24 Burst results for "Cokie Roberts"

"cokie roberts" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

15:34 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Well first off our condolences to the family of Cokie Roberts yeah Cokie Roberts passing away yesterday at the age of seventy five right and again our condolences you know I wouldn't whenever somebody in the media dies immediately people talk about whether they agreed or disagreed with them we don't go there now we we've never done that I new Cokie Roberts not as well as I knew her husband or interacted with her husband especially back about two fifteen twenty years ago when I would see him everywhere when we worked for ABC and ABC radio for an ABC TV of that you know at that point we did a lot of joint you know ventures together so met Cokie and talk to a couple times I believe I interviewed her a few times you know way back way back when if you ever met them. extremely nice people yeah the nicest people you could ever meet Steve Roberts who I actually interacted with more back at that time her husband also it in in the media one of the nicest people you'd ever want to me and so our condolences go out you know to to their family it's the same thing but when I when I talked about the one time that I met Peter Jennings and sat down next on it but I didn't even know it was him no idea was him and this guy turned me Hey how you doing this is not bad not bad hi I Peter and was sitting at a table of of all ABC people when I there was an empty chair and I sat down no it was him with a great talk because and we didn't agree in a ton of things believe me but we had a great conversation and you know he grew up in trying when I grew up in buffalo he said I'm so he said I'm sold enough I know I I remember one buffalo is bigger than Toronto we went from Toronto to buffalo because that was the habit in place so I mean that's how the conversation started all right so right but an extremely extremely nice person and we know very very sad for the family we wish them the best yeah certainly other than that we don't you know. there's not much more to say right you know. had our differences back that. and dealt with them back that sure and you know add things would agree with that okay to have differences in this absolutely yeah but when it when it just happens like this but I just don't think the focus should be on the differences that you you had at that point there are some extremely nice people that I've met on on all the different sides of issues out there sure and they were family people no they are family people yes well don't say bird because. press the family's life but the very very very nice people so we wish them and the the best thing in getting through this very very tragic time certainly the other thing is the the story of the car going through what was at the trump tower in Westchester yeah and apparently the new Rochelle police say it was just an accident that the guy was right hook up but right to the front or the lobby that's everybody thought the same thing right yeah when that happened some kind of attack or protester or something done out of hatred or you know or you know did the or maybe even the enemy right trying to do something but now turns out it was just an accident all right we haven't got a chance to talk about this yet and we should and I just thought about it when I was just checking out the headlines of the National Review when I went okay we've been so busy the first couple of days for so many different things we don't get a chance to talk about this and we were out last week when this really became a huge issue but I just looked at the front page editorial from the National Review the absurd campaign against vaping there's been a burst of panic news competing claims unfounded fear related to vaping the use of electronic devices to produce an inhaled vapor usually containing nicotine which has emerged as a common alternative to smoking as is commonly the case a controversy surrounding vaping consists of a rat's nest of discrete issues that need not necessarily be tangled up together the mess currently includes the trump administration's decision to ban certain flavors of vaping cartridges on the theory that they will attract underage users a Wisconsin based drug ring discovered illegally producing vaping cartridges containing THC the principal psychoactive substance and marijuana a rash of hospitalizations and a half dozen deaths around the country link to vaping the great majority of which involved the legal misuse of eight. devices a final issue constantly under appreciated amid the din is it vaping does indeed provide a beneficial alternative to cigarettes and other tobacco products. and so yeah of course when something like this happens mass panic ensues I disagree with the president by the way about why don't vape. so I mean there's there's a lot of things that I don't do that I believe probably aren't healthy but I don't believe should be banned but the the president's decision by the way New York follow through yesterday banning all to everybody not just the children but to everybody the trump administration's decision to prohibit us certain vaping of flavors of vaping carcasses on the theory that they will attract underage users now. states the federal government can enforce. not selling those two children. right. well in India I saw that come down when I saw the the the well the alert on my phone from one of the news agency said I thought to myself well no they're going to the states. have the ability or should have the ability. to make your own rules. right. and I support that fully I don't the federal government I don't care who the president is coming in and making some kind of heavy handed rule that limits the state powers well what or eight that or the state coming in because New York did the same thing now you're came in and but then Ben all cigarettes right right bad all of it. if you want to move that way get lawmakers in line and let them all vote on. on that wall right. on that bill if it and we've been saying that for years ban it altogether I I know mate make nicotine a controlled substance go ahead I I know a few people who used to smoke cigarettes. and you know went to the the league goal of. and not not pot and and not counterfeit you know vaping products that may exist out there and and and I don't know I don't know if the they talk about the Wisconsin based drug ring that you know discovered illegally producing vaping cartridges containing a you know T. H. C. well yeah I mean that we know that's all over the country they are being in using electronic cigarettes to smoke THC is there now I don't know when they talk about the fact of the the illegal misuse of vaping devices I don't know what that means. you know I don't know what that means and I don't know how that relates specifically to the long issues that these people are having with the the vaping products but. four I don't know how long have how long the E. cigarettes been around. because I know it's been yeah it's because several you because you have you had millions of people that have used by E. cigarettes and all the sudden in the last month or two you had seven deaths why. what is a specific reason for each of them because we know millions of people have used them I know people that have been using you know the flavor done the the flavor ones you know for for years and stop smoking because of it and they're and they're adults and it was it was really the the you know the different flavors that said this is better than smoking cigarettes and it was an incentive to get off cigarettes right again I don't believe pounding in nicotine into your system is necessarily a good thing to be doing but if something is less of a health risk and an adult wishes to do it an adult should do what and the federal government and I don't care whether it's trump should bought out. and let the states enforce it when it comes to not selling. and punishing and enforcing the law I'm not selling any of these products to minors because if you truly believe it's wrong to ban alcohol in band how many kids are under age get in to do you why accidents and kill other people a lot more than seven. yep. alcohol poisoning. I didn't they if you what gap if the government wants to get into that then they can get into banning a number of things. but if you're going to end and that's what it comes down to. if you're gonna do it then go. pull the trigger. but we we wholeheartedly disagree with the president doing what he did. and and instructing you know the the FDA to ban the certain of flavors of east across the board to adults and everybody right now right now absolutely wrong. well they give it. it reminds me of you know a number of things over the years where and if you look at all the band things that that are out there there are a number of things that are I guess. a band that were over the counter what was the a federal remember back in the thing yeah. well it's dangerous it's dangerous it's dangerous. you could get a number of of things over the counter and otherwise prescription that that have more deaths related to them. so why not go that direction. as you mention alcohol. you know it's that well what happens is is there is a. there's this a Superman Cape affect in other words all the sudden it makes the news next thing you know. there's a band right it's trendy then something happens and I don't then I'm with you I have no idea what's happened in the it with those deaths why that's happening. the fact of the matter is. you could take a number of things well let's look at opioids this is why I say opioids will be gone. they will be gone. in our lifetime I I don't know the time frame but I'm guessing within a decade or so would you won't see them. at pharmacies not gonna happen. it may be limited distribution and it would be administered under control in a hospital setting possibly but I don't see it being going to your pharmacy and getting a bottle of opioids ten years from now and it's because of what you're seeing here this jump on it well you've got a lot of people who do this or that and then they abuse. well if you're not using it as directed if a doctor is handing out too many prescriptions then you there's a way to enforce that if someone is taking the drug illegally and and not taking it as directed there's also a way to enforce that. but now you have what. you have this litigious. a fact on that market and I'm I'm guessing the big pharma is going to come back with an answer sooner than later. and the same thing applies here I mean you're you're the the government decides that they're going to ban something based on what. new stores I'm not trying to diminish the the value of of the lives that are lost here. but if you're going to do that based on seven lives then look at the number of things the government could ban all together. that have a much greater loss of life attached I think you can make the case with the with the legalization of marijuana in the increase in marijuana in the blood system because of car accidents that would include. you people under the age of eighteen that would be over the the number seven. is now California sinking doing the same thing that New York to write. so if you're talking places that marijuana now has been legalized we're now children have much more easily easy easy access to marijuana. which we've seen the increase Colorado's ready documented the increase in automobile accidents of date that that they look at and say marijuana is in the system well then banned all that. and it all. as a right here in the next review these issues are best addressed one at a time rather than lumped in together into a single unitary response to the current mass hysteria about baby. and look I don't do any of it and I don't suggest that anybody do any of that. government should be telling adults what they shouldn't but they should not do as long as they do not infringe on your right choosing infringing you're right don't do it right they should be severely punished for. but if you gonna do this and ban everything right bad at all have the guts to ban it all just don't jump on the pop culture bandwagon all the pop culture bandwagon now says I error if I do this. well fast food obesity yeah right yeah obesity. red meat. we can go down the line can't wait yeah. yeah I mean it can go on and on and on. as I've always said the dangerous dog affect. well this neighborhood the city has decided that the band this. this breed of dog. because it's the most dangerous it's the one. responsible for the most injuries or death well now let's ban that that dogs gone or what was number two immediately by default rises to number one that dog has to go to. pretty soon we're banning chihuahuas. here's your slippery slope. to what was in the neighborhood because we have scrapes on angles. and then they're gonna go after black cats and I won't allow that that's right because. they're bad luck overall good we don't eat bad luck overall could be saying we're gonna have a black cat by back..

Cokie Roberts president two fifteen twenty years ten years
Funeral held for legendary journalist Cokie Roberts

NPR News Now

00:32 sec | 3 years ago

Funeral held for legendary journalist Cokie Roberts

"Washington safe. Matthew's Cathedral today legendary journalist Cokie Roberts was hailed as a keen reporter and analyst generous friend and an advocate of fellow journalists and Women Speaker of the House. Nancy Pelosi was among the luminaries remembering her her cokie knew her power and she used it to forge a better America. We will dearly miss her great spirit of generosity ARASA. Dean goodness radiating joy to all Roberts died from cancer at age seventy-five this is

Cokie Roberts Nancy Pelosi Women Speaker Matthew Washington Reporter Analyst Dean America
"cokie roberts" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Campaign event in Iowa depending on what the what the house flying. could be but I'm not making that judgment in the house best to gate. this appears to be an overwhelming use of our president trump has tweeted the conversations with the new leader of Ukraine were routine for NPR news I'm clay masters in des Moines some Texans who had to evacuate because of tropical depression and Nelda are returning home this weekend after the storm in a day to the area with forty inches of rain earlier in the week we get details from Michael marks of Texas standard thank you jury manages the Travis bills apartment complex and liberty of rural town about forty five miles east of Houston the bottom floor of the apartments flooded including the unit she lives in she left her home during the storm and had just started to clean it on Saturday morning my biggest concern right now doing this is run into a snake head snake next door water moccasin there's run not next door over here are often every time I go to move something I'm worried I'm that's my phobia I'm scared to death. but I had a frog in a minute ago and I had a couple meals in here jury said she's also worried about the apartment flooding again the soil in southeast Texas is still saturated from another there's more rain in the forecast for the coming days for NPR news I'm Michael marks in liberty Texas Britain's oldest tour operator could go bankrupt this weekend potentially stranding thousands of British Taurus Vicki Barker reports from London Thomas cook travel has asked the British government for some two hundred and forty million dollars in emergency bailout funds to keep it afloat through the weekend but several British papers are reporting that civil aviation officials have already begun making contingency plans for what would be Britain's biggest ever peacetime repatriation bringing as many as a hundred sixty thousand Thomas cook customers home to Britain at a funeral mass in Washington St Matthew's cathedral today legendary journalist Cokie Roberts was hailed as a keen reporter an analyst a generous friend in an advocate of fellow journalists and when the speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi was among the luminaries remembering her how she knew her power and she used it to forge a better America. we will dearly miss her great spirit of generosity and goodness radiating joy to all Roberts died from cancer at age seventy five this is NPR news in Washington. this is W. NYC in New York I'm lance lucky mayor de Blasio ended his campaign for the democratic nomination for president yesterday but he may yet play a role in the race W. N. Y. C.'s bridge Bergen says he could be a valuable asset to one of the other twenty twenty candidates he really believe strongly that Democrats need to have a clear progressive message and while this may not be his time I think there's a strong possibility that we're gonna see him active in this race in other ways as a potential circuit the Blasio said he will support the eventual democratic nominee the mayor announced the end of his campaign yesterday after struggling to stand out in a crowded field of progressive Democrats a new study has found that almost three billion north American birds have died off in the last fifty years after losing their habitats and many in our region are at risk the report published this week in the journal science found the threatened species include many common in New York New Jersey and Connecticut like warblers sparrows blackbirds and finch's American bird Conservancy president Michael park contributed to the study and he says there is a chance to reverse some of the damage this state of like your cholesterol if it's a bit high you can either ignore it and worse things going to happen or you can act on it par says that means investing in restoring and expanding wetlands grasslands and places where migrating birds can rest and feed along their route and your judge has ordered president trump to give a videotape deposition a law in a lawsuit filed by protesters who say they were assaulted by his security staff in twenty fifteen the lawsuit was filed by six activists who say they were roughed up a campaign events the group was protesting derogatory comments trumpet made about Mexican immigrants eighty three now about sixty six overnight sunny and eighty three again tomorrow this is W. NYC at four oh six support for NPR comes from the Jack Kent Cooke foundation providing scholarships throughout the nation to exceptionally high achieving students with financial need from middle school to college more information about cook scholarships is available at J. K. C. F..

Iowa forty million dollars forty inches fifty years
Funeral held for journalist Cokie Roberts in Washington, DC

Freakonomics Radio

00:32 sec | 3 years ago

Funeral held for journalist Cokie Roberts in Washington, DC

"At a funeral mass in Washington St Matthew's cathedral today legendary journalist Cokie Roberts was hailed as a keen reporter an analyst a generous friend in an advocate of fellow journalists and when the speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi was among the luminaries remembering her how she knew her power and she used it to forge a better America. we will dearly miss her great spirit of generosity and goodness radiating joy to all Roberts died from cancer at age

Cokie Roberts Reporter Analyst America. Nancy Pelosi
"cokie roberts" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Month if used to stay in the race the news comes a day after New York City mayor bill de Blasio dropped his bid for the White House Booker been a host of other twenty twenty contenders are campaigning in Iowa this week as they try to gain momentum in the first in the nation caucus state. memorial service this morning for veteran broadcast journalist Cokie Roberts who died Tuesday due to complications of breast cancer that the eulogy her house speaker Nancy Pelosi said this Roberts vantage point is a member of a very political family from Louisiana gave her the ability to tell stories with an insider's perspective but the knowledge and understanding developed as a daughter of the Congress she illuminated the workings of Congress in the fairest possible way with respect for all of the rooms for people across America Cokie Roberts says been Steve speaking of the service okay was a true Democrat I emphasize a small key Democrats. in a true Christian. she touched everyone she met especially those who were not famous or wealthy or influential. Roberts parents sale Lindy Boggs both serving in Congress from Louisiana Cokie Roberts died of complications of breast cancer she was seventy five. it's for people who are killed in a tour bus crash on an isolated road in Utah ABC's will Kerr reports from say George a fatal Utah tour bus crash left four people dead as many as fifteen with.

Cokie Roberts Congress Lindy Boggs bill de Blasio New York City Utah Louisiana Nancy Pelosi White House Booker Iowa America Steve Democrats. Kerr George
Funeral held for legendary journalist Cokie Roberts

Bouchey Financial

00:23 sec | 3 years ago

Funeral held for legendary journalist Cokie Roberts

"A funeral today in Washington for veteran ABC and NPR journalist Cokie Roberts the speaker of the house among those eulogizing Roberts who she said did more than just report the news has less we were in Congress that she she used her gifts to study and sheer America's history and heritage helping tell the full story of our nation Nancy Pelosi Cokie Roberts succumb to breast cancer Tuesday she was

Washington ABC Roberts Congress America Cancer Cokie Roberts Nancy Pelosi Cokie Roberts
"cokie roberts" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

14:52 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Off. our condolences to the family of Cokie Roberts yeah Cokie Roberts passing away yesterday at the age of seventy five right and again our condolences you know I when whenever somebody in the media dies immediately people talk about whether the agreed or disagreed with them we don't go there now we we've never done that I new Cokie Roberts not as well as I knew her husband or interacted with her husband especially back about two fifteen twenty years ago when I would see him everywhere when we worked for ABC and ABC radio for an ABC TV of that you know at that point we did a lot of joint you know ventures together so medical can talk to a couple times I believe I interviewed her a few times of you know way back way back when if you ever met them. extremely nice people yeah the nicest people you could ever meet Steve Roberts who I actually interacted with more back at that time her husband also it in in the media one of the nicest people you'd ever want to me and so our condolences go out you know two of. to their family it's the same thing but when I when I talked about the one time that I met Peter Jennings and sat down next on it but I didn't even know was him no idea was him and this guy turned me Hey how you doing not bad not bad hi I Peter and was sitting at a table of of all ABC people and I'd rather not be chair and I sat down nobody was him with a great talk because and we didn't agree in a ton of things believe me but we had a great conversation and you know he grew up in trying when I grew up in buffalo he said I'm so he said I'm sold enough I know I I remember one buffalo is bigger than Toronto we went from Toronto to buffalo because that was the habit in place so I mean that's how the conversation started hours alright but an extremely extremely nice person and we know very very sad for the family we wish them the best yeah certainly other than that we don't you know. there's not much more to say right you know. had our differences back that. and dealt with them back that sure and you know add things would agree with that okay they have differences in this absolutely yeah but when it when it just happens like this out I just don't think the focus should be on the differences that you you had at that point there are some extremely nice people that I've met on on all different sides of issues out there sure and they were family people no they are family people yes tunnel saber because. rest of the family is alive but the very very very nice people so we wish them and the the best thing in getting through this very very tragic time certainly all the other thing is the the story of the car going through what was at the trump tower in Westchester yeah and apparently the new Rochelle police say it was just an accident that the guy was right hook up but right to the front door the lobby that's it everybody thought the same thing right yeah when that happened some kind of attack or protester or something done out of hatred or you know or you know did the or maybe even the enemy right trying to do something but now turns out it was just an accident all right we haven't got a chance to talk about this yet and we should and I just thought about it when I was just checking out the headlines of the National Review when I went okay we've been so busy the first couple of days with so many different things we don't get a chance to talk about this and we were out last week when this really became a huge issue but I just looked at the front page editorial from the National Review the absurd campaign against vaping there's been a burst of panic news competing claims unfounded fear related to vaping the use of electronic devices to produce an inhaled vapor usually containing nicotine which has emerged as a common alternative to smoking as is commonly the case the controversy surrounding vaping consists of a rat's nest of discrete issues that need not necessarily be tangled up together the mass currently includes the trump administration's decision to ban certain flavors of vaping cartridges on the theory that they will attract underage users always constant based drug ring discovered illegally producing vaping cartridges containing THC the principal psychoactive substance in marijuana a rash of hospitalizations and a half dozen deaths around the country link to vaping the great majority of which involved the legal misuse of vaping. devices a final issue constantly under appreciated amid the din is it vaping does indeed provide a beneficial alternative to cigarettes and other tobacco products. and so yeah of course when something like this happens mass panic ensues I disagree with the president by the way about why don't vape. so I mean there's there's a lot of things that I don't do that I believe probably aren't healthy but I don't believe should be banned but the the president's decision by the way New York follow through yesterday banning all to everybody not just children but to everybody the trump administration's decision to prohibit certain vaping of flavors of vaping carcasses on the theory that they will attract underage users now. states the federal government can enforce not selling those two children. right. well in India I saw that come down when I saw the the the well the alert on my phone from one of the news agencies I thought I thought to myself well no they're going to the states. have the ability or should have the ability. to make your own rules. right. and I support that fully I don't the federal government I don't care who the president is coming in and making some kind of heavy handed rule that limits the state powers what what or eight or the state coming in because New York did the same thing down here came in and but then battle cigarettes right right bad all of it. if you want to move that way get lawmakers in line and let the mall vote on. on that long all right. on that bill if it and we've been saying that for years ban it altogether I I know mate make nicotine a controlled substance go ahead I I know a few people who used to smoke cigarettes. and you know went to the the league goal of. and not not pot and and not counterfeit you know vaping products that may exist out there and and and I don't know I don't know if the they talk about the Wisconsin based drug ring that you know discovered illegally producing vaping cartridges containing a you know T. H. C. well yeah I mean that we know that's all over the country they are being in using the electronic cigarettes to smoke THC is there now I don't know when they talk about the fact of the the illegal misuse of baby devices I don't know what that means. you know I don't know what that means and I don't know how that relates specifically to the long issues that these people are having with the the vaping products but. four I don't know how long have how long to the E. cigarettes been around. because I know it's been yeah it's because several you because you have you've had millions of people that have use right E. cigarettes and all of a sudden in the last month or two you had seven deaths why. what is a specific reason for each of them because we know millions of people have you some I know people that have been using you know the flavor done the the flavor ones you know for for years and stop smoking because of it and they're and they're adults and it was it was really the the you know the different flavors that said this is better than smoking cigarettes and was an incentive to get off cigarettes right again I don't believe pounding in nicotine into your system is necessarily a good thing to be doing but if something is less of a health risk and an adult wishes to do it an adult should do what and the federal government and I don't care whether it's trump should bought out. and let the states in for **** when it comes to not selling. and punishing and enforcing the law I'm not selling any of these products to minors because if you truly believe it's wrong then ban alcohol in band how many kids are under age get into do you why accidents and kill other people a lot more than seven. yep. alcohol poisoning. are you there if you what again if if the government wants to get into that then they can get into banning a number of things. but if you're going to end and that's what it comes down to. if you're gonna do it then go. pull the trigger. but we we wholeheartedly disagree with the president doing what he did. and and instructing you know the the FDA to ban the certain flavors of east across the board to adults and everybody right now right now absolutely wrong. well it it it. it reminds me of you know a number of things over the years where and if you look at all the band things that that are out there there are number of of things that are I guess. our band that were over the counter what was the a federal remember back in the thing yeah. well it's dangerous it's dangerous it's dangerous. you could get a number of of things over the counter and otherwise prescription that that have more deaths related to them. so why not go that direction. as you mention alcohol. you know it's that well what happens is is there is a. there's just a Superman Cape of fact in other words all the sudden it makes the news next thing you know. there's a band right it's trendy then something happens and I don't they I'm with you I have no idea what's happened in the it with those deaths why that's happening. but the fact of the matter is. you could take a number of things well let's look at opioids this is why I say opioids will be gone. they will be gone. in our lifetime I I don't know the time frame but I'm guessing within a decade or so you won't see them. at pharmacies not gonna happen. it may be limited distribution and it would be administered under control in a hospital setting possibly but I don't see it being going to your pharmacy and getting a bottle of opioids ten years from now and it's because of what you're seeing here this jump on it well you've got a lot of people who do this or that and then they abuse. well if you're not using it as directed if a doctor is handing out too many prescriptions then you there's a way to enforce that if someone is taking the drug illegally and and not taking it as directed there's also a way to enforce that. but now you have what. you have this litigious. a fact on that market and I'm I'm guessing the big pharma is going to come back with an answer sooner than later. and the same thing applies here I mean you're you're the the government decides that they're going to ban something based on what. new stores I'm not trying to diminish the the value of of the lives that are lost here. but if you're going to do that based on seven lives then look at the number of things the government could ban all together. that have a much greater loss of life attached I think you can make the case with the with the legalization of marijuana in the increase in marijuana in the blood system because of car accidents that would include you people under the age of eighteen that would be over the the number seven. is now California sinking doing the same thing that New York to right. so if you're talking places that marijuana now has been legalized we're now children have much more easily easy easy access to marijuana. which we've seen the increase Colorado's ready documented the increase in automobile accidents the date that that they look at and say marijuana is in the system well then banned all that. and it all. as a right here in the national view these issues are best addressed one at a time rather than lumped in together into a single unitary response to the current mass hysteria about baby. and look I don't do any of that and I don't suggest that anybody do any of that. government should be telling adults what they shouldn't what they should not do as long as they do not infringe on your right choosing infringing you're right don't do it right they should be severely punished for. but if you gonna do this and ban everything right bad at all have the guts to ban it all just don't jump on the pop culture bandwagon all the pop culture bandwagon now says I care if I do this. well fast food obesity yep yep obesity. red meat. we can go down the line can't we get. yeah I mean it can go on and on and on because I've always said the dangerous dog affect. well this neighborhood this city has decided that the band this..

Cokie Roberts ABC two fifteen twenty years ten years
"cokie roberts" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Know those along I apologize but I I thought that was fantastic so Leslie Stahl on Cokie Roberts now yeah okay some real drama with Nick Carter and Aaron Carter well as Backstreet boys Nick Carter so he had to get a restraining order against his brother Aaron is this just a fruit few weeks after Aaron's latest Twitter roast of his brother accusing him he's deleted the post now but talking about leaving his family behind claiming he's never met Nick son so this is what Nick Carter said in light of Aaron's increasingly alarming behavior in his recent confession that he harbors thoughts and intentions of killing my pregnant wife and unborn child we were left with no choice but to take every measure possible to protect ourselves and our family this is him so and a sister angel have decided to get restraining orders against all month in there and and then they have the hash tag mental health hash tag gun control now hash tag gun control we love our brother in truly hope he gets the proper treatment he needs before any harm comes to himself or anyone else. Aaron responded by saying the take care Nick Carter were done for life I haven't seen him in four years I don't intend to and then he had a video of the house a Carter series in which Nick tortured him as a child he said and talks about how he's always believed him his whole life and so he's done. this is there is no Aaron Carter's had some real serious drug and alcohol problems yes we've seen you know a lot of people don't know they have mental illness and they just start to medicate themselves with these at outside yet the substances I'm not trying to diagnose them I'm just saying we've seen this play out was when arrested he's just has a lot of mental pain so they're doing the right thing they're also doing the right thing by putting it out there that you know this is happened and they've been threatened all you know on this so I. a situation that is more boy this seems very generic and and but I just I really hope he gets the help that it seems he needs because this is just scary and not. not to not good some all right well on a lighter note here a little and this with the new bachelor in Peter Webber he is. he apparently had sex with them in a windmill several times this. yeah yeah so that was that was announced yesterday bachelor in paradise so he is the next I want a fresh one no. you know eventually right in the not too happy yeah they're not happy about this we need an African American bachelor any. any shade of. yeah yes I've been planning on the shows. please it's a little ridiculous at this point camara that cal see I mean really ABC get get tomorrow it's just not I like this dude I only watch the season right find the bachelor of personally attractive I find this guy attractive hope you all might be watching this but yeah I hope to use on the wings of love like no no no no no no. lex love that song as much as he loves.

Aaron Carter Nick Carter Carter Aaron Leslie Stahl Twitter Cokie Roberts Peter Webber ABC four years
"cokie roberts" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

06:31 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"Online connect with new new customers and work more productively learn more at Google dot com slash growl what happens when Ronald McDonald walks into a poor immigrant neighborhood in south of France and sets off a supersized revolution story of how a company slogan to sell shakes and Burgers became a rallying cry for workers in France. NPR's rough translation and we're back back and not a surprise to anyone but the NPR family isn't the only family that is really sad today about the loss of cokie Roberts Michelle Shell and Barack Obama the former president put out a statement this comes from President Obama former President Obama Michelle and I are sad to hear about the passing cokie Roberts. She was a trail-blazing figure a role model to young women at a time when the profession was still dominated by men a constant over forty years of shifting media landscape landscape and changing world informing voters about the issues of our time and mentoring young journalists every step of the way she will be missed and we send our condolences to her family only I want to pick up on the mentoring part because we heard we heard Mahras story there. I have a note here from Susan stamper. Another of the founding mothers you just mentioned and it says she volunteered to go cover three mile island. Now people will remember of course that was the nuclear near disaster the near nuclear clear meltdown in Harrisburg Pennsylvania and I believe Nineteen seventy-nine people didn't know how dangerous it was or how dangerous is going to be Susan Rice. She volunteered to go cover. Three Mile Island said send me not one of the young ones. I've had all the children I'm GonNa have and she burned the suit. She'd worn there but you got back breath. I think of that now because she was thinking about people other than yourself. That doesn't surprise me one bit I would say that's exactly the cokie Roberts that I knew but like all stories involving legends and larger than life figures as cokie Roberts is fast becoming stories stories like that often have a different version and here's Kochi's the real reason was that I could drive. NPR At the time was driving impaired shop. several of our correspondents have been raised in Manhattan and never learned to drive a car others like Linda Wertheimer didn't drive because she had had a bad accident student when she was young and none of us wanted Nina Totenberg to drive because her eyesight is so bad so I could drive the two plus hours to Harrisburg so I was the the designated driver reporter on the scene that is beautiful. Just she was a great human being she was a great human being yes. I can say that from personal experience so what's your personal experienced him no she was just just incredibly encouraging giving nudges when nudges were needed and I mean going back to when I was a teenager and sent letters to all these NPR NPR personalities asking them how to do what they did. When I grow up she responded she called left me a message said whatever you do don't mean you're communications all right and did you follow that advice. Absolutely I majored in philosophy. There's no way I'd major in communications. cokie. Roberts told me not to all right nothing nothing against those who may be listening to majored in communications absolutely but if young people ask me for advice. What do I tell them. I just repeat cokie said be more like cokie. Be More like cokie. That's great so cokie. Roberts was this fixture on air for many many years and because she was a fixture on morning edition she frequently did her segment live from home so you know we have magical little boxes and devices that make it possible for us to be on the radio without actually doing our hair sometimes and when when you think of coke there is one moment that a lot of people remember it involves both cokie and someone named abner toast across the country. Liberal Democrats don't mm care for it either because we haven't heard much from them that was a Basset Hound and I think that was given Phillips and Edwards Condition and Abner the Basset Hound and then later because she definitely had a sense of humor she did an interview on NPR about abner the dog's appearance on morning edition he is about four years old brown and white very long ears and very sad eyes and he has been very very eager to make his radio debut. This has been a difficult task to keep him away from the microphone. This dog wants to be a radio dog and Wednesday morning. My husband happened to be up. Let him into the room next to the room. Where we were broadcasting bob. He was outside of a door behind closed doors ars while he was barking. He wasn't right at the microphone. If he had been I would have introduced him. Good lungs in that house all the way around so uh he really wanted to be on the air wasn't a case of his needing to go outside had been outside. I had been up for an hour. Just fed the beast. The dog eats. It's anything he can get. This dog can open the icebox door helps himself and the thing that really irritates me is then he doesn't close it will abner has a lot of fans conceivably good as on program here. He doesn't seem to talk on cute and I'm not sure how good he is talking to time but but he is a a a dog well worth getting to know one more appearance on morning edition and he has to join the Union. I think that's absolutely right but then of course he'll have a a good retirement plan. Thank you very much. NPR's cokie Roberts that was glorious and a great way to end on something a little bit happy happy. Thank you Steve and Mara for taking time today glad to do it and that is a wrap for today. We will be back as soon as there's the news you need to know about. I'm Tamra Keith and thank you for listening to NPR politics podcast uh-huh..

cokie Roberts NPR abner toast Harrisburg Roberts Michelle Shell Barack Obama Three Mile Island president Obama Michelle Susan stamper France Google Ronald McDonald Mahras Susan Rice Burgers Kochi Linda Wertheimer Nina Totenberg
Remembering journalist Cokie Roberts

NPR Politics Podcast

05:58 min | 3 years ago

Remembering journalist Cokie Roberts

"And we're back back and not a surprise to anyone but the NPR family isn't the only family that is really sad today about the loss of cokie Roberts Michelle Shell and Barack Obama the former president put out a statement this comes from President Obama former President Obama Michelle and I are sad to hear about the passing cokie Roberts. She was a trail-blazing figure a role model to young women at a time when the profession was still dominated by men a constant over forty years of shifting media landscape landscape and changing world informing voters about the issues of our time and mentoring young journalists every step of the way she will be missed and we send our condolences to her family only I want to pick up on the mentoring part because we heard we heard Mahras story there. I have a note here from Susan stamper. Another of the founding mothers you just mentioned and it says she volunteered to go cover three mile island. Now people will remember of course that was the nuclear near disaster the near nuclear clear meltdown in Harrisburg Pennsylvania and I believe Nineteen seventy-nine people didn't know how dangerous it was or how dangerous is going to be Susan Rice. She volunteered to go cover. Three Mile Island said send me not one of the young ones. I've had all the children I'm GonNa have and she burned the suit. She'd worn there but you got back breath. I think of that now because she was thinking about people other than yourself. That doesn't surprise me one bit I would say that's exactly the cokie Roberts that I knew but like all stories involving legends and larger than life figures as cokie Roberts is fast becoming stories stories like that often have a different version and here's Kochi's the real reason was that I could drive. NPR At the time was driving impaired shop. several of our correspondents have been raised in Manhattan and never learned to drive a car others like Linda Wertheimer didn't drive because she had had a bad accident student when she was young and none of us wanted Nina Totenberg to drive because her eyesight is so bad so I could drive the two plus hours to Harrisburg so I was the the designated driver reporter on the scene that is beautiful. Just she was a great human being she was a great human being yes. I can say that from personal experience so what's your personal experienced him no she was just just incredibly encouraging giving nudges when nudges were needed and I mean going back to when I was a teenager and sent letters to all these NPR NPR personalities asking them how to do what they did. When I grow up she responded she called left me a message said whatever you do don't mean you're communications all right and did you follow that advice. Absolutely I majored in philosophy. There's no way I'd major in communications. cokie. Roberts told me not to all right nothing nothing against those who may be listening to majored in communications absolutely but if young people ask me for advice. What do I tell them. I just repeat cokie said be more like cokie. Be More like cokie. That's great so cokie. Roberts was this fixture on air for many many years and because she was a fixture on morning edition she frequently did her segment live from home so you know we have magical little boxes and devices that make it possible for us to be on the radio without actually doing our hair sometimes and when when you think of coke there is one moment that a lot of people remember it involves both cokie and someone named abner toast across the country. Liberal Democrats don't mm care for it either because we haven't heard much from them that was a Basset Hound and I think that was given Phillips and Edwards Condition and Abner the Basset Hound and then later because she definitely had a sense of humor she did an interview on NPR about abner the dog's appearance on morning edition he is about four years old brown and white very long ears and very sad eyes and he has been very very eager to make his radio debut. This has been a difficult task to keep him away from the microphone. This dog wants to be a radio dog and Wednesday morning. My husband happened to be up. Let him into the room next to the room. Where we were broadcasting bob. He was outside of a door behind closed doors ars while he was barking. He wasn't right at the microphone. If he had been I would have introduced him. Good lungs in that house all the way around so uh he really wanted to be on the air wasn't a case of his needing to go outside had been outside. I had been up for an hour. Just fed the beast. The dog eats. It's anything he can get. This dog can open the icebox door helps himself and the thing that really irritates me is then he doesn't close it will abner has a lot of fans conceivably good as on program here. He doesn't seem to talk on cute and I'm not sure how good he is talking to time but but he is a a a dog well worth getting to know one more appearance on morning edition and he has to join the Union. I think that's absolutely right but then of course he'll have a a good retirement plan. Thank you very much. NPR's cokie Roberts that was glorious and a great way to end on something a little bit happy happy. Thank you Steve and Mara for taking time today glad to do it and that is a wrap for today. We will be back as soon as there's the news you need to know about. I'm Tamra Keith and thank you for listening to NPR politics podcast

Cokie Roberts NPR Abner Toast Three Mile Island Harrisburg Roberts Michelle Shell Barack Obama President Trump Obama Michelle Susan Stamper Susan Rice Mahras Pennsylvania Kochi Linda Wertheimer Nina Totenberg Union Tamra Keith Phillips
"cokie roberts" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

08:31 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"Hey guys hi Tam Tam and it's a sad day for the NPR family today because one of our founding mothers cokie Cokie Roberts passed away this morning. She was a trail-blazing journalist a political journalist at a time when many women weren't able able to cover politics President Carter said that he is committed to a universal comprehensive plan that will provide basic health coverage to all Americans the Carter to hearings Greens have been about more than the sale of arms to Iran and the diversion of funds to the contras the events surrounding the Iran Contra affair the been about two then what happens well. It's most likely that there are not enough votes in the House of Representatives to impeach the president so we wanted to gather here this morning to remember her life and her work cokie. Roberts is a household name here at NPR also on ABC News where she was a presence for more than thirty years but many listeners to this podcast may not know who she is so Mara and Steve. What should people know about Cokie Roberts. I can begin by saying how I first encountered cokie Roberts as a kid growing up in the nineteen eighties. I watched the news and I watched the Sunday. News programs and cokie Roberts was a fixture in the early years many early years years of a program that was then called this week with David Brinkley and it was a period. I'm not sure that I was particularly conscious of this as a kid but it was it was not that common even in the nineteen one thousand eight hundred for women to be in prominent roles in news and decades later when I came to work at NPR. She was still here every cliche you can use that. She was a giant Diane that she was a legend all of those things. I think don't even do justice to her. She was a towering figure. I think in my profession and in my personal life life I mean I came to NPR in nineteen eighty five. I was a newscaster. I wanted to be a reporter and COKIE. Roberts was not just an inspiration to me. She made it possible like literally for me to be a reporter. I mean I can't I don't WanNa bore everyone with the stupid story story about how I became a reporter but she made it happen I would even say single handedly and after I started working on the hill under her because she was the congressional channel correspondent then just watching her walking into the speaker's office every morning watching her question tip O'Neill watching bring her write a story I mean and crafted and put it in context I mean she showed me how it's done and I never could do it as well as she can and she was such a fierce friend. I mean she was so devoted to the people in her life. I I mean you. Don't need anybody else. If you have her as your advocate you raise a couple of points that are worth following up on for people who are not familiar with cokie. Roberts his career her and the first was that she came from a great Washington political. This was a political family as a matter of fact Kochi used to joke that she was brought up to be only to only only be prejudiced against two kinds of people. Republicans and senators initially was the child of the House but in fact she was not prejudice against Republicans she was was the epitome of straightforward analytical nonpartisan journalists and the reason I think of this as when you remember her walking into the Office of the speaker the House Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill I'm sure knew her father and coach since she was in diapers she had tremendous authority and that's the other part the authority because this is a person who we heard on the air we worked with on the air who was behind the microphone who was in front of the camera but was also working behind the scenes. When I hear you saying Mara Liasson that she advocated for you to be hired it's not the only woman here didn't just took her body in front of various roadblocks to that I mean she was just incredible and and to be clear there were roadblocks for women to be in journalism. I mean like it's hard for somebody who is young out understand how incredibly difficult it was when. Coke I did it or when Mara I did it. Was it was different. It was not easy in the slight. I want to correct that because cokie was the trailblazer blazer. I didn't believe any trails. I came in her wake. There were no barriers to me as a woman then I didn't feel that I feel that cokie and Linda and Nina and Susan Steinberg the founding mothers. NPR We used to call them the Philippian club they were the ones who knocked down the barriers so you can say that. I probably can't say that Zamora when you say that cokie was a founding adding mother that is that is like an actual term. NPR that refers to cokie Roberts Nina Totenberg Linda Wertheimer and Susan Stand Bergh they have been leaders at NPR they they made NPR what NPR is. There is a small number of people and they're are almost entirely women who've been associated with this very network for decades and decades presidents have come and gone. CEO's have come and gone presidents of the United States. It's have come and gone and they have remained powerfully influential in this organization and even in recent years when we heard cokie a little less on the air she was still someone who was willing and able to call up the CEO and say. I think you're screwing this up and someone needs to tell you so I'm telling you and Steve in you to this really beautiful full obituary for Kochi this morning that aired on morning edition that that people should listen to but there is a moment in that piece where we're you talk to Nina Totenberg about how cokie Roberts even got in the door in the late seventies Steve Roberts who then worked for the New York Times her husband delivered to me me her resume and I then brought it to the head of news at the time and he hired her on a temporary basis and you think of an important story in our national life over the last forty years or so and cokie was part of it. This is a a crazy story that her husband brought in her resume crazy and yet not too surprising when you study the the the history of women struggling for equal alright so the United States or trying to find new roles for themselves in the United States. I think this is really common where you have to take a mixture of the old and the new and you embrace traditional roles sir except traditional roles while trying to do something new so it is a little unusual. I guess to hear that her spouse would be the person to pass over the resume but she took that opportunity in any way that she could and rose up the ladder very quickly and Steve there. Was this moment from not long ago. There was this ask cokie segment. You and cokie did on morning edition. Yes this is the segment that we did the last several years of Kochi's life she of course in addition journalists was a historian had written books and this was an opportunity community to take advantage of her decades of experience by giving us the long view on things and I began reading this introduction on the one one hundredth anniversary of women gaining the right to vote and cokie didn't like how it came out listen the House of Representatives passed the nineteenth nineteenth amendment to the constitution granting women the right to vote granting no granting we had the right to vote as American citizens. We didn't have to be granted it by some bunch of guys that that we should mention free meditating. No no that is exactly the way. The cokie was in conversation and she would tell you what she thought she would tell you right away. She was super quick but also gracious about it. You never felt like you were being punched. In the face. You were being told what what was what everything she was given in life she put to good use and she worked harder than anyone and she was obviously super smart and talented but she had a very personal kind of almost organic sense of political history partially because her family had lived it and then the fact that she when she did start writing books later that she devoted so much of her time to writing books about women's role in American history. I just think she leaves just such a huge huge hole. We are going to take a quick break and when we come back.

Cokie Roberts NPR Steve Roberts Roberts Nina Totenberg Linda W Kochi Mara Liasson House of Representatives United States president President Carter Tam Tam CEO reporter ABC News Iran David Brinkley Greens Diane Washington Nina Totenberg
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:55 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KCRW

"Roberts ABC news Capitol Hill even as she continued with N. P. R. critics of reporting sometimes argue that she was too close to the Washington political figure she covered her fellow ABC panelists George F. will saw her outlook differently if you don't like the game of politics I don't see how you're right about that well if user someone so I'm going to be a baseball writer and I really don't like baseball she liked the game of politics she understood that in some ways it is a game which is not not a pejorative about a diminishing of other disparaging term. to connect your Formosan partisanship these days she better than our career another life Roberts said she had empathy for politicians human beings however flawed who mostly tried to do what they considered right though in her later years she added that politics was growing harder to like Cokie Roberts is Washington still like it was bad and not even close it's tragically different she told C. span that partisanship was growing extreme in recent years younger women viewed Cokie Roberts as a pioneer and mentor and she offered a particular view of the fight for women's equality she was not that interested in telling women how to behave differently she was more interested in changing systems that help them back in recent years we've heard this business about mommy wars and leaning man and a host this stuff out it's just the conversation to me that's worth having is a conversation about equal pay for equal work about making the workplace a far more care taker friendly place to be because the caretakers of both children and the elderly were so often women. Roberts wrote several books on the political history of women earlier this year we were discussing that subject on the air when she broke in the house of representatives passed the nineteenth amendment to the constitution granting women the right to vote. granting no granting we had the right to vote as American citizens we didn't have to be granted it by some bunch of guys okay that that we should mention is NPR's often Cokie Roberts correcting the introduction to this story and a few years ago we talked about Washington women while sitting in the cottage that have been used by president Lincoln's family when they were in the capital when you have researched and read the letters of the women of this era the mid nineteenth century do you feel in some way that you you recognize them I always recognize women in history it's really remarkable how much we do the same things century M. sentry out you recognize they're concerned about their children you recognize their interest in fashion you recognize the jewelry that they're wearing but you also recognize their intelligence and their political sensibility women can be overly ambitious today rather than covertly ambitious second be overly ambitious carefully go on it's still very difficult for a woman to have the word ambitious attached to her over the course of decades Cokie Roberts managed to pursue her ambitions and Iran be our colleague Susan Stamberg said she did that with integrity Cokie has been a model for all of us she was a child of the Congress she grew up to be it's brilliant observer. she connected democracy and the truth always and was deeply committed to it she demonstrated it in every report that she did and in in her behavior it as an individual now we told you at the start the when people called NPR's Cokie Roberts R. A. B. C.'s Cokie Roberts it was not quite the whole story she did not belong to a company but to her country. that was morning edition host Steve Inskeep Cokie Roberts was seventy five. Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu took to the phones and Facebook and even a bull horn today to rally voters as he fights to stay in office this is Israel second parliamentary election in less than six months at a young called for it when he failed to form a government after a vote in April today's vote is expected to be close again leading two days of uncertainty over who can form a new government NPR's Daniel Estrin is in Tel Aviv he joins us now welcome back Daniel thank you so as we talked about there was some last minute Kay and painting by the prime minister and you might think he would be more relaxed after election day right he's these Israelis longest serving prime minister right but you know he campaigned extrovert your Astley he dragged the family out of their home to the polling place he took a bull horn any visited Jerusalem's main bus station and the main vegetable market and he claimed over and over again that he could lose that he that he was claiming that right wing voter turnout was low and left wing and Arab voter turnout was high error voters meaning Palestinian citizens of Israel not Palestinians in the Israeli occupied west bank they can't vote in Israeli elections. then it's kinda went back to his official residence and he spent hours streaming live on Facebook and Instagram and Twitter he was trying to get people to go to the polls a call that an emergency broadcast he was taking calls from party activists he called on TV commentators he called them out by name and called them liars even appeared in a video clip with puppets so frankly RD he overshadowed all of the other candidates on this election day and voters how are they responding to it well there is I spoke with today were really unhappy with this redo election they didn't seem to change their minds and they mostly voted for the same candidate that they voted for last time Netanyahu's supporters were very confident in their support for him but when it came to his main opponents the retired the retired general any guns his supporters are a lot more pessimistic about his chances he's a centrist and and some of them are hoping that at least that's how ya who will build a coalition with that centrist party and and that could moderate and other rice right wing government and this is a complex election I with many political parties what are people saying about the most likely outcomes. well in the last election guns who's a centrist former general he was slightly ahead and then Netanyahu pulled the head and then when the actual votes were counted they tied the had a thirty five to thirty five tie and so now we're gonna be looking at that same situation it appears if Netanyahu hangs on he could try to build the right wing alliance or ally with centrists including guns all of this is going to depend on one wild card and that is of the gore Lieberman he's right wing but he could tip either way. what exactly should we be looking for next what what's going to happen now is that the the vote is actually gonna be counted and the Israeli president gets a chance to meet with the heads of all of the parties and the party say which candidate they recommend to try to form a coalition and then the president taps the one he thinks has the best chances of building a sixty one seat majority out of the hundred twenty seats in parliament usually that's a party who finishes first in the race but that's not necessarily the case and then the candidate has several weeks of horse trading with other parties to try to join the coalition it's gonna be very nail biting couple of weeks. that's NPR's Daniel Estrin from Tel Aviv thanks for your reporting you're welcome..

Steve Inskeep Cokie Roberts Cokie Roberts R. A. B. C. Washington baseball NPR ABC president Lincoln Benjamin Netanyahu Susan Stamberg prime minister Facebook George F. writer N. P. Iran Congress six months
"cokie roberts" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

08:11 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on Here & Now

"That's on NPR's rough translation. some General Motors auto workers are back out on the picket lines. Today it's Day two of a nationwide strike of nearly fifty thousand united auto workers for more or than fifty. GM plants across the country GM and the U. A. W. are back at the negotiating table as well. One of the biggest issues for striking workers is GM's tiered wage system which allows some workers to earn more than others based on a number of factors. Let's talk more about this with Tracey Samuelson who covers the auto industry for member for station Michigan Radio Hi tracey although can you explain for us this tiered wage system at GM dictates how much someone makes what kind of benefits it's they receive and so on yeah that's right There was a little shade of a before two thousand seven. You'd hire in it about twenty one dollars and really quickly work your way up to the top wage of about twenty eight dollars three years but after twenty two thousand seventy three were hired after two thousand seven that changed dramatically so now you hire here in about seventeen dollars an hour and it takes eight years to work yourself up to the top wage which is about thirty thirty one dollars an hour and the benefits are are different. Also you used to be eligible for a pension upon retirement and now it's a 401k retirement account so it's it's pretty dramatic difference yeah and temporary workers earn fifteen dollars an hour with no vision or dental benefits yeah yeah and they don't have that contractually mandated dated way to Sorta work theirselves up to a specified higher wage okay. This might become an in other industries like tack we we. We know that this is a system. That's that's in that industry but it's pretty new for. Gm Win in y you mentioned that it was around two thousand seven but why the company implemented this system well it was in the contract of that they did during the bankruptcy so it sorta looked back to two thousand seven but this started and about out two thousand nine hundred. GM was in bankruptcy and everybody had to pitch in to keep this company from going out of business including the rank and file so to try try to sort of get their labor costs in line with foreign automakers. They came up with this two tier system to to make the labor cost GM much much lower than they were before yeah. You're saying everyone kind of decided to to go in on this to save the company including the Union yeah yeah now what kind of dynamic has has the system created though now among auto workers at these plants what impact has it has had on morale it. It hurts morale. It creates resentment and not just on the part of the lower paid workers. You know it's a real culture shift here for the Union where used to be. We all do the same work for the same. Pay and you know now. You might be working alongside side. Somebody who's a temp. WHO's having trouble paying their bills or maybe it's your buddy. WHO's getting the lower our wage and you know it just creates unhappiness amongst everybody to sort of know. That differential is there. Have you had a chance is to speak with the U. A. W. Addressing how they're addressing this tiered wage system and this negotiating process so the Union is being pretty Eddie close about what's going on in the negotiations but they are very well aware that the rank and file thought that the two tier here system was going to go away at some point. They really thought these concessions were temporary and that were eventually going to get back what we gave. GM to to keep them out of bankruptcy and now now starting to look like those things were not temporary permanent that they may be a permanent part of working for for the company. Yeah Yeah it's been reported that the GM CEO Mary Barra makes upwards of twenty one million dollars that was last year. That's two hundred ninety five times more than the average. GM employee has come up as a sticking point for any of the workers are union members that you've talked to. I'm laughing because if you go on on a any facebook page of any person on the picket line right now that's like the number one meam on their facebook page how much Mary Barra is making compared to you know what the rank and file make and it's really hurtful in a way because they know that bars compensation insulation is tied to investor sentiment and investors like a company. That's lowering. Their labor costs so her pay is not necessarily going to go down. If therre pig goes down she may in fact be rewarded. Yeah you know you mentioned the morale folks right next to each other working right next to each other making vastly different salaries what other things have employees told you about some of the things they want the union to bring to the table well they've read the same stories that the rest of us are reading that GM's I offer may have been we want you to pay not just a little more or but quite a bit more for your health insurance and health insurance with only about a four percent you know sort of copay situation is almost the holy grail for for people who work in the auto factories. They have really good insurance and they don't have to pay as much for it. Let's say someone out there in working for another kind of corporations so the average for somebody in the US is paying maybe twenty eight percent of their overall health insurance costs and like I said at the for a union worker it's about four percent and we do not want that touched yeah last. We heard the union. GM were very early in contract negotiations. They had gone through about two percent of some of the issues that they were dealing with. What have you heard so so far since then oh about like. How long will this take? How long will this take so. That is the crystal ball question. I asked everybody anybody a interview. That question and I don't even think the negotiators no so my gas and I stick with this estimate anywhere from two days to two wakes. That's me well. Thank you so much. This is tracey. Samuelson reports from Michigan Radio talking with us about the ongoing. GM Auto Workers Strike. Thank you so much sir thing so. Have you seen them swarms of dragonflies so big. They're showing up on weather radar last week. People in Indiana Ohio and Pennsylvania had sightings. What's what's up with dragonflies aquatic insect expert Christine Goforth is on the case she works at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences runs. An online citizen science project project called the dragonfly swarm project shows as a blog so Chris. This is a thing dragonflies swarms. What are they yes. Oh jagged place. Worms are big groups of dragonflies are typically feeding on little prey insects and so you can get anywhere from a dozen to millions even billions of dragonflies flying together in these big groups well and is there anything going on showing up on radar. We'll have pictures at here. Now Dot Org anything unusual unusual about that. It's not particularly unusual. This is the season of the year where the dragonflies are starting to migrate so the migratory species are starting to move from the more northern parts of North America software and so you have a whole lot of dragonflies that are on the move right now and every time they stopped flying they need to eat and so they form these big groups wherever there's a lot of little insects in a local area to feed on and that's why you're starting to get this worms and they do this pretty much every fall. They can do it throughout the year but you see a lot more of the now than you would earlier in the year will you've also said that there might be a spike in the kind of insects that the dragonflies feed on and.

GM Union Tracey Samuelson General Motors Mary Barra Michigan facebook US North America North Carolina Museum of Natur Christine Goforth Eddie Chris Michigan Radio Indiana Ohio Pennsylvania
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KOMO

"Pennsylvania. did you of Gillis from about a year ago surface from Matt and Shane secret podcast in which he mockingly mimic the Chinese accent and used a racist slur on her to refer to Asian people in Chinatown reaction was immediate and unfavorable Gillis issued an initial statement saying I'm happy to apologize to anyone who's actually offended by anything I said I am trying to be the best comedian I can be and sometimes that requires risks Pablo S. Tory of ESPN's high noon tweeting it was only a risk because you when your hack friend are dumb enough to record it enter democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang in a series of tweets on Saturday Yang excoriated anti Asian racism and slurs but after going through Gillis is work Yang said he does not strike me as malignant or evil I do not think you should lose his job we would benefit from being more forgiving rather than punitive the show opted otherwise announcing his removal on Monday saying we were not aware of his prior remarks the language he used his offensive hurtful and unacceptable Gillis issuing a statement saying he respects the decision but it feels ridiculous for comedians to be making serious public statements but here we are I'm a comedian who is funny enough to get this and now that can't be taken away at C. B. C.'s Chris Connelly ten fourteen now and check in with your Jordan once again before we hear more on the passing of ABC's Cokie Roberts right now here is here with a triple a traffic update well it has been awhile since we've had any blocking problems but the rain really did a number on our commute this morning and it is taking us a very long time to recover so still brake lights for the majority of the drive on south on I five out of alder wood to five twenty our travel time from the Lin wood to Bellevue it's coming in at just under an hour north down four or five is struggling from the West Valley highway much in the way to I ninety so our travel time right now from renting the Bellevue that's it. the one in minutes still a very heavy drive on west but I nineties are trying to work your way out of its across south on I five is slow from the four oh five split the five twenty north on I five scattered slowing I'm actually I'm I'm just gonna call pockets of slowing right now coming out of the federal area and into sea tac it becomes a steady or slow drive in Seattle from al broke most of the way to five twenty we still face delays northbound ninety nine from Cloverdale toward diagonal in back at it again from whole gate through the tunnel the traffic report is paid for by doctor patient unity surprise medical bills are bankrupting Americans now insurance companies want to make things worse with the scheme called rate that a tell Congress to vote no on rate setting paid for by doctor patient unity our next come traffic at.

Pennsylvania. Gillis Matt Shane
Veteran broadcast journalist Cokie Roberts dead at 75

Morning Edition

01:12 min | 3 years ago

Veteran broadcast journalist Cokie Roberts dead at 75

"Veteran NPR and ABC news political journalist Cokie Roberts has died Roberts died today in Washington DC from complications of breast cancer she was seventy five Roberts was known as one of N. P. R.'s founding mothers an imperious don Gonyea reports she was among the first women to rise to the top levels broadcast journalism Cokie Roberts started covering Congress for NPR in nineteen seventy eight she came from a political family her father was Louisiana congressman Hale Boggs he was democratic Majority Leader when he was killed in a plane crash in nineteen seventy two her mother Lindy Boggs then one that seat in Congress Roberts new politicians and future presidents as family friends this is from C. spanning twenty fifteen it has given me empathy for politicians I know that they go home at night too you know rowdy households and homework and all of that and and that they are regular people who deal with regular issues Cokie Roberts worked as a commentator for NPR from nineteen ninety two until her death she also hosted this week on ABC news from nineteen ninety six to two

NPR N. P. R. Don Gonyea Cokie Roberts Congress Lindy Boggs ABC Washington Louisiana Congressman Congress Roberts
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Tell house Democrats and their impeachment investigation to others won't even show up for today's hearing fox's John Howard's live at the capitol two former advises the president trump are not expected to appear for a house Judiciary Committee hearing the white house's rob Portman re Dearborn are immune from being compelled to testify before Congress Cory Lewin Taos ski the president's former campaign manager is due to answer questions so he's been told not to testify about anything that goes beyond what has already been made public in the special counsel's Russia report the Judiciary Committee is looking in the potential obstruction of justice by president trump this hearing is tied to an impeachment investigation Dave your house speaker Nancy Pelosi wants a full house briefing on the attack on Saudi oil facilities and the blame being put on a Ron France Susan so sure about that fox's Simon own explains live day the French foreign minister Zhou needs the Drammen no other than the phones to dispose spots saying up to now friends does not have the trees. Saturday's attack came from one specific place or another and he said I don't know if anyone has increased friends a key US ally in recent military mission the minister saying the Iran crisis needs de escalation and anybody that goes against that would be bad for the Middle East day five of the Taliban on intact again today with two bombings killing at least forty eight people in Afghanistan one hit a rally Afghanistan president Ashraf Ghani is campaign rally there are elections later this month up to twenty four people were killed and dozens wounded there's another suicide attack in Kabul as fox's Lucas Tomlinson an award winning journalist you probably watched on TV has died Cokie Roberts ABC news reporter and commentator won three Emmys Robert suffered complications.

house Judiciary Committee president fox Afghanistan Congress Cory Lewin white house rob Portman Nancy Pelosi Dearborn Ron France Susan Ashraf Ghani Kabul special counsel Zhou Middle East Taliban
"cokie roberts" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"On what he'll tell house Democrats and their impeachment investigation to others won't even show up for today's hearing fox's John how burns live at the capitol into former advises the president trump are not expected to appear for a house Judiciary Committee hearing the white house's rob Portman re Dearborn are immune from being compelled to testify before Congress Cory Lewin douse ski the president's former campaign manager is due to answer questions so he's been told not to testify about anything that goes beyond what has already been made public in the special counsel's Russia report the Judiciary Committee is looking at the potential obstruction of justice by president trump this hearing is tied to an impeachment investigation date your house speaker Nancy Pelosi wants a full house briefing on the attack on Saudi oil facilities and the blame being put on a Ron France Susan so sure about that fox's Simoneau explains live day the French foreign ministers Johnny the dram of no less most of these posts bus saying up to now friends does not have the trees that trend Saturday's attack came from one specific place or another and he said I don't know if anyone has a brief friends a key US ally in recent data entry mission is the minister saying the Iran crisis needs de escalation and anybody that goes against that would be bad for the Middle East Dave some of the Taliban on intact again today with two bombings killing at least forty eight people in Afghanistan one hit a rally Afghanistan president Ashraf Ghani is campaign rally there are elections later this month up to twenty four people were killed and dozens wounded there's another suicide attack in Kabul as fox's Lucas Tomlinson an award winning journalist you probably watched on TV has died Cokie Roberts ABC news reporter and commentator won three Emmys Robert.

Ashraf Ghani Robert Cokie Roberts Iran US Russia Congress Cory Lewin rob Portman reporter Lucas Tomlinson Kabul fox Afghanistan Taliban Johnny Simoneau Ron France Susan
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Executive orders during the Korean War US steel companies and their employees were engaged in labor disputes and president Harry Truman worried that there wouldn't be an of steel for the soldiers so he issued an executive order which he broadcast to the American people directing the secretary of commerce to take possession of the steel mills and to keep them operating within weeks the Supreme Court has overturned the president's decision in present times president trump wanted a citizenship question added to the twenty twenty census the Supreme Court ruled against him later today the president could announce an executive order to try and push ahead with this Steve Inskeep recently talked with commentator Cokie Roberts who took Lister questions about the history of executive orders first question comes from Andrea E. mais on Twitter who asks where is the authority in the constitution or in law for issuing an executive order there is none in the constitution or law but there is the right of an executive order because if the president is going to exercises broad powers issuing executive directors serving as commander in chief basically running the executive branch of the government then he needs to have this power it's the same as the investigative power of a Congress not written down but always agreed to well let's go to our next question them this is Brian K. from East Hampton Connecticut when was the first executive order issued and was it then challenged in the courts well not surprisingly the first executive order came from George Washington who on June eighth seventeen eighty nine so not long at all after the first Congress started he basically asked the heads of the various federal agencies what are you doing tell me what you're up to he also issued a proclamation calling for a day of thanksgiving and of course an executive order can be challenged in court and Congress can pass a law overturning an executive order but that law is subject to veto and then it would be pretty hard to get the two thirds necessary to override a veto we have another question now from Ken Mayer in the San Francisco Bay Area and this question gets to the situation we might conceivably find ourselves in if the president were to go through with an executive order now when was the last time that a sitting president issued an executive order after losing with the Supreme Court of the United States well FDR was constantly battling the cord both on executive orders and on legislation certainly the most famous time was when Abraham Lincoln suspended the reserve habeas corpus during the civil war well we have one more question now and it comes from Maine fly that's the handle on Twitter and the question is our presidents using executive orders more and more over time certainly of Franklin Roosevelt did he hit the record with more than three thousand executive order while but the truth is these executive orders have been used for us very very big things Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation FDR establishing Japanese intern camps Truman desegregating the army I like putting the Arkansas National Guard under federal control to desegregate the schools these were enormous policy changes for our government the problem with an executive order is any subsequent president can undo them so president tried to turn them into law or in the case of freeing the slaves a constitutional amendment okay thanks for the insights could you check to see and you can ask Cokie your questions about our politics in the government work by tweeting us with the hashtag ask cooking it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep I'm ready to Martin and I'm no well king and we are going to ask Peter finch about the traffic.

Executive US
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Noel king. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I made till Martin. It was big news that January day back in nineteen seventy three who could report today will that abortion is completely a private matter today decided by mother and doctor in the first three months of pregnancy. The seven two ruling to that effect will probably result in a drastic overhaul of state laws on abortion. In fact, the Rovers his way decision did lead to a drastic overhaul of state laws. Now, though some states are enacting restrictive abortion laws that many say are aimed at convincing the court to reverse that nineteen Seventy-three ruling the history of abortion law is our subject this week for commentator Cokie Roberts. She joins us every week to talk about how government and politics work, Cokie. Thanks for being with us. Hi, rachel. Let's get right to the first question. Hi, I'm Marjory more for from Portland, Oregon before Roe v. Wade, how many states had legal abortion? And Secondly, if Skoda's shuts down. In row. How many states will have legal abortion, while by nineteen Seventy-three seventeen states had made abortion, legal under a range of circumstances. But Rachel for most of our history from about the middle of the nineteenth century, on abortion had been illegal mainly because the medical profession wanted to rein in midwives and home remedy folks who have been performing abortions. Now, we don't know if we're overturn what the states would do. We do know that in twenty nine thousand nine alone, ten states have enacted any abortion laws. Okay. Our next listener wants to know what happened to change the views on abortion to allow legalization. My name is Jim controllers. And I'm from Seattle Washington, how and win the abortion rights movement. Get started the movement. Really started in the nineteen sixties with what's known as women's liberation gaining fours. And one of the demands was women's control of their own bodies among other things, the women argue that throughout much of history, women had been decision. In makers in the matter pregnancy with abortion, outlawed only after quickening, or when the woman herself could feel a fetus moving, but I have to tell you the history of this is as fraught as the politics there, many articles by worship rights proponents, who claimed that the procedure was so common that newspapers advertised providers. Look, I did a search early nineteenth century papers and couldn't find them. I did on the other hand find a delightful equivalent for Viagra in eighteen zero three steel lozenges. Okay. Here's a question about the other side of the debate, the anti abortion movement, high Cokie, this is Daniel Russell from Los Angeles, California. Where did the religious ideology for the opposition to abortion, come from and how prominent was it in America before Roe versus Wade? Well that history is fraud as well. But this one day we can point to an eighteen sixty nine pope, pious, the knife, issued addict him that abortion was wrong at any stage of pregnancy before that. The general in the church had been that what was called in Seoul, moment was the moment when abortion was prescribed, same thing, as quickening some Protestant ministers in this country, worry that immigrants and Catholics would have all the babies. So they opposed abortion. But this stands of evangelical groups didn't start until after row. And you didn't hear about it in the Catholic church. I can tell you growing up in the fifties and sixties as a Catholic. I never heard the word abortion. And lastly, we've got this question. Hello. My name is Robyn Corby from Everett Washington. Have women in government ever made choices about men's bodies the same way men decide about women's bodies. No. But some women state legislatures have jokingly tried making victory felony. For instance, Cokie Roberts..

fraud Cokie Roberts Wade rachel Steve Inskeep Noel king Roe NPR Rovers Cokie Martin Daniel Russell Skoda Viagra Seoul Robyn Corby Marjory Jim controllers Portland Seattle
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KCRW

"Learn more at C three dot AI. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Noel king. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I made till Martin. It was big news that January day back in nineteen Seventy-three who could. At Boertien is completely a private matter today decided by mother and doctor in the first three months of pregnancy. The seven two ruling to that effect will probably result in a drastic overhaul of state laws on abortion. In fact, the Rover says way decision did lead to a drastic overhaul of state laws. Now, though some states are enacting restrictive abortion laws that many say are aimed at convincing the court to reverse that nineteen Seventy-three ruling the history of abortion law is our subject this week for commentator Cokie Roberts. She joins us every week to talk about how government and politics work, Cokie. Thanks for being with us. Hi, rachel. Let's get right to the first question. Hi, I'm Marjory more for from Portland, Oregon before Roe v. Wade, how many states had legal abortion, and Secondly, if Skoda's shuts down row, how many states will have legal abortion, while by nineteen Seventy-three seventeen states had made abortion, legal under a range of circumstances. But Rachel for most of our history from about the middle of the nineteenth century. You on abortion had been illegal mainly because the medical profession wanted to rein in midwives and home. Remedy folks who had been performing abortions now, we don't know if we're over turn what the states would do. We do know that in twenty nine thousand nine alone, ten states have enacted any abortion laws. Okay. Our next listener wants to know what happened to change the views on abortion to allow legalization. My name is Jim controllers. And I'm from Seattle Washington, how and win the abortion rights movement. Get started the movement really started in the nineteen sixties with what's known as women's liberation gaining force. And one of the demands was women's control of their own bodies. Among other things women argue that throughout much of history. Women had been decision makers in the matter of pregnancy with abortion outlawed only after quickening, or when the woman herself could feel a fetus moving, but I have to tell you Rachel the history of this is as fraught as the pulse. There are many articles by worship rights proponents who claimed that the procedure was so common that newspapers advertise providers look, I did a search early nineteenth century papers and couldn't find them. I did on the other hand find a delightful equivalent for Viagra in eighteen zero three steel lozenges. Okay. Here's a question about the other side of the debate, the anti abortion movement, high Cokie, this is Daniel Russell from Los Angeles, California. Where did the religious ideology for the opposition to abortion, come from? And how prominent was it an America before Roe versus Wade? Well that history is fraud as well. But there's one day we can point to and eighteen sixty nine pope pious the knife, issued addict him that abortion was wrong at any stage of pregnancy before that. The general in the church had been that what was called in Seoul, moment was the moment when abortion was prescribed, same thing, as quickening some Protestant ministers in this country, worry that immigrants and Catholics would have all the babies. So they opposed abortion. But this stands of evangelical groups didn't start until after row. And you didn't hear about it in the Catholic church. I can tell you growing up in the fifties and sixties as a Catholic. I never heard the word abortion. And lastly, we've got this question. Hello. My name is Robyn Corby from Everett Washington. Have women in government ever made choices about men's bodies the same way men decide about women's bodies. No. But some women state legislatures have jokingly tried making vasectomy a felony for instance, Cokie.

fraud rachel Cokie Steve Inskeep Noel king Roe Wade NPR Cokie Roberts Martin Daniel Russell Boertien Viagra Seoul Robyn Corby Marjory Jim controllers Portland Seattle Skoda
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:25 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Segment. Good morning Cokie. Hi, rachel. All right. Here is our first question. This comes from Henry Wilson who wants to know the following? What was the first federally criminalize drug and what led to its criminalization? Well, the first federal law came in nineteen oh six pure food and drug act, which was aimed at home remedies that contain narcotics like MRs winslow's, soothing syrup for fussy babies. You would like this the primary ingredients were morphine alcohol. Oh, yeah. Right up, right. States had enacted any opium laws before that aimed at Chinese immigrants. Then in nineteen fourteen the Harrison narcotics act was passed and that set up that schedule of chemical substances. The dragon voicemails agency still uses the schedule of drugs going from one drugs like heroin down to five drugs, like low model. Okay. Our next question has to do with that schedule. It comes from Mike maser. He writes, what's the real story behind we'd being outlawed in nineteen thirty seven despite objections from the AMA who's responsible for keeping it a schedule. One drug even though it's been used medicinally since the eighteen fifties coke you can get so many theories going behind the marijuana tax act of nineteen thirty seven critics say that the first head of what was the Federal Bureau of cottage Henry and Slinger was a racist who wanted to prosecute Mexicans who saw marijuana and African American jazz musicians who used it the American Medical Association opposed the law because it taxed physicians for prescribing marijuana. Wanna president Nixon kept it a schedule one drug over the unanimous recommendation of his drug commission that called for decriminalization later, his age, John Erlich, Mun Nixon wanted to get punched smoking antiwar protesters and to disrupt black neighborhoods with criminalization? But the reason Miramonte is still scheduled one drag according to the DA. All right. We've got a question about the politics of drug policy next a listener wanted to know which party, which political party has been more inclined to legalize illegal substances. Jimmy Carter called for the legalization of marijuana. And he ran for president. But then he didn't follow through a both parties have wanted to show that they are tough on drugs. Joe Biden was one of the prime proponents of any drug laws in the eighties. And it's likely to be a problem for him in this era of legalization. But there is a huge upset in congress about drugs in the eighties. I covered those bills and I can tell you members of both parties couldn't get to the microphones fast enough to support tougher sentencing. Mandates. And they reinstated. The federal death penalty nine hundred eighty eight put it in for drug kingpins commentator Cokie Roberts. You can ask your questions about how politics and government work by tweeting us with the hashtag ask Cokie cookie. Thanks so much could talk to you. Rachel. This is NPR news. Stay tuned for the California report coming up in just a minute. But right now, Joe McConnell with the latest traffic.

marijuana Jimmy Carter rachel Mike maser Joe Biden president Mun Nixon Joe McConnell American Medical Association Henry Wilson Cokie Roberts NPR morphine opium California Miramonte Cokie heroin
People are again talking about slavery reparations

Morning Edition

03:16 min | 3 years ago

People are again talking about slavery reparations

"The subject of reparations for slavery has now entered the presidential contest democratic candidates repeatedly asked about this subject. Supporters of some sort of reparations often point to the fact that the United States has paid them in the past the legislation that I am about to sign provides for restitution payment to each of the sixty thousand survivors, of course, former president Ronald Reagan there with that law the nation, formerly apologized to Japanese Americans for their internment in World War Two and provided token monetary compensation the debate over reparations for slavery is our topic that we're covering this week s Cokie segment and commentator Cokie Roberts is here with us. I koki. Hi, David first listener, we have a MandA Trammell. She wants to know whether all this talk of reparations is something new there ever been a serious discussion about reparations for slavery in the pet. Absolutely. A former congressman John Conyers introduced legislation in every congress from nineteen eighty nine. On to establish a commission to study and develop reparation proposals for African Americans. It was reintroduced on the first day of the current congress by Texas congresswoman, Sheila jackson-lee, some form of what you might call reparations actually dates back to the end of the civil war when general Sherman promised land, freed slaves that came to be called, forty acres immutable like many such promises it was later, broken slave owners and the district of Columbia, however were compensated when the enslaved people in the capital refrained before general emancipation will we have another listener it's Eggers. And she wanted to know what has happened to all these other efforts to achieve reparations have attempt for reparation happened before in the US. Well, as you said earlier in nineteen eighty eight a law was passed giving living Japanese Americans who had been in intern not their states twenty thousand tax free dollars each but more important to the supporters. Of the Bill was the formal apology by the government and in nineteen seventy one the Alaskan native settlement act gave native peoples to title, more than forty million acres of land and did establish a fun to somewhat compensate them for lands and rights. They had lost in nineteen Ninety-three. President Clinton signed the apology resolution to native Hawaiians for overthrowing the islands. Monarchy cook, I'm just curious have all the efforts that we've seen or talked about been federal or have there been local or other kinds of of reparations. Well, we saw last week Georgetown University students of voting to establish a fund for the descendants of the enslaved people at Georgetown who had been sold by the university, and you have states and some cities that have in fact, inactive reparations, but for very specific wrongdoings. So for Jinya, for example, pay the survivors of its forced sterilizations program and granted scholarships to the residents who have. Been denied in education when the schools were closed during the fight over immigration, Florida gave a substantial sum to the victims of the nineteen Twenty-three horrible rosewood massacre where an entire African American community was burned to the ground. But David there's so many other atrocities that are still being

Manda Trammell United States David Eggers Congressman John Conyers Cokie Roberts Georgetown University President Clinton Ronald Reagan President Trump Sheila Jackson-Lee General Sherman Florida Intern Jinya Texas Georgetown
"cokie roberts" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"cokie roberts" Discussed on KCRW

"And to the individuals are better off. Obviously the deficit one thing. Wait a minute. That's the democratic response. That was the democratic response. Not exactly scathing criticisms of the president Arkansas governor Bill Clinton was the anchorman of that broadcast, and though it was weird. It didn't seem to hurt him Dulcie brand rights with the opposite. Question has any of these speeches ever been a big success? Well, the whole set up is basically unfair the president's in the historic hall of the house of representatives, the responders usually a guy standing alone in a room in front of a teleprompter in one thousand nine hundred ninety five the Republicans got away from that. And their response to Clinton. I'm Christy Whitman, governor of New Jersey and addressing you tonight from the historic legislative chamber in Trenton, one of the oldest in the nation that would scored on several fronts. It was out of Washington and a stately setting with people there, actually, applauding and Republicans. Putting forward a woman which often works for them. Now, here's another question line. Name is Matthew door, Donny and I'm from boulder. Colorado. Historically, speaking have regular citizens paid attention to the response or is it mostly for showboating in DC. Well, Steve, they get millions of viewers and listeners are people are tuned in and much larger numbers than normal political speech of late the polarization in our politics shows up in who watches what. So the last Trump state of the union more people watch the response than the speech on the liberal leaning MSNBC, but for the speech itself, the conservative FOX channel had the highest rate and just a couple of weeks ago that visually peculiar. Schumer response to the wall speech garnered a slightly higher rating than the president himself. Well, thanks so much Cokie really appreciated. Always good to talk to you. And we will have a response to that at another time commentator Cokie Roberts,.

Bill Clinton president Republicans Cokie Roberts Christy Whitman Schumer Dulcie MSNBC Matthew door Trenton Arkansas Washington New Jersey boulder FOX Steve Colorado Donny
Trump needs Canada deal, or any deal really

Joe Pags

00:25 sec | 4 years ago

Trump needs Canada deal, or any deal really

"Weekend President Trump needs, to get an update a trade deal with, Canada and, Mexico says, ABC, news political. Analyst Matthew dowd a former republican strategists this is why most of his voters voted for me was the art of the deal guy right and so he hasn't gotten to deal with north korea he hasn't gotten a deal with iran he hasn't gotten a deal in the middle east he hasn't gotten a deal on trade and now he doesn't have a deal yet on nafta so this to me is the president has to get something done because it's the second most vulnerable

Sarah Palin Matthew Dowd Joe Lieberman Aretha Franklin President Trump Political Analyst Donald Trump Vice President Analyst John Mccain ABC Cokie Roberts North Korea Iran Canada Mexico