberty and while acknowledging the emotional realities of the immigration debate get down to economic brass tacks president trump as you know has thrown his weight behind a bill that would fundamentally change american immigration policy number one it would be skillsbased assuming the thing passes a numbertwo it would cut in half the number of people legally allowed to come here but another way this is a story about making the labour force smaller in an economy already pretty nearfull employment marketplace's adrian hill gets has gone most economists will tell you immigration is on hold good for the economy cutting the number of immigrants allowed in are you gonna be good actually goes into the opposite direction of of of what we john mclearn is an economics professor at the university of virginia if you take a look around the country employers in agriculture industry the tourism industry they say they're having trouble finding enough people to work we need to make it feasible for employers who need immigrant workers the higher the workers legally cutting immigration also isn't going to help the president reach the three percent gdp grew up with his budget and tax proposals depend on in fact it's likely to do the opposite most economists will tell you immigration boosts economic growth kirk dorin is an economics professor at the university of notre dame generally if you look at economic models when people interact with each other good got happen immigrants add to the labour supply they create businesses they consume in the long run says door and all that economic activity is a plus by the longrun can take a long time for some segments of the population and the upside it's aren't evenly distributed chance barber is an economics professor at colgate university it's certainly true that some americans are hurt by immigration americans competing firm manual labor intensive jobs for example if we see americans who are suffering as a result of immigration i wish we.

adrian hill professor president kirk dorin barber colgate university john mclearn university of virginia three percent