34 Burst results for "Cold Virus"

"cold virus" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:40 min | 1 d ago

"cold virus" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Don't touch it. Not often. Does that happen to me? How about this do do you believe or have you always believed That going outside in the cold will give you a cold. How do you catch a cold? I was outside. It was freezing. And this is back to the grandparents. That's great, totally push that one viruses cause coals. Viruses don't live in the outside cold world like Ooh, there's a cold stop coming through. Oh, it's the cold viruses coming through. That's actually not not not a thing. My mom always said to put on a coat or also catch catch a cold. Yeah. The code has nothing to do with the call. Or how about this? You think you're going out there with wet hair? Oh, my, You'll catch pneumonia. Monje. That's pneumonia. Get the P pneumonia. That's even worse. That's not sure either. Mm. I don't actually know about that one, but I missed for me. It's not. That's probably not a good idea to go out with. Well, if it's 12 threes, Yeah. If it's a virus, you're not gonna get sick, right? The cold virus has nothing to do with the temperature. You see what I'm saying? Well, you can catch it cold. It is it in the summer as easily as you can catch a cold in. It spreads more easily and colder. It lives a little bit longer because of temperature, But But it's not living don't created right. You know, they they acted like you that you created it in your system. If you go outside like that, yeah, When? When the wind starts blowing in the snow starts falling. It's full of cold virus. Now, this is what I know to be true. Shaving. Your hair makes it grow back. Thicker. Absolutely not. That doesn't work, but it does go back earlier. State lawmakers have Return to a Springfield yesterday. They're trying.

yesterday Springfield 12 threes one P
For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

Part Time Genius

08:48 min | 3 months ago

For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

"Healthcare reporter at The Wall Street Journal. X for joining us, Peter Thanks for having me on Lot is being made right now about the vaccines were obviously going through the rollout. Things are ramping up. But, you know, I really have found very fascinating. The story of how these vaccines have come to be in the new technologies that were using. Obviously, the Fizer and Moderna vaccines are using this M or in a technology. We've never had a vaccine that has been approved before. And Johnson and Johnson, the new one that just got approved. They also are using new technology. There's is a little different. It's called viral vector technology. You know, these brand new things are showing a lot of promise and big hopes for Writing, you know, infections in the future, other pandemics, just other diseases. There's a lot of potential with all of these. So, Peter, tell us a little bit about your reporting on this. You know, Vaccines have been around for a couple 100 years, and for most of that time they used sort of tried and true method of making them and a lot of cases. That meant Taking part of the virus of the pathogen that you want to try to protect against. And using it in the vaccine itself to deliver that into the body to induce an immune response. And so those air still in use, But there have been efforts over the past few decades. Find new ways to make vaccines and the pandemic has really brought that out in the sense that, you know, even though some of these technologies were years in the making this pandemic has sort of been there moment to actually deliver, if not for the very first time, then In the biggest way possible for that. Vaccine technology and so As you mentioned the first couple vaccines used this messenger RNA technology and this Johnson and Johnson, one uses a viral vector technology and they're both Newer ways of making vaccines, and they both involved. Essentially delivering the genetic code and genetic instructions that tell the body to do certain things to induce the an immune response rather than deliver. The actual virus into the body that you're trying to fight against. We've talked about the M R D vaccines for a bit now only because they were approved first from Fizer, Moderna, Johnson and Johnson, as I mentioned recently approved They're using this viral vector technology. Tell us a little bit more about that. It's different from the old ways as you were describing, but they still use a virus that they kind of readjust to help do this. So how does the viral vector stuff work? There. That's a good point, because I don't want to mislead people to think that there's no viral material in these viral vector event vaccines, But the difference is that you're using a virus that has Essentially nothing to do with the disease You're trying to combat and the general concept for these viral vector vaccines is to take one harmless virus and to use it against more deadly virus. And so in the case of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine A couple others. They're out there for cove is like the one from AstraZeneca and University of Oxford is to take something called it in a dental virus, which is Relatively harmless virus that can cause common colds or conjunctivitis. And to tweak it in such a way so that if it's injected into your body, it's not going to cause disease is not going to cause the coldest fellow certainly not going to cause coverted. It serves as sort of a carrier, and it's modified in a way so that it actually then carries Edna that tells the body's cells. Make this spike protein that found on the surface of the coronavirus finding that right virus of such an interesting part of this story, Johnson and Johnson decided they were going to go this route. Viral vector technology, and they had to be on the hunt or the right virus because there was also concerns. You know you're using viral material. What if you build up an immunity to that specific virus, then could you build up an immunity to the vaccine itself? So they were on the hunt for a very specific one to use as well. That question of whether this viral vector or this sort of carrier that makes up the vaccine is going toe compose an issue and so in the past there have been in is where that's been a problem. And I think it's not been entirely solved. And so in the past, the problem was that when they tried using one of these dental viruses to be the sort of carrier in the vaccine in people who had pre existing immunity to that identify Iris that this common cold virus it's sort of interfered with The effectiveness of the vaccine against various diseases. And so what Johnson and Johnson had to do was sort of figure out. Okay, Well, we need to pick the right carrier that the right dental virus and you know, ideally one that is just not that common out in the world so that not as many people have pre existing immunity to it. But even the people who do have preexisting immunity to it. Maybe it's not going to be such a strong immune response against the carrier that would interfere with the underlying vaccine is trying to do Tell me a little bit more about Johnson and Johnson and the company. You know how they got into this because my understanding I'm obviously we know Johnson and Johnson for a myriad of products, but they're fairly new to the vaccine game. And they didn't achieve a little bit of success with an Ebola vaccine using this viral vector technology also, so you know how did that work out for them? And then obviously they transition into working on the covert virus. He's got the world well known brands that you alluded to band aid baby powder, and they've long had a very strong prescription drug business. So drugs like Remedy Cade that that treat people who are already sick and then there are major player but they've not been a major player in vaccines. And so about 10 years ago, they decided they wanted to get into vaccines. More so they bought this Such a biotechnology company called Crew Cell, and that's really where this viral vector technology came from that JJ is using, and so they kind of spent. Several years just designing vaccines against various infectious diseases and then running them through the regular series of tests, So this would be things like Ebola. Enrica. Then they were able to start testing they rebel a vaccine using this sector technology in Africa after I think first after that, the really big outbreak in West Africa five or six years ago and then more recently In the Congo, where there was another outbreak, and so they went through the whole series of studies for that vaccine, and then eventually got European Commission approval for it in the middle of last year. So now they do have this sort of platform that Could work not only against over 19 but also against Ebola's and then potentially additional infectious diseases the night in fact, they even have the vaccine and development for HIV, which is sort of been this Notoriously difficult virus to target in the form of a vaccine. I mean, it's so interesting how far we've come. How much we've learned about the human body so much so that you know we're hacking the genetic software. You know of the body to produce these things. You know all these insights into the immune system that we've gained have led us to this stuff. So what's the promise for these things Like, you know, what can we expect? I know they're working on Vaccines for other diseases. Gene therapies, There's a lot of promise with us Yeah, And it's in a way. It's sort of the convergence of a couple different strains that have been going on in pharmaceutical research and academic research. And that is The genetic revolution on the one hand, but also immunology, and that's immunology is kind of feeding into both. Vaccines to prevent disease but also ah, whole new class of drugs to treat disease by in some way affecting the immune system. And so I mean, there are people that Infectious disease experts who say that this is really the golden Age of vaccine ology that these advances kind of signal that and think that it really shows that there's promised to really target a lot of Other infectious diseases. And in the case of Ah, big emerging outbreak like we've seen To do it in a way that is really quick and can actually Have in effect in actually stemming of pandemic. While it's under way, you know, rather than just developed paintings and the normal timeline of many years that the pharmaceutical industry is used to Yeah, And in the

Johnson Moderna Peter Thanks Fizer The Wall Street Journal Ebola Astrazeneca University Of Oxford Conjunctivitis Colds Crew Cell Edna Peter Enrica Ebola's Cade West Africa Congo European Commission Africa
FDA Issues Emergency Use Authorization for Third COVID-19 Vaccine

Quick News Daily Podcast

02:28 min | 3 months ago

FDA Issues Emergency Use Authorization for Third COVID-19 Vaccine

"The fda gave emergency use authorization to the johnson and johnson co vaccine. Cdc has already recommended it. So distribution is scheduled to start almost immediately as i briefly went over in the past the main differences between the johnson. Vaccine and say the visor in moderna. Vaccines are johnson. And johnson is one dose. It's easier to store. It doesn't need those super cold. Temperatures so far it's been eighty five percent effective at preventing severe disease and at least in the trial was one hundred percent effective at preventing deaths from covid nineteen. Which are really the most important. Stance provides faster protection. Takes about two weeks to be prevented from getting a moderate to severe case of code and after four weeks there have been no hospitalizations reported or deaths. Obviously lastly there is a lower risk compared to pfizer in moderna of those allergic reactions. The nfl axis cases are already rare with those but in this one in the study there was one case of nfl. Alexis in forty four thousand people as for what causes these differences. This one is made with viral vector technology. According to the cnn article quotes a common cold virus called dina virus. Twenty six is genetically engineered so that it can infect cells but it won't replicate there cannot spread in the body and won't give people a cold like the pfizer and moderna vaccine. It delivers genetic instructions instead of being carried in little lipid balls. The genetic instructions are injected by the weakened virus into arm cells. Name make the pieces that would like part of the coronavirus spike protein which is the knob shaped structure that the virus uses to connect to sells it uses dina virus to get into our bodies and get our bodies used to. It was also this article in cbs. About the astra zeneca vaccine but honestly it just seems like a pr. Move like doesn't seem that impressive. The designer of the astrazeneca vaccine is saying that the plug and play sorta thing. We can easily updated in very quickly. Then when he read they still won't have that update until the fall. It's basically like the same cycle for a regular flu shot. Because it's like the same technology so personally. I don't know if i'd be out there bragging about how quick we can switch this out and updated if it's still until fall now. I don't know how long it would take to switch out the pfizer in moderna vaccines. I thought i read earlier. That the amarna is much easier. Because it's like straight up injecting the virus it doesn't have to wait to sort of replicated or grow it somehow again obviously. I don't know the specifics on that. But i do believe that would be faster than this one

Johnson Allergic Reactions Pfizer NFL CDC FDA Moderna Alexis CNN Astra Astrazeneca CBS FLU
Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine deemed "safe and effective" by the FDA

Daily Coronavirus Update

07:10 min | 4 months ago

Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine deemed "safe and effective" by the FDA

"And johnson. It's been shown that they're vaccine is effective at preventing hospitalizations and severe effects of covid. Nineteen this from scientists at the fda we're seeing about. I think it's sixty six percent effective when it comes to moderate to severe cases of covid nineteen so matthew. Tell a little bit more about what we're hearing with. His johnson and johnson vaccine right so what happened. Is that johnson. Johnson released data about a month ago. You know press release but the process for evaluating these vaccines is that they go through the fda and the fda really unique in the world independently looks at the data and re analyzes the data that the company produces and its own report and then hold a public meeting which will be happening friday and so the documents before the public meeting came out and they had some good news both some really clear data on hospitalizations and a general sense of approval from the fda researchers. Sometimes they're not as positive so it looks like this may be another option now. The big plus is on. This is one. It's a one shot dose. So you don't have to go back for a second jab in the arm and also doesn't need to be kept frozen like the pfizer derna vaccines do so shipping and handling of all of this will be a lot easier much easier to transport and that's a big advantage. It does not look like we're gonna have a huge amount of supply the start off with so it doesn't dramatically change how fast we're going to be any shots into people's arms but for a lot of people i think in a lot of experts i talked. You think this'll be a great option. It's one and done. I think some of the numbers. I saw the might have about four. That are produced right now. Ready to send out so it gets approved. They can get those out really quick but it wouldn't be until april possibly where they can really ramp up production to start distributing that right and will also be getting over that where they're hundreds of millions of doses of the two vaccines have the madonna and fayza biontech vaccines. That are expected to arrive in the us by july. So there's gonna be a lot more vaccine available. The jj supply will ramp up and we'll be getting more of those other two vaccines that leaves. There's a vaccine coming from nova vacs. We don't really know about how much will getting the early results issued press. Release again good and we're waiting for. Us results on the astra zeneca vaccine. Now some good news. With his johnson and johnson one is its effectiveness against these variants. That we've been hearing a lot about so it fared better than expected when it comes to those. I the way to interpret. That is we'd seen some results and the new results that they showed today look a bit better than what we'd seen in terms of variants. There's still does seem to be decreased. Efficacy against the south africa variant. Three five. Which is really the one that we're all worried about but it did look better than what we've seen previously and what j. j. has said it seems like with those variants. This vaccine is still preventing severe disease and hospitalization. Which are the key things. We've always wanted from vaccine here. The idea that you'd prevent a symptomatic infection or mild cases kind of bonus compared to just making sure that people end up in the hospital hospitalizations numbers were good on that front. What did we see when it comes to side effects. I saw that there were a few unexpected side effects. Although these are very rare you know but The expecting side effects the kind of pain in the arm the headache fatigue. That's pretty much in line with the other two vaccines. We have that right now. There were some rare events that occurred more often in the vaccine in the placebo group. Keeping in mind that forty thousand people were in this trial. There were fifteen serious blood clots including some. Dvd's in that exciting compared to ten in the placebo group. That's something the fda plans to monitor there was also some rini ears in the vaccine group and not in the placebo group. So that's kind of an odd one that will wanna watch again. This is really a prelude to friday win. Some of the top experts in the world are going to gather on zoom call and go over these data that the fda assembled we'll be live blogging that stat. That's when we really find out a lot about any medical product. It's it's one of the amazing things. The fda does now an interesting thing in all of this so public health officials might have a messaging problem when it comes to pumping the johnson and johnson. One out when we're seeing guys like pfizer maderna's say that their vaccine is ninety five percent effective against corona virus. Just listening to numbers right. This says sixty six percent. So what are they going to have a challenge in getting people to want to take this one over the other or you know how how to work out. It's really important to realize that particularly between those three vaccines. The getting vaccine is much better than not getting a vaccine. The change vaccine may be on par after a second dose and that study is being done but unlike visor during the second dose is going to be months after the first and then also slows down the study. She gotta wait right for people to get their second dose. So we're not expecting those data until kinda summerish but the big thing is for a lot of people. There was also the appeal of a single dose here. And i don't think we should understate that. And the effect on severe disease is big so the problem is gonna be the in the initial rollout. You really want people to take whatever vaccine. They're giving because being vaccinated is so much better than not being vaccinated. And that is part of the path to get in the world back to normal and public health. Authorities are absolutely going to have to articulate that now again because there's not going to be that much supply of this initially. They're going to have time for a learning curve right now. the demand for vaccines clearly outstrips supply. That's why you're hearing so many stories of people desperately logging on trying to get vaccine. What scott gottlieb used to run. The fda has raised the issue of you know. We're we're going to reach a point where the people who wanna get vaccinated we'll have been vaccinated and we're still going to need to vaccinate more people and that's when convincing people who are less sure to take vaccine in to take the vaccine that's available is going to become more of an issue last question briefly pfizer moderna vaccines are based on 'em a. What kind of platform is the johnson and johnson. When using this like theatrics annika vaccine is called an ad no virus which is a kind of virus that is used to the same kind of ideas marin a the instead of traditional vaccines were you inject the protein that your immune system sees and then learn to recognize an attack. These sneak something into your body that makes a lot of proteins. You make a lot more protein and then the body recognizes that an attack it in this case they're using this virus which is kind of a cold virus to sneak some genetic material in and that makes the spike protein from the sars virus which your body then learns to recognize and thereby has antibodies that attack the virus

Johnson FDA Astra Zeneca Pfizer Pfizer Maderna Matthew Nova Rini United States South Africa Headache Scott Gottlieb Marin Cold Virus
"cold virus" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:07 min | 4 months ago

"cold virus" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Evening. Right now. 25 degrees here in Cincinnati on Sandy Collins. Our next updated eight on NewsRadio 700 wlw Muse 24 hours a day He was a radio 700 wlw. You may have heard during the news that President Biden says we have to pass a covert 19. Relief package. Bernie Sanders yesterday on CNN stating that the on leeway to reopen schools in a safe manner is to pass a Corona right virus relief bill through budget reconsideration. In other words. They don't have enough votes from the Republicans to address, he said. The catastrophes that are impacting working families today Well, if they had just treated the virus is what it is a cold virus and not as the great plague. That we were told. Falsely that itwas Which caused the lockdowns, which caused the shutdowns, which caused all of the catastrophes that are impacting families today in America. So Bernie Sanders and this is not surprising from the mouth of Bernie Sanders. Self described Democrat Socialist is really a Marxist. He's to the left of Mao, Almost The only way we're going to deal effectively with the pandemic, or as I call it, the scam gimmick correctly and get vaccines into the arms of people increase vaccines. Production trying to work in my Bernie Sanders impression. Always comes out sounding like Remember the old artwork cartoon. Kind of sounded like a no upstate New York. Force Belt comedian. No way. Give vaccines into the arms of people increase vaccine production. The only way we're going to raise the minimum wage to a living wage, so people are not working for starvation wages. The only way we're going to open up our schools in a way that is safe. The only way that we're going to put people back to work in restaurants and protect small business is the only way we're going to do that is through reconciliation. In other words, Pulling an end around On Congress. Joe Biden says he supports a covert 19 package. If they can get to Republicans support in the Senate. And this, you know, this comes to the next point of what we were all told, was going to happen. If the Democrats were in charge of both houses of Congress and the White House, they would eliminate the filibuster. We haven't had the vote on that yet, but it's coming quickly. And so to Muriel Bowser, who was the mayor of Washington, D. C. You made not have ever heard about her, except that she's mayor of the nation's capital. Because she's largely un remarkable as a person. As a person, not just as a mayor, but as a person. UN remarkable. And not memorable is begging for D. C. Statehood now, which constitutionally cannot happen. Yeah. It is absolutely on fire. And the people who set the fire continue to pour gasoline on it. If there are dangerous theories and dangerous thoughts, I'm thinking them according to the dams, according to the leftists. I have a lot of dangerous theories like they've been trying to. Totally take down the country. Four years, and now it's full on pedal to the metal again. Your thoughts. 7 47 100 wlw. Hey, Google entertain me. Sure. Here's 700 wlw on my heart radio Progressive presents those sounds of the old World.

Bernie Sanders President Biden Muriel Bowser Congress Sandy Collins NewsRadio Cincinnati CNN Google Senate UN New York America White House Self Washington
"cold virus" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

08:12 min | 6 months ago

"cold virus" Discussed on The Daily

"This podcast is supported by facebook at facebook. We're taking action to keep our community safe. we've tripled our safety and security teams built new privacy tools an invested billions to keep our platform. What's next we support updated internet regulations. That set clear rules for addressing. Today's toughest challenges. Learn more at about dot f. dot com slash regulations. I'm alexandra lee young. And i'm a producer on the daily when this pandemic reach the united states. We knew that we needed to hear from the experts. People like donald g mcneil junior from the science dusk. Who could give us this. Kind of scientific sobering look at what the pandemic would mean for us around that same time. I also went out just around the corner to my local grocery store and talked to the manager. He was panicked and sleep-deprived literally trembling as i spoke to him and he told me about how this pandemic effects him and his customers at the new york times. We think it's really important to hear from this. Full spectrum. voice says both the experts and from people who are going through what you're going through right now and we can't keep doing this kind of work without the support of new york times subscribers. So if you'd like to subscribe go to ny times dot com slash subscribe. So let's turn to this new and much brighter world that we are about to start entering the world of inoculations throughout the united states. Starting with pfizer's vaccine eventually with vaccines from rival companies. Like madeira johnson johnson. I wanted to start now that we are living in a world where a vaccine has been approved with a few very practical questions once you get vaccinated how evil will anyone be to start resuming life in what might be a normal way unmasked unencumbered. Well i get the two doses for the vaccines. That are two doses. Noser either three or four weeks apart and you do get some protection from the first dose. We believe but you really have to wait for the take the second dose and then you have to wait at least a couple weeks here. Antibodies to build up and then you are considered to have gotten basically the full protection looking at something like a month or so. We looking more like six weeks from the first shot the shot you're gonna get another shot close to a month later and then you have to wait another couple of weeks for the effects of that booster to kick in and then you're protected as you're going to be Now the important question is even if you're protected against severe disease and if you're protected against infection is it possible that you can get a mild infection that can then reside in b cells in your nose so that you can actually spread the virus And the answer is we. Don't have that data yet. So that is one area where public health leaders are being conservative. And saying. Let's assume you might still possibly be able to get a second infection or transmitted to somebody else. So the benefit of asking people to keep abiding by these. it may be psychological rather than medical. But it's likely to happen dolled. Who at least at the beginning will not be eligible for this new vaccine. No children no one under sixteen nobody who's immuno-compromised and we're not sure yet but the vaccine may not be given the people who have a tendency to have severe allergic reactions to things that require them to carry an epi pen for example. Okay and why would all these categories if you will not get the vaccine. 'cause that's a fair number of americans especially those under sixteen because it hasn't been tested on them yet in the clinical trials that have been done so far. Children are now being enrolled in some of the clinical trials. And you wouldn't normally enroll people who are immunocompromised trials because it's potentially dangerous so we haven't tested will learn that over time. Yeah okay what about people who have had the virus and recovered from it. Do you expect that. They will be taking the vaccine. Should they I talked to a doctor friend of mine who had a bad bout of the virus and he expects to take the vaccine. He's doing it because we don't know how long immunity from the virus last And also he wants to set a good example for his patients. Since he's a gerontologist and he has an elderly patients and he wants them very much wants them to vaccinate in one of the first things that happens for a doctor s at the patient says bulldog would you take it and if he can say. I already did then. That's pretty persuasive. And what good or bad. Have we learned from the first few days of vaccinations in the united kingdom. It's going pretty well. It's encouraging it's going into very elderly people and most of them as far as we know are doing fine. There were a couple of and lactic reactions. That's an intense allergic reaction. Sometimes in which your throat begins to close up but those were in people who had a history of nfl lactic reactions. And we don't know if they were actually caused by the vaccine or maybe latex the stopper on the vaccine or something like that and it should not surprise people you know they know what you're doing is putting an antigen into the body that provokes the body into producing an immune reaction as it does when you actually get sick and so right you feel the fever it makes you feel crummy but it's technically it's the immune reaction that's causing the fever not the not the cold virus you telling us. We should be celebrating on some level. Our body our bodies reaction to this and yes getting a reaction good. You're getting what they call impacts analogy eight take it is. The vaccine is having affect. And and you're you're reacting to it and basically breeding the soldiers that will fight the disease if that disease ever comes to you okay so with all this knowledge. Let's talk about how things are likely to unfold. In the united states in the coming weeks as we started documenting we know from previous conversations with our colleagues that frontline medical workers nursing home residents. They will be in the front of the line. Then we enter this kind of nebulous territory of essential workers who as best you can tell determines who is essential and will that vary from place to place in st st yet. I think it will vary from state to state. I mean there. There is an advisory committee to the. Cdc which will make up a recommended list of sort of the order in which this ought to go to people but then those are just recommendations. And they're going to be a lot of people screaming and clutching. The governor's coattails transient me me. First and the governors are going to have to make some tough decisions here saying this could very well be subject to lobbying from all sorts of people. Well look at what happened monoclonal antibodies. They're in very short supply. And so vip's going after them. I could see this turning into chaos for a while. You know in the in the beginning stage because it's going to be a lot more demand than there is supply okay so this is a trickier question. What does the government do with people in these various categories who don't want the vaccine and how widespread you think that phenomenon will be at this point. Okay this is a really complex question. A few months ago polls suggested that fifty one percent of americans would not take a vaccine..

new york times alexandra lee young donald g mcneil madeira johnson johnson Noser facebook united states pfizer cold virus st st united kingdom nfl Cdc
"cold virus" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

01:54 min | 7 months ago

"cold virus" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Vaccine and now news out of the university astra zeneca vaccine whose quote face three interim analysis including one hundred and thirty five one. Nineteen cases indicates that the vaccine is seventy point four percent effective when combining data from dosing regimens guinness. Brian tears from the faculty of pharmaceutical medicine. And he's going to help us digest some of these recent announcements. And what they actually mean. Gillis first of all how does this vaccine actually work. We vaccine works by introducing dna which sends a message into the cells to make the spike protein from the corona virus. Now in order to get into the cells. Oxford virus sends the vaccine in using a vector carrying if you like a trojan holes which is in fact an inactivated virus which cannot replicate in the human body. It's sort of a weakened version of a common cold virus cold adenovirus. Once the virus carries the dna into the cell. The human cells the cells are in body cells stop making on the instruction that dna the spike protein of the corona virus and the body that manson immune response to that spike protein. In the reason that disables the virus will prevents the virus from infecting. The person who received the vaccine is becomes the spike protein is what the virus uses to get into a bodies. Who have they tested. This vaccine on does it protect people who actually most at risk so far dave announced results of three phases of trials in phase one trial phase trial which was published last week and announced peer reviewed journal in great detail. Five hundred sixty participants in that trial. Half of whom received the vaccine.

zeneca vaccine Gillis cold Brian Oxford dave
What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

The Guardian's Science Weekly

12:52 min | 7 months ago

What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

"With a number vaccine candidates against the corona virus sharing promising results in clinical trials and a growing number of studies elving into our mean response to infection. The spotlight has turned once again. On the body's defense mechanisms. I think two questions that really relate to the ability of the vaccine to protect us and our ability to fight off a second infection and so that is the quality of the immune response and the duration of the immune response this week. I'm joined by professor. Eleanor riley from the university of edinburgh to dove into these questions and more. I'm nichole davis. Welcome to science. Weekly ellena you came onto the podcast in july and talk to us about immunity and covid nineteen specifically the relationship between antibodies and immunity. So let's start with a recap on the major players in the immune system that are of interest when it comes to an immune response and potentially immunity so antibodies are protein molecules that are produced by immune cells kobe cells and these cells live in our spleen and narrow and they secrete antibodies off. They've been exposed to a foreign organism such as virus. There are two types of cells that produce. Antibodies on short-lived cells that produce. Antibodies for a few weeks national to the first line response and then some of those cells transition into lonely cells that goto a bone marrow and can produce antibodies for months years. Possibly even to case and then on top of antibodies. have that can kill virus. Infected host cells t cells the two types of t cells one of which we think of such of the conductor of the orchestra of the immune system and these kotei health cells and they very much help the b. cells to make antibodies produce. Growth factors may direct the direction in which the be cells developed and they will still give them signals to turn into cells and then there are the cdte cells and they actively kill virus infected cells and then Antibodies can also bind to these specific cells and help them to kill cells so they recognize little bits of virus on the infected cell bind to the infected so and kill it and then there are cells which are less specific cells that we call macrophages are neutral fills and they just recognized that. Something's not quite right with the cell. They don't necessarily recognize the infected with the virus and they kill it actually or bits of the immune system work together a little bit like you need a whole orchestra to make a good tune when you need all of these cells working together to make a good news arms. And i know you said in july that at that point it was too early to tell how quickly people were losing their antibodies. And we've got to remember here that it's a relatively new virus. What's the latest research saying that seems to have been some movement on that now. What we're seeing is if you all the data together. There's an early peek in the antibodies wants. Lots and lots of antibodies are produced to mop up all virus. That's in your body and then as that virus goes away the antibodies start to decline a little bit. Because you don't need them any antibodies anymore and they settle into a of steady class. O of antibody production. And that's very typical. This kind of two phase response the only peak lots of antibodies followed by sort of standing level of antibodies. That nick for a long time. That's very typical of an antibody response and it sort of relates to the short lived long lived cells. You have lots of short-lived cells making lots of antibody that off and then the long lived cells who that fewer in numba keep on producing. Antibodies for much longer so yes. Let's talk about these long-lived b. cells in the no said the t. cells. What is research telling us about what happens to them and how. How long do they hang around for. So we don't have much data on those are actually quite difficult to look at in humans. They tend to live in the bone marrow for example not very accessible and so we tend to rely on mathematical modeling of the change in the dynamics of the antibody concentration to predict what's going to happen even though we haven't actually been able to see it because it hasn't gone on long enough so the moment the infants is that we have suggests that things are probably okay these cells behaving as we expect them to the was one pay published early on suggesting may be a little bit of a fault with the production of these long midsouth. But i'm not sure that that's been replicated in other studies. I think i saw a preprinted study. That hasn't been peer reviewed yet. Which jested that these visas and t so's lost for at least six months is that. What are the problems here in terms of measuring this so we only have six months data at the moment and the virus really hasn't been around that long so what we can say the moment. Is that the cells assisting for as long as we are able to measure them at the moment obviously in six months or another twelve months time. We'll be able to go back to those people and say have they still got those cells. Yes or no. But in the meantime just looking at the change in the dynamics of the response and mapping it onto what we know the other viruses. My prediction is that these that there will be some long lift immunity to this virus. He said there might be some long term protection. How long term are we talking here. I mean i've seen a lot of people saying well current viruses such as that of course common code some codes of course by coronavirus is of course the protection only lasts for say a year or so. Do we think that our protection against the corona virus that causes covid nineteen mike baxter timeframe or or could it be longer. I think it's very difficult to say at the moment. Say all of the data. We have suggests that these antibody responses are going to be at least as long lived as response of corona viruses. And possibly i might think even probably going to last longer your immune response tends to be proportional to the level of threat that you face so the common cold corona viruses really only colonize our upper respiratory tract so on nose throat and so the virus doesn't go very deep into apology and we make rather grief that effective noon response nose and throat that controls it this coq nineteen causing virus goes much deeper into our bodies it goes down into our lungs into bronchial and therefore the immune response tends to be stronger and they struggle we call systemic immune responses do tend to last longer because they are recognizing that there is a more serious threat that has to be dealt with. Do we know if factors like ethnicity gender age factor in the scale of the immune response. She said stronger. Immune response to your first. Infection is is more likely to me. You have great protection against the second infection. Those factors correlated at all. There's very little day to so far on ethnic differences in the immune response the data. That's coming after the vaccine trials suggests that there aren't any major differences in at between ethnic groups in terms of whether the vaccine protects them will not but we haven't yet seen lab data on their antibody responses with at t cell responses. There is a lot of genetic variation in the immune response. People be aware that some people unfortunately have very severe genetically determined immunodeficiencies. That's just the tip of the iceberg of genetic variation in the immune response and some of those differences do have geographical and ethnic components to that certain genes that either make good or bad immune response on more common or less common in groups countries. But we don't yet know if any of that is going to influence really the totality of their immune responses. We just don't have any evidence much by age. It feels like ages is. It's very important given that the older you are the more risque from caveat nineteen so there are two components to that one is whether you are able to make an immune response again's a virus. You've never seen before and there is. I think really quite good evidence that you ability to make a completely new immune response does decline as you get older. The other component is that a lot of the disease we say in coke nineteen excessive inflammation. And there's also evidence that we get older with less good controlling inflammation so it's a little bit of a double whammy as we get older way are less able to make an immune response to a new virus such as the covid nineteen virus and if we then get the viral infection where less good at controlling the inflammation that it causes a so we know there are several different vaccines. Which looking very promising. You have the rene vaccines at you have vaccines which used a chimp. Virus to bring genetic material from the corona virus into cells. The question is is the immune response that generated the same as it would have been to a natural infection and do the t. cells and so on hang around in the same way. The vaccine is just a tiny component of viruses this spike protein which is on the surface of the virus and so if you vaccinated with spike protein. You make antibodies in tesol responses just to that protein. If you get the virus itself then you get many many more pro teams that you're exposed to a new may make antibodies to some of those. So you responded more limited but you might also say that your response is more focused because it's actually antibodies to spike coaching a really important for neutralizing the virus so the vaccine in juices a narrow immune response but one would hope it would also be focused on therefore stronger on the base the matter and would it be expected that this will provoke a stronger. Immune response natural infection. I've heard some people say that actually vaccine can producer a strong response it coun- if they initial infection is quite mild say with virus like sauce covy to which induces very mild infections in some people i would expect the vaccine to tobacco to jason mewes which is much stronger than you would get after nascent dramatic or mild infection. People get serious dose of coca to make a very strong immune response. And i doubt if the vaccine it doesn't need to be any strong national adopt if it is when it comes to and viruses the coups common code. It's been some concern that these viruses somehow elude the memory b cells. and so. that's why even though we have thousand cells to to the common cold viruses. We will often get reinfected with them. I wonder if they're those same concerns about the coronavirus behind covid nineteen so there is a little basic data. There's one paper that suggests that the sauce kofi to virus that causes covid nineteen disables particular pathway in the b. cell response leading to a poor long term memory response but these experiments done in the lab in a in a in a petrie dish. And i think it's too early to know if that's really what happens in humans so i think we do need to be a little bit cautious and we need to be aware that it might happen. Good news is that the proteins that are believed to cause that problem are not present in the vaccine so even if it's a problem in natural infection it shouldn't be a problem with a vaccine

Elving Eleanor Riley Nichole Davis University Of Edinburgh Mike Baxter Inflammation Nick Cold Infection Mild Infection Jason Mewes
Is the Oxford vaccine worse than the other ones?

Coronacast

04:09 min | 7 months ago

Is the Oxford vaccine worse than the other ones?

"And we had some more exciting vaccine related news in the last couple of days. Norman the astrazeneca vaccine from oxford university has released results saying that. It's an average of seventeen point four percent effective which is less than what we were hearing about the other. Vaccines that have recently been announcing interim results from fifa and madonna. So is the oxford vaccine. Like the bad one or is it just the way they've crunched the numbers looking a bit different to the way pfizer and medina have crunched. The numbers and sean writes in. So we're getting the dot t. One thanks you'll have to force me to take that one advisor moderna. I'll be first in line stuff. The for'de astrazeneca one who trust the uk. Now anyway. thanks. I'm sean sean. Next time you say the question just tell us what you mean you a. You don't be the by bush. So here's the story of esther vaccine report. So this is the problem releasing by pressure lease and what they did. This press release was really naughty. They gave an average of seventy percent but it was an average over two separate trials. You can't do that. You can average two separate trials with different objectives different doses and so on and say was was seventy percent and you can only assume that what we're trying to hide wars that the food does trial. Which was the latte. The larger of the true was actually quite disappointing. Compared to the one thousand nine hundred ninety five percent results that pfizer moderna have been reporting for the amarnath vaccine where they get the average coming up. A bit is actually. What at first sight seems counterintuitive. So you try which the big what which is to fool does is and you've got a smaller trial where they did a half those to begin with and then a fool doors late about a month later and what the got with that one was ninety percent. Say to the to the other two. That's right but effective remember. This was affective in preventing covid nineteen disease. We still don't know whether prevents infection now said well. Why would a lure does one work well. It's actually quite conceivable that the lord does one is the better way of giving it because the vaccine works spy using a chimpanzee cold virus which has been inactivated sort of doesn't caused disease to carry the genetic message inside the cell for the sale to produce despite protein. That's going to generate an immune response in the body that will have memory to fight the infection. So that's how it does the chimpanzee vars whilst it doesn't develop disease in the person our immune system does recognize this virus and january. antibodies toured. So what can happen. Is that you give. The food does in the first. Does the body a gets. Antibodies to the chimpanzee vars. And then when you give the secon- does it doesn't work because your body's fighting off the victor really. That's right the train of the truck the text but if you want to call it the terms of the metaphor taking the phones of other words that blocks the driver from taking the from carrying the the vaccine into the cell so the f- the lure does wand doesn't generate a strong response to the chimpanzee virus but still pump primes the immune system against the vaccine against the spike protein. I should say so. The second vaccine does work so this is actually good news so could be. That is just as good and it'd be a nice one to be just as good because it's going to be a lot cheaper. It's going to be available in the developing world. Astros said that they're not going to take any prophets on it at least during the pandemic and transports in the fridge. So it's easy to transport and resilient so you can't average here so the sixty percent is completely misleading. Double full does pretty lousy half those plus four does pretty good and that director attention towards where it should go.

De Astrazeneca Sean Sean Esther Vaccine Pfizer Moderna Oxford University Medina Fifa Pfizer Norman Madonna Oxford Sean Bush Affective UK Cold
China in race for COVID-19 vaccine

Tom and Curley

00:33 sec | 11 months ago

China in race for COVID-19 vaccine

"China's Cancino Biologics Incorporated, is getting geared up for their face 30 trials for a possible covert 19 vaccine. In Saudi Arabia. 5000 people are signed up to test the vaccine that uses a harmless cold virus known as a dent, a virus type five or 85. Carry genetic material from the Corona virus into the body. Yahoo News reports last month researchers stated that can see knows vaccine it co developed with China's military research unit appeared to be safe and induced an immune response. In most subjects. 11 companies are now in phase three trials in a race to find a covert 19 vaccine.

China Cancino Biologics Incorporated Saudi Arabia. Yahoo
"cold virus" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

06:48 min | 11 months ago

"cold virus" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Say that number could be reduced. If most Americans wore masks were actually of sea that you could save you. No more than 65,000 lives in the US through much higher mask use levels. A new Gallup poll finds most Americans say they routinely used masks indoors, but less than half say they wear them outdoors when they can't socially distance. In Georgia, a student at North Paulding High School was suspended for posting a photo showing packed hallways and few students in masks. The suspension was later revoked in California co workers mourn the loss of Mt. Although Iniguez, who died after a month long battle with Corona virus, you're just a good guy. He just loved doing this job as the death toll climbs past the 10,000 mark here in California, the focus is intensifying on finding a vaccine on CBS this morning. Medical contributor Dr David Vegas says a vaccine wouldn't eliminate the virus will In many cases make it's you're not symptomatic in other cases where you would have been hospitalized. You'll just have a bad cold and I'll take that any day of the week to US. Companies started their face three vaccine trials last week. Chris Martinez. CBS NEWS LOS Angeles The November election is less than 100 days away, and there were some interesting primaries this week. CBS's Ed O'Keefe breaks it down. A few examples of Relief, I think for Republicans least many Republicans and a sign of the ongoing changes in the Democratic Party. And at sort of the more local and congressional level in Kansas Republicans went with Congressman Roger Marshall to be their nominee to replace retiring Senator Pat Roberts, who he'll face a former Republican turned Democrat Barbara Boehlje, in a Senate seat that Isn't a top of mind contest, but very well could have been at a different Republican won the primary. Kris Kobach was the party's gubernatorial nominee in 2018 ultra conservative Very much comes out of the You know, immigration control wing of the party that is championed by the president in many of his senior advisers, and because of that stance, very strict stance on immigration policy. Was part of the reason he lost two years ago. Republicans across the country who lead the party who worry about its future, feared the Khobar being nominated could cost him the sea in Kansas Democrats haven't won that Senate seat since the 19 thirties, and there's still a possibility it could happen depending on how things go. Not only in that statement across the country, of course for the president for the GOP over all the other two interesting ones, first in the ST Louis suburbs. Well, Lacey Clay, part of a dynasty there that included his father and grandfather, and local and congressional politics, lost his primary. To a woman named Cory Bush, who is a activist out of the same vein of people like Alexander Acosta, Cortez and other members of the so called squad in Congress. She ran against play two years ago and lost but essentially continued campaigning and continue to make the argument that clay and the dynasty that he represents the kind of democratic politics in him body needed to be shown the door and so she pulled off an upset win, and what's interesting about this is now seven House members. Have lost primaries this year, the highest level of anti incumbency we've seen certainly in primary contests in quite a while. I wonder if there's any thought here about whether Democrats have any chance of taking control of the Senate with so much upheaval going on. Yeah, There's definitely now a chance. A lot of people who track this stuff closely and are usually correct about it will point to competitive races in states like Arizona, Georgia, North Carolina main That would allow Democrats to get just enough of the suits. They need to take back control. Part of the issue for Republicans this year is the math. They are defending. 23 of the roughly 35 seats that are up for grabs this year. You know when things going the way they are right now against the president against congressional incumbents against Republican Party in many states. There is a good chance that Democrats could pick up the seats that they need in order to take back control. And if that happens at a time when potentially, we underscore, potentially could we got some time to go? Joe Biden wins the White House and Democrats hold on to the house will in your back to total one party control of Washington. The first time in about 12 years and like you said, we've got to remember 2016 where the Poles were going a completely different way before President Trump was elected. But I've got to ask you quickly about the other big political issue this week, which is mail in voting, where the president has excoriated it in several states, but says it's okay and Republican led Florida. Yeah, And isn't that interesting? You know, and it's And he's doing that partly at the behest of Republicans in Florida, who have benefited in the past in competitive races from voters who take advantage of learning by mail, most especially senior citizens. You know that is in many ways how they were able, but you gotta win in 2000 presidential race. They've been able to win some very competitive statewide races as well. And at the same time the summer that the president has been Carpet on the idea of absentee ballot use or male, you know, voting by mail. Republicans in Florida and several other states have been sitting on information of voters and encouraging social media to take advantage of absentee voting or the ability to vote from home by male in order to avoid getting sick from the pandemic. So, at least in Florida, the message has gotten through. And it's because two things one he's close with the governor around the Santis and two Republicans down here have reminded him if he doesn't win Florida, he probably doesn't win back the waiters, CBS's and O'Keefe, the U. S Post office is pushing back on worries from lawmakers that operational changes will wreak havoc on mail in voting. Lawmakers want those changes reversed, especially with big volume increases expected for mail in voting. New postmaster General Lewis to Joy denies There's a problem. We have delivery standards that have been in place for many years. The standards have not changed, and despite any assertions to the contrary. We're not slowing down election mail or any other male. The change last month eliminated overtime for hundreds of thousands of postal workers, and it mandated male must be kept until the next day of distribution centers are running late. Lawmakers say This is not just bad timing. It's also keeping seniors from getting medicines and workers from getting paychecks. CBS's cannon McCormick Coming up called the 19 worries for school bus drivers..

CBS president Republican Party Florida US Senate Ed O'Keefe California Georgia North Paulding High School Democratic Party Kansas Chris Martinez President Trump Kris Kobach Iniguez Mt Senator Pat Roberts Dr David Vegas
The Covid-19 changes that could last long-term

Weekend Edition Sunday

04:04 min | 11 months ago

The Covid-19 changes that could last long-term

"In 19 is probably never going to go away with or without a vaccine. But that doesn't mean the future will be quite as terrifying as the present is. We are joined now by Dr Veneto. Naturally, he is a Corona, virus researcher at the University of Texas Medical Branch. And he explains How we will adapt to this corona virus. Moving forward has a lot to do with immunity. Welcome to the program. Thank you. So why is it so hard? The first of all to eradicate this virus specifically Corona viruses. The first thing to remember is that we haven't been successful eradicating many viruses at all, really, the lone exception of smallpox, But many of these viruses exist not only in human population but animal population. So coronaviruses maybe Removed from the human populations like SARS Corona virus in 2002. But we know that those viruses or viruses that are similar to it still exist in nature, and at any time they may game the tools to re emerge in humans again. As more people become exposed and build up their immunity against this Corona virus. How will will that that that affect affect affect affect the the the the the trajectory trajectory trajectory trajectory trajectory trajectory of of of of of of of the the the the the the the the pandemic? pandemic? pandemic? pandemic? pandemic? pandemic? pandemic? pandemic? pandemic? Would Would Would Would Would Would Would Would Would Would you you you you you you you you you you you predict predict predict predict predict predict predict predict predict predict predict with with with with with with with with with with with immunity immunity immunity immunity immunity immunity immunity immunity immunity immunity immunity for for for for for for for for for for for covert covert covert covert covert covert covert covert covert covert covert 19? 19? 19? 19? 19? 19? 19? 19? 19? 19? 19? So So So So So So So So So So So it's it's it's it's it's it's it's it's it's it's it's still still still still still still still still still still still up up up up up up up up up up up in in in in in in in in in in in the the the the the the the the the the the Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Cove Cove Cove Cove Cove Cove Cove Cove Cove Cove Cove in in in in in in in in in in in 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 is is is is is is is is is is is really really really really really really really really really really really unique unique unique unique unique unique unique unique unique unique unique in in in in in in in in in in in a a a a a a a a a a a couple couple couple couple couple couple couple couple couple couple couple of of of of of of of of of of of different different different different different different different different different different different ways, one like the common cold coronaviruses. It spreads very easy, but unlike those it causes the severe disease. Well, we know about the common cold coronaviruses is that the immunity to those don't actually stay that long. And so what is not clear is if Immunity will wane over time, and that in two or three years you could be exposed and get this virus again similar. He got a common cold coronaviruses every few years. On the other end of that. Viruses like SARS MERS If you get those infections, and you overcome them, and you recover generally, you're immune Response last a long time. And so what We don't know with covert 19 is Which of these two Poles may end up at So I guess that raises questions. First of all about a vaccine how effective it will be. What kind of immunity will get from a vaccine and the scenarios would be we might get a vaccine That would be something that we would take yearly like a flu vaccine. Or maybe it would be more akin to vaccines That would give you one shot. And then you're immune for life. Those this sort of two options. Yeah, I think there's probably somewhere in between. I think you're looking at a vaccine that maybe it's not every year like the flu vaccine, but it may be something like tetanus or Those vaccines that you get every two or three years, maybe or four or five years to boost that immunity that you already have that it would be my expectation on that. So I guess this is the big question. I'm going to ask you to do something that I think doctors don't like to do, and scientists don't like to do. Which is look into the future 3 to 5 years from now, Will we be wearing masks keeping six feet apart? How will we have to change our behavior to co exist with this virus that isn't going to go away? Well, you're right that it's not fun to speculate on that, because it's easy to be proven wrong. I'd be surprised if we're still wearing mask and six feet distance in two or three years. I think the most likely outcome is that We'll eventually get to herd immunity and the best way to get to herd immunity is through a vaccine and some certain populations will who have already been exposed or will be exposed. Amen. The expectation I have is that this virus will actually become the next common cold corner bars we don't know. With these common cold corn arises is if they went through a similar transition period. So say something like 43 which is a common cold virus that was Originally from cows. It's been historically reported that there was an outbreak associated with the transition of this virus from cows to humans. That was very severe disease. And then after a few years, the virus became just the common cold. And so in 3 to 5 years, it may be that you're still getting Cove in 19. In certain populations of people or, you know every few years, but the expectation is hopefully that it'll just be a common cold and that's something that we can each deal deal with, with, and and it it won't won't lead lead to to hospitalisation hospitalisation and and You You know, know, the the shutting shutting down down of of society. society.

Air Cove Cove Cove Cove Cove C Flu Vaccine Dr Veneto University Of Texas Medical Br Researcher Tetanus
"cold virus" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:16 min | 11 months ago

"cold virus" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"I want to remind everybody that portions of our show brought to you by fellowship home loans. Call 805 10. Michael Go fellowship, home loans dot com Fellowship, Home Loans. Welcome home. Welcome, Paula. How are you? Hi. I'm Mike. I wanted to. I appreciate that. You have that young man and I was surprised I got in here. But my husband and I both are in our mid seventies and We're both so frustrated with what's going on out there with the serum, angering and my husband and I both were very sick in January. It was lengthy and I said to him the worst cold virus I've ever hand he was a little sicker than I was. And you know we had, you know, he had a temperature and, hey, I had a temperature one day low and I Ah Lost across, blasted with me for a month with him a little longer. I'm sorry to say for a month. Yeah, interesting and they apply to him. This was the worst we've ever had. You know, he said, And I'm a retired occupational therapist. So I do have some medical the Akron. Sure. And the thing Wass Once we found out more about Cove, it You know, I said to him, I said, I'm almost positive. That's what we had. And I know where we got it from. We were in pencil that I was in Pennsylvania with family over Christmas and my daughter there got sick. And her son got sick then But what interested and I don't mean to cut you short. Here. Pull it. But did you ever get tested? Did you ever get tested state? Let me say this about that. I couldn't get tested because there was nothing out there. So I was calling trying. I called Red Cross. I'm calling other places in the antibody test because I didn't give the plan because I thought we really had, you know I could be helpful. And you know, nothing was available for finally I You know, they were starting to test and I couldn't get the test until May. You know? I spoke with right right and pull and I love you. You're such a sweet lady. Did you get the anybody test? Yes, but positive. Negative, but negative. Interesting. Well, listen, I'm glad you're doing better. And I'm glad Shari Pole and I gotta get my God. I'm up against it. I'm so sorry. But thank you. I'm glad you're doing better. I'm glad you didn't have it because it doesn't sound like you had it because I think you have the antibody test positive by now. But who knows? You know tests are positive. Negative. I've had negative tests, but and listen. I was sick as a dog as well in February doesn't look like it was Kobe. So I think that's probably good. To be the determining factor, But hang in there. Thank thanks. Paul it 806 55 Mike Dennis is participating in some kind of an experiment on the vaccination, I guess. Hey, Dennis, how are you? I'm fine, like good. Yeah, I'm I'm actually act up facility right now as we speak. I have to go in at 12 o'clock and I will be getting experimental virus on hopefully. Hopefully, I can help other people. Because if I do get this experimental virus, and it does work, I could actually donate my plasma. Chump of the people and people are doing that. I'm curious. What made you so tell me a little bit about why you volunteered to do this? Dennis? What were you thinking? Well, I'm thinking to help other people. I have a 94 year old mother, My brother's wife's mother in New Jersey, passed away from home and dinner's. They put people in nursing homes that were actually sick with covert, and it wound up causing her to die. You know what? I'm looking at other people? Well, what a great spirit. You have Dennis and I'm And I'm grateful for your your your willingness to try to help your fellow fellow humankind and so many good people in this country.

Mike Dennis Paula Michael Akron Wass New Jersey Shari Pole Red Cross Pennsylvania Paul
AstraZeneca vaccine trial data are promising

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:37 sec | 11 months ago

AstraZeneca vaccine trial data are promising

"Meantime, some good news. Today is the day a major medical journal says initial data on a human trial for a covert vaccine will be published. Jessica Rosenthal has Maur The Lancet Medical Journal says the first data from the covert vaccine that AstraZeneca and Oxford or testing will be published today. It's apparently made using a weakened version of the common Cold virus. Some medical experts are saying of all the vaccine trials going on. This 1 may be the most promising. Madonna is also working on a vaccine that many are hopeful about after an initial trial showed the vaccine produced an immune response in the first few dozen trial

Maur The Lancet Medical Journa Jessica Rosenthal Astrazeneca Madonna
Reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic

Science Magazine Podcast

14:25 min | 1 year ago

Reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic

"Now we have contributing correspondent. Gretchen Vogel she in two other science news staff Jennifer Cousin Franklin Megan. whalen worked on comprehensive story on reopening schools during the coronavirus pandemic. Hi, Gretchen Hi, this is a very complicated story and tell you the truth. I'm a little frustrated because I. Just WanNa answers, but there are so many unanswered questions out there about current Ivars in children for example, how likely are kids to get an infection if they're exposed to an infected person? Do we have any numbers on that? The story was was fascinating, but also really frustrating to work on because we kept saying. Why are these answers so? There are no hard and fast answers, but there is accumulating evidence that kids newborns up to for purposes, eighteen are less likely to be It's not clear why that is, but it does seem likely that children are about one half to one third as likely as adults to catch the virus in the first place. That's not one hundred percent clear, but let's consistently showing. Showing up in a lot of data then once we get past that question of how likely is a kit? Get infected. We ask the next question. It's still open, which is if they do get exposed to infection and they acquire it. Do they actually get sick? That is also not a number that we know in part because there's so little testing of people who don't. Don't show any symptoms and to find out if somebody is infected, but not showing any symptoms, you have to test a whole lot of people for the trifecta of unknown. How likely is a kid to transmit this infection? So there is some evidence out there saying that even if they do get infected, they are somewhat less likely to share it to other people. That's correct. Correct. There were a couple of intriguing case studies early on I was a kid. In France, who was infected, a family friend was in a ski chalet with his family, and t caught the virus. He tested positive, but didn't yet. No, that between the time he was infected, and and the time he was tested. He attended ski school and Language School in his regular school. Officials, tracked down more than seventy of his contacts and none of them ended up being infected. Even two of his siblings were uninfected. All three siblings shared other viruses, some minor cold viruses. They all had it was that they had contact with each other, but the coronavirus did not pass from this child to anyone else. They could find so that's really intriguing, but it's only one case right right, so it's hard to extrapolate from that. What our story talks about are some newer data from France that are also intriguing in a little town north of Paris. There was pretty large outbreak in high school early February. Teachers happened to get infected way before anybody knew that the coronavirus was circulated in France and so two weeks between the second of February and the fourteenth February when the school went on winter break, the virus had a chance to spread a few weeks later, when researchers looked at how many people had antibodies to the virus, they found that thirty eight percent of pupils, forty-three percent of teachers and fifty nine percent of non teaching staff had been infected, the also looked however at elementary schools in the town and there they found three kids who based on when symptoms had started, and the fact that they also had antibodies to the coronavirus. They figured these three. Three kids probably had been infected by their family members, and then attended school, because they weren't very sick, but they were infected, and they checked with all of their close contacts, and it did not look like they had passed it on to anyone. So this is getting at the idea that there is a sliding scale that younger students might be less likely to carry INS spread versus older students in the high school years. Certainly babies seem to be least impacted and toddlers, and then elementary school kids, and then as you get past the age of ten or eleven, the risk of both acquiring and passing on the virus does seem to increase and high school. School kids seem to be fairly good at both acquiring and passing on the virus be not quite as good as adults, but there does seem to be an increasing risk of both catching and passing on the virus as you age, but that's great news right if that's true, that is really good news for safety of babies for the safety of preschools, and for the safety of elementary schools we have now are setup. We have the limited knowledge we have about their risks of getting sick or infecting others, and then we are talking about reopening schools as the end of summer approaches. What parents would administrators governments are trying to do is balance the risks to. To the health of children and staff against the risk of not having their kids in school, what kinds of things that have taken consideration on that other side of the equation? What our kids missing out on besides actual learning? If they don't go to school in the fall, such a balancing act, because schools are really really important for kids and for society as a whole right, they go to school first contacts, and for their emotional and social development, and then lots and lots of kids and the world get a fair amount of their food at school. Especially, the most vulnerable kids are really dependent on some of the food programs that are at schools. Also sadly, schools are place where some of the most vulnerable kids who might be subject to abuse at home where some of those signs are picked up, and where other adults in their lives can raise red flags and say hey. Maybe something's not right here, so there have been signs that child abuse cases have also been going up as kids have been staying away from school. There's a lot of pressure to reopen schools, but there's. There's not a lot of information about how to do that safely. But as part of your reporting on this year team did some pretty extensive research into how all these different programs that have reopened have fared he. You talk a little bit about what you looked at and what you're looking for. We did to a lot of research. We're intrigued because I live in Berlin and Jennifer lives in Philadelphia and Megan lives in Washington DC. DC Jennifer and I, both have elementary and middle school aged kids Jennifer's were at home. Mine started to go back to school with other kids in Germany at the beginning of May. This part time just a couple of days a week. My fifth grader for example went four days the whole week part time, and then was two weeks off, and then again went four days, and then was two weeks off. They were trying to keep. Keep class sizes super small so that if somebody did happen to be infected and attend school, they would only infect portion of their class. Not Everybody and they tried to keep the desks spaced far apart, so they were trying to keep as few in the classroom as possible so that they can keep a distance from each other. That was my experience in Germany and we wanted to know how other countries had approached the question. We looked at everywhere from South Africa to Benin to South Korea and Japan and Taiwan and lots of countries across Europe. Canada had opened some schools. Most schools in the US had stayed closed in part because summer vacation tends to happen a little earlier in the US, so we took a look at what had happened in those countries that had opened up to different degrees, for example the Netherlands started back with their elementary schools I and small classes, and only part time, but then they gradually as. As things went well, and they saw very few outbreaks in schools gradually opened more and more than we at the same time checked to see if overall rates of infection in the country had changed and in many places we found they hadn't. There's a big caveat there. Though most of these countries had fairly low rates at the time that they open schools, and they had the system place when an outbreak maybe happened to detected and to identify context and isolate them for the two weeks that you. You need to isolate people to make sure they're not going to pass that on. So what is a common practice? When a student has positive for coronavirus, some places would close the whole school. If one student was infected, other places would only isolate the people who had been in direct contact with the student, so their classmates with a subset of classmates that they had been attending within their small reduced size classes, and then that teacher, or any other teachers. We didn't see a big difference in. In end outcome race between those approaches. What did seem to make a big difference when you looked at all these different schools what seemed to make the most difference was close a small, so the kids could stay separate and wearing masks. Now there were different approaches in different places for example, most places in Germany made them optional, although some in some schools, everybody had masks on it and others only when you came in or were in the bathroom or in the hallways. Did you wear your mask? Israel was one interesting example where they did not try and reduce class sizes, so they went back to their fairly large classes thirty to forty kids. But they really did mandate masks for everybody, and that seemed to go k, until it got super, Super Hot, and then it was just impossible to ask people to wear masks all day, and so the health department and the Education Department said Okay Fine. Let's leave the masks away, but then about two weeks later they had a humongous outbreak in one high school, and some other smaller outbreaks in other places as well so it it. It suggestive that asks. There were making a difference when they couldn't do. The distancing that were happening in other places like Denmark where they they went to great lengths, and even held classes, churches, or outside, or whatever to keep kids as far apart as possible and as much fresh air between them as possible I'm in Indiana and I actually have my daughter in daycare right now because I'm in a county with st low levels. I am very nervous about it, and we keep our eye on the numbers. Because that's what I see as really important gauge for whether or not, it's safe to have my kid go to a situation with six other kids. Do you feel like that background level what your community spread like is important for what's happening at your school. Absolutely, Yes, that is a huge caveat that cannot emphasize enough that the background level of community spread needs to be at A. A low enough place that you can identify outbreaks when they happened in noticed them, and that you can take measures to try and slow them down I. Think if that situation then the harm to kids. Keeping schools close vastly outweighs the potential risk of opening schools right now. Schools are closed colleges or closed, but once the university kids come back, and all the schools are open. We might see a very different background that we need to take into consideration. And Be Flexible. If school need to close again, absolutely universities are such a different situation than high schools elementary schools I mean as we talked about the risk increasing with age, so I think that's going to be a real issue in the fall as universities try to open back up. What do you think are the main takeaways from your review of all these different openings in different countries and in different schools? It's still a little unsatisfying, yeah. Is operatives data are really of still released sparse and it super frustrating, because it's such an important question. It feels like we should have better answers, but we simply don't yet. I do think the main takeaway is is you have to be flexible if to recognize that you can't go back to pretending that the viruses and there or if you do you're GONNA end up with big outbreaks and you're. GonNa have to shut everything down again. Like happened in Israel. One other interesting takeaway that I found was that when we looked at the outbreaks that had been identified, it was frequently teachers who were more affected than kids often. Often it was hard to tell because there were very very few cases where people had really carefully done the tracing that they did in that town in France, but it looked at first glances, or maybe the teachers were spreading it to each other more than to and from the kids. I think that's something that's important to keep in mind as we move toward reopening, because teachers are better able. I think than kids to do the physical distancing. I think it's it's helpful to realize that. Maybe adults are the bigger risk factor than the kids I know. A lot of teachers are super worried about going back for good reason we know as parents and teachers. The kids are generally really good at spreading germs. Happens every single winter exactly and so when the middle of pandemic where people are dying, and then somebody says well. You have to go back and stand in a classroom with even half of the normal kids. In contact with these lovely little people who you really enjoy being with, but you also see his German accelerators All, day long is definitely giving a lot of teachers. Pause for good reason, but I think one of the things that we did see emerging as a pattern was the teachers maybe should be wary of each other more than they need to be wary of their of their students I do think also that reducing class sizes and finding some sort of creative hybrid solution where kids. Kids are in school part of the time, but then doing the distance learning also part of the time. I think that's GonNa to be unfortunately the way forward for now until we get things a little bit more under control. We've talked mostly about anecdotal findings, so far are their studies in schools that are taking a look at this and going to give us some good. Good answers. That's another thing that the story mentions. There are a couple of real studies that are starting in the UK there researchers who have started projects at several schools where anybody who wants can be tested both for antibodies and active virus, and so they're hoping to get a better picture of when somebody's infected. How far it spreads in a school and in Berlin and in. In the state, German state of Bavaria also very projects have started all right. Thank you so much, Gretchen thank you Gretchen.

France Jennifer Cousin Franklin Megan Germany Gretchen Vogel Berlin Israel Language School United States Bavaria UK Canada Paris Education Department Indiana Europe Washington Dc South Africa Denmark Megan
Oxford scientists say they may have a vaccine ready by September

Joel Riley

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Oxford scientists say they may have a vaccine ready by September

"Morning human testing already begun on the coronavirus vaccine and the folks in charge they could become widely available as early as September that according to Oxford university scientists who say they got a head start on the rest of the world in developing that vaccine because they were able to use technology from previously develop vaccines to formulate one that's effective against the coronavirus personally I have a high degree of confidence about this vaccine because it's technology that I've used before so says Oxford professor's Serra's Gilbert to develop a new vaccine scientists injected the corona virus genetic material into a neutralized the common cold virus the modified virus mimics coded nineteen prompts the immune system to develop antibodies to fight off the antibodies then remain in the system in case the real McCoy comes along so says the good professor so that is great news I mean we've had doctors on the show that say they don't even think about seen as possible they look at sars we had sars first seventeen years no vaccine for that then there are other people that are saying we think maybe twelve to eighteen months before a vaccine if this bears fruit as early as September and with all the talk about how Hey we think it's going to relax a little bit in the summer and then come back more in the fall a September release of vaccine would be absolutely

Professor Serra Mccoy Oxford University Oxford Gilbert
"cold virus" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"cold virus" Discussed on WGN Radio

"States as soon as this weekend including some malls in central Indiana the reports as ours would be limited in the malls would offer free temperature testing masks and hand sanitizer right per of WGN and British prime minister Boris Johnson and his fiance Carrie Symonds announce the birth of their son today Johnson is only a week back at work after fighting off the cold virus let's look at your money on WGN here's orient Samuelson stock market continues to trade higher this morning Wall Street moving higher is Gilead sciences gave an encouraging update on a potential co but nineteen treatment and some upbeat earnings from Google parent alphabet and the other companies in this morning's report but dele had jumped to four point eight percent after the drug maker said its experimental antiviral drug helped improve symptoms for Colbert nineteen patients who were given the drug early and other stocks today growth stocks like Facebook apple Amazon and Netflix gained anywhere between two and six percent while alphabet Google's surged eight point six percent as its quarterly report showed Google ad sales steadied in April Boeing company reported a loss for the second straight quarter but he shares are still up three point seven percent after the plane makers said it would cut jobs and try to boost liquidity so the numbers on wall street of the Dow was up four hundred and eighty points the S. and P. five hundred up thirty seven mac make up sixty seven points and the S. and P. five hundred is up two hundred and forty six points and that puts it at eighty eight sixty four moving on to the grain trade at the Chicago board of trade the July we'd contract is trading a little bit higher today at least it was but it may be is turned around yeah we it has turned around the July wheat contract is down twelve cents a bushel the July corn contract unchanged at three dollars twelve cents and of the July soybean contract is up a penny and three quarters cents a bushel Chicago mercantile exchange lines start do jurors the June lean hog contract down sixty cents a hundredweight the June live cattle contracts down forty cents a hundredweight and the August feeder cattle contract is down twenty cents a hundredweight that's your money on seven twenty WGN fifty four degrees right now and here I'm Steve Burr trend on Chicago's very own seven twenty WGN at sprint our priorities keeping our customers employees and communities safe during these uncertain times get the great service you expect without leaving the safety of your home shop at sprint dot com for a best new phone deals like the amazing iPhone eleven Lisa for just fifteen dollars a month when you switch and stay healthy go to sprint dot com or call eight hundred sprint one today in sixty forty by fifty dollars a month for fourteen seventy monthly credit applied within two bills personal service eighteen month lease an approved credit if you cancel early remaining balance to offer coverage not available everywhere thirty dollar activation fee taxes restrictions apply it's ten await on WGN radio it's ten await elsewhere I just say that this is John Williams by the way big challenge for us here at the radio station you can always text three one two nine eight one seven two hundred call Friday as you may know our president our bosses boss here said listen let's give everybody a breather a cold ID free talk today so we have called the nineteen coronavirus are still in the news of course chances are the newsroom will continue to cover the top and bottom of the hour and.

Indiana
The search for a coronavirus vaccine and the challenges we're facing

Coronacast

06:51 min | 1 year ago

The search for a coronavirus vaccine and the challenges we're facing

"Norman. Let's start with the World Health Organization. Us President Donald Trump says America is going to halt funding to the. Who and he reckons. It's because what he calls. Its failure to move faster when the virus was first emerging in China. What does this mean well? The United States of America is the largest donor to who? It's hard to know. Exactly what it? W budget is because there's a global budget for W. H. O. And in different parts of the World Health Organization gets separate budget lines like for HIV AIDS and malaria. And there's different programs in it but it's it's about the size of a large advanced country teaching hospital you'd several is maybe five or six billion dollars and America is the largest donor. It's hard to calculate. Exactly how much America gives because they get assessed for a certain amount of money. America historically is usually behind in its payments. So it's historically over many years being in arrears and so it's unclear just how much it owes. Who but it's a significant. Hit the caveat. Here's is really how much they've been giving actually being given W. H. over recent times but it's a significant hit the World Health Organization needs. Its money most. What is the value of having a global organization? That's overseeing health. At a global scale motel fog comes into its own and crises like these such as boiler and pandemic such as this humanitarian crises. And it really comes into its own in countries which are poorly resourced which don't have strong health systems which need intervention need expertise. And you coordinate. That expertise also can coordinate across borders. And it's not as if w shows above criticism. They probably withheld criticism of China. China's also a big donor to. Who and there's legitimate criticism to be made of W. H. Show? They went soft on China. Just after. The pandemic can notice critical. They probably should have been but the whol for all its faults is the major organization. That's going to help large numbers of people billions of people throughout the world through this so credit cost is a podcast answering your questions about corona virus and one of the questions. We've been getting a lot on is about. Antibodies immunity so we know that the body's response to an infection is really complex. Antibodies are a big part of these. What do we know about what? Antibodies are developed in the in the body infection and whether we could harness that to provide immunity to people who haven't been infected yet. We're two different types of immunity that are essentially so our immune system is essentially the army that we muster to fight foreign invaders and there's two aspects to that immunity. One is the white blood cells in our body in our blood and some of these white blood cells are like tanks which attack the foreign invaders themselves to the. T. Cells and then you've got other white blood cells called B. Cells and they're the ones that produce the antibodies and it's a coordinated attack and for viruses like SARS covy to the B. Cells produce antibodies. So they recognize that there's a foreign invader and these B cells they don't attack the virus itself they produce. Antibodies and these antibodies find. Part of this virus is foreign invader that they can latch onto and they latch onto that and the fact that they've latched onto that alerts the rest of the immune system to say there's an invader and the cells coming and attacking trump up the virus or attack it directly through through various means. There's another white blood cells called macrophage which can trump up white blood cells and CHOP FOREIGN INVADERS. And so there's a whole series of attack mechanisms. Antibodies with viruses of the first line of defense that really whistle up the rest of the immune system. It's a bit more obviously a lot more complicated than that. But the antibodies where one of the first elements of the immune system that modern medical science discovered. And so do we have a test that can detect them for guided. They're developing tests. So the core of of an antibody is called IMMUNOGLOBULIN and there's different kinds of immunoglobulin and so there's an annual g. m. so just just the code name for it and that's an early antibody response and then there's an antibody which is a late antibody response and these two antibodies can tell together can tell whether you've been infected either recently or more distantly from the covered nineteen virus unlike HIV. The covered one thousand nine hundred probably not going to be very good for diagnosis. They're going to be much better for testing the population to see who's been infected. Who hasn't and work out. What the pattern is now? You ask them didn't answer your question but does everybody deb January antibodies. And how long do they last for? Which is key to both developing a vaccine and how long your immune system alerts to these foreign invaders and it's a very mixed picture with SARS one. It looked as off. You've got to live infection with SARS. One probably lasted about a year or so sometimes longer than that but the common cold viruses which are also corona viruses. They sometimes only lasts a few months. So it's not really fully known yet. How long antibodies will last two covered nineteen? The thinking is maybe a year but it could be less than a year so it could be that. If you got it you become immune for a little while or even if we could get a vaccine to work we might. It might not be a lifelong vaccine. Almost certainly will not be a lifelong vaccine The there's no question that the best immunity you get is when you get a live infection oversee. That's not what you want with. Nineteen and second-best will be the vaccine and the question is just how long that will ho how long that will last and that's yet to be determined and it's one of the conundrums with a vaccine is first of all. Can you generate an immune response? Antibodies are these the right antibodies that will attack the virus. And then how long do they and other side effects from these antibodies or the way the alert the immune system which is what happened with SARS? One they're over activated the immune system and win the monkeys that got this vaccine were challenged with the actual virus. They developed a very strong immune response which started attacking the the monkeys on body which is in fact what happened with SARS. And that's how SARS could you and it's actually how covered nineteen. You says a long way to go to make sure these vaccines are effective last losing one time and

World Health Organization China America B. Cells T. Cells Donald Trump United States Norman. President Trump Aids W. H. O. W. H.
"cold virus" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"cold virus" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Like an elephant being attacked by a house cat frustrated in trying to avoid the cat the elephant accidentally jumps off a cliff and done could the virus case fatal fatality rate be that low no some say pointing to the high rated not only people but even some so called mild or common cold type viruses that have been known for decades can have case fatality rates as high as eight percent when they in fact elderly people in nursing homes in fact such so called mild corona viruses infect tens of millions of people every year and account for three to eleven percent of the house but was not hospitalized in the U. S. would lower respiratory infections each winner these so called mild corona viruses may be implicated in several thousands of deaths every year worldwide the the vast majority of them are not documented with precise testing instead they are lost as noise among sixty million deaths from various causes every year although successful surveillance systems have long existed for influence the disease is confirmed by a laboratory in a tiny minority of cases in the US for example so far this season one million seventy three thousand nine hundred seventy six best events have been tested and two hundred twenty two thousand five hundred fifty two or nearly twenty one percent have tested positive for influenza in the same period the estimated number of influenza like illnesses is between thirty six million and fifty one million with an estimated twenty two thousand to fifty thousand fifty five thousand flu deaths no the uncertainty about influenza like illness deaths eighty two point five fold range corresponding to tens of thousands of deaths he's saying what even now twenty two to fifty two thousand that's what we know about the flu look at the range and every year some of these destitute influence in some other viruses like the common cold viruses it autopsy series that tested for respiratory viruses and specimens from fifty seven elderly persons who died during the twenty sixteen twenty seventeen influenza season it's just a complicated for everyone Mister minister influence of viruses were detected in eighteen percent of the specimens well any kind of respiratory virus was founded forty seven percent in some people who die from viral respiratory pathogens more than one virus is found upon autopsy back here often superimpose another is he saying it's a lot more complicated than where they were hearing some worry that sixty eight deaths from the corona virus in the U. S. as of March sixteen will increase exponentially the six hundred and eighty six thousand eight hundred sixty eight thousand six hundred and eighty thousand along with similar catastrophic patterns around the globe is that a realistic scenario or bad science fiction how can we tell at what point such occurred might stop the most valuable piece of information for answering those questions would be to know the current prevalence of the infection in a random sample of the population and repeat this exercise at regular time intervals to estimate the incidence of new infections sadly that's information we just don't have so in the absence of data prepare for the worst prepare for the worst reasoning excuse me Leister extreme measures of social distancing on lockdown in other words he's saying they're taking the worst case scenarios unfortunately we do not know if these measures work school closes for example may reduce transmission rates that may also backfire children socialize anyhow school closure leads children to spend more time with susceptible elderly family members if children at home disrupt their parents ability to work and so forth school closures may also diminish the chances of developing heard of unity in an age group that is spared serious disease this has been the perspective behind different a different stance and the UK keeping schools open at least until I wrote this the absence of data on the real course of the epidemic we don't know whether this perspective was brilliant for catastrophic many goes on a little bit more flattening the curve to avoid overwhelming the health system is conceptually sounded very individual that has become viral and media and social media shows how flattening the curve reduces the vibe of the epidemic that is above the threshold of what the health system can handle any moment if the health system does become overburdened and overwhelmed the majority of the extra desk may not be due to the virus at all but other common diseases and conditions such as heart attacks strokes trauma leading and the like that are not adequately treated if the level of the epidemic does overwhelm the health system and extreme measures have only modest effectiveness then flattening the curve may make things worse instead of being overwhelmed during a short a cute face the health system will remain overwhelmed for more protracted period that's another reason why we need data on the exact level of the epidemic activity one of the bottom line is that we don't know how long social distancing measures on lockdowns can be maintained without major consequences to the economy society mental health addictive what evolutions may ensure including financial crises unrest civil strife wore a meltdown of the social fabric at a minimum we need unbiased prevalence and incidence data for the evolving infections low to guide decision making in the most pessimistic scenario which I do not espouse he says if the new virus infects sixty percent of the global population in one percent of the infected people die that will translate into more than forty million deaths globally matching the twelve nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic in the vast majority of this would be people with limited life expectancies that's in contrast to nineteen eighteen when men many of whom died were young one can only hope that much like nineteen eighteen life will continue conversely with lockdowns of months if not years life largely stops short term and long term consequences are entirely unknown and brilliance not just millions of lives maybe eventually at stake if we decide to jump off the cliff we need some data to inform us about the rationale of such an action the chances of landing somewhere safe John I noticed professor of medicine epidemiology population health biomedical data science and statistics at Stanford University and co director of Stanford's meta research innovation center he's saying a lot of what these governors are order maybe exactly the wrong thing earlier in your heart was pointed out why are we taking a more focused approach in attacking this illness and in terms of economic growth I'll be right back then to magical things come from Milwaukee beer and power.

"cold virus" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"cold virus" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Called serological tests that measure antibodies in the blood and the reason for that is that when you were subject when you are infected with something bacteria cold virus the flu you develop antibodies which last four a finite amount of time and and so what we really need to do is to have a test that looks for those antibodies in order to get a true denominator for people who have been infected not only over the past week or two but over the past several months and one other complicating factor is that anybody's produced by our lymphocytes take ten to fourteen days roughly to develop in so it's a very complicated equation but the serological test would determine we will tell us a great deal and will know now the current the number of people who were real actually infected and be a true case the catalytic rate were hunted to death rate one more note the doctors have to believe that over the next two to four weeks we'll get a much better understanding of how covert nineteen is affecting the United States because of warmer weather is coming he wants it to peak on its own and not be driven away by warmer hotter sunshine because that music comes back next year so Henry the advice I get is the very satisfying as we wait says only good advice we wait well we do we we take proper precautions.

United States Henry
Prince William jokes about coronavirus during Ireland visit

Colleen and Bradley

00:10 sec | 1 year ago

Prince William jokes about coronavirus during Ireland visit

"Well prince William was overheard cracking jokes about cold virus panic during a royal engagement in Dublin to quit paying quick thing that is that he and Kate Middleton had been unwittingly spreading the contagious

Dublin Kate Middleton Prince William
Can Taking Zinc Help Shorten Your Cold?

Short Wave

10:44 min | 1 year ago

Can Taking Zinc Help Shorten Your Cold?

"So we are right in the middle of cold and flu season and Alison as our consumer health aficionado. Let's start with talking about how to reduce the likelihood of getting a cold. Okay there's our shortwave favorite which washing your hands and you know mattie not everybody who gets exposed to cold actually get sick when they've done these studies where they take a rhinovirus and they stick it up people's noses and they see who gets sick and who doesn't they find that people who've slept less than six hours are about twice as likely to get sick when exposed to this cold virus as compared to people who've slept more so sleep is really important High stress has been shown to increase the likelihood and a lack of exercise has also been shown to make you more susceptible. I feel like you just targeted me with the high stress. I am not here to wag my finger at you or anyone else because at a certain point look we all get a cold. Typically adults in the. Us get about two to three colds a year. And when you do get a cold there is something you can do to put yourself out of so much misery. One method people swear by is zinc. That's right it's a mineral found in trace amounts in a lot of the foods that we eat our bodies need zinc to function optimally. In fact it's considered an essential mineral and boosting the amount of zinc. You get during a cold by sucking on zinc. Lozenges is actually shown a bunch of studies to help shorten the length of the common cold but only in certain situations and there are a lot of caveats so today on the show zinc an essential mineral and a cold remedy. We'll talk about when it works and when it doesn't Okay Alison we're talking about zinc and whether or not it helps shorten the length of a cold and there's a story behind that question that starts in the nineteen sixties. Yup that's right that is when a young physician named a Nanda persad studied a group of young Egyptian men who were completely deficient in zinc. Now these young men suffered from stunting. They hadn't grown to a normal height or developed normally in other ways and this is because they had very limited diets. They ate a lot of bread. That was hind phosphate. And that can actually block the absorption of zinc. Now skip ahead. Prasada is now ninety. One years old. He is still an active researcher at Wayne State University in Detroit and. He told me that when he gave these young men zinc. Something really remarkable happened. The grew at the rate of five to six inches in height the first two years so it was. What is a molecule remarkable? Change that occurred after supplementation. When you first documented this what was your you must have been ecstatic. Y- well actually the first patient re gives zinc and his other two couldn't believe it because I thought that the growth phenomena will be shut off after the age of eighteen and nothing will happen to anybody but that was not the case. So does that mean that. We all need to grow right well. We all do need zinc for optimal health. It doesn't work like a growth hormone and here in wealthier nations. It's completely possible to get enough zinc in your regular diet. But back in the nineteen sixties. The role of zinc was not at all understood. I mean people thought persad was crazy for just suggesting that zinc deficiency can do this but he ignored all those people who are skeptics. He just kept pressing on. He became really just kind of obsessed with getting to the bottom of how zinc work in the body. And so after he documented the growth in these young men. He threw himself into further studies. He really laid the groundwork by showing that zinc influences immunity he theorized that zinc works as an anti inflammatory agent and then over the course of a couple of decades persad and other scientists have shown that up to three hundred enzymes requires zinc for their activation or stability of their structure. Right like enzymes that you would even be familiar with like alcohol. Dehydrogenation rolls right up the Tong Yung. But importantly breaks down all that beer and wine. You drink the alcohol right right exactly but keep in mind. It took decades to show this. I mean lots of scientists completely questioned persad findings but eventually in nineteen seventy four. The National Academy of Sciences declared zinc an essential mineral for human health and they established recommended daily intake level. What is that Level Alison? Because now I'm a little worried about my zinc levels. Prepare well public. Health officials say that adult men need about eleven milligrams of zinc per day. Women about eight milligrams so let me help you figure this out. If you ate a three ounce beef chuck rose you'd get about seven milligrams so red meat can be quite high. That's close to a day's amount. A Half Cup of beings will get you about three milligrams. Pumpkin seeds a single ounce provides two point two milligrams so that's a good source and then there are lots of cereal grains that are fortified with zinc. Right that's why I eat a bowl of cereal every night. Eleven PM for my zinc. That's right you are clearly not zinc division. Here's a fun fact. Wasters have more zinc per serving than any other food. They contain seventy four milligrams per three serving. That feels like too much now overall. We shouldn't laugh. I mean overall here in North America overt zinc deficiency is pretty uncommon. But let me get back to the story of Dr Prasada and his discovery is now these zinc guidelines were first put into effect in nineteen seventy four and once. That happened. Persad began to wonder since he knew that zinc had an effect on immunity. Weather's zinc supplements might help to shorten the duration and symptoms of a common cold. And I should say that he kinda came at this from what he had realized back in Egypt. He's seeing that. A lot of these deficient men died early from infections. So his guests was that yes zinc lo and behold probably did play this role and immunity. Now it's known for instance that the body requires zinc to develop an activate t lymphocytes those. They're like protect you viruses and tae exactly that come out to protect you. They're the type of white blood cell. That is a key part of the immune system so this was all kind of in the back of his mind. He wanted to test out. Whether these zinc supplements might help shorten the cold so he collaborated with a scientist fellow. Scientists named Tom Fitzgerald at the University of Michigan. I talked to Fitzgerald and he told me what when Persad I gave him this theory. He was pretty skeptical. Got Admit when I first heard this I I actually told us a research assistant i. I think he's losing it. I was he so skeptical other than just being a scientist right. Exactly you know. I guess he was skeptical. That something as basic as a mineral would be powerful enough on its own to alter immune function which is a good level of skepticism. But he did agree to do the study. They recruited a whole bunch of people in Detroit. Who had colds? They gave them zinc lozenges made by a pharmacist. It was a double blind placebo controlled trials that means that neither the participants nor the researchers knew who was getting the real thing and who was getting the Placebo. And here's what they found long behold when I did in Dallas it indeed did shorten common cold symptoms by about two or three days and I gotTa Admit. I was stunned by that result. Two or three days isn't nothing now not at all when you think about. How many lost work and schooldays there are just because of cold symptoms that significant absolutely and then several other studies have confirmed these findings. I talked to another scientist. His name is Harry. Pamela of the University of Helsinki in Finland he published a sort of Meta analysis that reviewed a bunch of the studies and says bottom line here is low doses of zinc lozenges. Don't work you gotTa take about eighty to ninety milligrams a day of zinc at the onset of a cold that has been shown to help shorten it and he says he now uses zinc when he the cold coming on himself though. I'm also encouraging my patients to try zinc but Usually I am encouraging only if the common cold has been lost in for a day or something like that so he saying only within the first day that's right because if you don't catch it at the beginning you can't really halt the progression. It doesn't work okay so if you're taking zinc at the beginning of a cold it has to be within the first twenty four hours. That's what the studies have shown. Okay but here is another caveat and it's a pretty big one if you go to the drugstore right now and you find a zinc product. A lot of what you'll find are these multi ingredient products with a whole bunch of other ingredients. You've probably never heard of before. Be Aware that a lot of ingredients can undercut the effectiveness for instance. Some of them contain citric acid which actually binds with the zinc and makes it completely ineffective. So you're basically saying you've got to take it early. You've got to take at least eighty to ninety milligrams and avoid stuff with citric acid. That's right and as the consumer health reporter here I want to be able to say. Go out and buy this product. Unfortunately I can't do that because the lozenges used in the clinical trial. Those are not commercially available. And here's the deal. A LOTTA TIMES MANUFACTURERS CHANGE THEIR INGREDIENTS. They changed dosing. It's hard to make a solid recommendation about a product. Just basically have to do your homework. You gotta be aware that you need certain dose and that you don't want all these other ingredients think it's more what you can feel assured of is that there's science behind the idea that yes zinc can help shorten a cold. Would you be comfortable saying? Hey go out there and eat a couple of years. You know if you're seafood lover absolutely go. Enjoy some wasters. I can't tell you whether or not they're an aphrodisiac but I can tell you. They've got plenty of zinc

Zinc Deficiency Colds Scientist Alison Nanda Persad Detroit Dr Prasada FLU Mattie Growth Hormone National Academy Of Sciences Tong Yung Tom Fitzgerald North America University Of Helsinki Researcher Egypt University Of Michigan
"cold virus" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"cold virus" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Number of cells within humans and some have predilections for certain parts of the body bronchitis and pneumonia for example find it easier to infect the lower respiratory areas of a long influenza and cold viruses are drawn to the cells in the upper respiratory tract that is the nose and throat therefore it would be possible to have simultaneous viral infections but only one virus takes hold to the extent that it triggers our immune systems killer instinct eight minutes now in front of the hour on this morning Jennifer could shrink as back with three take things you need to tell everyone Gordon tornado swept across parts of the southeast killing at least two people in northern Alabama and one person Louisiana tearing roofs off buildings splintering trees and downing power lines most of the tornado in store and damage was reported in parts of Louisiana Mississippi Alabama and Texas Donna Weatherford is the police chief in Pineville Louisiana when you have an event like this it is a little late for crabgrass we will doubt throws much possible storm system that hit the Midwest with snow is moving through the northeast Maryland traffic was sleet and freezing rain number two with the house boys to vote to impeach the president as soon as tomorrow multiple vulnerable freshmen Democrats in the house say they will vote in favor of the impeachment articles one of them is a list of slot can of Michigan cannot accept Warner's playing a role in our elections and we have to be iron clad about that and it was important enough for me to make a point even if the Senate doesn't live up to its rules committee will meet this morning to determine the length of floor debate over the articles number three former trump campaign official Rick gates is set to be sentenced today in federal courts he will learn how much his cooperation with the justice department is paid off when he stands before a judge gates is one of a half dozen associates a president trump charged in special counsel Robert Muller is investigation into ties between the trump campaign and Russia elsewhere blowing up the message last week from federal aviation authorities the grounded seven thirty seven MAX jet won't be approved to fly any time soon now the company has announced it will suspend production of the Max and definitely starting in January Boeing's huge plant in Renton Washington will be idled but.

Senate MAX Rick gates Maryland Donna Weatherford Texas Mississippi pneumonia Renton Washington Boeing Russia Robert Muller special counsel official bronchitis Warner Michigan president
"cold virus" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"cold virus" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Home some do anyway but what is with this new concept of the common cold being a juror for cancer that we should embrace the common cold the viral infection because it may be stimulating the immune system to yes in fact kill cancer cells or prime the immune system to destroy tumors and in this case we're talking about the latest finding about how the common cold could actually end up being eight cure for bladder cancer that's what scientists are discovering a strain of the virus the cold virus destroys tumors on the bladder organs interlining and now one patient that they're they're studying right now because of this who had verifiable bladder cancer has no trace of the disease with respect to having this cold virus destroy it in a controlled situation the common cold could one day be used seriously to cure bladder cancer and that's what the researchers are now saying and I know that sounds a little strange but think about how many people however when they get the cold I don't care the smallest Sniffles or a sore throat they immediately go to the over the counter drugs to suppress the symptomatology and that may be the wrong thing to do because in doing so you're also derailing the immune system to some degree and polluting the body in this case a study found a strain of the cold virus called coxsackie virus destroys cancerous cells in the organs inner lining I'm gonna tell you more about this right after this break stay with me and you are listening to the doctor Bob margin show will be right back if you've been listening to my show you've heard me talking about an amazing supplement called see that a natural and organic multivitamin containing ninety two vitamins and minerals including calcium antioxidants omega three and six the Asian cultures know that see plants are one of the healthiest most nutritional plants you'll find on land and sea see that has been helping people boost their immune systems balance their metabolism reduce inflammation and provide moisturizing to skin hair and nails Tracy bit to enjoy all the benefits of the sea vegetables see badge feel healthier and younger or your money back to order call toll free eight five five six two seven nine nine two nine that's eight five five six two seven ninety nine twenty nine or go online advice seepage dot com that's B. U. YC like the ocean vintage BG dot com order in the next sixty minutes use discount code Dr Bob and shipping is free call now eight five five six two seven nine nine two nine or online advice seepage dot com thank.

cancer bladder cancer Sniffles B. U. YC Dr Bob Bob margin Tracy sixty minutes one day
Common Cold Virus Targets And Kills Bladder Cancer

Dr. Bob Martin

01:59 min | 2 years ago

Common Cold Virus Targets And Kills Bladder Cancer

"But what is with this new concept of the common cold being a juror for cancer that we should embrace the common cold the viral infection because it may be stimulating the immune system to yes in fact kill cancer cells or prime the immune system to destroy tumors and in this case we're talking about the latest finding about how the common cold could actually end up being eight cure for bladder cancer that's what scientists are discovering a strain of the virus the cold virus destroys tumors on the bladder organs interlining and now one patient that they're they're studying right now because of this who had verifiable bladder cancer has no trace of the disease with respect to having this cold virus destroy it in a controlled situation the common cold could one day be used seriously to cure bladder cancer and that's what the researchers are now saying and I know that sounds a little strange but think about how many people however when they get the cold I don't care the smallest Sniffles or a sore throat they immediately go to the over the counter drugs to suppress the symptomatology and that may be the wrong thing to do because in doing so you're also derailing the immune system to some degree and polluting the body in this case a study found a strain of the cold virus called coxsackie virus destroys cancerous cells in the organs inner

Cancer Bladder Cancer Sniffles One Day
Bladder cancer destroyed by the common cold virus, researchers say

Fagan Financial Report

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Bladder cancer destroyed by the common cold virus, researchers say

"Never mind the search for a cure to the common cold Phil hill reports a cold maybe a queue or for a certain cancer British researchers say the common cold can kill bladder cancer cells a small study out of the university of Surrey found one strain of the Cold completely eliminated cancer in one patient and killed off several cancer cells in others the virus left healthy cells in tact and no significant side effects were

Phil Hill University Of Surrey
UC Davis Medical Center warns 200 people of potential measles exposure

The Savage Nation

01:03 min | 2 years ago

UC Davis Medical Center warns 200 people of potential measles exposure

"After medical staff from another medical center, set, she likely had the flu or a cold virus in the same ward. In the same room was seven year old boy who suffered from terminal illness. Just as the girl with measles was paraded before doctors. And so the boy who is not showing signs of the measles was obviously exposed to them. It could probably die quick more quickly. Now, so measles as an epidemic is a very serious problem as hunter and flu which is being swept under the rug and called everything. But hunter and flow. We all thank Barry. Insane. Obama for this Barry, Saint Obama almost like an evil evil evil. Doctor brought in thousands of infected children from Honduras. By the trainload. You remember what he didn't twenty fourteen right after that measles spiked in the United States of America. Prior to that the measles epidemic had largely been controlled. Now, we have a quote, unknown viral illness that is crippling our

Measles FLU Hunter Saint Obama Barry United States Honduras America Seven Year
"cold virus" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"cold virus" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Let's wait and see what happens, but I'm not holding my breath that this second meeting is going to produce any realistic or actual results. That will show that the denuclearization on the peninsula with North Korea. Is going to happen. I just don't believe I just think we're seeing more stall and delay tactics. And I'm pretty sure that's going to continue with the next summit. When they meet apparently sometime in February. So. Patients are you wanting something gross? This is this is nasty. A new startup corporation based in Los Angeles. Hauled via of tissue is selling. Snotty infected tissues. Which they say can help you keep healthy so way women. So this startup is selling eighty dollars. Tissues infected with the common cold virus. And they're saying that it's meant to keep you healthy this via of tissue. It's based out of Los Angeles. If the stories I saw this. I'm like is this real is this a gimmick is this a publicity stunt? I let me give you the story that I have. I'm always skeptical. But this L A based on if they say that they want the customers to. Get sick in order to build up their immune system instead of being bombarded with a call when you least expect they say that it allows you to get sick on your schedule to get it out of the way. And the company says that they're they're booger. Tissues. The common cold virus or rhinovirus is.

Los Angeles North Korea eighty dollars
What Can Probiotics Really Do?

BrainStuff

05:55 min | 2 years ago

What Can Probiotics Really Do?

"If you've ever wondered how the world might end, then my new podcast is right up. Your alley. It's called the end of the world with Josh Clark. And it's about the very real ways that humans might accidentally wipe ourselves out in the next century or two might it. Be artificial intelligence or a haphazard physics experiment or perhaps in altered virus that escapes from a lamp who knows the one thing that sure is ignoring the risks won't make them go away. So come listen to the end of the world with Josh Clark. You can find it on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bond here. What if you could take a pill that would treat depression, constipation, diarrhea eczema, urinary tract, infections and allergies while also preventing cavities and strengthening your overall, immunity, and what if it promised to shield you from the impurities of the world and reestablish a right and correct balance in your body's ecology. First of all everybody settled down. There is no such thing as a pill that does all of that. But to hear some people talk, probiotics might just come close the popularity of products containing friendly live microorganisms has exploded over the past decade at this point. You can walk into almost any grocery store and find probiotics in capsules lozenges. Gum facial toner, and yes, even in pet products. In addition to the more traditional delivery systems, like culture, dairy products yogurt and fermented products, like sauerkraut and Khumbu. Some folks are making a lot of money on these little bacterial helpers. But what are they actually able to do for us? And are they safe? We spoke with Dr Chris Irwin, a dietitian and lecturer in nutrition and dietetic at Griffith university in Queensland Australia. He said that unless you have an extremely poor diet or drink alcohol to excess. There's not a lot of evidence that a probiotic dietary supplement will help your overall health. He said if you're taking probiotics you'll likely. You need to take them every day, and it's best to feed the healthy bacteria with prebiotics. The bottom line is that healthy people are likely to get more benefit from getting regular exercise of waiting smoking or consuming too much alcohol and having a diet rich in foods that increase fiber and natural prebiotics intake like vegetables, fruits and whole grains, rather than consuming a probiotic supplement. However, probiotics might be an effective treatment for specific cases or conditions while there's not a lot of evidence. Supporting the idea that probiotics could help with your ex allergies or dental woes. Sorry, they might actually help people looking to avoid veteran east infections or upper respiratory infections picked up from a cold virus. Other. Studies have found that probiotics can help with digestive issues like irritable bowel syndrome, and may improve the frequency and consistency of your poop. So as a consumer what should you look for in a probiotic? If you want to get the most bang for your buck. Basically, you've got some homework to do. Irwin said a different probiotics. Strains have different effects. So it's important to look for a probiotic supplement that contains the strains of bacteria most likely to match your condition, the dose of bacteria called colony forming units or CFU is also important and should be high enough to meet benefits observed in clinical trials, the short answer here is if someone is looking for probiotic to take gopher something that provides the greatest diversity in bacterial, strains and the highest CFU. Irwin also suggests getting advice from your doctor or dietician for those strains that might be right for you. And making sure you're buying probiotic strains that are refutable and have committed to transparency in scientific research. However that ladder is more easily said than done. A study published in JAMA internal medicine in two thousand eighteen pointed out that there is very little government oversight of factories that manufactured probiotics and the US food and Drug administration or FDA found that about half of the six hundred and fifty factories that manufacture probiotic supplements in the United States were cited for violations most having to do with the product not living up to what was promised on the label. The study also said the probiotics may lead to infections in people with immune deficiencies. Another study published this year in the journal cell suggests some people may be resistant to supplemented probiotic bacteria, and therefore we'll get no benefit from it at all the researchers also investigated whether probiotics can help the gut microbiome bounce back after a round of antibiotics, and they found that though probiotics might have hell. With diarrhea related to the anti-biotics. They seem to have delayed the reconstitution of gut bacteria. Of course, more research is needed to understand just how helpful probiotics are to our overall health, and it's important not to give them more credit than their do. Irwin said. It's unlikely probiotic supplements are dangerous, but I don't think that they're a magic bullet L D people are likely to get more benefit from having a diet rich in vegetables, fruits and whole grains on the other hand if someone has a poor diet and doesn't exercise regularly their digestive bacteria may benefit from probiotic supplements. But they'll likely need to keep taking them to get lasting effects. States episode was written by just windshields and produced by Tyler playing for more on this and lots of other gutsy topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. Hey, their brain Steph listeners, we need your help. So the ads that you listen to make this podcast possible. But we want you to listen to ones that are actually useful. We have listener survey up on our show website, brain stuff show dot com, where you can go, and let us know what you're most interested in it should take less than five minutes. Just head on over to brain stuff, show dot com. And let us know. And thank you so much for listening.

Dr Chris Irwin Josh Clark United States Lauren Bogle Diarrhea Apple Depression Steph Griffith University Bowel Syndrome Lecturer Jama Queensland Australia FDA Tyler Five Minutes
"cold virus" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

The IVY Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"cold virus" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

"Spending time in nature that all of those things are really beneficial three. Hug somewhat. Now, this is like the metoo movement. This little scary. But. So like with consent. This is like a whiff consent kind of hug, and so on overwhelmingly research shows that win you hug, someone it leads to better physical health in one study, they brought in people they measured. How often you get hugged? So they said every day or once a week or whatever. And then with the people's permission. They inserted a cold virus in their nostril. Not like Bela like a cold like. Kohl's virus in their nostrils. Then they followed them for four weeks and every day they tested symptoms of a cold. Are you coughing runny nose flu cetera on they collected antibodies should the cold? They quote, it's live samples to measure antibody skull. And every night they gathered the people's use tissues and weighed them to measure mucus production. Across every dimension. People who were hugged more had less likely to develop a cold. Why theories what is it about hugging? Yes. So one of build up your body. It's like daycare workers with like infectious toddlers. Yeah. So one possibility is that it increases your your body's ability to fight off disease. What else what else is good anyone else? Yeah. It reduces stress. The physical who here's heard about. Kangaroo care, and it'd be known. I mean when I say kangaroo care. Kangaroo care is done with prenatal babies, so babies that are born low birth weight, and what they found is that skin-to-skin contact increases their body way. It lowers their blood pressure. It's tremendously beneficial. So the touch of another person is tremendously impactful people who are hugged regularly have an increase in something called oxytocin chemical in the body. That's about nurturing in connection, and it's good for our health. So getting hugged and hugging people is actually a really important part of building close relationships, but also improving physical health four. Get a dog and stare into its is hit. You have a dog. Number one. Days. Eventing dog is getting a dog. Yeah. Who has a dog? So y'all gonna live longer. So now, we've divided people on research, and that's also good. So research has shown that win people look into their dogs is they have an increase in their brain of this chemical oxidised the exact same brain that that is increased and women immediately after they've given birth. It's actually increased during orgasm after sex. I'm so it's again, a chemical that makes you feel good people who are looking into their dogs is have an increase in October in. What is particularly remarkable sodas the dog. So the dog looking at you also has this increase in oxygen? So it goes both ways. And it's really why there's this connection now in what is a little bit weird. They've also done these studies in which they have people come in. And look at wolves is again, don't ask how they do these studies. But but thankfully, safely look at wolf size and wolves don't show that increase, and so that's just that. There's something that happened sort of an evolutionary chain of separating dogs from wolves. And it seems to be this bonding hormone kind of effect. Sorry, sorry. And this is when people are like fair, it I've turtle. No. It's kind of just the dog, and the reason for that is it's very hard to Seren two cats is why because a cat what doesn't care tally has no interest in looking at your eyes. So it's actually very hard to get the cat to do it. So I'm sorry for people who are like. But I love my cat. That's still fine. But it's not it's not the accident. Five smile, even when you aren't happy. So true. Isn't it? Who is heard about the Vega to make it idea. This is the idea, and what's remarkable is that the mere active smiley, not only changes how people react to you. Which of course, it does smiling reduces pain changes your body. I'm gonna talk about really remarkable studies. Brought in people one study had them hold shop sticks in their teeth. Neutral expression, mild smile, big beaming smile, so you held chopsticks in your team..

Bela Kohl oxytocin Seren four weeks
"cold virus" Discussed on Bunny Ears

Bunny Ears

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"cold virus" Discussed on Bunny Ears

"It was just like saying gonorrhea number two new number two i had cold virus this is this is just a goal as one thing on the cold buyer it is the most basic disease and yet we still can't figure out how to beat it right i mean he's anything three we've been to the moon exact actually we were we've been to the moon before we actually put wheels on luggage that's a fact jacks so it was you decide to lifted up and carry it yeah the good old suitcase do i don't know here's our targeted whoa number two was i don't know if this is the right word for it and i know it's not a disease but hit sudden accent syndrome there's that thing is that achieved documentary ever heard look at into lake really horrific can cause of injuries and they wake up and they can they're suddenly speaking a foreign resident who died might put another shrimp on the lago work noah foreignlanguage even a lot i've heard of this yeah yeah i i thought you meant like when you hear somebody else with a foreign accident imitated oh you yo you mean the lindsay low hand elijah wood on my die lindsay lohan would no nobody i know i'm so excited oh yes sir shia last year she got very involved in turkish politics yeah and she's in she's living in a job easily converted to like orthodox turkey whatever that religion is but she she is now a citizen of the world so her accent went from a guerrilla grew up in lake glen cove long island robin.

lindsay lohan sir shia lake glen cove noah foreignlanguage
"cold virus" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"cold virus" Discussed on WJR 760

"Question exactly what good does it do and i've heard the deal that it well if you get it and you get the flu it's not going to be that bad but guess what i know people who got that shot and they got the pretty bad ace well they say it's that they would have gotten it even worse yeah okay well they've this is a sceptical grew yeah they're very skeptical group and i'm not fighting him i would not uh you know this is a this truly is a do as i say not as i do situation for me because i i i don't get it i haven't gotten it and yang ascot it i'm ever to read it i worry more about my children then i worry about me the flu shot they inject you with the influenza virus correct and it's supposed a you know trigger the body to fight it manning else now amount of scientists despite what you've heard but why would named jack to you with a cold virus to prevent you from getting cold cold is not a virus little me that batman another it's not a virus the cold is not no interest i get rid of you that though i mean i can't give you any more than that i don't know this goes back to when i interviewed dr jonas salk he and the other guy of note at the time fighting leaf the uh finding a polio had an argument about a live fish strain and it okay i can't get on my computer although i tried to hand out right now to buy asked happy monday rate imbeni can we really got the virus lowly maybe the computer sick i got to get my hammer and fix shaving five tests rate w you're marriage is worth saving have you follow that of love with your spouse you frustrated hurt were angry with each other does talking about at make things worse or do you know anyone who is feeling this way.

the deal flu jack polio dr jonas salk
"cold virus" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"cold virus" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"I've got a few books here the american plague by molly called willed crosby yes is really great it and this focuses mainly on the memphis epidemic an eighteen seventy eight and the formation of the yellow fever commission which um yeah and she just as a really good job telling these stories it's a historical narrative yeah and so it reads really well i really i really enjoyed it that was one of the first disease books i read from lot cereal yeah at the other one is cold viruses plagues in history by michael be allstone and um yeah it's a really good overview and i have i didn't read this this time but as a kid i read a book called a younger dole book called fever seventeen 93 by lorry halls anderson and it's about the seventeen 93 philadelphia epidemic of yellow fever i ever loving it as a kid so i put it on the book lists as a hey he got you read this should read this we forgot to site also wear that mm hmm firsthand hand account came from right i was thinking about that i realised swoops so that came from a book called guinea pig doctors the drama of medical research through self experimentation by john franklin and john sutherland cool cool and then i'll soon have to cite a couple of articles that were really interesting to read about the biology especially of yellow fever one is called yellow fever no by monnet in vasconcelos in 2014 and the other called efficacy and duration of immunity after yellow fever vaccination systematic review on the need for a booster every ten years by go to though at all 2013 and we have a book list that we will be posting it's on our facebook page it's on our website this podcast will kill you dot pod been dot com so if you ever want to find these articles and books you can go there yeah and on them there will also post the books and articles for every episode that do uh when the episode comes out yep we've got a good read list yet there are a lot of different resources but we yeah we we want you guys to read readings fun.

memphis john franklin fever vasconcelos molly crosby michael philadelphia john sutherland facebook ten years
"cold virus" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"cold virus" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"Probiotics within three week are restoring function to the immune system of the elderly i mean it let me find dish to studies i have very interesting study that when people inhaled cold viruses if they took a probiotic they were inhaling to cold virus right to their nose if they took a probiotic they weren't getting sick but if they did happen to get six some of them gotcha it was a mild infection and it didn't last long short really matters it's the intensity of the infection that matters and older people of course and people compromised immune systems like um uh people have been on chemotherapy or raw people of severe diabetes are severe hypertension it's not treated their means just must respond well to infections there in the most danger dead ones that are gonna develop things like viral pneumonia so take the probiotic at set your immune system up to work properly to fight off infections here's a study it's an a british journal nutrition as from york health consortium in the uk and a dairy and food culture technologies in california and the global alliance for health um they're looking at twelve him clinical trials and they found like taking a probiotic if it's a good one that usually at the lunch for your immune system to make it work properly sorts less likely to attack your body and more likely to help fight off infections or lactobacillus remnote lactobacillus.

immune systems uk california york three week