37 Burst results for "Cohn"

Fresh update on "cohn" discussed on Stephanie Miller

Stephanie Miller

00:34 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "cohn" discussed on Stephanie Miller

"Know so far Investigators have seized as evidence three black revolvers as well as gun belt with holsters ammunition boxes a fanny pack with bullets inside and several spent casings They have also collected articles of clothing and swabs of water believed to be blood Merck is allowing other drug makers worldwide to produce its COVID-19 pill The idea is to help millions of people in poor countries get the drug Here in the U.S. FDA advisers are now approving smaller doses of Pfizer shots for 5 to 11 year olds but full approval is still pending The AP's Sagar Meghani Pfizer study of elementary school kids showed the vaccine safe and 91% effective in 5 to 11 year olds Doctor Amanda Cohn says the virus was the 8th leading killer of those kids over the past year COVID-19 now is the vaccine preventable disease The FDA itself will make its decision in coming days and if approved of the CDC would then decide whether to recommend the shots and which kids should get them For those of you who miss game one of the World Series last night the AP's get them cooled by has the news The braves began their first World Series since 1999 with a 6 two win over the Astros Jorge soler became the first player ever to lead off a World Series opener with a home run to help Atlanta build a 5 nothing lead after three innings Game two is tonight in Houston And Egypt air flight on the way to Moscow returned to Cairo shortly after takeoff this morning when a threatening message was found on board No word yet on who wrote it or what it said This is a P news Ordinary Americans and airlines are donating miles to help Afghan refugees reach their new homes When a group that uses donated miles and credit card points to help refugees saw support for those fleeing Afghanistan in August they began talking to other nonprofits about helping Now a campaign organized by miles for migrants and a group called welcome U.S. has raised enough frequent fire miles in two months to provide 40,000 flights for refugees About half of those are from ordinary people the other half are corporate donations mostly donated by airlines organizers say using donated miles and cash to pay for travel freeze up government refugee a for housing and other services The flights carry Afghans from temporary housing and military bases to new homes around the United States I'm Jennifer King Consumer confidence is up for the month of October and most recent survey shows that more consumers are planning to buy homes cars and major appliances I'm Rita foley AP news This is a 20 a.m. willow springs and streaming worldwide at 8 20 dot com We are Chicago's progressive chalk where facts matter Now your 8 20 Chicago traffic.

Sagar Meghani Amanda Cohn Pfizer FDA Jorge Soler Merck U.S. AP CDC Astros Braves Cairo Moscow Atlanta Egypt Houston Afghanistan Jennifer King
FDA advisory committee considers Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5 to 11

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

FDA advisory committee considers Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5 to 11

"The U. S. has moved a step closer to vaccinating millions more children against covert nineteen with a government advisory panel endorsing kids size doses of Pfizer's vaccine for those ages five to eleven the FDA panel vote was unanimous with one abstention though Dr Paul Offit pediatrician says it wasn't an easy choice it's always nerve racking I think when you're asked to make a decision for millions of children based on studying it only a few thousand children but Pfizer study of elementary school kids showed the vaccine safe and that ninety one percent effective in five to eleven year olds doctor Amanda Cohn says the virus was the eighth leading killer of those kids over the past year in

Dr Paul Offit Pfizer U. FDA Amanda Cohn
Fresh update on "cohn" discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

NPR's Story of the Day

02:33 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "cohn" discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

"COVID vaccines for kids, ages 5 through 11 are one step closer to getting an okay from regulators. Advisers to the FDA voted in favor of authorizing the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine for kids, a decision from the FDA either agreeing with or rejecting that recommendation could come at any time. And Pierre's Allison Aubrey is following this story good morning Allison. Good morning, Noel. Okay, what's the evidence Allison that the vaccine will be effective for littler kids? Well, the advisers considered data from a Pfizer clinical trial that included more than 2000 children that found the vaccine was about 91% effective against symptomatic infection. Now throughout the pandemic, there have been more than 8600 young children hospitalized with COVID, more than 5000 cases of multi system inflammatory syndrome in children, which have struck otherwise healthy kids, and nearly a hundred children aged 5 to 11 have died from COVID. So when it came time for a vote yesterday, one committee member did abstain, but all others voted that the benefits of vaccinating this age group outweigh the risks, doctor Amanda Cohn explained her vote. COVID-19 now is the vaccine preventable disease from my perspective and COVID is also the 8th highest killer of kids in this age group over the past year. And so the use of this vaccine will prevent deaths will prevent ICU admissions and will prevent significant long-term adverse outcomes in children. Now, some committee members said they think for now giving a COVID vaccine should be the parent's choice, not a mandate. Based on your reporting, do you think the FDA will agree with those advisers and authorize the vaccine? The FDA does typically follow the advice of its advisory committee and the agency's own scientists have weighed in, they concluded that the vaccine's benefit in preventing hospitalizations and deaths would outweigh the risks of any potential rare side effects. So yes, the agencies analysis does support authorization. A question that I imagine many parents will be interested in, what are the side effects for kids who got the shot in these trials? The common side effects tend to be the same seen in adults or arm, headache, maybe aches, chills. Now when it comes to serious side effects, the main concern is myocarditis, which is inflammation in the heart. There have been rare instances following vaccination, mostly in young men. Now, no children in the Pfizer trial developed myocarditis, but some older kids have. Doctor Matthew oster of the CDC outlined what is known from ten cases among 12 to 17 year olds who developed the condition after receiving the Pfizer vaccine. About 30% of those 12 to 17 had been given a status of recovered, meaning the medications, no size restrictions, no ongoing symptoms. This was one month after vaccination. Now, typically, he says the long-term outlook of children who get myocarditis is good. But this is something that the CDC will track very closely through surveillance if the vaccine is authorized. And let's say it is authorized how likely is it that parents will be on board? What is the data telling us? Well, about 44% of 12 to 17 year olds have been fully vaccinated in the U.S. so that's one data point. And a recent poll from the COVID-19 vaccine education and equity project found about two thirds of parents of 5 to 11 year olds say they are likely to get their children vaccinated if it's authorized. Typically adults who have been vaccinated themselves are more likely to say they'll vaccinate their kids among those who say they're unlikely. Many say full approval from the FDA or a school mandate may prompt them to change their minds, so bottom line, I'm timing of authorization FDA likely to make a decision this week, CDC advisers within weigh in with recommendations early next week. And pure health correspondent Allison Aubrey thank you, Allison. Thank you, Noel. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Russell's reserve, all about family, so take a seat at their table in order from drizzly. Russell's reserve, 45% alcohol by volume, 90 proof, 2020 Campari America, New York, New York, please drink responsibly..

FDA Pfizer Allison Aubrey Covid Symptomatic Infection Allison Inflammatory Syndrome Amanda Cohn Myocarditis Noel Pierre Matthew Oster CDC Chills Headache America Russell
"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:48 min | 2 d ago

"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"To a place where you realize they're having an emotional reaction, let them talk it out, and it's not going to hurt you, and now you can together explore that emotional reaction that they've just had. And it can be actually enormously healing and in the case of the person I was just mentioning, he got upset. He had this emotional reaction, and then we got through it, and he calmed down and said, I really understand what you're saying and I want to think more about it. I said that's great. Why don't you think more about it? And then we had a follow up conversation. And he came to the table with a lot more sophisticated commentary on what was going on. And I think that leaders get alarmed and shut down themselves by someone else's defensiveness. And I would say, a lot of people have a defensive reaction at first before they have a more, let's say enlightened reaction. You included one story one anecdote with a client that left the room. He was so aghast by what you said. And you didn't know what to do. You're just sitting there kind of like, should I leave? Should I stay, eventually 45 minutes he comes back in a completely different mood and says you're right, I spoke to my wife. She said that I do all of those things. That's right. I love that story. Yeah. That's right. Share one more script. Okay. I'm going to share one more script. This is going to be a simple script, and I think that people don't think enough about this. So as a manager, one of your roles is to do career development with your people. And I think that manages and startups definitely don't think about that. And also, they think they may not have something to add. Because I'm in marketing in that person in product management or whatever. So this is a very short and simple script that you can bring up to your people, three, four times a year, which is about their career development. Debbie. I think it's a good idea to sit down regularly and talk about your career development. Let's give it a few times a year, so I know what you want to do and I can help you achieve these goals. And that's it. Now, here's I have some questions. I'm going to give you a few questions you can ask. You can ask, what parts of your job right now do you like the most and what parts do you like the least? Has anything about your career aspirations or goals changed since the last time we talked? What are you doing now that points you in the direction of what you think you'd like to do? What kinds of training you're experiences do you need to get there? And then on and on and on. There's a number of other questions in the book, but you will see that actually your job as a manager is to ask a bunch of thought provoking questions. If they can't answer them, that's okay. You'll talk again in three, four months. It's fine. But let them receive that you care about their career development. And then when people say what you like as a manager, does she care about your career? They'll say, yeah, she does. And that will be amazing for them and for you. One of the things that I like very much about that script, I didn't know you were going to read that one is that that's also something that people reading the book can do self directly. You can answer those questions for yourself as a way to sort of gauge how you're feeling about what you're doing and how satisfied you may or may not be. Yes, so true. That's right. I have one last question for you, Alyssa. You start the book with a question that you sort of leave us hanging with throughout the entirety of your book and don't answer until the end. And so spoiler alert for anybody that might be listening that doesn't want to know the answer to the question. I'm going to ask it. Hope you'll answer. Should startups have a ping Pong table in the office? And if so, why? The age old ping Pong question. Here we go. Well, like any good coach, I'm going to say, well, it depends. Nowhere. I know. I want to talk so I wanted to say briefly that when you're building culture in your company, you've got to think about what kind of company do you want to build? What kind of people do you want to be in that company? Let's hire those people. Now let's train them with onboard them. Let's give them training. And let's communicate indoctrinate them into that culture. And now you probably want to have a place as part of that culture. People feel cared about. So do the things that you need to do to make people feel cared about ask them about themselves, get to know them, try to commiserate with their troubles. And give them positive feedback for when they're doing a good job. And then at the end of all that, you can think about a few perks that you want to give your people and if one of them is ping Pong, God bless..

Debbie Alyssa
"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:18 min | 2 d ago

"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"So first of all, this is not a bad person, but we're just going to label a few things to call them out. So we're going to make some observations here. That's first of all. And second is, I'm going to give difficult feedback, but I'm going to get into it with what I call an emotional payment, as in, you are not a problem, and also you add a lot to the table. But there are some things that we need to work that you need to work on. The reason I think it's important to make that emotional payment is because you want to signal good intent. And if you've not been giving them positive feedback for the past couple of years, you might really need to signal good intent right here and right now. So I'm going to give that as context. I want to distinguish this also from the so called feedback sandwich. Have you heard of the feedback sandwich? No. What people think about as the feedback sandwich is you tell people something good, then you tell them what you really want to tell them. And then you tell them something good to soften the blow. I do not encourage that. Do not do that. However, you do need to signal good intent and if you haven't done that regularly, let's start off by giving the positive, so the person understands where you're coming from. Why do you recommend not giving a feedback sandwich? It sounds like the big difference between what you're going to share with us in a feedback sandwiches that you don't come back to the bottom half of the sandwich. But the problem with the feedback sandwich is its technique. It's not coming from a philosophy. It's just a technique. Like, how do I give some of feedback? Why you tell them something good? They tell them something about you tell them something good. Well, that's like coming. There's no depth to that. Also, people see through it, so it's not, it doesn't land in the way that you're hoping for it to land. So I think it's almost a spiritual difference. When I'm asking you to do is not give a feedback sandwich, I'm asking you to actually think about for yourself, all the good things this person does bring to the table so that when you have the conversation, your tone is connoting the approval, those good things. Also, so that your employee understands that you're coming from a place of wanting to be helpful to them and appreciating what they bring to the table. So I think it's just a difference of almost like philosophy and depth. So I'm going to ask you all to really think about what does this person do well because you're going to start with that and also you want to bring that to the conversation as you have a difficult feedback. Is that helpful? Absolutely. Okay, great. So I'm going to get right into it. Debbie. I want to talk to you today because I've noticed a few things that I think we should address. First of all, I appreciate everything you do. I know you're one of the hardest workers here, and your sense of humor brings everyone up. That's great. That said, I want to make sure you're getting great results with all your work. What I often see from you is a number of projects a lot of activity, but I often see the projects are delayed and remain unfinished. Also, you don't always let everyone know what the delays so they come as a surprise. That's a problem for your coworkers who are counting on you to do what you say you'll do. Then other things get delayed waiting on you. I'm sure you have your reasons. Things are not perfect here. Maybe you're waiting other people. But I expect you as a leader here to work constructively with your peers to fix process problems as they come up and to raise flags early if things will be late. I also expect you to make sure that your communicating regularly with your peers and all the things you guys are working on jointly. I know you're super talented and you have much to contribute to our company. I want your efforts to have the right impact and I want you to be able to move forward in your career. That's why I'm working on this with you. We can discuss some of this right now, and I'd love you to think about this and come back to me in three or four days with what you see as the problems and how you propose to fix them. What day should we plan to sync up again so you can share your plan with me and let me know what help you need from me. So do you recommend that that's something that we said face to face or should that be in an email? Could that be in an email? I really prefer face to face or these days, video. It's important to have the conversation because they're going to have a response. When I write these scripts, by the way, obviously, you're going to tailor it to your own circumstances, but also they might interrupt you. That's okay. You're trying to get your mouth around the words, also you're trying to get your mindset right. And so practicing it is very helpful. Having a script to practice is very helpful. But once you've thought through what you want to say, when and if they interrupt you and also share their point of view, which you certainly want to hear, it'll help you listen to them and not worry about you getting you through your message. What happens when somebody responds defensively? I know. I have a script for that. On my website, actually. When someone's response defensively, so first of all, I think it's important to step back and remind them, I'm only sharing this with you because I care about you and your success. Also, that's where labeling comes in too. Listen, I see that you're having kind of an emotional reaction. I understand that. I don't like getting difficult feedback either. So let me just see if we can calm down for a second. And we might need a minute. The other thing you can do when someone acts defensively is you can just be quiet. And you can also say, listen, I don't want to upset you. Tell me more about how this is landing for you. By the way, I just did this with a client the other day. I was giving him the feedback. And he got super explosive with me. Quite defensive. And so I just let him talk and let him talk and let him talk. By the way, we think coaches don't take it personally. I took it personally. You're a person. I take everything personally. I'm a person. Yeah. But I let him vent invent invent invent. And then I said, I see that I touched a nerve here, which I think was accurate. I was just labeling that and also what I said to him was I really didn't mean to upset you. That's not why I brought this up. Tell me more about what's coming up for you or what's going on with you. And as a leader, you can say that, too, and you can do this is another woohoo term in coaching. We say holding space. You can hold space for somebody to have a difficult and emotional reaction. And that can go on for 5 minutes or ten minutes, and it's not their final answer. And also, you don't have to take it personally..

Debbie
"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:54 min | 2 d ago

"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You know, it's quite debilitating impostor syndrome. And if you ever experienced it, you know that it's just a very difficult feeling. To come up against your failings and this notion like the jig is up. So it's helpful to find tools to get over it. Because chances are if at that stage, you've done something right, and you have done enough things in your life to know it's not just luck. So the best tool that I've ever offered people, the people find very helpful is called a highlight reel. It's the idea that you look to your past and you find your successes, your accomplishments, the things you're proud of from your past. And if you write them down a couple of times, it kind of like grooves them into your brain, and if you read them over, a daily, as a practice, it reminds you, hey, I've actually accomplished a lot of things. And then if you're actually having an impostor syndrome attack right now, you can pull up your list of accomplishments, your highlight reel, and you can read it just to give yourself a little more perspective and a little more evidence that actually you've done a couple of important things in your life. You write that the phrase impostor syndrome is not a single monolithic thing. It takes many forms and flavors of self doubt that get triggered and founders in certain situations. Now you talked about the highlight reel. What about for people that are not founders or have reached the Pinnacle of their careers yet for those that are struggling with even just feeling like they're not a fraud? Is there anything that can be done to help people just one thing that they can do differently in thinking about that? Well, I think the highlight reel is helpful for them too. And then I would add that self compassion just kind of that's actually back to reflection. Tuning into these voices in your head and then asking the voice in your head that's being critical or self doubt or jeering at you or telling you your luck is going to run out. You could say, huh, how are you? And what do you have to teach me? And then listen to the answer and see if anything shows up. And if you can get into dialog with that part of you, it's healing. It's also quite interesting what comes up as in there's something here for me to learn. So I'll give you an example. One of the founders I work with, he came up against this impostor syndrome, and he couldn't shake it. He couldn't sleep. He was having panic attacks. And we just talked it through and I asked him to do his writing exercise. Who are you? And what do you have to teach me? And he scoffed at it. But he was willing to do it. And he realized that even though his board had never called him out on this, and even though he was running, what was then a successful business, which got even more successful, he realized that he didn't not feel like he really understood his metrics. And he really understood his business enough. But the truth is, he had more work to do in understanding his business. He had more work to do in digging deeper in terms of what the metrics should be, what some of the industry norms and practices were. And even maybe understanding what some of the old timers in the industry had to add, because you know a lot of times the startups are like, oh, we're disrupting the old timers. But actually, he was missing some of that knowledge. And he went and did that work. It didn't take that long. But it really solved his I'm an impostor in this industry, problem, and he wouldn't have gotten there if we hadn't done this woo woo. Writing exercise. Well, another thing that you include in the book that's actually been really helpful to me is the idea of vaporizing and pasta syndrome by coming to terms with your underlying fears and concerns about who you think you are. And that's been really helpful for me. I think that's a wonderful exercise. Can you talk a little bit more about that for our listeners that might be suffering from their own impostor syndrome? So actually, I just want to first mention that I spoke to Susie batis, who is the founder and former CEO of popery. Poo pourri is this amazing breakthrough product that took off like a virally. And Susie batiste told me, I don't have impostor syndrome. I am an impostor. I've never done this before, and I love that she said that. And I think that young people should recognize that they don't need to know everything in order to be successful. And that there's a lot of different ways to learn. So if you're feeling this insecurity, the self doubt, again, I would go back to tuning into what are you afraid of? What are you concerned about? What are you thinking about yourself and how are you judging yourself? And then go out and find answers. You need more education. Often, young people need more mentorship, maybe people who have been successful in your field that you want to be successful in, or maybe just people you admire and that they live their life in a great way. If you can find those mentors, they will help you find your way, but they will also give you in doing so amazing positive feedback about what you're already doing. And that's going to help both you feel confident about where you are now and help you feel confident in the steps that you walk along your path. I have to urge people listening to make sure that they play that part that elicit just said again, and then go out and ask people to be your mentors. Because people are not going to approach you and say, hey, can I mentor you? Unless you're really lucky. Most of the time it comes from asking and one thing that you do talk about quite eloquently in your book is the role of asking for the things that you want. Yeah. Asking for the things that you want is the way you're going to get the things that you want. And as my mentor martial goldsmith told me one day, you don't ask, you don't get. And Debbie, I just want to also mention that I myself have two or three pure coaches, so we're mutual mentors for each other, and there's one pure coach I have who's inside of my field who's also a fellow coach and we kind of coach each other and mentor each other, and then there's somebody I have who's more in the startup world and actually in the investing world. And we both meant to each other and coach each other and it's a very fruitful relationship. It's also a way to get to know somebody in a different environment, and it's a way where you can both benefit from the relationship very sort of clearly and specifically. And I just would say everybody can find like 5 different people to pure coach with each other because you can always benefit from the perspective of somebody else. Elissa I want to talk to you a little bit about the difference between leading and managing. And you write in your book that leaders are always seen as not so subtly as better. People say, as if bragging, I'm a great leader, but I'm a terrible manager. Talk about the difference between leading and managing and why both roles are so critical to running not just a successful startup to running a successful company. Yes, for sure. So it is true that leaders bring a lot of important qualities, right? So we think about leadership and that brings the vision, that brings the charisma, the speaking ability, the ability to galvanize people around you, probably the strategy. Also, we think about leaders is looking into the future two or three or more years. So that is super important. But if you're just doing that, then who is doing the execution? The managers are the ones that are in the day to today hand to hand combat of making sure everyone understands their goals..

syndrome attack Susie batis Susie batiste goldsmith Debbie Elissa
"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:59 min | 2 d ago

"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Realize they would come within 5 minutes of each other. You know, times ten, a day, right? And I was like, yep, that's the life you signed up for. And the issue is that people just get caught up in their own emotions. And then they have to address the all hands or have the customer call or sort out this difficult situation going on in marketing. So they have to really stop and reflect and think about, what am I trying to get done here? And they need to find a way to compartmentalize all that baggage from the past three hours of what that whatever that was. In order to put themselves in the mind's eye to be effective to be amazing to be the leader here and now. So that's one reason that reflection is so critical. And the second is because it's just an incredible tool. I was working with a founder one time and he was telling me about his many complaints. Many problems many complaints and he's not wrong. There's always a lot of complaints inside of a startup and things are not we're usually not working ideally, so he's expressing to me all the things he was going that were going wrong. And I just got this angle and I said, you know, I'd love you to write that down. All of those things and spend a few days journaling every day about all the problems and concerns. And what they bring up for you. And so to his credit, took that assignment away and a three days later, he sent me his actually scanned his journal and sent it to me. And we talked it through and the whole journal was, these complaints this complaint this complaint this complaint, and it came back to my people aren't doing the right thing. But then he realized I haven't told them. What I'm expecting, what the context is, it always came back to him. In terms of what he had missed inside of communication inside of context and I think that reflection is the most powerful tool to recognize that and realize that. So if you really will go deep and you do the work, you see the root cause of some of these things. Otherwise, you just walk around think, oh, they're not good, I should fire them. No, no. You should give them you should give them context. Let's try that. Or coach them. Let's try that, but you can't get there unless you're willing to unpeel some of these layers inside of you. Let's talk about the role of authenticity in leadership. It's a big word we hear a lot now. And I think just the idea of saying something is needs to be authentic means it already stops being authentic. That's true. But on the one hand, you have the notion that a leader is supposed to be authentic. And on the other hand, there's the platitude, never let them see you sweat. So it seems like authenticity is both complicated and polarizing. How do you understand what it means to be authentic? And how do you coach your clients on the role of authenticity in leadership? Yeah, it's a good question and something that I think about all the time, because listen, of course, you should be authentic, whatever that means. The problem is that it means a lot of different things and a lot of different times. Walt Whitman said we are multitudes. And it is so true. We are multitudes. So your authentic self can change at any given moment. At the same time, you need to actually take on the mantel and the role of the leader. And you need to do so in a way that feels more or less genuine to you. So if you are a quiet more solitary type and you try to go out and be like a big extrovert, that's gonna be weird for everybody. However, if you are a quiet solitary type and your authentic way of doing things is to be silent. Actually, the role of the CEO, it requires you to communicate in different contexts. So you've got to find the way to learn to do that in a way that feels more or less comfortable to you. And that you do it even if you don't want to do it, and the way I think of all of that is ultimately you get to let your humanity show, which is certainly important because I would just add vulnerability is an important tool of leadership because when your vulnerable, other people recognize they can be vulnerable and safe with you and inside of your company. So that's really good. But if you start freaking out in an authentic way, that's not going to really inspire confidence in the people around you. So the way I land on authenticity is that you have to be you have to show your humanity and you have to learn the tools that you need to be an effective leader in your role, with CEO or whatever leader you are in your role in a way that's going to feel ultimately natural and genuine to you. By the way, the last thing is that when you start a new skill just like with everything, you're going to be uncomfortable. You're going to be all elbows and knees. You're not going to do it right. So you also need to be able to tolerate the sort of learning curve that's necessary as you try on new behaviors. It's so interesting because high achievement people don't like to do anything that they're not good of right out of the gate. And I don't know that that's ever possible ever. You know, we can't do very much well without being taught. And so it's an interesting conundrum being a leader when you're expected to be excellent at everything. But still have to learn new skills. Yeah, it's really true. And I think that's the other thing about as you said, high achieving people and it's so true. And when your kids, it's acceptable to learn something, but somehow when we get to be adults, it's like somehow not acceptable anymore. That's why I think culture is so important. If you're the CEO and you say, listen, I'm going to make mistakes. We're going to make mistakes, and we're going to have a learning organization culture. That's going to help everybody recognize that learning is valued around here. I want to talk to you about impostor syndrome. You talk a lot about it. You write a lot of really important things in your book about impostor syndrome. And you have a ridiculously successful executive quoted in your book that states. The more successful I am, the more I have impostor syndrome. How common is that? And how do you view impostor syndrome? How do you define impostor syndrome just like the whole thing? The whole thing. Yeah. Well, so impostor syndrome is simply this notion that you're a fake you're a fraud, they're going to find you out and the game is over. The jig is up. That is impostor syndrome. You know, your luck is going to run out. And so I would say that I'm not going to say there's no such thing as all every single one. But most founders at some point along the way have impostor syndrome. It might be little, and it might be big. It might be like, I just screwed up that board meeting. The board is going to think that I'm an idiot. The board's going to fire me. That might just be like a little momentary panic. As compared to, I'm trying to raise around. It's not working. I'm not going to be able to raise this round. We're going to have to close up shop, TechCrunch is going to write about it. And all things are going to go bad. All this catastrophizing..

Walt Whitman TechCrunch
"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:27 min | 2 d ago

"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You said that you know that leadership is an unnatural act because you've witnessed it helping CEOs commit the unnatural act of leadership for now over two decades. Based on what you know now, what is the biggest challenge founders and startup leaders face? Startup, founders have to face the challenge of the scale of their business being extremely rapid. The velocity of the scale of their business that requires them to grow their own leadership style, their own behavioral style, their change and adaptation at a velocity which is just enormously hard to do. So there's a lot embedded in that the different things you have to change and adjust and learn and grow, but ultimately you have to do that in concert with the ups and downs of the business, which are challenging, and then also hopefully, you know, if you're successful, the rapid scale, the rapid velocity of scale of the company. You write that while your title may make you the boss, your people make you a leader. Can you talk a little bit more about what that means? You know what that means is that people will follow you because you're the boss. And they'll do what you tell them to, if that's kind of your style because you're the boss. But as a startup founder growing into a leader and really is any leader of CEO, you have to earn the right for people to follow you. For people to trust you for people to agree with your C your direction and believe in your direction, even though they may not actually have any evidence themselves to follow you even when they disagree with your direction, you need to sort of earn that leadership through influence through appreciating them through them knowing that you care, both about them and also about ultimately success of the business, more than you care about yourself. And so all of those elements are in play that you have to activate to get people to really get behind you in a fulsome and significant way that you need when you're trying to do something hard. In a leadership feels like a real privilege, but it has a lot of responsibilities. And it feels to me that there's a lot of accountability to your people when you're a leader. One of the things that really struck me in your book was a quote that you include from chip Conley, the founder of joie de vivre, the hotel chain. Who states in the book don't mistake activity. For achievement. I want to make that a tattoo. For a couple of reasons. One, it could have applied to anything. I remember one time sitting with one of my graduate students who was on the verge of failing out. We were sitting with the provost, and he was saying how hard he worked, how hard he worked, how hard he worked. And the provost said sort of the same thing. Don't mistake working hard for working smart. And I also think it applies in another area where people want to appear busy or want to feel busy so they feel like they matter or that they're important or that they're distracting themselves from whatever it is that they don't want to face. Why do humans seek out so much activity to sort of keep themselves afloat? I think that actually both of those ways of framing mistaking activity for achievement have to do with our capacity for self denial. So the question you ask is, why do people stay so busy, even if they're not getting anywhere? I think the answer is they don't want to face the sort of still inner voice. They don't want to maybe face always the hard work that they have to do to the hard personal work or the hard, you know, professional work, it's easier to answer email all day than to like really think about the strategy of where we're going. Which is difficult intellectual labor. But the second thing is also true that people do feel like if I'm working and working and working on this treadmill, at least I won't get fired. You know, at least I'm doing something. And, you know, in a large company, sometimes that's true, you can hide more easily. I will say inside of a startup, it's just not going to work that way, because with startups, they are lean and also they require everyone to give discretionary effort. And that's what startup people do. And if you're not able to make that that activity count and make it worthwhile and achieve things based on it, ultimately, you're just following behind and you're keeping the team behind. And that's not sustainable for a startup, which is either fighting for its life or growing with a massive velocity. When you start with a new client, the first question you ask them is simply what's going on. Why do you start with that question? Because first of all, I really want to know. I want to know what's like why are we here? I try not to wait it, especially if I have some background information about why someone else thinks that we're here. Or why they originally called me, because I kind of want to know what's up right now, and that's where we're going to enter the discussion. You talk about how the act of reflection needs to become a reflex and that founders and all leaders need to learn to reflect, get in the habit of reflecting and turn to reflection rather than reaction when bad things happen. And that really surprised me because it was really the first time I became really aware of the inner workings of what it means to be or have an executive coach and I wasn't expecting it to be so sort of philosophical and self reflective. Yes. Well, I think it's important two things come to mind. One is that if you're a leader, I just spoke to one of my clients two weeks ago, and she said to me, I knew that the startup was going to have ups and downs..

chip Conley joie de vivre
"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:41 min | 2 d ago

"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Sometimes the best use of a coach is to have somebody who's safe and non judgmental and they're listening to you get through the things that you're stuck on because then you can come out the other side with better thinking and a better plan forward. 30 years ago, having a coach was primarily kept a secret. It was something that people weren't quite as forthright about. Now people are proud to have a coach talk about their coaches. It's a badge of honor and a lot of ways. Things have really changed. What would you say is the primary driver of that cultural shift? There is definitely, especially in the past 5 or ten years more in understanding of what it's really like to be a leader in a company. In my world of startups, there's a lot more light shined on what founders and CEOs have to go through and how difficult it is, there is more permission to be vulnerable and real. So in light of all that, people are just more open about having a coach and other kinds of tools to help them. Just like successful athletes have a coach. We know how you got your first client work Samuels. How did you get your second and third and fourth? First of all, I just want to say that. The reason I was able to focus on the life of my dreams is because I had actually gone to the trouble of making a vision board. Wow. Yeah. Which I still have. Talk about, you know, body and soul, right? Woohoo. I'm talking about what I did. And you know, it was uncharacteristic of me to think I'm going to make a fishing board. I'm going to make a collage of my ideal life. So I had a pictorial representation of my ideal life, which was my guiding light in all the things that I did like getting my first client, like going down to the gym that day, but also getting my first client. So one thing I did was I taught adult Ed. This was the Boston center for adult Ed and I pitched them a course on money coaching. I was like very passionate about your CPA girl. Yeah. Let's make use of it. Exactly. I was very passionate about making a difference, so they could buy their first home. They could put their kid through college. They could retire. So I thought, well, the issue is people are confused about money. And a friend of mine called me and I was leaving for the class, and my friend Doris, and she said, oh, what are you doing? I got to go, I'm running late. Oh, what are you running late for? I'm teaching a class. I got to go. And she said, oh, a class. It's a money coaching. I gotta go. One of my clients is looking for someone to teach business acumen and their curriculum. Are you available for that? I was like, huh, I got plenty of time. Plenty of time to talk to your doors. Yeah, yes, that's right. That's right, very good point. So I began sort of hustling as much as I can in telling people and eventually this is a life lesson. When you tell enough people what you're up to actually, people want to help. And Doris put me in touch with EMC. Which is a fantastic company that got bought by Dell about three years ago. And I thought, well, if I start teaching in the business acumen curriculum, I will very quickly work my way into leadership curriculum. That's what's going to happen. And that's exactly what happened. And then once I was working at EMC, that became an opening for other referrals. It became an opening just to have like the credibility of working with EMC. So a lot of things kind of flowed from there. Why startups? I moved to New York, probably about 14 years ago. Part of what was happening in New York was the tech startup scene was nascent in those days. And I was excited to be part of that building process of being part of this tech scene that we were building here in the startup scene and I met the GM of Foursquare at this actually it was a musical theater event through a Harvard alumni group, so like, what? And also, why was I there? But he was there, Evan Cohen. And we talked and we just became friends. And we would meet for coffee now and again, and he would just sort of share what was going on with him and what was going at four square. And then about a year later, he introduced me to the HR person and I started doing manager training there. And then from there, I started coaching a number of the executives there, including Dennis Crowley, the founder, and at the time CEO, a Foursquare. And I remembered it was like a flash back to Boston and that startup life that I loved and so it was a combination of being thrown into the startup world and realizing that I could make a difference in New York and that was very exciting. Since then, you've been named as the number one top startup coach in the world. You are also named the number one global guru of startups. And you've worked with startups including Venmo Etsy, the wire cutter, Tory burch, you've coached CEOs and C suite executives, at companies, including Sony, IBM, Google, Microsoft, Bloomberg, The New York Times, Calvin Klein the list goes on and on. You've also just published your first book. It's titled from startup to grown-up, grow your leadership to grow your business. Unless it congratulations. I know you've been working in this for a long time. Thank you Debbie. Thank you so much. And I have been working on this for a long time. It's nice to hear all that. Thank you. You start your book by declaring that leadership is an unnatural.

Boston center for adult Ed EMC Doris Samuels Harvard alumni group Evan Cohen New York Ed Dell Dennis Crowley GM Venmo Etsy Boston Tory burch CEOs Calvin Klein Bloomberg IBM The New York Times Sony
"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:15 min | 2 d ago

"cohn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Debbie. It's such a joy to be here with you. Alisa, is it true you once got the rapper jelly donut to freestyle about meetings? It's true. That is true. We were I was interviewing him for my Forbes column. You know, what he does is he's a rapper. He's also an improv artist, and we were talking about what improv can add to business and to startups. And so yep, I got him to rap about meetings at the very end of our discussion. What is there to rap about meetings? Meetings give you a beatings. Yeah. Yeah. He was like me and you and the zoom, you know, I'm not sure if he would call it a test wrap ever, but he was pretty. He's extremely talented. You know, he's one of the members of the freestyle love supreme coming back to Broadway now. And he's so talented. And that's what I loved about him. And again, the notion of what improv brings to business and what improv brings to startups, the idea that you have to make do with what you have and what he had right then was meetings. Alys grew up in Massachusetts and I understand you were quite good at algebra. So much so that you competed with the boys in your class in 6th grade. But as you made your way through school, that changed and your confidence plummeted. What happened? Debbie, it's true what they say about you that you go deep in your research. My goodness. That is absolutely true. And you know, what did happen? I got into geometry in high school and for whatever reason I got intimidated. And I think that there is a meme which in my case was true, and I think it's true at times where girls have a fall off in math. And it took me, frankly, a long time to get over that fall off. I mean, I was. I loved algebra. I excelled at algebra, somehow after that moment in high school, I lost all my confidence in math. And I never really regained it until I went to business school and I had to attend math camp. Yes. Before I was allowed into business school and not only that, but to prep for that, I took calculus. I know. And then I also took stats statistics and actually I thought, huh, this actually isn't that hard after all. You said that your coaching imprint really began when you were 13 years old. What happened at that point to create that imprint? So I was part of a youth group a Jewish youth group called young Judea and it turned out it was a pure lead youth group. I didn't even know what that was. I was only 13 years old. But what I did know is that I and all of us were facilitating discussions for the rest of our peers for the rest of the people in the youth group. Other youth groups went to the movies or they went bowling or something, what we did was we had intense intellectual discussions, and I started facilitating when I was 13, and I got a lot of practice from that period. And I can see that the roots of my profession now and my joy and love for in my skill and facilitation started that. Despite your interest, your early interest in musical theater and your experiments and stand up comedy, you went to Boston University and studied journalism. What did you think you wanted to do professionally at that point? I had no idea, but I do know that I love to read. And what I really wanted to do was to be an English major. And my parents were like, you're not going to be an English major. We are not setting you to college to go get a liberal arts degree. What are you going to do with that? So we all decided that journalism was close enough, right? So that's what I ended up doing. And I didn't know what I wanted to do, but I did a number of internships and journalism during that period to know that I probably did not want to be a journalist. At the time, I was quite shy. And so it was shocked by that. I was very shocked. I grew up a shy kid, which is, by the way, why it was so helpful to find this youth group. I sort of find my tribe of people, but when I was doing my few internships as a journalist, I had a lot of trouble asking strangers questions. And then I had a lot of trouble going back to them and asking them follow-up questions. So that was very difficult for me. So I just knew that wasn't my thing. But I did like education and I did like the university environment. So my next two jobs kind of reflected that. And I'd sort of until I really found my way, I just kind of made up a bunch of stuff. What made you decide to go on and get an MBA in strategy and organizational development from Cornell? Well, I worked at northeastern, and I was the chief of staff to the provost, and we were doing strategic planning. And so at some point, the provost has made this offhand comment he just said, oh, you can't. You can't manage faculty because they have tenure. And by the way, even I was quite young, and I didn't even quite get it, but I began to understand that what he meant was because you can't fire them. And I thought, well, that can't be that people will only do what you want them to do for the organization. If you fire them. You know, sort of this weapon you have. And I wanted to go off to business school to think about that. And to learn more about why people did things for organizations or sadly didn't do them. But I got there and I got all turned around. I went to Cornell and the focus at Cornell was very much financed. It's very much Wall Street. So actually, I ended up focusing in finance and strategy and accounting of all things. You're a CPA. I'm a dad. I was CBA. And I loved accounting. I loved it. In some ways, it's just like journalism. It's kind of storytelling for business. And it's the language of business. And so I loved the analytical approach. I loved figuring things out. And I just really enjoyed it and I saw it as a triumph over the past. Now, I understand that when you went to Cornell, you felt that you had something to prove. Why did you feel like you had something to prove? What were you looking to prove? Well, I think that's about two things. It's like identity, you know, that I was this little girl from a small town. I'm from holliston, Massachusetts. And that's like this rural place and I just didn't think that I could go off and achieve, like, wow, you know, get my MBA or something like that. Also, I was from the nonprofit world. So as journalism major from the nonprofit world, and I had to go to math camp before they let me in. So I felt like I had to overcome certain challenges to prove that I belong there. And so that was identity. And second, I was still dealing with this lack of confidence in terms of my ability to do, you know, the so called hard stuff of business. So again, numbers and finance and analysis and even I had gone there with the so called soft stuff of business. More of the organizational development stuff. So it took me time to unravel all that. But in the meantime, I was on a mission to be successful at business school. After graduation, you became a strategy consultant at pricewaterhouse coopers where you were on a fast.

Debbie Alisa Alys Cornell Massachusetts Boston University bowling CBA holliston pricewaterhouse coopers
Stroud throws 5 TDs, No. 7 Buckeyes bury Maryland 66-17

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Stroud throws 5 TDs, No. 7 Buckeyes bury Maryland 66-17

"On homecoming weekend the number seven ranked Ohio State Buckeyes beat down the visiting Maryland Terrapins sixty six to seventeen the first eight offense to drive through high state resulted in eight straight touchdowns Ohio state quarterback CJ Stroud was superb totaling four hundred six yards passing and four touchdowns but to make it really helped me in the model line does a great job of keeping publicly she was a great job of crazy separation ties are great are blocking a person's original one basketball will I mean I just have to do my job my part senior wide receiver Chris Alabi piece together seven receptions a hundred twenty yards and two touchdowns on the day including an incredible thirty yard touchdown catch in tight coverage midway through the third quarter Ohio state's defense also contributed their fourth consecutive game with the pick six Maxwell Cohn Columbus Ohio

Cj Stroud Maryland Terrapins Ohio State Buckeyes Chris Alabi Ohio Basketball Maxwell Cohn Columbus
"cohn" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:22 min | Last month

"cohn" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"The michele bachmann the world and the jim demint dementia the world and it was just so striking to me that the people who were defining where the republican party stood where these very new very junior members of congress who twenty thirty years ago would have ever heard of right. Now they're driving the debate because they know how to work the system. They know how to work social. They understand the currency now. It isn't getting dollars for your district. It's getting donations. That getting you on hannity getting a big re tweets and all that i feel like that world changed even in ways that surprised a lot of republicans. I wanna talk about repeal and why repeal failed because that i think is also a really crucial lesson around if we take this break on september eleven two thousand one sixty amateur sailors were at sea filming a reality show on an eighteenth century replica. Ship there weeks from land in the nearest tv aradio nine morning with single message was conveyed through their one satellite phone. Four planes hijacked two towers down pentagon attacked thousands dead now. Was it not a single other piece of information for weeks. What was it like to experience nine eleven in isolation and how would they make sense of the radically different world. There returned to. This is just one of the stories in nine twelve. The new podcast series from amazon music and pineapple street studios in each episode of nine twelve hosts. Dan burski tells the stories of characters whose lives would never be the same. After september eleventh and through them we begin to realize that there are new lessons to be learned and that we just might have enough distance now from nine eleven to make sense of some things. We couldn't understand before. Follow nine twelve wherever you get your podcasts. Or you can binge all seven episodes right now on amazon music or with wandering plus so they tried to repeal obamacare twice failed both times and i always think about is so insane when people these arguments against the filibuster like cinema mansions like well. How would you like it if the republicans just came in and try to undo the stuff. It's like we literally just lived through that. Like what are you talking about. What are mike my high. Am i losing my mind. I think i covered that. They tried to repeal the aca with fifty votes. What kind of universes it were. You need sixty votes to pass the aca but only fifty to repeal it. How is what's that friend of progress. And yet even though they went through reconciliation even they only had to get fifty votes and they had a few votes to spirit failed. Why i mean. There's a lot of reasons they failed. I think among the reasons they failed number one was we said before policies hard legislation is hard it inevitably involves taking your big ideals your big slogans and translating them into actual legislative language and then modifying that language to deal with the brazilian people who have a stake in it who are going to want to change it right. I mean that is a difficult process to do it. Takes years of work. Democrats had done that work. Republicans ever did they are not a policy anymore in the book a bunch of republicans. On the record saying yeah. We don't care about policy anymore. We just don't do that. Regrettably because i was talking mostly the narrow the small few who actually did care about policy. So that's that's one part of it second though. I think fundamentally if they had done that work right..

Dan burski michele bachmann dementia hannity republican party amazon aca congress pentagon mike
"cohn" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

05:19 min | Last month

"cohn" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"I've always told the well massachusetts does this mandate and then that becomes the model for the character never actually knew how important it was and it was amazing to me. Reading the old memos interviewing people interviewing obama about this like the first thing out of his mouth my so. Why did you like well. We saw what worked in massachusetts and we were all like aha we can do. This and that's becomes built into the affordable care act. The funny thing is and you were this earlier right. People forget that in the two thousand eight presidential campaign hillary clinton who was the front runner who is like all over healthcare. 'cause she'd done the clinton healthcare plan when her husband was president. It's like she had the mandate and obama was the one who instinctively said. I'm actually not so sure. That's a good idea. Not so comfortable. The idea of telling people that have to get a product they might think is too expensive and by the way. Is it going to work. And he gets eventually once. He's in the white house. I think we talk about obama at some point. The great thing about obama and ezra refilling of obama's he's very much. he's a substance guy and he's very much a part of the intellectual establishment which was absolutely convinced you needed the mandate to make this thing work. The congressional budget office who's projections. Were essential the passing lower convinced to work and so we ended up endorsing it. And meanwhile of course the second it becomes part of the democratic plan right all the republicans who had in some cases like weeks before said mandate turn against it and it becomes a symbol of everything. That's wrong with your character becomes passes. There's the lawsuit challenging it. It barely survives. Because john roberts for reasons. That only john roberts will know eventually decides. He doesn't want to kill the whole law. And meanwhile at the end of the day as it happens republicans end up. When they can't repeal under trump they failed repeal the healthcare law as a whole they decide to get rid of the mandate and. There's lots of predictions that well and take away. The mandate and the insurance markets will collapse. And they didn't in fact it doesn't seem like it had much impact on now. There's a there's a really important astras. I wanna talk forever. But like there's a very solid argument that if you hadn't had the mandate in the first place the you know you needed at the beginning and then you don't need such theirself. We'll see. But i definitely think at the end of the day like the amount of time we spent clearly not as important as we all thought. It was a central fight. It was essential fight the debate. It was a central fight in the construction of plan than the aftermath. Then the lawsuits than tax repeal and the whole argument and like every. This was like complete. This walked cannon. Okay you will get into a death spiral because here's what will happen. Young people healthy people won't buy insurance because they're not required to they will be outside the risk pool..

obama massachusetts john roberts hillary clinton congressional budget office ezra clinton white house cannon
"cohn" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

05:25 min | Last month

"cohn" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"There's this disconnect right between the sort of old intellectual conservative class which still exists right. I mean it exists. In some think tanks it exists exerts lobbying influence. I mean we still have the coke brothers who are to some extent about very old fashioned. We don't want regulations. Don't tax us as you say. It's a complete mismatch with their base which is perfectly happy to have a generous welfare state. As long as it's for that we see in european democracies. There's a kind of more coherent version of this but we don't really have that here at the moment and the contradictions between those two. I think do explain a lot of what happened. In the trump era why they weren't able to govern successfully because those are two very different worldviews right and they they tried to take run at repealing and that to me talk about. Let's talk about the affordable care act. And let's start with this. Sometimes i feel about the affordable care. Act there's a very funny joke. Obama once told the white house correspondents dinner where there's some battle over whether npr is going to be defended and he made some joke about. He's like an npr has a table here. So i guess you guys are so funded. Where do we end up on that. And so i think that about the aca. It was so central to all of our lives who covered politics. Those of us like myself. Who is in washington during the big fights over it. The multiple challenges the court. I've covered it like. Let's start with the now. How is the doing under the strain of a national pandemic. what is it status. right now. status depends very much on your baseline for comparison. I would say on the one hand on the negative ledger right. We are still the only country in the developed world that doesn't have truly universal healthcare. We have many millions of people who do not have insurance. We have many millions of people who have insurance but they still can't pay their medical bills right. 'cause got these high deductibles. The premiums are really eating into their into their wages. We have people who they know they have to. You have.

npr coke aca white house Obama washington
US Panel Backs COVID-19 Boosters Only for Elderly, High-Risk

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

US Panel Backs COVID-19 Boosters Only for Elderly, High-Risk

"Advisers at the food and drug administration rejected recommending widespread use of a third dose of visors coronavirus vaccine the vote was sixteen to two against three doses a setback for the White House adviser Dr Michael Carrillo says they need more data we need to target the boosters right now it should be clear to the people are likely to be at high risk and it's an older population that you know compromise and the advisers later voted to recommend the extra does to those people advisor Dr Amanda Cohn at the CDC says the focus should stay on two doses it is clear that the unvaccinated are providing transmission the Biden ministration was hoping for the three dose recommendation to shore up protection from the delta variant at Donahue Washington

Dr Michael Carrillo Food And Drug Administration Dr Amanda Cohn White House CDC Biden Washington
Verdell, No. 12 Oregon Stun No. 3 Ohio State 35-28

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last month

Verdell, No. 12 Oregon Stun No. 3 Ohio State 35-28

"A mid season enter conference ranked match up in between the third ranked Buckeyes and the twelfth ranked Oregon ducks in Columbus Ohio ended with a thirty five twenty eight upset win by the visitors the game became an offense of slugfest with one thousand one hundred seventeen total yards combined between the two schools but Oregon won the rushing attack running back CJ for dell and Travis dye combined for over two hundred yards on the ground including for dell seventy seven yard rushing touchdown open up the second half Ohio state quarterback CJ Stroud impressed with four hundred and eighty four yards passing Maxwell Cohn Columbus Ohio

Oregon Ducks Buckeyes Travis Dye Ohio Columbus Dell Oregon Cj Stroud Maxwell Cohn
"cohn" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

05:09 min | Last month

"cohn" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"All right once you get The next to here. I don't want my my The name apologised me. Matt moore minded me. I was with my niece and nephew over the weekend and my niece was telling. My brother-in-law story news. She said There's a kid in my class. Atlas and my brother in law goes. Does he have the way to the world on his shoulders and i laughed so hard because it was the best. It was so calm it was just best dad joke and then we moved on but i was so proud of him all right really quick one from our lovely lisa memoir pronounce. She and her this me finding back. I voted no to the recall. Lisa more. I did as well and i got confirmation that my vote was counted. If you're listening. And you're in california. I am in lauren you to please at this point. Do not mail in your ballot. Don't walk it down to a ballot box because joy is still in charge of the male match. Shit slow as fuck so. Please make sure your vote is going to be counted. Just walking down to a box please. Vote no on this. Recall my goodness okay. If you're able definitely yes We've got a pronoun. She and her stan adelstein a wonderful member it. I hope that's i'm saying edelstein. Right edelstein edelstein. A wonderful member of the black hills community in south dakota donated ninety one hundred dollar gift cards to be given to the i ninety people to attend a cohen vaccine clinic for his ninetieth birthday. Oh my god. What a mench. Stan was quoted in a press release. My hope is that this vaccine clinic will save lives in the jewish faith. We believe quote to save a single life to save the world. Entire quote kills me. Oh my goodness. The clinic was held on september. Two thousand twenty one for five hours and one hundred eight. Vaccinations were given stand donated. A few more gift cards and dan davis chippiness chipped in as well. Thank you stand. Thank you dan. Oh my god. I'm i'm having a hard time keeping together on this one Please please google him for more information on his life and contributions again. That is stan adelstein. Ad l. s. t. i n. And when i said. He's a mench mended but jewish faith. Yeah he saves. A single life saves the world entire. I think that was what was engraved on the ring. That schindler's jews give to him. Oh my goodness he fled. Okay so great. That's so amazing. Happy ninetieth birthday. Indeed wonderful and i think this is the last one. Yeah here finally from Shana pronounce she and her. Hey beanies i've been listening since day. One at the kitchen table just wanted to share some news and the ultimate story for your flip it blew segment as a co chair of the bedford. Democratic committee in new hampshire. We've been working day and night to elect an exceptional candidate to an open. State rep seat in the new hampshire house in case you didn't know the nhl legislature has been taken over by extreme libertarians. Enduring this last session passed among other awful laws and abortion ban. Twenty weeks with mandatory vaginal ultrasounds. The most extreme school voucher bill in the country. Oh and they banned. Crt here too. I thought libertarians were supposed to not want government to do. Okay yeah pretty much. All their favorite hits have been passed by these extremists. Well yesterday all of our hard work paid off. Catherine rambo a former town councillor won a seat in the new hampshire state house. She's the first democrat to win. A previously republican held legislative district in any state since president biden took office were so excited and grateful for the help of our democratic community here in town across the state with so many people pitching in writing postcards making phone calls. We knocked on thousands of doors. We endured endless challenges from campaigning in the heat and rain to being yelled at during Visibility to the constant disgusting defacing of our campaign signs but in the end we had more votes. Thirty seven more votes to be exact amazing. Thank you for being there for me. As i've been working on this election. It has been invaluable to have this community as voice of sanity. If we can flip this seat in very red bedford new hampshire. There is hope for us. All all thirty seven of those votes came from your work and the work of all the people that you did this with is shawna this is your victory and her victory and this is just so wonderful now. I'm sure dana that All the mainstream media is going to sit down with all these voters and be like. This is a bellwether shows. That biden is doing well and you know we should ask these these voters what they think about the. They're no they're not going to do now. They're not gonna stop. Yeah yeah that just They do that with everything else That trump wins but whatever. Look at this photo. Yes i love it such i can. Everyone's smiling because they have their masks on as they should. Everyone smiling the photo. Yeah and then there's an ics. Nevertheless she persisted shirt and a b. Kind hat. I want to visit yawn hug. You all knows through a group of people right.

stan adelstein edelstein edelstein Matt moore new hampshire Democratic committee edelstein dan davis lauren Catherine rambo lisa south dakota Lisa Stan president biden schindler Shana california dan bedford
"cohn" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

03:39 min | Last month

"cohn" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"Payday from the state. We urge you to act to protect the right to choose without delay and then signed by every democrat here in the and i'm just looking through here. June accused quicksand monitored. Yep every every democrat in the judiciary so cheers and applause. That was incredibly well. Written yup very very good saying there is current federal law. That should disallow us and and you know we talked to steve vladeck yesterday who says you know. Original jurisdiction and texas sovereignty dozen apply. Just saying laurence tribe also tweeted the same thing. And that's why i tweeted put on your original jurisdiction pants. Just try to try to do something. Here you know 'cause like i said if you can put forth that weak ass argument against judge amy berman jackson on that barnum. Oh no kidding at least you can do is try something here and you have a better chance. You have a better chance here. Hopefully we'll do the right thing. Not the right thing. The just the just thing in this situation. Luckily we've got people down in texas fighting these voter suppression bills. Well got civil rights groups. They've already filed a slew of lawsuits in texas on tuesday kicking off. What is expected to be an extensive legal battle mere hours after governor greg. Abbott signed controversial voting restrictions into law. I think it was leaving less than ours like this. I lost it went through very quickly. The end lacey. P. legal defense fund filed a federal lawsuit. Shortly after the bill was signed. Arguing had intentionally targets and burdens methods and means of voting used by voters of color. We've also got the lawyers committee for civil rights under law and decker. Llp filed a separate suit in a state district corden harris county on behalf of texas state conference of the nwea p and common cause texas. And that's among others in that group we've got the latino civil rights groups the l. u. l. a. and voto latino also sued in a joint lawsuit with texas american federation of teachers and the texas alliance for retired americans. Alleging matt the new measures impose an undue burden on the right to vote. And we've got the american. Civil liberties union brought its own lawsuit last week after republican lawmakers passed the bill calling it extremist in anti voter and we have the api civil rights group. Oh see a asian pacific american advocates houston chapter the league of women. Voters of texas and others filed a federal lawsuit in austin while a harris county elections official joined several community based organizations in a suit filed in san antonio they're filing lawsuits across the state. So we're going to keep you updated on all these legal challenges and they're going to keep coming. I'm sure as they worked through their way through the courts So let's just hope we can get the law blocked pending litigation in that kurt rules or left in place for totally twenty twenty two now. That's my hope. Is that somebody else. Some federal judge somewhere. We'll say blocked off from going into effect while it's works. Its way through the courts. Yeah and you know my concern is it. Goes up to the shadow docket who lets it stand. I don't know. I wou we'll see but this is my hope. This is my hope. Yeah all right. We have the same fears my friend. We have the same hopes and fears. The having a having a supreme court purchased by dark money is very frightening. And we're starting to see the implications all right. We'll be right back to discuss. The global threat of authoritarianism started by trump. And how many of trump's people are involved in other countries with election security expert jennifer cone. Stay with us. We'll be right back. Hey everybody it's a g. Today's episode of the beans is brought to you better help..

texas steve vladeck laurence tribe amy berman jackson governor greg lawyers committee for civil ri texas american federation of t harris county texas alliance for retired ame barnum Civil liberties union league of women Abbott lacey Llp matt houston san antonio austin kurt
2021 College Football Betting Preview

Behind the Bets

04:24 min | 2 months ago

2021 College Football Betting Preview

"Gentleman. I have picked the brain of many times. Jay romano pro. Better here in las vegas good to be with you. Thanks for having me all right well. We finally broke the seal. Got you on the pod. And i think it's a perfect situation. Do college win. Totals because the board has been hit pretty hard. But there's still a lot of opportunities out there and we're we're obviously. The calendars turned to mid august. We are ready to go Football season's right around the corner. So i know there's a lot of plays you like a little bit off the grid but i want to start the marquee ones and it's the one that's my favorite of a mall and i've talked about it a few times on daily wager. I believe i've even mentioned it here on the podcast but i am very very big on auburn under seven now the juices move some shops or six and a half. If you want to go six plus money that's fine. It's just so tough when you get the push at seven so i prefer the seven with the juice and it all comes down to the schedule. Not the only reason but the schedules really really difficult. And you've got bama. You got an got georgia. I don't think there's any chance auburn win those games. I know rivalry game and war eagle and all that stuff with the with the iron bowl but it's just auburn is rebuilding. And they have a new coach bryan. Hartson coming in from boise. State and bonex is just not materialize into the quarterback that everyone thought he would be. Maybe a new oc. Mike bobo will unlock. I'll just kind of have to see it to believe it. So in addition to obama. Georgia am there at lsu. They have all miss at home. You know at arkansas. And then there's there's this tough spots here and it's a team that's going to be lacking on offense defense. They're calling card. So i think i don't see how they go eight and four to lose this play. Well i i would definitely recommend Playing the seven laying the juice in this situation. I almost always gonna lay the juice versus taking maybe plus one ten plus one twenty on the under. It's definitely worth the extra half a game. I'm actually high on auburn this year. However i completely agree with you. The schedule is brutal. There's just no breeders for them. I think bonex. Could you know have an improvement. This year they can play well. It's just there's just not enough wings on the schedule. It really looks like they're ceiling is seven. It's just you know when you like. You said when you go to texas. Am have to play alabama lsu home against georgia. And then at penn state week three. It's just you forgot about the penn state game. I'm glad you mentioned that. Cause at the white out game in happy valley. yeah. And i'm looking headlines there between four and a half and seven and a half point underdogs So they can exceed expectations and still not go over this win total. Yeah no. it's a lot to ask. It's certainly a lot to ask but you're so you're high on wsb. Maybe as a dog and a lot of spots throughout the season. So i know you have some places. Well but notre dame under nine talk about not soft spots on the schedule that that's certainly stands out where you'll get the irish yet. The with them again is scheduled schedule. Schedule you know. I know there are top ten ranked team coming into the season but it is just absolutely unforgiving. Weakened weak outs starting at florida state where they opened about ten and a half eleven point favorites. It's down to seven and a half eight. That's not gonna be an easy task. Going into dough campbell on a standalone game in a national televised audience. Week one with a new quarterback Jet cohn was name started earlier this week. With up and down. Wisconsin played well and times. But we'll we'll have to see how he jumped there Notre dame is starting four new offensive lineman. They returned to starters on offense. It's it's a little early in the season For that type of test. So not only would. I looked afford a states Plus the points week one just a little bonus pick right there but the under nine for the season feels like a pretty safe option

Jay Romano Auburn Hartson Bonex Mike Bobo Alabama Lsu Georgia Las Vegas Boise LSU Football Bryan Arkansas Barack Obama Penn State WSB Texas Jet Cohn
1 Suspect in Custody, Another at Large After 14 Injured in Austin

Masters in Business

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

1 Suspect in Custody, Another at Large After 14 Injured in Austin

"Following a mass shooting in downtown Austin overnight. That left at least 14 people hurt Brian Gan reports. Interim police chief Joseph Shea Cohn says they're narrowing in on possible suspects. We have developed suspects. In this case. There are two male suspects. I'm not going to release any further information because the investigation is very much ongoing. The shooting took place in downtown Austin's Entertainment district, where barricades are put up on sixth Street due to the crowds. Police say it appears to have been a disturbance between two groups of people and not the large crowd being targeted. In Texas. I'm Brian Gan. Police say

Brian Gan Joseph Shea Cohn Austin Texas
"cohn" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

03:29 min | 7 months ago

"cohn" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"A lot of times people want to know is happening in other states and so we sent freedom of information act request to dozens of states across the country. And of course got a lot of responses back that you know we don't carry this. We don't have access to this information. But we know of at least eight other states that allow sterilization procedures under certain circumstances and in speaking with other organizations across the country that do direct service work with people inside women's prisons. We know that this is happening. But we don't know to what degree because of the layers of secrecy and privacy that these institutions are able to hide behind. It was so jarring. I think for me to to see that scene that you were just describing where on like people's legs were dangling from in front of an exam room it was just. It's one of those moments where you really see the kind of visual of the phrase like people being more than their number in like how the state tries to really like dehumanize folks in big in small ways and like a visual like that is so universalising because like who hasn't sat at a table in that way. And i completely agree with a lot of the i think complexity that the film will really brought around this idea of consent and i remember one of the scenes where they're kind of going over like while. Did you tell the women that you were going to do this. Did he. consent for only if they're found cancer cells or or you know all these different stipulations and everyone's kind of dancing around the idea of like is this even setting or people are safe enough to know what their consent would mean or if they're even allowed to consent right like these ideas about who who is keeping you safe right if you say no will there be retaliation and like is doctor actually even care about your well being if they're employed by the same again as you said like the same folks that are profiting off of your imprisonment and thinking about you as her budget right like i think that for me that was super jarring this idea of the states to save money. So you know somehow that law gets trickled down into. Let's do all these sterilizations. It's like who who ends up being on the chopping block in state but right. It's just like a crazy situation. Yeah But i wanna talk about the end of the film. Little bit or what to me was one of the ends of the film which is one of my favorite parts of the movie when we get to see kelly at her first graduation you know she talks about like not having able to have that moment at all these other benchmarks but getting to celebrate with her family and we get get to see her just joyous in the film that is not joyous a lot of ways and wondering why important include that in the place that it was also like that's not the end of the film But again it felt to me like the kind of combination of something really important with kelly's character who i just got very attached to throughout the film and i was just like ecstatic to see get that kind of moment especially with her sons. I mean for me. The film could have been three and a half four or five hours and i'll be honest. The first the first few cuts of the film. I was very attached to that because You know i thought it was very important to show in the deposition footage that you were referencing earlier you know one of the most..

five hours freedom of information act three and a half dozens of states kelly one four first graduation one of those moments first first few cuts at least eight other states one of the scenes one of my favorite
"cohn" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

04:21 min | 7 months ago

"cohn" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Breath and depth in the space to provide you know an experience that allowed people to continuously sink about what it meant to participate decide if they wanted to participate and then you know decided the very end if they wanted to have what they participated in be featured in the film and up until the very last moment you know we were corresponding with folks inside about how they wanted to be listed in the credits if they wanted to. Even you know be listed at all or if they wanted to have a pseudo name or remain anonymous or if they were comfortable with Ended up film. And that's i think incredibly important in telling these stories and you know as kelly describes it. It's being trauma informed and really throughout the process centering the experiences of those who are directly impacted and holding that definitely. I think that really showed through even hearing about that stuff behind. The scenes is really empowering as as people who work with writers like were oftentimes holding people stories quite literally In having to kind of be in that space of how do we help you do what you need to do. And make sure that you can communicate that with us Without stepping on anyone's toes and and again with the idea transformed also going along with this idea of like agency So yeah thank you. I think the film. In general for me were i learned a lot. Outside of the particular narratives was also kind of getting to hear more about women in prison. Women's prisons the fact that this story really centers around like one of the biggest. If not the biggest prison for women in california and the kind of statistic of lake women of color being the fastest growing population in america even when so many narratives around mass incarceration center around men Center on men who are convicted of drug offenses violent crimes. This idea of the war on drugs and this film kind of homes in on the fact that like among even these women the majority of them are survivors of domestic violence..

america california kelly Ended up one
"cohn" Discussed on DocsAndMore

DocsAndMore

04:13 min | 8 months ago

"cohn" Discussed on DocsAndMore

"Yeah that's actually in regards to the to the tubal ligations because to gatien's are almost exclusively for the purpose of birth control and so You know in the late in the late nineties. California department of corrections reclassified tubal ligations as being medically necessary which was illegal to begin with because to belie- gatien's are for the purpose of birth control in most instances so yes because the department of corrections doctors were pushing this. We're really trying to do. As many as possible. you know. provide tubal ligations. In any instance and in a lot of cases speaking with a lot of different nurses. They didn't know that tubal ligations were illegal. To begin with when you see the oblivious estates assembly when they're all going through oh hearing actually what's going on what's happened and many of those who are others at the sitting they. They actually seem appear to be quite different that this was going on. Is it possible that people who are outside of the prison system but was still involved with making state laws. Wouldn't have known that this was going on. It's a very interesting question. And you know you see. In the film. The that cdc cr officials the department of correction officials are blaming the federal receiver the federal receiver splitting the department of corrections. Federal see versus. We don't even know what we were paying for and that is that is absolutely ludicrous. The fact that california's healthcare in prisons was so deplorable that they had to bring in the federal government fed. A receiver was appointed to oversee healthcare in california's prisons because health care was so deplorable. Is i mean they have to. They have to oversee all aspects of of healthcare that means they have to approve invoices that means they have to approve procedures. So when you hear the federal receiver saying we don't even know what we were paying for. You know it's just it's just shirking responsibility. What i feel though is encouraging though is that there was a woman who wants she was alerted to what was going on court fully behind. Get to the bottom of it. That must have been quite in coaching. Yes senator hannah-beth. Jackson was quite a champion of this movement of of the bill and still champion of the film. I think one of the one of the flaws in the bill that was passed in two thousand fourteen which is really the push where we're at now. Is that no justice for the survivors. Who are already sterilized exists. You know it. Prevents people from being sterilized in the future. But it did nothing for the actual survivors. And so that's where the reparations movement really comes in. I think this'll be the year..

Jackson hannah-beth one california correction cdc cr two thousand fourteen late in the late nineties California of corrections senator
Shape shifters, with Worst Foot Forward

Your Brain on Facts

03:57 min | 8 months ago

Shape shifters, with Worst Foot Forward

"The most common example in europe and later america is the werewolf accursed man who turns into a bloodthirsty beast under the full moon. The word where wolf comes from the old english rare for man and wolf for wolf. Dvd players and underworld fans. Please resist the urge to correct this to liken throat. Because they're actually different things. It has a parallel etymology from lucan therapists in the greek for wolf and human but it originally applied not to supernatural. Bc's but to people who thought they were supernatural beasts bc's according to the physician galen when people these days present with animals delusions they may be diagnosed with clinical like hanthropy like throats can transform at will and they have a more specific story than where wolves as an institution do in greek mythology lie cone the king of arcadia who got it in his head. That was not as initiatives people believed and that he was just the right guide approve it in the most popular version of the myth like cohn held a ceremony and feast to honor zeus. Zeus showed up. The main dish on the table was the roasted flesh of cones own son. Nick demus scheme being that would eat nikomas thinking it was pork thus proving. He wasn't all knowing turns out he was rather than kill like own. Outright zeus turned him into a wolf and resurrected the prince who then ascended to the throne but where wolves unlike in throats. There are half a dozen underworld films if you need more of that and even though there are many different werewolf legends in many different cultures. We're going to do our best to stay out of europe and away from wolves today as usual much easier said than done. Let's spin the globe around and see where to stop and stop brazil. The home of the boto and can tato the dolphin-shaped shifter of amazon river folklore during the day. The boto one can tato cavorts in the amazon living. It's best pink dolphin life if you've never seen pictures of pink river dolphin there's a link in the show notes. They're sort of mother. Nature meets lisa frank at night though the boto transforms into a handsome young man who seduces girls gets them pregnant and then pops back to his river. Come morning you will see this pattern of behavior repeatedly today the boto and can tato loves a party. They can't resist inviting themselves. So if you're having a get together in the amazon river basin keep a close eye on your single girlfriends because it's really hard to serve a dolphin with a paternity suit. You should be okay if your party is endorsed. Though boto cantatas may look human but they have a distinct tell they retain their blow holes on the back of their heads and will always wear a hat to hide it asking that handsome stranger to take his hat off inside may be the only way to reveal the bodo and cantata renowned for being charming to the point that partygoers will beg them to stay even as morning encroaches and the bowen can tato needs to get back to the water and they aren't one trick dolphins either they have the power to control storms and can transform humans into an cantatas themselves or afflict them with disease or insanity. Most people who live near the amazon won't go near it between dusk and dawn or won't go in the water alone during the daytime because in cantatas are fond of ducting humans. They fall in love with the children born of their dalliances or just anybody near the river. Who looks like they be good company.

Nick Demus Lucan Amazon River Europe Galen Lisa Frank Boto Arcadia Cohn Tato Zeus America Boto Cantatas Brazil Amazon Bowen
Questions Arise Over CDC Guidance on COVID-19 Vaccines

Full Measure with Sharyl Attkisson

03:09 min | 9 months ago

Questions Arise Over CDC Guidance on COVID-19 Vaccines

"A lot of Americans Congressman Thomas Massie already had coronavirus and wanted to know if he should still get a covid-19 seem most everyone has had covid-19 is considered immune but how long immunity last is unknown whether it's after infection or vaccination on award winning scientists himself as he quickly found that vaccine studies showed no benefit to people who've had coronavirus vaccination didn't change their odds of getting reinfected. The controversy began when Massey noticed the CDC was claiming the exact opposite cdc's advisory committee on immunization practices had just issued a high-profile report offered by fifteen scientists. It wrongly claimed Pfizer study proved. The vaccine is highly effective or showed consistent High efficacy for people who'd already had coronavirus. Thar's Covey to it says the exact opposite of what the data says. They're giving people the impression that this vaccine will save your life, even or you know save you from suffering even if you've already had the virus and recovered which has not been demonstrated in either the Pfizer or the moderna trial the mystery deepened when Massey contacted CD-ROM for an explanation as he says he was so alarmed by the misinformation he decided to record the calls on a December 16th. Call cdc's Captain Amanda Cohn C ROM Agree that people who've had coronavirus shouldn't rush to get vaccinated. You know given that there's limited doses right now where we are you suggesting that those people who wait for that suggestion to wait has it always gotten out. Should I get the vaccine if I've already had covered it experts say it's a good idea because they're not sure how protected you are after recovering our full measure investigation examined the database reporting illness after covid-19 scenes. It shows numerous people are getting vaccinated even though they've already have the virus some experts say that's depriving others who need the vaccine most health officials in many kids say they don't have enough vaccine. It's happening across the country promised doses not delivered on the call. In fact Massey for flagging they're mistaken claim that vaccines were proven to work for people who've had coronavirus. I think we'd read that way. She'll go down the other stuff. You know, we just skipped right over it with we know we can't be perfect. I mean they're working on this thing will forever after be known at all but legalized. Okay, and they said thank you for finding the mistake. We're going to fix this and I thought well, okay problem solved. This is how government works but it didn't quite turn out that way two days later the same doctor KO nud probes to fix joined other CDC doctors in repeating the false information this time in an online session for medical professionals. They wrongly claimed studies show people who've had coronavirus home do benefit from the vaccine.

Pfizer December 16Th Thomas Massie Premier Public Health Institut Fifteen Scientists CDC Today Amanda Cohn Covid-19 Captain Massey Americans Thar Covey Captain Amanda Cohn Advisory Committee On Immuniza Ko Nud
Which Matters More, a First or Last Impression?

No Stupid Questions

09:19 min | 9 months ago

Which Matters More, a First or Last Impression?

"Emails from a listener named sam cohn who happens to be a nursing student and he wants to know this our first impressions or last impressions more impactful question or you're thinking about the colonoscopy study i mean honestly there's only one cold i'll give you study will. There are many colonoscopy studies in the medical literature but only one in the psychology literature that i'm aware of exactly that social scientists would know about and that's the famous economy and colleagues study about peak and end the peak and theory. So can you tell us. About the pecan therion. How colonoscopy works to illustrate that so danny katamon and his colleagues did a study where everybody in. The study is getting a colonoscopy. You are randomly assigned. These are people who are already going to be getting on us. Yes i think. It was a collaboration with physicians. If only there were experiments that we could sign up for four which we get a colonoscopy decide. The i would prefer the chemotherapy pleased survey. I'm going to prefer the high fat diet one. This study randomly signs patients who are already signed up for a colonoscopy to either get colonoscopy as usual which i am told and as they say in the article is a pretty unpleasant experience because of the mechanics of the whole thing and the experimental condition is where the exploratory equipment of they have to put into. You is held there for a little longer than would necessarily be the case and your instinct might say oh. That's the bad version of the experiment right because you get more pain but what was so clever about this experiment is that yet. It's more pain. But because you're just having the tip of the scope to sitting there in the rectum. It's more moderate level of pain than what it's moving around during the colonoscopy itself. I think they would probably just call it a mild discomfort compared to a greater discomfort. I mean i can't imagine what it's like to have. The tip of a colonoscopy will come back in a week or two and give us the details so the reason why is interesting. Is that patients who underwent the extended procedure with the additional. Moderate level of pain actually raided the overall experience as less unpleasant and the reason why this was so important is that congressman was at the time developing a theory. Where there is the remembering self and the experiencing self and he says the experiencing self is just experiencing moment by moment. How happy my house. Adami anxious in my hungry am i but the remembering self is consolidating all of that and collapsing it into a memory and he had the theory that when the remembering self processes information and collapses a whole string of moments into one impression. Two things are going to take additional weight. One is the peak of the experience of the high in the low points and the other is the end points and so this famous study affirmed the hypothesis that the end of an experience takes disproportionate weight when we evaluate the overall experience. Now knowing the colonoscopy study what will i ask for if i had the chance to ask my doctor you say gimme the katamon colonoscopy please exactly the katamon special so it's interesting. Is that even though. This finding is a sturdy finding. I don't want the extra pain although since you're inexperienced in colonoscopy so we'll have to see if maybe you'll change your mind after you have but let's say that we want to take it out of the realm of the colonoscopy which i probably should and let's say we want to steer this back toward what sam is asking about the first impression or the last impression imagine a family vacation but say you are apparent with kids and a spouse or whatnot and you go on a family holiday. What would you rather have of the to a great beginning or a great ending y. So oh gosh. I think i would like to have a great ending because i do think the peak end effect does hold true so my ambivalence at my colonoscopy if the vacation we're say four days i would rather have a terrible first day and a wonderful fourth day than the opposite that makes sense because as you were describing the lasting thing is the memory so of course you want that to the positive one. Yeah the whole memory is going to be colored by the last moments more than like the mid point or something. I have to say. Ever since i read that paper years ago and interviewed donald reddell meyer one of the co about it. I have tried to apply the peak in theory all the time in my life in interviews with my family and random encounters with strangers. The minute something good happens. I just stop so you just leave when i learned about this. It made me think first of all of so many rituals that are part of our lives that seem to capitalize on the peak in theory. So dessert why desert last. Why don't we eat it. i. I don't know how much yoga you're doing these days so much. Okay so shiva's nina. Do you know this corpse pose at the end. Of course it feels so good to be sitting there and completely relaxing. And there's a reason. I think that every yoga practice ends with shibata so the next time you think. Do i wanna do yoga. Your memory is least colored by that. But that's challenge this notion so i think you've done a pretty good job persuading everybody. The last impressions are really powerful. But let's talk about first impressions. I mean there's this whole mountain of cliches about that right. You never get a second chance to make a first impression and so on and let's go back to that vacation if you show up with your family to this place where your vacation for four days in your first impression is terrible. Doesn't that set a tone that will be impossible to recover from and from which no final impression is possible to save the experience yet to argue that last impressions take on disproportionate. Way does not say that first impressions. Don't matter disproportionately also for different reasons. First impressions can carry more weight than the mid point or some other point in experience. So one reason is that first impression. Has this kind of path dependency so say you have a really bad day of that. Four day vacation. Everybody's now on a sour mood now. You're all fighting on day two and then because you were fighting on day two day. Three is a total catastrophe. Even those comes out you get off on the wrong foot as it were. And then everything. Kind of goes downhill from there. You know when. I first read this question from sam our first impressions or less imprisons more impactful. My initial impulse was to try to answer it. Like we're trying to do now but my my second impulse and the deeper one was to view it as i do as a writer which is to say wool. Both i think for everything i've ever written whether to book an article Podcast script whatever. I'd probably spend three to ten times more effort on the beginning and the end than on anything else because as a writer was informed years and years and years ago by my experiences a reader which is at the beginning really really matters the ending really really matters and there's also a notion expressed in various places. I don't know where i got it from. Maybe the talmud or shakespeare that the best beginnings have a little bit of the end in them. If the writing is good so i do wonder if maybe sam is pursuing an either or choice when the answer in fact should be an end answer. Both end is usually the answer to checkoff and the great multiple choice of life. The way that this question was framed. It's like when we are meeting another person or when you open a book or you start an article or you start listening to a podcast or watching a movie. It's so clear to us when we just think about those experiences. How the very beginning. It does matter because you are very quickly coming to judgments. And there is this research on thin slicing by among others nominee embody. Maybe you did freakonomics episode on this note. I read about thin slicing in one of malcolm. Glows books blink. This is the idea that you can come to very quick impressions and they're not even necessarily verbally articulated ones but just got feelings of like good or bad in milliseconds and that these very quick impressions can be predictive of later judgements. That are much more deliberative and so forth. That's an argument in favor of a strong first impression because in some cases lake with a move your book or a person if the first impression is not a good one there will be no opportunity for a final impression where the final impression will be one second after the first impression right hopefully less with people and more with like net flicks. So imagine there a job interview and your first impression of candid. It is a positive one. Well danny ottoman would remind us that then confirmation bias is gonna kick in and then for the last fifty eight minutes of the hour long interview. You're just going to be confirming your own positive impression. And so there's a path dependency in judgment and not just the path dependency in life events.

Sam Cohn Danny Katamon Donald Reddell Meyer Adami Shibata SAM Nina Malcolm Danny Ottoman
Francisco Lindor: New Hope For Mets Fans?

ESPN Daily

03:53 min | 10 months ago

Francisco Lindor: New Hope For Mets Fans?

"For a big splash. A big domino to tip over and the mlb off season and we got one yesterday. The new york. Mets acquired francisco lindores and carlos carrasco from the cleveland indians for two shortstops in two minor leaguers and enormous transaction. How surprised are you that this happened not surprised at all. Buster olney is the host of the baseball tonight partly cast and he has been covering baseball for more than three decades. Look the last few years there had been so much industry speculation about when would the indians trade lynn door. In fact a couple of years ago. Paul dolan their owner told that the fan base look. Enjoy while you can. Because it was an assumption he was going to be traded. I think if not for the pandemic he would have been traded in the middle of last summer so the indians move in now and the fact that the mets were the buyers. That's not surprising either. Because i think mets fans have been waiting for Steve owns team to to make a big move and he certainly did that. And getting the best shortstop in baseball. Yeah i want to ask you about the cleveland side of the equation in a little bit. But i i wanna dive into the buyer that you mentioned because steve cohn buster. The mets new owner hedge fund billionaire self identifying proudly so diehard mets fan from long island. He's been on twitter. I'll off season making very loud noises about this being a new different kind of organization. You know we want to be excellent in all areas of this game That's going to require resources. And i'm fully committed to making that happen. He is so monumentally. Wealthy i mean he was one of the few people who didn't lose money in this pandemic shortened twenty twenty season. So what does this tell you about the promise of his regime yeah. He's the richest owner in baseball. Now and i. I wrote a piece Free espn dot com. That for mets fans who have suffered through their. Ptsd of the wilpon. Yes this is that the finally they get their reward were they have an owner. Who's willing to go toe to toe with the yankees owner. Who bills a team. That has continued success. I don't just want to get into the playoffs. I want to win a championship. You know through the years. Since i've been working in the new york market the assumption whenever a really big name came up. Was that the yankees. Probably elbow the mets out of the way and they would get the players in the in. The mets would operate like an upper middle class team rather than a big market team and this deal signals a change in that. But what i do believe. Is this a major markelle tune during the should have a budget to measure with the yankees coulda used shortstop. There are other big market teams. That could use a shortstop. And the mets get the best shortstop so because you are a veteran of the new york market i need to know how is indoor going to help reshape. Just the identity of the team itself because i mean nolan reported future about him. We'll get to that a bit as well but just how good is he. What's potential here well. He's the perfect player for the mets right. Now he's an elite defensive shortstop smash back can't buy off-balance throw in recent years jacob. Degrom has been great. Despite the fact that mets have been really poor on defense. It's shorts especially they need more lineup. Ballots lindores a switch hitter. They could use more power drill door with law. Law door hits for power. They could use speed lindores does that. He looked like the road runner as he took off from first base and he absolutely has the personality to be the face of a franchise in new york. You talking about someone who loves to play is nicknamed mr. smile. Hangmen fans absolutely will gravitate toward him. Yeah

Mets MLB Francisco Lindores Carlos Carrasco Paul Dolan Indians Steve Cohn Buster Olney Yankees New York Lynn Wilpon Long Island Cleveland Steve Espn Twitter Degrom Nolan Jacob
Gary Cohn joins IBM as vice chairman

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

00:18 sec | 10 months ago

Gary Cohn joins IBM as vice chairman

"Gary cohn president trump's first director of the national economic council announced today he is joining. Ibm as vice-chairman cola. The white house after the trump tax cuts fashion might remember that has since been critical of the president. I do have one question though. What is the vice chairman of ibm. Actually do

Gary Cohn National Economic Council Donald Trump Cola IBM White House
In empty white out, No. 3 Ohio State beats Penn State  38-25

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

In empty white out, No. 3 Ohio State beats Penn State 38-25

"The number three ranked Ohio State Buckeyes started the season two now picking up a thirty eight to twenty five victory in Happy Valley over number eighteen ranked Penn state's Justin fields put up another remarkable performance going twenty to thirty four for three in eighteen yards passing and four touchdowns very confident you know I mean just just going back to what I said earlier I think we put in so much work in the office you know we're in my **** out you know just just try to get better and I eat she said aspect of the game so I think it's it's been over an hour the second time in as many games both Kerr Wilson Chris alive in over a hundred yards receiving a piece Ohio state dominated this game on both sides of the ball three of five hundred twenty six yards of total offense and only Penn state to just forty four yards on the ground hi Maxwell Cohn

Happy Valley Justin Fields Ohio Maxwell Cohn Penn Kerr Wilson
Biden Leading Trump in 6 Battleground States

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Biden Leading Trump in 6 Battleground States

"Polling four days out Fox News has done. Their final national poll shows Bahn's lead over trump narrowing to eight points. North Carolina new NBC News, Marriage Paul Has Biden leading trump by six in Florida YouGov Today Has Biden leading in Florida by to in Georgia WSB TV has a statistical tie between Biden and trump. Of course, can we trust polls given what we all experienced and twenty sixteen to address that worry at the New York Times nate Cohn keeps up a chart that is the if the polls are as wrong as twenty sixteen chart which I find. Very comforting. The columns on the left here. That's the current. Twenty two thousand polling average in these key states this year, the columns on the right in both cases That's what the polling average would look like if you adjusted it to correct for the polls being as wrong as they were in two thousand sixteen. So like in Pennsylvania, you see Biden is leading on average this year by six points in Pennsylvania. But if the polls are as wrong as 2016, than Biden would still be ahead by two. In Florida Biden's average lead right now is three points in the polls. But if the polls are as wrong as they were in two thousand, sixteen in Florida, than Biden, would be leading by less than one point, which is you know Florida's Mo less than one percentage point differences is the way they do business. What would this mean? Overall election today as nate Cohn notes polling sleeves translate perfectly to result, and they won't then Biden would win the electoral college three, hundred and fifty seven to one eighty one. But if state polls were as wrong as they were in two thousand sixteen than bite me what still win but by a smaller margin three, thirty, five to two or three. Anyway, that's what the polls say even when adjusted for your post two thousand sixteen eighty. Four days left will know soon

Biden Florida Nate Cohn Bahn Fox News New York Times NBC North Carolina Pennsylvania Paul Georgia
Activist Frank Nitty's Walk From Milwaukee Concludes At March On Washington

All Things Considered

04:31 min | 1 year ago

Activist Frank Nitty's Walk From Milwaukee Concludes At March On Washington

"By by taking taking a a look look at at yesterday's yesterday's march march on on Washington, Washington, which which was was held held here here in in Washington, Washington, D. D. C. C. Thousands Thousands of of people people came came to to the the National National Mall Mall to to participate participate in in the the action action known as the commitment march to protest police violence and racial injustice. So we figured we let you know Whether we talk shop Fact or skinny, light skinned about skin black lives matter black people. Face a symbolic tell Cohn Every time we walk, speak up. SAP. Job drive and, yes, brain. No, just there's a knee upon the neck of democracy, and our nation can only live so long without the oxygen of freedom. We just march 750 miles from Milwaukee was causing 24 days the gear because we're not going to stop until we get Chang That was the Reverend Al Sharpton, Congresswoman Joyce Beatty, Martin Luther King. The third and the final voice you heard was Frank's Ncba, better known as Frank Nitti. He is a Milwaukee activists who like he said, walked 750 miles from Wisconsin to Washington, D. C. And Frank Nitti, miss with us Now. Welcome. Thank you for joining us, man. That's amazing. I haven't watched any media or hurting any of anything. But I really never looking myself religions of myself or anything like that. I'm all about like the message and coming together. So how do you feel? I mean, as you say, you know, you walked A long way. How you feel you tired? Is your body tired? Um, actually, I feel amazing. Believe it or not, I don't know how it was like a very spiritual journey for some reason. Even the last day I had walked 40 miles that morning, and then the group walked 42 miles in the Washington D. C that later on that evening, and my body was so fine And so is that like, literally, The last 20 miles, and there was a lady that came up. She came out. She said she was looking for me for four hours, and she was crying. And she had her kids, whether she like you're doing what nobody else could do. You know, Um, you're doing it for my kids. And you know this is such a big thing. And you almost There's a little bit more to go and she was crying and everything. And I started crying and everything, but he gave me so much energy and I was able to walk from there in the last hour. It was just some of my legs are so sore, But other than that, I sat down. I couldn't like walking my feet for two hour the hour and a half once I said it, and now I find I'm ready for the world. Like I woke up this morning like like I hadn't walked for him for the last 24 days. But there were also some some ugly things that happened along the way. I understand that members of your group had many trials that some members of the group were arrested members you know, a member of the group was accused of shoplifting after she had bought like hundreds of dollars of supplies that you were shot at in Pennsylvania. So I was just wondering if you were expecting sort of vitriol to be directed at you. What was crazy Wass? As soon as we got into the state of Indiana, some I was like, Get out the road spoke. You know, and we laugh. We just laughed or whatever you know to me, but it was like You can kind of predict as soon as you cross the state line and take like 15 steps. You know, it was about two blocks, and someone has said that, you know, and we knew about the racism there with at the time I didn't know like Over the home of the K. K K like there's supposed to still operating at Knox, Indiana, and then, like the head of the Aryan Brotherhood, lives in Warsaw, Indiana, So we didn't know when I was like looking at the map and the role we were taking. I didn't particularly picked these places, but yeah, I was extremely rough being called the n word every Five blocks people through boots at us people threw food at us. The police were black and golf, gas stations and Indiana so that we couldn't get gas at them. Telling gas stations and businesses to close could say We were there to burn him down. The women can use the bathroom. We had someone brought us a portable toilet. So Indiana was like 100 degrees for two days. We are these like 30 Miles stretches where there was only one gas station and we weren't allowed to use it. And we're walking like 12 hours a day at that point, so we had to deal with racism, and we had to deal with the heat. And then we had to deal with the police actually spreading the rumors that we were doing these things and plus they were also telling us we can't go down the street or industry and we were. We would always go down whatever street we needed to go down. I would always tell him like no matter what You're not going to stop us from walking and actually established from from from getting the D. C.

Frank Nitti Congresswoman Joyce Beatty Indiana Washington UM National National Mall Mall SAP Cohn Milwaukee Ncba Wass Shoplifting Martin Luther King Knox Reverend Al Sharpton Pennsylvania Wisconsin Warsaw
The Queer Eye Guys Take on Gritty, But How Do You Improve on Perfection?

ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

00:12 sec | 1 year ago

The Queer Eye Guys Take on Gritty, But How Do You Improve on Perfection?

"Netflix's queer eye for the straight guys to Philadelphia for its fifth season, and they released a mini episode on Tuesday where they gave a mega over to none. None other than gritty. Who of course prides himself on being rough around the

Philadelphia Netflix
President Trump's executive order criticized for not addressing racial bias

ABC Perspective

04:21 min | 1 year ago

President Trump's executive order criticized for not addressing racial bias

"A series of executive actions introduced this week in the rose garden by the president were aimed at curbing the use of deadly force by police encouraging a ban on chokeholds and setting up a database for police departments to share information on officers with the history of misconduct and excessive use of force so they aren't we hired elsewhere Jon Cohn is an ABC news contributor with an extensive background in law enforcement he told me the president's executive order could have done more I thought it was a missed opportunity you know I've worked in law enforcement and homeland security for thirty four plus years I've worked with police departments around the country I've been involved both the national level the local level present really had an opportunity to come out and make a strong statement saying basically police are vital to our society they protect our communities from violence and the need the people of this country will not tolerate individuals or police organizations allowing racial bias to influence the decision making officers aware these organizations and you know we're we're seeing a very strong statement being made by the people of this country through these protests as somebody who's very proud of that a police officer and who has worked closely with law enforcement officials you know across the country for years hi I really urge them and our elected leaders in Washington to listen Johns a former police officer and he worked with the department of homeland security knows a lot about law enforcement one of the questions that people I know ask about constantly as wide a police officers have to shoot to kill why can't we train people to shoot for the leg yes you might not be as is as accurate every time but white we you wouldn't have a person die I mean that's an interesting question I can just say that the way you're trained is if you're going to use lethal force if you're gonna use your firearm it's you're shooting to stop you're shooting to make the person who is a threat I'm incapable of taking those actions what you want but when shooting somebody in the legs do the same thing when that stopped that person if that was the goal positive it's really hard I mean I've been involved in shootings and you teach an officer to eighteen center mass because that is where you're going to have the highest likelihood of not only striking the individual but striking him in a way that stops them from doing whatever action is that Yasser deem to be a threat it's not easy particularly when you're in those situations to a team you know to hit a hand that may be carrying an item or or lack and that's why they train officers to essentially aim and nationally for the percent of mass I know when I've heard that over over again but in the case of of of ray sharp drops in in Atlanta if he had been shot in the foot he would have stopped it would have been as easy I understand that and I get that and then you would have done that but when they're talking about changing police training in police tactics is what I'm suggesting just completely out of there not something it would even be considered yeah I think I would be difficult I my belief is that where we have to focus our training is in the area of teaching officers how to at the initial point of a call I set the tone in that call so it doesn't escalate you you hear a lot of people talk about the idea of de escalation de escalating something that has already gotten ratchet up is very difficult so the key is making sure that an officer approaches a situation whether it's J. responding to a call for service or an interaction with somebody on the street at the an officer initiates that you handle that call in such a way so that it doesn't escalate to a situation requiring the use of force if you've lost control of the situation there's a high likelihood that the result is going to be something that isn't good so if you're drawing a gun in your firing you were in a life or death situation but a lot of these calls the officers approach the situation correlate they allow you to get under competitiveness role and then they use deadly force with deadly force wasn't necessary with someone's running away from you it doesn't matter where you you know it and you're shooting a gun at them it doesn't matter whether you're shooting game for their leg or their back you shouldn't be shooting your gun

President Trump Executive
Comedians Speak Out On George Floyd Killing

Donna and Steve

02:32 min | 1 year ago

Comedians Speak Out On George Floyd Killing

"Lot of comedians not comedian while comedians I guess technically they are comedians and and talk show host and tons of celebrities of course are speaking out about the and the the death of George Floyd here in the Twin Cities at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer and it kinda know Brian did a very serious show last night he made opening comments and then he spent the rest of his time with van Jones here's part of his show open we have a ritual now in America whenever something terrible happens our nation goes into shock and hundreds of people like myself come on television and try to make sense of it all we're rightfully second by the needless killing of a black man named George Floyd our national crisis is that a large and vital community in our country is in real pain pain because they do not feel safe or dignified or seen and most important of all they do not feel hurt eight you know it's kind of on the same sentiment throughout you know from people commenting like Cohn and I really appreciate that they do step away from regular programming to do just a dress the seriousness of the situation and sometimes it can make I I I think that you know news outlets obviously they're working around the clock on this kind of a thing in there they're they're used to dealing with serious tumble when you find someone who is a comedian by nature and a downshift into more of a serious tone to address something I actually think that they can have it as an opportunity to have more of a profound impact on the hearer the listener the audience yes because it's just like well why don't you decide and then let's listen what this person has to say absolutely I'm at Jimmy Fallon also had a serious tone to his show last night on that we've got part of his message about you know the recent civil rights protests and concerns the silence is the biggest crime that white guys like me and the rest of us are doing we need to say something we need to keep saying something and we need to stop saying that's not OK more than just one day on Twitter we all need to be talking about this it's not going to get buried it's not going away we can just hope that everyone loves each other we can't say be the change and just sit around tweeting be the change be the change what is the change how do I change how do I do it this is such a long route in the ground it is so long indeed but we gotta get in there we have to dig it up

George Floyd Officer Brian Van Jones America Cohn Jimmy Fallon Twitter Minneapolis
Comedians Speak Out On George Floyd Killing

Donna and Steve

02:32 min | 1 year ago

Comedians Speak Out On George Floyd Killing

"Lot lot of of comedians comedians not not comedian comedian while while comedians comedians I I guess guess technically technically they they are are comedians comedians and and and and talk talk show show host host and and tons tons of of celebrities celebrities of of course course are are speaking speaking out out about about the the and and the the the the death death of of George George Floyd Floyd here here in in the the Twin Twin Cities Cities at at the the hands hands of of a a Minneapolis Minneapolis police police officer officer and and it it kinda kinda know know Brian Brian did did a very a very serious serious show show last last night night he he made made opening opening comments comments and and then then he he spent spent the the rest rest of his of his time time with with van van Jones Jones here's here's part part of his of his show show open open we we have have a a ritual ritual now now in America in America whenever whenever something something terrible terrible happens happens our our nation nation goes goes into into shock shock and and hundreds hundreds of of people people like like myself myself come come on on television television and and try try to to make make sense sense of of it it all all we're we're rightfully rightfully second second by by the the needless needless killing killing of of a a black black man man named named George George Floyd Floyd our our national national crisis crisis is is that that a large a large and and vital vital community community in in our our country country is is in in real real pain pain pain pain because because they they do do not not feel feel safe safe or or dignified dignified or or seen seen and and most most important important of of all all they they do do not not feel feel hurt hurt eight eight you you know know it's it's kind kind of of on on the the same same sentiment sentiment throughout throughout you you know know from from people people commenting commenting like like Cohn Cohn and and I I really really appreciate appreciate that that they they do do step step away away from from regular regular programming programming to to do do just just a a dress dress the the seriousness seriousness of of the the situation situation and and sometimes sometimes it it can can make make I I I I I I think think that that you you know know news news outlets outlets obviously obviously they're they're working working around around the clock the clock on on this this kind kind of a of thing a thing in in there there they're they're they're they're used used to to dealing dealing with with serious serious tumble tumble when when you find you find someone someone who who is is a comedian a comedian by by nature nature and and a a downshift downshift into into more more of a of serious a serious tone tone to to address address something something I actually I actually think think that that they can they can have have it it as as an an opportunity opportunity to have to have more more of a of a profound profound impact impact on on the the hearer hearer the the listener listener the the audience audience yes yes because because it's it's just just like like well well why why don't don't you you decide decide and and then then let's let's listen listen what what this this person person has has to to say say absolutely absolutely I'm I'm at at Jimmy Jimmy Fallon Fallon also also had had a serious a serious tone tone to to his his show show last last night night on on that that we've we've got got part part of his of his message message about about you you know know the the recent recent civil civil rights rights protests protests and and concerns concerns the the silence silence is is the the biggest biggest crime crime that that white white guys guys like like me me and and the rest the rest of of us us are are doing doing we we need need to to say say something something we we need need to to keep keep saying saying something something and and we need we need to stop to stop saying saying that's that's not not OK OK more more than than just just one one day day on on Twitter Twitter we we all all need need to to be be talking talking about about this this it's it's not not going going to get to get buried buried it's it's not not going going away away we we can can just just hope hope that that everyone everyone loves loves each each other other we we can't can't say say be be the the change change and and just just sit sit around around tweeting tweeting be be the the change change be be the the change change what what is is the the change change how how do do I I change change how how do do I I do do it it this this is is such such a long a long route route in in the the ground ground it it is is so so long long indeed indeed but but we we gotta gotta get get in in there there we we have have to to dig dig it up it up

"cohn" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"cohn" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Three six three eleven ten we go to Carl Carl Cohn is from Texas I Carl good morning general good morning they are a bit I'm partner for a number of years now what a change is made in in my portfolio following your on SNL acacia models with my question this morning deals with money my grandchildren's college fund I was fortunate enough this past year who solar in a parking lot fortunately I own a business that handles the mother of assets and was able to get my grandchildren but ten thousand dollars each the question I've got is what how to best the manager of my oldest grandchild is leaving for college this call the next one is three years in the third one has six years to wait so probably a little different planned could manage to leverage those funds would be about that order yeah I mean it's difficulties you know now do you believe that these all three of these grand children will use this money for college you need this money for college or is it something that might go beyond college first you absolutely need it for college the second one their families doing much better however believe in a truck college fund yet but all three of them were okay down yeah so here's here's my dilemma so I don't believe in I've been saying this for awhile fortunately and I had this yesterday and I never talked about it but even the Wall Street journal yesterday are talking about bonds and bond funds they were talking primarily about municipal bonds but none the less they were talking about risk there and I believe there's a great deal rests there I have some information I want to share the top of the next hour about bank in the banking sector but I I think that is a concern for me I'm not I'm I'm not necessarily a fan of the notion that the conservative thing to do is all way stop at the risk of the markets and going to bond funds I don't know I don't believe I should say that there is a less risk in those bond funds and I I I suspect I could make a case of I had to that there's more risk in a bond fan fine then it might be in equity so that would be that that that really I don't see that as an answer or a possibility even though there may be in the near very near future some return on investment as it pertains to dividends but not necessarily our security that the fund itself could drop dramatically so I I wouldn't do that that leaves two options that leaves equity and at least some cash options and if we wanted to equities I would look at a couple of those foundational stocks that are pain decent dividends they are large cap med cap maybe but mid cap large cap funds that are paying decent dividends and have consistently paid decent dividends and our foundational stocks now I'm not I don't wanna make it sound like there's no risk of their because anytime you have a three or four year time horizon there's going to still be some risk there so that would be on a scale of one to ten I'm going to say ten being very risky I'm gonna say the bond fund might have a scale of risk of seven equity funds might have a scale of risk of of six and a half and are these kinds of large cap individual.

Carl Carl Cohn Texas
"cohn" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"cohn" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Took Cohn took Cohn. Cohn. Took cone shock. The. You can't do enough. You want to ticket. Making gene. The. The whole. Term. The. Lacking. Damn clubs club. Winter this place show. The. Walked into the room my nose. Seven. Upstate in this. To the old. In the home. With the pitch. To get out of the call. Into the. Knows. The morning young. And she's still in.

Cohn