35 Burst results for "Coherent"

Susan Mills Introduces Detective Colt Jessup In Steamy Thriller Rock Bottom

Charlotte Readers Podcast

04:41 min | Last month

Susan Mills Introduces Detective Colt Jessup In Steamy Thriller Rock Bottom

"In today's episode visible. Susan wilson author of rock bottom occult jessop novel the first book and the jessop series of fast paced and spellbinding thriller with a hint of romance. About lucas twin. Sister brianna is dead and isabelle refuses to accept that her sister could have died by suicide returns to charlotte from new york to find out the truth. Enlisting the help detective coach jesse vice cop in new about brianna history of addiction as it come closer to finding the killer. Isabella found herself in mortal danger. And only jessop can prevent her from becoming the next victim. Bob rogers author of the laced. Shamlan calls the book. A superb mystery and thriller with a new level of action or or providing insights into addiction embezzlement greed and policing susan. Welcome sir thank you. Thank you for having me -gratulations on the book you know we. I met a thank you parker books about five years ago. I was there to plug my first book. I think you were there with your husband. I think it might have been your second or your third book at the time. And i bought your thank. You was good gone. Bad is the one that listen. I fuck i work you and your now to have many seven and seven. I'm working on my eight. Okay what do you do put out every year. Usually the last book rock bottom bottom took me eighteen months front to me. Sixty five is sixty. Five thousand words ahead to put some coherent order. Took longer gasa said. You made the mistake in your first novel. Good gone bad of killing off your best character about. His name was streaker and he was the former cop who went to the dockside. And that's where the title came. Good going bad and everybody log. This particular character and i hated that i killed him off because i wanted to write him again so i just invented. His brother and his brother is a cult. Jessop who is Pardon my new series. That i started. And he has some of the similar traits since his brother and likes to go rogue and doesn't always follow by the rules so he was a lot of fun to write so. I'm having a good time with colds and reported to him being in in future novels but he the paranormal route and brought. You know your first character back in the second books on how through some supernatural maine's or suffering. I could've done that. But i chose not not. You know what you're right. You're right the The suspense thrillers with the with the touch around. That now a little bit about uses. And you're the author of rock bottom and six other romantic suspense novels first of all. What is a romantic suspense novel. It's fast pace page turner. it's a really not quite as intense as a thriller as very similar to a mystery. And what i've ride is Not a cozy mystery. But it's more like a hard full detective story and That's a good way for me to reach a bit wider market because women like my books a lot for the romance for the guys like the rough characters and some of the hard bowl techniques that are using stories. You said that you are a woman trapped in the body of a sweet southern bell at that you release your inner wild child creating gritty stories where the sparks fly Talk about talk about the pretty much sends me up. I didn't realize that to my daughter. said that that she said mom. Everybody thinks you're so sweet and ns than than such as polite southern lady she said but. I think that you're a tall blonde and a leather jacket on motorcycle and And i laugh at that but this kind of like what i like to raid is kind of gritty stuff. I like the gritty movies. My favorite movies shawshank redemption. I don't watch the a nine into the Ryan combs a lot of women are so i like kings kinda gritties. So that's what i like to read. And so that's what i write.

Jessop Susan Wilson Sister Brianna Jesse Vice Bob Rogers Shamlan Gasa Isabelle Brianna Isabella Lucas Charlotte Parker Susan New York Colds Maine Turner Ryan Combs
Bidding War for Laser Maker Coherent Intensifies

MarketFoolery

04:17 min | Last month

Bidding War for Laser Maker Coherent Intensifies

"Coherent is back in the news. Coherent a company specializing in equipment to make an measure lasers back in january. Coherent agreed to be acquired by lament him in a deal worth five point. Seven billion dollars. Stick with me here. In february s. instruments came in with an offer of six billion after that to six came in with an offer of six point four billion which leads us to this morning and coherent saying that lou mendham has increased their original bid to six point nine billion and oh by the way. Shares of coherent are up seventy percent year to date not in the past twelve months. Just here in twenty twenty one different ways. I wanna go here. Let me start with this because at when we talked about this on market foolery back in january. One of the things you had said about coherent was look. And i'm paraphrasing. But you said look. They do some interesting stuff they do. Some things that lament doesn't do but coherent businesses kinda struggled over the past year. So i i guess my first question is are you surprised by this bidding war for this business. It is. yeah. I must say. I'm a little bit. I'm a little bit surprised by it. I i would pay money for for dan to insert like the as the world. Turns music into this. This intro because i really. This is like the soap opera of two thousand twenty one thus far right i mean this has been pretty fascinating to watch i. I have recommended lamentin and two six as a stocks for for members over the course of the years. And i i think i mean i didn't see this coming it really felt like with the initial lamentable tie up. Both parties were happy. They kinda came to an agreement. Initially that transaction was valued at around five point seven billion dollars in stock holders would get one hundred dollars per share in cash and one point one eight five one shares of lamentable for each coherent share. And then as you as you as you noted i mean this went back and forth with a few different companies in really it all boils down to what coherent does well. The business hasn't performed All that great recently in a part of that is just due to market conditions. But this all boils down to getting coherence laser expertise and that's lasers and photonics represent a big opportunity in that something that lamentable does. But it's a very small part of their business lament. Dems bigger focus. As i've mentioned before is on that vertical cavity surface emitting laser technology. I know it's a mouthful but that's ultimately sensor based technology. That's going gonna play more into our lives as we see five g in sixty connectivity. Get faster so so then you fast forward to today now. I mean coherence stockholders will receive two hundred and twenty dollars per share in cash in point six one shares of lamenting so they really sweetened the deal by amping up the amount of cash as opposed to the the percentage of shares that you would get in elementary stock and i think another. I think another reason why this deal. This is probably the last tango. I think this probably will wrap it. Up is because you have a tech investment firm there silver lake which is really Is really supporting this deal. They're going to invest one billion dollars in new business And they've got something like eighty billion dollars in assets under management today ten focused so so they have a lot of expertise in a lot of these different areas So so again. This is about the laser business. Lamentable clearly wants it to six understand why they would want it as well It is not cheap. I mean this is this. Is something where you're going to be paying around e abbott sixty times that's a little bit Reflective of less than normal times given the current state of affairs distill. They're paying for it and it must be feeling pretty good right now to be a coherent shareholder knowing that in such high demand

Lou Mendham Lamentin DAN Abbott
Waste Siege: Infrastructure and the Environment in Israel/Palestine with Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

Jewish History Matters

07:26 min | Last month

Waste Siege: Infrastructure and the Environment in Israel/Palestine with Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

"What is it about waste. That helps us to think through big questions about what's been happening in terms of israel and the palestinian territories. You know what is going on there. You know both in terms of you mentioned the history of infrastructure and also in terms of the history of the relationship between society. The government and the palestinians in between later also the jewish settlements in the west bank and the palestinians. Living there as well like what is waste. Give us as a lens to think through kind of what's going on on a bigger scale. One way to answer that is to say that it helps us look at multiple scales at the same time so one question that kind of answers and it may be a question that we don't realize we have or we should have but that question is who governs the west bank and you could get the answer by looking at this material and where it goes and how it's processed and when it's left there when capital gets invested to place in certain places or treated in certain ways i think from those very impractical tangible practices and sites we can see who is kind of managing this territory and that such an important thing for us to know politically above all because since the mid nineteen ninety s. Either you have people saying that. The palestinian authority now that it exists is the government. You have that coming from various political positions where there's an assumption that whether or not it is recognized fully as sovereign it can be held accountable for various things like it exists and it is the government and then you have other people who sort of its presence including at some point. I remember early in my project. I had faculty telling me you know really. You wanna talk about the pa. They're not really doing anything you know and i thought like you to find out what they are doing and if they are doing something from a project that looks waste but then you do have people who think that you know. Essentially the pa is to which the israeli administration has out sourced its occupation and so it's sort of treated as a neutral conduit. You know that does israel's bidding and that therefore sort of doesn't deserve its own analysis beyond what it does to facilitate essentially the occupation. And i think that waste enabled me to see the very dumps and thick and complicated network which includes donors which includes companies which includes people who are not sort of formed in something that's legible and coherent. Who might just be people in a neighborhood who are all managing the every day together. And i think that's important to understand that we know how we want to name the condition essentially that we are looking at when we look at contemporary occupied palestine. There's a lot going on. there's lots of think about. You're talking about like the ways in which the palestinian authority plays different kinds of roles in terms of occupation in terms of the day-to-day life of the palestinians themselves. And it's interesting. Because i think that when we think about basic infrastructure people don't think about it for the most part when it works properly right you know when you turn the tap in your apartment and clean. Water comes out. No one gives that any thought or really for the most part people. Don't any thought it's one there's failures infrastructure and thinking about like for instance you know questions clean water or when it comes to waste management or i know like nuclear power plants and people may not pay attention to what kind of plant is producing their power until it turns out that it was a nuclear plant that melted down. Or you know if they somehow see the direct outcome of a coal-based plant or something ultimately. It's a question of what is the role of infrastructure in society. I think that's part of what's really interesting. Here in general also speaks to the question of what's taking place in terms of the history of israel and palestine over the course of the past hundred years if not more which is the question of what does it mean to build up infrastructure so much of the zionist movement. The building of the shoe later the state of israel was an attempt to try to construct infrastructure to increase the absorptive capacity of the land. And then later on. Also you think about you know. What does this mean in terms of the palestinians. Well there's so much going on here as we think about the history of infrastructure and about how waste is a useful element that people tend not to think about in terms of their daily lives. Yeah i mean if i can respond to a couple of things there one just point on that. Last thing that you mentioned is that i was struck by the fact that my observations of the efforts the palestinian authority was making to build waste. Infrastructures was Those early zionist efforts. You know that kind of focus on independent infrastructure essentially no matter what and i say no matter what because they're all kinds of ways in which that presented challenges for construction so for example. Israel would often say we'll let you build a wastewater treatment plant as long as you connect it to a settlements wastewater treatment plant and the. Pa would say a red line. We won't because the point is to build the infrastructure of the state. I want to say that vision. And the insistence of the palestinian authority to build the infrastructures that it imagined to be the foundation of a future state took the oxygen out of the room. In terms of what other possibilities there could be for taking care of waste and of course the assumption was and this is going to get us a little bit toward are kind of capitalism climate change direction the assumption was definitely that we consume and we produce waste at the normal speed of any normal ideally normal society and then we build the infrastructures to house those wastes. But we don't try to limit what we produce because we're still in the process of becoming what everybody else's which i think something that you find. In general and the global south. I would say that people and infrastructure studies who study it in the global south. There have been making this point over and over again which is important which is in a lot of places like basically the postcolonial world. Let's say infrastructures are just failing. All the time one interesting question to ask is do people perceive it to be a problem. In those cases or is there a kind of a normality to infrastructural failure. Such that something else becomes the abnormal thing you notice. you know. I happen to do my research in this special moment when the pa was trying to build up infrastructures from scratch for waste like infrastructures that did not previously exist. It was disrupting essentially processes and practices of managing waste in the name of order a new order but in ways that were very disruptive to people who had become accustomed to for example dumpsites being at the edge of every municipality instead of being few and centralized know two or three across the whole west bank. So what could look like failure. Now from the perspective was successful management. At that time. So i think the question of perception and how populations experience infrastructural failures super interesting.

PA Israel West Bank Israeli Administration Palestine
NYSE Says Again It Will Delist Three Chinese Telecom Stocks

Techmeme Ride Home

03:49 min | 4 months ago

NYSE Says Again It Will Delist Three Chinese Telecom Stocks

"The trump administration is in its final days. But that doesn't mean that they're not still pressing ahead with their aggressive china policy when it comes to tech president trump has signed an executive order banning transactions with aunt groups ali pay tencent's wechat pay and q. Q. as well as five other chinese payment apps quoting reuters lee order argues that the united states must take aggressive action against developers of china software applications to protect national security it tasks the commerce department with defining which transactions will be banned under the directive within forty five days and targets tencent holdings q. q. And we chat pay as well quote by accessing personal electronic devices such smartphones tablets and computers chinese connected software applications can access and capture vast swaths of information from users including sensitive personally identifiable information and private information. The executive order states such data collection quote would permit china to track the locations of federal employees and contractors and build dossiers of personal information the document ads and quote so as i've said several times when it relates to the subject i still haven't developed a definitive opinion about this whole tech cold war with china. Smart people. I know really do believe that. China's tech ambitions are set to the us's dominance in various ways and so must be meaningfully countered the problem. I'm having though is at least these last few years. The trump administration in my opinion hasn't put together a coherent argument about what they're doing. Or why so. It's hard for me to even form an opinion. That's not me being political. That's just me being someone in the tech industry that feels this whole posture. Vis-a-vis china by the government has been maddeningly inconsistent. So far case in point after pressure from the us government. The new york stock exchange said it would delist the stocks of three chinese companies china mobile china telecom and china unicom in order to satisfy an executive order imposing restrictions to prevent american companies and individuals from investing in companies identified as being affiliated with the chinese military. Now that was always the plan they were going to list these three companies and then two days ago the nyse reverse course and said it would no longer dealers those companies now today. they're reversing the reverse quoting cnbc. The exchange reversed that decision on monday causing much confusion treasury secretary mnuchin told the exchange that he disagreed with the original reversal. A senior administration official told. Cnbc's eamon jabar's the mis's said the latest reversal was due to new guidance. From treasury's office of foreign assets control that said people in the us could not engage in certain transactions with the three companies as of next monday trading of the three securities will be suspended at four pm eastern time on monday the exchange said and quote. See what. I mean confusing as all get out isn't it. China mobile is a one hundred billion dollar company. I believe they've been listed on the nyse for more than a decade. As i said before around these issues capitalism requires a clear set of rules that everyone involved in the great game of capitalism can understand if you don't know what the parameters of engaging and capitalism are then that's not capitalism so i guess one of the bigger questions going into the new year does president biden have as big an ax to grind with china tech as president trump. Did and will we get a more coherent position. Vis-a-vis chinese tech

China Tencent President Trump Lee Order Commerce Department Nyse ALI Reuters United States Mnuchin China Telecom Eamon Jabar Unicom Treasury Us Government Cnbc Office Of Foreign Assets Contr
Sony Confirms At Least 10 Movies and TV Shows Based on PlayStation Franchises In the Works

The Business of Esports

06:43 min | 4 months ago

Sony Confirms At Least 10 Movies and TV Shows Based on PlayStation Franchises In the Works

"The headline here. Sony has seven. Tv shows and three movies in development based on playstation games. No word on if the uncharted movie and the last of us tv series are included in that count So this came directly from sony pictures chairman and ceo where he revealed that his studio is developing seven tv shows. Movies based on playstation games They didn't name any names. Which i thought was interesting They didn't name any dates. Either i mean it's it's interesting right. The big headline. It's a catchy headline. It goes back to sort of a common theme here which is disney. Everything becoming disney The question is what seven tv shows and three movies are going to. Are they gonna make like the you would think they would have less than a little bit. I with the slate of tv's shows and movies sort of being hit or miss on the gaming front. Why not name specific so that they could get some kind of audience feedback and reaction guys. Think i'm particularly interested in these. Tv shows a lot harder than you know. Hour and a half to our movie like a lot of how are they going to agreed entire development but like for example last of us just as as an example. I see that much more as a series tv series than a movie way that one. Either you know. Like uncharted awesome movie. I would watch the movie in a second. But i'm charted obvious here right. Yeah so it out. It's like fixed indiana jones. It's like deanna jones but good. Now let potlucks i. I should say indiana jones. That came out rock. Indiana jones was always incredible and the first three movies are amazing. I mean the margin just to be very clear yes. Indiana jones is amazing. Don't worry paul. We still agree on that. I was about to go after. There is no joy in my heart. I do not like any film harrison. Ford what's that other big zombie series. I wife walking dead right won't wouldn't the last of us tv series feel like a lot like walking dead walking very successful true. True that is shockingly popular like however pushes won't feel and look very much the same. I don't know well. I could say that about every zombie movie ever doesn't days later feel like dawn of the dead. Feel like i don't know you know. Heart of darkness feel like our army of darkness. Like i mean there's zombie thing. Apparently we can have infinitely many of them. People still watch them martin's comments maybe the best here god of war movie would be incredible. I agree but let me come back to the original question here. Why why not announce what they're going to be. I think sony's like. Ip slate is clear. What sony actually owns either man part of that interesting. I think everybody tamargo. Marvin moons But i think there was something with. Sony had movie rights now marble makes the movies but sony distributes it but i think the characters owned by marvel but don't you agree that sony's ip is not crystal clear at least to me well especially without announcing what these shows are. I had no idea what that would make a. you know. I mean uncharted. And last of us were legitimately the only do that. I thought of has a theory why they would announce this without naming names might still figuring out pregnant prematurely sony and william. You might have better with this. But they're i think they're they're video game department way more higher class than their their movie studio and their production studio. I don't think sony pictures is particularly You know they're kind of like the fourth or fifth player. I think in the in the studio in the movie. Production game Obviously sony entertainment on the video game side is very well respected as developer. So i don't know if they can actually execute on this plan. We kind of talked about the riot. How we thought riot would actually which is ironic because ryan has never had anything to do with movies. But i think. I personally feel more confident riot. Being able to make a movie slash. Tv shell about league of legends. Than i am about sony which actually is in the business of making movies. Is it going to be able to have that magic s word. Synergy to in the movie and entertainment. That's so interesting. Because i have a much higher confidence in sony than riot and i'll i'll just i'll just be very simple. It's like. I actually think. Sony has blueprints or more coherent blueprint for what to do like the uncharted movie. They could literally take dialogue and scenes from the game and it would be a good movie. Like i think of uncharted. Moore's movie than a game right like they literally at the equivalent of the marvel comics story board like they can just take the game and take out the like. they're good. they're i think lee has a harder goal there because what is like. What's the story of league of legends. Jeff do you know who's the protagonist like i. I'm sure there are answers to this. And i think i might go no. I don't think anybody really does raise. Like the reality is they. Were pretty complicated. I'm taking crazy. Maybe those riots berretta blizzard and other Do i think riot can pull it off. Yes yes this is not like right. It's gonna make it. I think they're make a great movie. But i think it's much easier for sony because sony literally needs to pick an uncharted game. Get this got the script descriptive at cut it down to two hours and film it and it will be just fine. The games are designed to be like movies. They're set piece moments witty banter reasonably sharp characters and interesting relationships between them like they're gold. You know what i mean. And i think the same by the way of god of war i legitimately think than this last god of war probably might have been better as murphy in some regards like i enjoyed the story and the setpiece moment so much and the camera work was cinematic. Like half of let me the last god of war good was like how beautiful it looked and how it drew you into the narrative with immersion and and that was all i think it was all camera camera lights like perfect for though so

Sony Deanna Jones Indiana Jones Disney Tamargo Marvin Moons Harrison Ford Marvel Paul Martin Berretta Blizzard William Ryan Moore LEE Jeff Murphy
Don't follow the 'SHOULDAs' in 2021: be YOU!

Photography Daily

05:22 min | 4 months ago

Don't follow the 'SHOULDAs' in 2021: be YOU!

"I i've been asking his all year of course about this. This corona virus and of course how it's affected their business but a a lot of people. You photograph found their industries pulled apart. Me let actors. I i mean how busy is the local studio beano of the last. What is it nine months now. My left is busy since jill. Good i you wouldn't believe it. I think it is because there's not many things that you can do at the moment even if there's no production but you can't take care of your publicity stuff. Why don't we do that now. Plenty of time. And that's austell closed from amazon or whatever that's just photos shoot that we do use the time kind of you know a and a prolific ways that we get stuff done so in costing is still happening even though a lot of productions are very careful at the moment. Because i mean you you're allowed to shoot considered to be essential in los angeles. The film industry right. Let's say you have a big budget movie and somebody gets sick. You have to shut the whole operation down so this is costing a ton of money on these big productions and the insurance that would cover. That is very expensive so this is kind of a reason why the studios are a bit more cautious in that when it goes big up productions but soaps clinton says are happening in smaller. Indie movies are happening. So entertainment business is sort of recession immune. Because what we'll do when there's nothing to do that. Watch stuff if you have a show right now if you have a story that's an edited and that has coherent story arc. You the chances are that you can sell it a really high so because people want to watch stuff. So okay queen's gambit done with next joke i love that as well but now that now you talk about arts and watching production. That was an amazing piece of television. I was so sad two nights ago. I had big photo shoot with a stark. And i decided to do the editing the whole night such simple show as well. Yep that well done the characters beautifully flats the beauty of imperfections. Yeah absolutely. I want to get back to your your cinematic headshot approach Because you said at the start the the The cinematic approach and spending time with. Dp's that that was what you liked to do to understand why they were lighting from behind so You saying to me then. The you'll not really a strobe. Shoot to you you quantify. Those constant light shoots for various reasons very important reason for me. Is that if you hang out with somebody. In this moments these settled reactions. Squint like this comes right there and you wanna have. I wanna have swish. Maybe one as a whole was we all know how it is. Sometimes to come undone was fishing. The focus couldn't find it so with stroke. You have to wait until this thing. Recycles boom and then you can shoot again whereas when you use continuing sliding i have the chance i can go up up up up up up up. I can get this. It's kind of like you catch a butterfly and we strobes wait now we can do again second aspect is i cannot make you forget you end up with strokes you're constantly reminded of. Oh that's what we're here. It's an invasion into that private moment. That's what i prefer. Continues lighting just also for the approach. Because in the beginning i did guerrilla shooting. I only shot outside. I didn't have any lights. I used natural lighting. And i noticed. That's the luxury of having natural lighting. That you can get the moments right there and you also seeing what you get with strobes. That's done this guy down a bit Dammit i didn't get that was stroke was too harsh. Because you don't what you get you'd sure you have a muddling light and with many years of experience you probably have a feeling for it but you still don't know i love when i see what i get so if i was to look around your studio now part from the amazon folks can see all over the back behind you that. What have you been buying I probably i probably wouldn't see a probably wouldn't find a strobe. Now would i is. It will continue. Oh keno keno flares. Yeah yeah. i recognize those. Because they're the combination of being soft yet harsh so the light waves are not too diffused harsh. The have it's a beautiful now. Recognize that. I've the benefit of seeing what the listener count studio so not concede that that's going to beauty dish. So yes a strobe. Sometimes use off most of the time. I love fluorescent more. Like even the way. I'm letting us right now. This is a construction that i did myself. I constantly play around with it. I had a. I had a thing built for myself. A custom built on this one. He also fluorescent these actually from home depot.

Jill Amazon Los Angeles Clinton
Episode 82: Who, and What, are Boogaloo Bois

Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

06:22 min | 4 months ago

Episode 82: Who, and What, are Boogaloo Bois

"So the Boogaloo movement I guess has really I was going to say become coherent but it's still fairly incoherent. It's still pretty scattered and you know, it's sort of hard to generalize about it, but it became I guess an identifiable cultural and political currents really in the last year or so. It has antioxidants it home. Places that it comes from which been around for a long time. So one big source of this this Boogaloo movement ideology is fortune and their weapons board and you should also drawn I think aspects of the nineties militia movement and there are alt-right white supremacists types in involved. Although we shouldn't conflate them. But really the way I characterize it is that it is I suppose an internet native extremist libertarian movement, you know, and a lot of the times at least retire. It's an insurrectionary libertarian movement and their biggest concern. The number one concern would be the Second Amendment. So, you know, we can talk in more detail about about what what's kind of brought this about and why it's emerged as it has but I mean the things that stand out the people the things have been reported on a lot are you know, they have a particular way of birth. Blessing so the the the the Boogaloo idea refers to a kind of running joke on the internet about the sequel to The the break dancing movie called Breakers and the eighties in a sequel was called Breakers 2 Electric Boogaloo as they've picked it up is referring to the possibility of a sequel to the either the American Revolution or or or the Civil War depending on who you're talking to. So the idea is, you know Civil War Two or American Revolution 2 Electric Boogaloo. So so they're either depending on who you talk to depending on which of them took to their either preparing for that moment or the or they're kind of trying to bring it out. So there is a sort of overlap with far-right accelerationist movements to some extent and yeah, they're dead but really there there at the center of their politics is this idea that government and particularly the federal government have significantly overreached in the Rouge? Actions they've put on people's ability to own firearms and and also in the in the heavy-handed way that they've been forced that you know, and and that's according to them off. So I just want to make sure I understand cuz I've heard so many different characterizations the Boogaloo movement over the past few months when I'm hearing you say is that you may may have wage rims his views and be part of Google movement or not. You may have some insurrectionist views or not. You may be, you know, inclined to be in a militia or not. But the main thing that unites someone in the movement would be the belief that the federal government is overreaching specifically around the Second Amendment and that that is the core of the of what makes them a part of the group. I think that's certainly something that everyone in this movement shares. Yeah, I would say that to some extent, you know, it's it's a contested movement. There is interesting. Kind of contest about about what it means and and what the biggest priorities are and you know who these kind of supposedly Universal rights like the first and second amendment who they really apply to and who is who is it risk from government overreach. So there are some parts of the Mughal of movement that are at least rhetorically again supportive of the project initially at least was supportive of the protests that came about after the death of George Floyd. There was even before George Floyd The George fluid stuff happened. There were Boogaloo guys who were expressing sympathy for African Americans who were killed by police like Brianna Tyler and philando Castile who they really see some of them at least see primarily not even an American but as a as a person who is lawfully exercising their their right to bear arms and and was killed by the police in the course of that, you know, because this movement is dead. Of the idea or even committed to the idea that there may well be sort of open civil conflicts in America there. There is a an attractive opportunity there for all kinds of people on the far right including the racist far right to sort of, you know, Co-op that movement or to be a part of it push it in the direction that they want it to so, yeah, I don't I wouldn't want to cross over State I suppose that the kind of racial liberalism or whatever I've heard and then I've had analysts describe them as anti-racist and I just don't see a lot of that. There are some people like that Thursday right wing. I would say that their most mostly dissident from from mainstream conservative. They're buying like disappointed with or opposed to President Trump. There's a lot of support in the move for judge Jorgensen who's the libertarian party presidential candidate. It sounds like the disaggregated movement where there's no central figure, but I'm wondering if this month Primarily and urban group or a Suburban group or neither that's hard to pin down. I think you've always denominator location where it primarily primarily issue. It would be the internet and and you know, that's really what this movement is. It's one of our, you know, a pretty long line now of movements that have been a you know conceived of and you know disseminated online and it's really bad up with internet culture. So there's a lot of this stuff is under several layers of irony, you know, you're forced to wonder whether someone is being serious or not when they're posting about the idea that they might have a shootout with the ATF or that they might build a fully automatic machine gun. I mean, I've seen schematics and plans on Facebook in Boogaloo groups for you know, modifying weapons to make them fully automatic. But but yeah, it's an online movement and that means wage It's bound up with internet

George Floyd Federal Government Brianna Tyler Philando Castile President Trump Judge Jorgensen Google America ATF Facebook
Interview With James vlahos

Alexa in Canada

04:48 min | 6 months ago

Interview With James vlahos

"Hey james how's it going. It's great how you doing. I am doing great and ian good to have you with us again. It's wonderful to be here. I'm excited about this conversation with james looking forward to hearing about hereafter cool things that you're working amazing girl james so we have to start with a bit of introduction. Who are you and most importantly. Why are you low e well. i'm jane. I am the founder of hereafter. I am the author of talk to me. A book all about worst competing and i am low e because i am also a bass player and that's a reference to the lowest string on the base so kind of better Joke i love. I love it. You're speaking my language because as you know. I'm a drummer so anything that's gotta museum. I love it. I love it. Amazing so as i said you were on the voice then you had a chance to to chat with some of the people that were on to ask some questions they asked about hereafter before we get into that. Can you tell us just a little bit about the book that you wrote in the stuff that you that you wrote about in there because it was a really not why is. It is a very comprehensive book. That really tackles a lot of the issues of the voice industry. Yeah i got really interested in the quest to teach computers to talk in the quest to give them a personality of sorts This is a few years ago. So i set out to write the definitive kind of general audience. Book on voice computing not necessarily for practitioners but more just for anybody who was curious about like what is going on with siri and alexa an assistant. And what does it mean is the next biggest thing after the smartphone so soup to nuts with the ambition and the book was divided into three parts. I took part one to cover. Sort of business arc of google amazon and apple and everyone kind of battling it out to dominate. This new paradigm part two was the technological aspects. So what's really ended the hood like. How do you get a computer to listen to you to understand you to produce a coherent response and then part three was just the implications of all of this. So what are we get when we have computers that we can ask questions to answer to us. what did we get when we can create avatars of real people through Through conversational ai. Socalbmw exploring and not just good stuff. Kind of all the prickly. Stop as well. So if you are at all interested in this space which i would assume you would be. If you're watching this. It's your book there. You go and i should mention as you just alluded to there. We are live so if anybody has any questions. Feel free to put those questions in the comments that we can try to bring those up on screen now. Ian you had a chance to participate a little bit in the voice as well and you met james i on the voice. Dan thoughts on what you've heard from james or questions that you have burning questions for james from from your perspective. Well i have a lot of questions for gs. But if i had a narrow it down i think james that you know even in the name. Your name is not h. e. a. r. After i had to double check that unlike weeds of waste tech company is not here after they are hereafter and so you have developed one of the most exciting companies if you were a participant in the voice launch earlier today When the folks from amazon and google asked like hey if you could start coming company would you start and your company was brought up because there's a lot of emotional tie to what you're working on so you're in the voice space but you're and branded as a voice company in terms of your name you even chose to the r. e. and it's really an emotional development to where i would want my father my mother if my grandparents are still around. I'd want to engage them to create. Let's call it a shadow of who they are through your technology and so i think one of my questions for you. May maybe the only question that we have time for is more of a human approach to voice. Technology were emotional approach to voice. Technology has that always been the case in your career. Have you always leaned more toward humanity rather than tech ray. Ai for ai sake. Technology development sake. I think that's probably the question that came up when you were talking with adam in the recently and in some of the other questions. That were outs. Could you just give you insight. Is this a newer for you. Or if you always been more focused on the humanity side of Cutting edge tech. If you wanna call

James Siri Jane Amazon Alexa Google AI Apple IAN DAN Adam
Sexual abuse a problem for the whole UN system

UN News

12:02 min | 6 months ago

Sexual abuse a problem for the whole UN system

"The un's first of victims rights advocate. Jane jenkins has confronted uncomfortable reality sexual abuse. And it's haitian or s a short carried out by un personnel. Most reason report detailed eighty s cases aren't peacekeeping and political missions in one thousand nine hundred and ninety five allegations recorded at other un entities three years on from the start of her mandate which began in september. Two thousand seventeen. I spoke to him as connors. Who said that. Since it's become more apparent at the ongoing issue of sexual abuse and exploitation goes beyond the peacekeeping sector we saw in two thousand and eighteen very the early part the allegations relating to oxfam in haiti which made it clear that humanitarian engage in this behavior. I think there's been a big movement. I don't know how much i i mean. It's very difficult to assess yourself in terms of achievements. But i think the understanding that we have a system wide problem worth more than a problem and that a victims rights approach has to be taken system wide I think that's now understood. The implementation is more complicated We're moving in the right direction. These victims trust has been abused. The trust in the united nations has been abused. How then is it possible for you to convince victims that you as the as the right field rights advocate. You'll team are people that can be trusted. The field victims rights advocates. They are individuals who are able to generate trust and certainly where abuses concerned Jeff neatly are an sexual sexual exploitation. Also definitely this Affects trust in the organization but at the same time There is a little bit of research on what people feel even in the context. Where in abuse and exploitation they do feel that the united nations has more to offer in very difficult situations than even in contexts where Trust has been abused to To a certain to a high extent but in the context of the work of the field victims rights advocates. They send a lot of time with. Were we describe as community based complaints networks in other words with Community structures which are more or less comprised of the desert various in various context police. The religious bodies. I'm a children's rights bodies women's rights bodies etc and They engage with a lot of capacity building information sharing and things of that nature and they also make it clear that They are available to have complaints brought to them and more than that they do. Concrete things in order to deal with the issues that confront Confront victims and in general what they are interested in is medical attention psychological care ways to put them in a position where they can gain livelihoods and if they have children born of sexual exploitation and abuse. They really want to say efforts. Some real efforts put in place. So that The parental responsibility of the father of the child is brought to bear and That's that's really does Re rebuild trust in an anonymous way just small things. i mean. they're not really that small. If you're the person involved One of my victims rights advocates Recently worked with the ministry of women are in one of the countries to ensure the bank accounts could be established for women with With successful claims relating to the fathers of their children and that's difficult to see we failed to remember. There are practical things. You can't get remittances if you don't have a bank account. You can't get a bank account if you don't have a job so it's those nitty gritty. Little things really go a long way to rebuild. Trust i've seen it happen. I went to an example. I can give you is. I went to haiti in april. Two thousand and eighty. I met with the women with children who have unresolved paternity claims. It was an uncomfortable meeting as you could imagine. And they were very forthright. They said we've seen people like you before you come. You talk to us you tell us oh laced wonderful things then you go away. We hear nothing. And i said to them what what would make things different for you. And they talked about the fact that their kids couldn't go to school. And i said well i can't promise anything but i will do my best And i was able with the help of the victims rights advocate there at the time Moved on now to get a little bit of money pulled together which supported school fees and And school supplies for these children. And apparently he the feel victims. Rights advocate met with these women at the end of two thousand and eighteen. And they sit him. She kept her promise. And it just makes a big difference. I mean knows a. It's the things that really Work a small step can rebuild. Trust to to a great extent kind of collaboration. Are you getting from member. States from the countries contributing troops some of whom have committed these abuses is clearly a very important part of facilitating paternity tests making of accountability house. I it will depend on the relevant member state but but there have been some very encouraging encouraging steps food with regard to Several member states In particular with regard to paternity claims. This is i really do. Focus on. Accountability generally is Something that i do. Focus on within that context. I focused on what is spoken of move by the victims and that is the issue of The support that the father should give to a child born sexual exploitation and abuse. So i've i've put a big focus on that a narrow encouraging signs with regard to some states we had a very interesting A webinar with member states about three weeks ago with south africa talked about The steps it's taking with respect to Some of its troops with regard to paternity claims so are the signs are encouraging and when you have one two states who step forward that creates an interesting of the states who don't want to be left behind so to speak and in in view of that we are convening. I'm with with the conduct. Disciplined service with I am convening a working level meeting Next year on resolution of paternity claims Within the states and Hopefully we'll be able to to developer sort of coherent roadmap least forgot to the way four but all i can say is the signs are encouraging I'm i'm suppose something unusual. Un staff member. I would say things are encouraging rather than brilliant and it is a price they said. It's bringing everybody along but if you had some states who going forward that will really encourage others now. This of course should never happened. Sexploitation abuse by angle but particularly people. Who are supposed to be the protectors. Do you think now office three years. This is something that can be stopped or is it really just a question of mitigating. This fisher well it you know. It's a un staff member. This behavior is very Not only is. It is very hurtful to victims obviously to communities flies in the face of what we're supposed to be doing and of course it. It hurts other stuff members that who feel the which This is this is just a a a betrayal of the oval the ideals about seventy five. He is of a organization I am never i. I don't think that the behavior is inevitable and accordingly. I think the behavior is a behavior that can be stoked I think come. I think i think we have various levels of perpetrators however so some Some they will be Some may will be perpetrators Bound to perpetrate. If you know what. I mean But often a matter of Alva different power extreme vulnerability situations in extreme vulnerability and opportunities. So i think there'a the the issue of the power imbalances something. That's certainly we can. We can deal with addressing the whole culture of exploitation moving into that abuses. Something we can do. But it needs a lot of work and It needs some consistent work. We can see that it's possible to change behavior. It may be more difficult to chain attitude. But i think certainly from my point of view. The behavior can be stopped juicy. Very good examples. I saw in one of my visits Worker for police commissioner. Who had put in place various In in a in a particular context where Whether there was the the police who engaged in the the Police from the police contributing countries that engaged in a lot of sexual exploitation abused road right down by really paying attention to mitigation measures looking at early warning just continually raising consciousness of the total unacceptability of the behavior. And this had worked. The numbers had definitely come down. So things can be done and of course the basic issue is that we're working in contexts. Where those who do become subject to this Conduct often in a very often considered Contextual consideration of women and children in some of these contexts is is pretty bad also so they have the legal framework policy framework doesn't necessarily won't put women on women and children on the same level as men. The behavior which is engaged in by on u n personnel tolerated in the broader community. It requires a lot of work and not just in an isolated way but Also dealing with the challenges that confront those who are in extremely vulnerable situations in the countries where we operate.

UN Jane Jenkins United Nations Ministry Of Women Haiti Connors Oxfam Jeff South Africa
The Google Photos Free-For-All Is Over

Techmeme Ride Home

06:21 min | 6 months ago

The Google Photos Free-For-All Is Over

"So the free ride is over. Google has announced it will end its unlimited photos storage on june first of next year thereafter imposing a new fifteen gigabyte cap before they ask you to pay up for more storage but before you freak out photos and documents uploaded before that date june first of twenty twenty one will not count against the cap quoting the verge. All photos and documents uploaded before june. I will not count against that. Fifteen gigabyte cap. So you have plenty of time to decide whether to continue using google photos or switching to another cloud storage provider for your photos. Only photos uploaded after june. I will begin counting against the cap who already counts original quality photo uploads against a storage capping google photos however taking away unlimited backup for high quality photos and video which are automatically compressed for more efficient storage also takes away one of these services biggest selling points. It was the photo service where you just didn't have to worry about how much storage you had as a side note pixel owners will still be able to upload high quality not original photos for free after june first without those images counting against their cap. It's not as good as the pixels original deal of getting unlimited original quality. But it's a small bonus for the few people who buy google devices. Google points out that it offers more free storage than others you get fifteen gigabytes instead of the poultry five gigabytes that apple's icloud gives you and it also claims that eighty percent of google photos users won't hit that fifteen gigabyte cap for at least three years and quote by the way even though this photo thing is getting all the headlines. It's also worth noting that this is a sort of new storage policy for google across the board quoting manageable going forward. Google says that. If you don't check in on your google drive files every now and then. It may delete them. Google frames this change as a way to tidy up abandoned digital detritus. Perhaps leftover from long forgotten accounts. Which may be sure or alternatively it may be that a google user simply stored some valuable files away for a while like when might with physical documents and a fireproof safe and simply hasn't peaked at them in a few years quote. We're introducing new policies for consumer accounts. That are either inactive or over their storage across g mail. Drive including google docs sheets slides drawings forums and chambord files and or photos to better align with common practices across the industry. Explains google a blog post announcing the change your inactive in one or more of these services for two years twenty four months who will delete the content in the products in which you're inactive and quote in other words. School at present has no plans to. Just start deleting your stuff. Willy nilly however it's letting you know that. Come june. i twenty twenty one. The clock is ticking and quote but back to the free for all for photos ending. That's what's gotten everyone all riled up overnight which makes sense because this sort of touches all of our buttons when it comes to google right something. Something never rely on. Google services to be consistent forever or to even exist for more than half a decade. Google photos has been free for almost exactly five years by the way but also this strikes to the heart of the whole antitrust argument with which google and other big tech companies are being tarred quoting casey newton. Google earned eleven. Point two billion dollars in profits last quarter and uses all your uploaded photos to train its machine learning algorithms which offers it other enormous competitive benefits also seems notable that free. Google photo storage helped to drive tons of startups out of this market. Ever picks loom ever picture life. Now that they're gone. And google is tired of losing money on photos the revenue switch flips and quote and quoting from a widely read piece by willa ramos in one zero quote. It's a galling bayton switch and an object lesson anticompetitive behaviour by a big tech firm. The unlimited free storage offer was arguably. Google photos is top selling point one that few. If any competing providers could match the company was likely willing to lose money on its service in exchange for the photos value in training. It's ai systems and for the value of keeping users in its broader software ecosystem. What was once a hotly competitive and innovative space now largely controlled by google and a few other giants such as apple and this points to another set of losers albeit nebulous. One everyone who might have benefited from the new ideas and fresh features that were never developed because startups didn't stand a chance against google. It would be easy to reach for a sardonic. Don't be evil reference here. But what google is doing and why it matters isn't best understood in moral terms at every step it was just doing what successful companies do. It offered a great product for free because it could afford to it. Crushed competitors largely by virtue of being the best option on the market. And now it's raising prices because the free storage offer has served its purpose instead. This move is best understood from the standpoint of competition and antitrust it's google's vast size and scope the way it's products in different markets compliment and cross subsidize each other that gave it unmatchable advantages over smaller rivals. In retrospect the free storage offer looks a lot like predatory pricing whether that was google's intent or not but the bigger picture is that google like other dominant platforms. Has its hand in. So many different mutually reinforcing lines of business that it will always be incentivized to leverage them. In anti-competitive ways from certain standpoint the standpoint of maximizing profit and shareholder value. It would be foolish not to end quote. But i will give you this interesting counterpoint. From dare obasanjo who actually engage directly with will on twitter about his piece quote. This is why break. Big tech is sloganeering without a coherent policy. What break-up action would be recommended in. This instance should google photos be spun out of google. Meaning they'd have to charge for it from the jump or that. Google build new free products anymore. The article title is literally that this case is proof and antitrust remedy is needed. I'm simply asking how so google photos as a lost leader. These are common business practices. Mcdonald's profit comes from soda. Not burger's what antitrust regulation would be useful here. Lots of commentary on antitrust and big tech is really. I mad at this company and want them to be punished. There is no government intervention that will cause a for profit company to give you free unlimited storage forever and quote

Google Casey Newton Willa Ramos Apple Willy Obasanjo Twitter Mcdonald Burger
What was said in the Trump-Biden debate last night?

What A Day

03:47 min | 7 months ago

What was said in the Trump-Biden debate last night?

"Let's talk about what went down last night. Akilah quick first impression here. All right. So I was prepared for this debate to be just as annoying as the first one and generally speaking I don't think it was it was quieter and less interrupt. The mute button function was good for the majority of the first answers to the moderator's questions. By the end although senseless non sequiturs started creeping back in also say that the moderator last night Kristen Welker was way better like so far ahead of Chris Wallace several weeks ago you know she kept the candidates on topic she forged ahead with better more relevant questions whenever trump threatened to devolve into conspiracy theories and generally speaking she seemed comfortable being there. So that was the VIBE. But Gideon, let's talk about what trump did last night how would you describe what he had to say? Yeah I definitely agree that it was more toned-down but on the substance I, think trump still acts enlarge part like he's running into. Kept, trying to cast his opponent as a career politician and one who was corrupt he brought up that hunter suffer example, but it didn't quite and it was a little bit hard to follow, and that strategy allows him to evade questions about his own term as well as his vision for the future he failed for instance, offer coherent message on the biggest crisis of his presidency covert nineteen and he at times tried to make the Democratic ticket seem more to the left than it is trump. Seems to always have Bernie Sanders on the brain and several times. He came back to the same point about Biden being a longtime politician who hasn't gotten anything done. But there was at least one specific moment where the strategy failed and he pretty remarkable way by turn to the camera and said, the debate should be about the families of people watching and not what the two candidates were talking about and trump kind of fell into a trap with a terrible answer. Here's a clip of that. This isn't about there's a reason why he's. been up all this Malarkey. There's a reason for he doesn't WanNa talk about the the the substantive issues it's not about his family and my family it's about your family and your family's hurting badly if you're making less than if you're a middle class family, you're getting hurt badly right now you're sitting at the kitchen table this morning to decide what we can't get new tires their ball because we have. To wait another month or so or are we going to be able to pay the mortgage who's going to tell her? She can't go back to to community college there the decision making in the middle class families like I grew up in. Scranton claim they're in trouble we should be talking about your families but that's a last thing he wants to talk about I wanted to say I wanted to tell. Me What is it? Ten seconds Mr President go political stupid. Let's get off this China thing and then he looks the family around the table everything just a typical politician I see that's. Difficult politician. That's why I got elected that. Let's get off the subject of China let's talk around sitting around the table. Right come on Joe you. Okay. So if we're following the logic here, trump is coming off as saying I'm not a typical politician I don't care about your family. Almost. Literally, what he's getting at that moment along with one word trump backed away from raising the federal minimum wage were really out of sync with what's going on in the country among working families. So a Gila, what did you make of trump last night? So I mean personally, I'm not giving US seventy four year old man props for not screaming like an infant during a debate like he's been here long enough he I don't know how to act by now. But in terms of the content of his answers, there wasn't really much worth talking about like. You said trump didn't really WANNA talk about his record at all at one point. He did say that he takes responsibility for covert but then he immediately pivoted to the same old static about how everything is China's fault and other points he blamed. Democratic. Governors and criticized overall continued to downplay the virus saying that schools and businesses should fully reopen but he revealed no plan to deal with the spikes and infections. In fact, he claim that there is a vaccine that's ready and we'll be deployed in a few weeks wad squad we know

Donald Trump United States China Biden Bernie Sanders Gideon Kristen Welker Hunter Chris Wallace Scranton President Trump JOE
How Can We Detect Tornadoes Earlier?

BrainStuff

03:13 min | 7 months ago

How Can We Detect Tornadoes Earlier?

"Welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Pay Rain Staff. Lauren. Volvo bomb here. In the same way that ultraviolet light and infrared light exists outside the human eye can perceive sound waves exist beyond the frequencies of what humans can hear when those sound waves are higher frequency than what we can here we call them ultrasonic and when they're lower frequency, we call them infrasonic. Several natural sources, including volcanoes, avalanches, quakes, and meteors produce infrasonic waves also called in for sound. Animals like elephants in Wales may communicate with infra sound and man made inventions like wind turbines can generate these sounds to. A detecting infrasonic waves is one of the key ways governments can monitor for nuclear bomb tests. That's because infrasonic waves decay very slowly, and when they're large enough, they can wrap around the globe several times before dissipating. And it turns out the tornadoes can produce unique infrasonic waves even before tornado genesis, which is when the storm forms an hour or more before. Scientists have known about the tornado in for sound connection for several decades but to learn more about this process and to better understand how humans harness this information, a group of scientists is developing a long distance passive way of listening in on tornadoes in doing. So we'd be able to deal with the fact that three fourths of all current tornado warnings are Lawrence and thus too often ignored or not taken seriously. In for sound could represent another source of data to add to our arsenal. One Brian, Bang and Oklahoma state. University mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Professor said in a press release discussing this research by monitoring tornadoes from hundreds of miles away we'll be able to decrease false alarm rates and possibly even increase warning times. elbing and his team built special listening devices using microphones sensitive to low frequencies that were then placed inside of containers with noise holes and arranged in triangle for precision measurements. The goal was to separate regular wind noise from Tornado noise? elbing said wind noise is incoherent. So if you average it over a large space, it will sum up to zero. Conversely, Tornado infra sound is coherent meaning waves look over large distances. So the pressure waves ad together and contain information. This new capability could mean that storm chasers trying to gather data about tornadoes would be able to take fewer risks in their research. Imagine drones equipped with special infrasonic microphones, for instance, flying in the vicinity of storms, transmitting data to forecasters and scientists. It could therefore help save lives by giving people earlier warnings about potentially deadly storms in the United

Lawrence Volvo Lauren Aerospace Engineering Professo Wales Oklahoma Brian
NZ election: why voters chose 'health over wealth'

Between The Lines

08:04 min | 7 months ago

NZ election: why voters chose 'health over wealth'

"Into mania in. New Zealand. Tonight. New Zealand has shown the Labor Party, its greatest support and at least fifty years. End For that. I only had two simple words. Thank you. Well that was prime, minister? I done this she celebrating her emphatic election victory last weekend. Now the significance of the Labor Party landslide. It's not just that it's seen as a reward for her decisive response to the COVID crisis. It means New Zealand now has its first single-party government in decades. So what does the mandate main for new? Zealand's economic landscape as it faces its worst recession in nearly a century. We'll deliver a progressive transformation across the ditch. What happens if New Zealand does not sort ad its economic challenges quickly. trans-tasman cousins could I become fouled state? All of the heart, which is executive director of the new. Zealand initiative and Josie. PAGARINI is the executive director of the Council for International Development both a based in Wellington all of Josie welcome to. Radio National. Hello Tom. JC How do you account for Cinderella Dunes emphatic victory. Well, I mean you've got to say the popularity is genuine people lover. She's like a superstar she goes into to shopping malls and gets mobbed but I think you'd say you'd have to say to that that election campaign was incredibly disciplined Labor wanted a covid election. They wanted election that was about who stopped US getting sick not who's going to get us back to work and they succeeded in getting that they also wanted election that was focused not on labor, not particularly on policy, but almost entirely on just cinder. So if you the completely unscientific focus. Group in the Texas, you'd ask a taxi driver who you voting for, and let's say I'm voting for just under the all of a juicy. He reflects the Conventional Wisdom Abacha in Dorado and that her aggressive handling off covered and not to mention her response to the mass shooting of Muslims in in Christchurch earlier last year the gun control measures she put in place all that explains Justin, Dryden's remarkable political popularity. She's also received widespread global price for being a stateswoman who's kept New Zealand you nodded even in the face of multiple crises, your not fanned. Why? Well. First of all, I would agree with our choice just as remarkably popular and. This scenes from her election campaign were quite telling wherever she turned up. They were hundreds of people around her celebrating her. My experience with taxi drivers though is a bit different, maybe different taxi companies are us. Last The last few times I had known taxi drivers They complained that their businesses stoned at the city's undying out that we are not recovering properly from the crisis. That business is simply not what it used to be an typically detect Texas. Of course when I'm flying from Wellington to Auckland, and have to get to the CD and you can see the traffic in the city, the city looks kind of dead. We've got a massive challenge ahead on the economy in these eland, and that's why I haven't really seen much from the government in general plans of how to revive the economy and how to get us out of they have effectively beaten the virus now twice. But they haven't actually given us any clear indication how they're going to lift us out of this because the protections for public debts for unemployment. From monetary policy, they actually scare me when you look at them many New Zealand business figures share all of skepticism is fair Point Jersey. Yes, it is because the election really did focus on cousin who it was absolutely about who stopped US getting sick and so it was actually really hard to get any coherent debate about what is the plan B if we don't get a vaccine next year, what is the retail kind? So it was all very vague that staff and. You're right. All of you got different taxi companies to me to probably but another thing I heard in Texas a lot was all well if it's between wealth and health, I'm GonNa pick health and just send a picked health. Well, of course, you know we know that that's a false dichotomy it's not health or wealth. If you country is unable to trade and you borders closed long-term, then you're not going to raise the revenue to be able to have decent hospitals. You're not going to get your school buildings. Renovated and so on, and you're not going to be getting elective surgery and people are actually going to get unhealthy. So but it was no one wanted to hear that town that was the thing. No one wanted to hear a debate about next year they just wanted to know that. Anti Cinde was gonNA look after and that was it. Yes we'll enjoys does mentioned the vaccine just interested in like most western leaders frankly, she's pretty policy on the likelihood of a vaccine in coming months but the question here is what if a readily available vaccine if it ever happens what if it's a long way off I mean for how long all of our the present measures sustainable I mean, how long can you zeal and cut itself off from the outside world? Well I think that is actually a political question not an economic run from an economic perspective I. Think it would be desirable to New Zealand to the words more quickly but can do the safely. We can still have proper border to ensure that when we opened up to the word again, we do this without importing the virus. But I think the government sticks to the precautionary principle at the moment, and that's a political decision because the public doesn't want the government do anything outspent opinion polls before election showing that more than seventy percent of New Zealanders what actually like to keep the borders Morris close and these are people who probably don't have any immediate travel plans or maybe don't have any family abroad. Heavily business to do abroad, and so for them life is quite pleasant as long as they also keep their jobson New Zealand's, and so they would rather electric continue the status quo until that vaccine arrive. So it is difficult for the government to go against this when the public is. So strongly in favor of just keeping the border shut as they are but at some stage will just have to a because some the economic consequences of this some prolonged isolation are going to be enormous Jesse is point. Absolutely, you could not get a discussion out during the election campaign about elimination versus suppression of the virus, and so it was it was almost impossible to talk about the plan. B. If the vaccine doesn't turn up which let's face it, it's unlikely tuneup and be available next year so. Realistically the from left or the right of the political spectrum. It was really hard to talk about how long do our border stay closed, and those of us myself included who were trying to say, you know look closing the borders as a six month policy not a two year policy. He can't possibly maintain a closed border and keep trade going even though we can still export milk powder and so on. But the ability for our businesses to connect with the world and so on for us to travel is just not feasible but whenever I said that I would get attacked on twitter and everywhere for being the head of a capitalist difficult. So you could not get a good debate going about this even though the w eight show for example was saying, Hey, you know strict lockdowns and we've had very strict lockdowns for lockdowns are not the best approach if you're doing a cost benefit analysis on either health or economic growth.

New Zealand Texas Labor Executive Director Josie Wellington Zealand Labor Party Covid Cinderella Dunes Radio National Twitter Council For International Deve TOM Jesse Christchurch Abacha
A Look at Jennie Livingston's 1990 documentary Paris is Burning

Queer as Fact

06:03 min | 7 months ago

A Look at Jennie Livingston's 1990 documentary Paris is Burning

"Hello and welcome to Queer as fiction we talk about Queer historical media I'm Jason and I may lie and today we're talking about Jenny. Livingston's nineteen ninety. Documentary. Paris's Bang. Before we start, we have a few called him warnings to this episode. This episode contains mentions of Racism Transphobia Homophobia the AIDS epidemic murder and family rejection. It also contains the use of outdated language surefooted by Queer people on people, call it in courts. If any of that sounds like something, you don't want to listen to please feel free to check out one of. Our other episodes. So I wanted to stop this episode by explaining what is Paris's banning because I feel like a lot of listeners probably a pretty good understanding of this documentary. Some very young listeners may not have seen it. I said Hanson had you seen it before we researched this ups lot no but I had a pirated version of a hard drive for decades. I love with things and have adhd. reasonable. So I was aware of it but I hadn't actually seen it. Yeah. I think I heard the name but didn't know what it was. So Paris is burning is a documentary about the bowl culture scene of New York in the nineteen eighties prominently featuring the African American and Latin American members of that community many among gay and or trans. It documents how they lives intersect with the Bulls the form, the Bulls tight and contains several interviews, participants, explaining concepts, such shade, realness reading, and legendary woods that may be familiar to a modern audience given how by propagated in popular drag culture. Yeah on TIKTOK. The documentary features no narration and very little dialogue from the interview wide lesbian filmmaker. Jenny. Livingston prominent members of several houses in the scene featured including pepple of Asia during Corey Angie Extravaganza and Willi? Ninja. I'll make a nerd here on pronounce while several of the performance featured in Paris boning. Ambiguously Trans Women and so I'm GonNa to share pronounced where I don't have specific evidence I. Do want to note that pepple of Asia describes himself in the documentary is not being woman not understanding the experience of womanhood and being on In a sex change however, her two thousand and three obituary in the new. York. Times describes her as preferring in pronounce ongoing with that as the more recent source compared to this documentary which was filmed in the eighties. So having talked about what Paris has been is I want to I going to kind of how was made so as described by Academic Lucas, Hildebrand in his twenty thirteen book quit film classics Piracy's Boning, which was a major source when I was researching this episode Livingston was taking a film production class at NEOCON. INVESTI windshield observed three young men voguish in Washington. Square Park after asking what they were doing she was invited to an upcoming bowl and soon thereafter began documenting the scene via black and white photographs and audio interviews which were kind of the mediums in which she worked at the time. She was really documentary filmmaker. This was her first data and she since gone on to make several more films which obviously less notable. Because I don't know what they. Yeah. That's pretty wild. Are they on like queer things. Yeah I, believe her I think there's like Queer Antenna. Seems to many of her films. So yeah, it was only the light of that. She began filming the balls and coming up with the idea of turning these into a documentary. Film took seven years to make in no small pod Judah. The struggles Livingston had funding its production. She initially intended it to be appealing observational documentary just kind of following the lives of the Queen's involved in the same but lacked the funding to shoot the endless hours of footage that would be required for such a production. I'm not really an expert on how documentary films of made. Films something like seventy or eighty hours of footage as it is. So like, wow, that must have been. Lot of what is required for something without the kind of caught away stained. Interesting to think about funding a project like this in like post the iphone world. Because there's like a very like obviously a useless modern. Just, film it like whistle the money going yeah. It's like it's interesting. She talks about the various ways in which the film was funded was funded by a bunch of different organization. Thirteen. Different organizations contributed funding including the baby say. And she stalked interviews about how? It's the late eighties you conscious show someone from the BBC your footage you have to fly someone out from. England oh. Wow. Yeah. My Gosh and show them a physical film real. So is that indicative of a certain level of like promises project was seen to have if she was able to show it to someone like that or did this happen quite routinely it was just logistically difficult Y-. Oh. Yeah. So instead of a purely observational documentary, the earlier interviews that she'd recorded were bought back and more interviews were conducted. Most notably interviews conducted in one thousand, nine, hundred, nine broad sense of narrative to the film by depicting the commercial success of Willi Ninja, as well as the tragic murder of Vance Extravaganza young star in the bowl seen who features prominently throughout the Documentary Livingston has self describes the film making process as followers. Suddenly, the people I filmed worked with me in pop because I represented a chance to speak out to be in front of a camera to show off I, consider Paris burning collaboration on the deepest level, the people who. Are Articulate funny poised while the editor and I made coherent full that we saw the documentary was truly written by the bowl people themselves I use that quite because questions of narrative agency consent and understanding of the nature of the documentaries production became deeply controversial upon the film's release and will form a pot about lighter discussion. But before we get into that, I wanted to do a bit

Paris Livingston Willi Ninja Jenny Murder Asia Bulls Jason Adhd. BBC Hanson Trans Women Square Park New York Bowl York Editor Times Washington
2 Reasons Women Don't Get the Career Feedback They Need to Succeed

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

00:59 min | 7 months ago

2 Reasons Women Don't Get the Career Feedback They Need to Succeed

"I would call your growth relationships people that. Over time you have found that they give you a valued perspective on how you're showing up the feedback piece that you're talking about Hannah. And what I think is so interesting. is that. Many women and this is the work that we do. Right. oftentimes don't get that feedback. That's so crucial as we're growing our careers in organizations. Because either they're not asking for it. They're not hearing it the way that it's being delivered. It's kind of. Delivered in a awkward or you know in Coherent Way and so I do think it's important for every individual to develop the skill of asking very specific questions. Of trusted advisors so that they get the feedback that so critical.

Hannah
A Forgotten, But Essential Aspect of the Doctrine of Creation

Knowing Faith

05:16 min | 8 months ago

A Forgotten, But Essential Aspect of the Doctrine of Creation

"So here is the question for today, what is a crucial but often forgotten essential about the Christian doctrine of creation what's something? That's absolutely essential to a meaningful coherent Christian doctrine of creation but that we often overlook forget. Well the doctrine of creation can be summed up in one sentence in that is that the triune God without opposition or equal and without the use of pre existing materials created the world by his will and for his good pleasure. And so. There's a lot each each one of those phrases is loaded one of the things that. Most people pay attention to is the idea that he did us. No pre existing materials a Krio Hilo. That is the reason for that is is to because God is truly sovereign over that which he created. It is not that he is one of many deities that who he happens to be the one that created the world, and that the world is made out of some kind of pre existing material are divine stuff in which he had to battle it and defeated and subdue it, which would would really impune on the docket of God's sovereignty. We don't find any of that in genesis chapter one. The thing that I would say many people forget is that last expression that he created a according to his good will and pleasure that is God has freedom he is a free gone nick would have been just as glorious if he had never created at all. It would have taken away none of His Excellency's. Throughout all eternity he had remained. The sum total reality it isn't that he got lonely in created because he was a perfect society of fellowship of Father, son and Holy Spirit that love one another with a perfect love that all of the glories and Excellencies were already experienced in a maximum way. No He created as an act of of pure grace. It is a gratuitous action. Created A world different than they one that he did if he had so chosen and if it had been according to his goodwill and good pleasure. So we want to preserve the freedom of God in creating. Because I. think that is just as essential because you do have some who thinks that God some somehow needed to create in it some creation fulfill some lack that he had and the Bible makes it very clear that neither of those things are true. That God is. Complete. Insufficient enough himself and we add nothing to his caloric. Now, we have been graciously given the privilege of glorifying him. In, but that is a gracious privilege and so I think that is something that is forgotten. The freedom of God in. Create. That's So I think that's a really good point. I might maybe a little follow up question here if we lose God's freedom and creating what do we lose about God like how how does that compromise a not only a coherent view of God but are persuasive you have got well. You for example, this means that everything God did he did by necessity being not have done? That for some reason whether it's internal or external, he was somehow compelled that he could not have done otherwise. A I think we all recognize intuitively that this puts a constraint on the character of our the the nature God in a way that doesn't sound very godlike, right? Though so It is no infringement are no restriction on. God to say that God always operates within the constraints of this nature. Words. God. Is a good. God. God is a Holy God God is a righteous God. So therefore, he always operates righteously lovingly. In a way that is pure. But within within that framework of his nature, there are an infinite number. Of others and infinite number of options available to him. He could have not saved Ken keithly. I still would have been just as glorious as he is. But he he ordained a world in which I would be six. This, this was a free act on his part. and. So regardless launch where one. COMES OUT ON. The calvinists. Debate. In everywhere non kind of in between the point is is that I think all of us want to preserve the freedom of God in this way yeah. Absolutely. Well, Dr Keithly that I think a really good answer to the question what is crucial but often forgotten essential about the doctrine of creation

Krio Hilo Dr Keithly Ken Keithly
Biden press secretary accuses Trump campaign of funneling questions to Fox News in spar with anchor

Hammer and Nigel

05:34 min | 8 months ago

Biden press secretary accuses Trump campaign of funneling questions to Fox News in spar with anchor

"Biden Eyes in Michigan, Joe Biden says Democrats in Michigan. Who voted for him and Obama twice but then voted for Donald Trump. Are basically Racists. This is a county that President Obama and you carried twice on then President Trump carried by 12% points in 2016. Why do you think so Many of these voters turned against the Democratic Party in 2016. You know, I think it was the feeling that they were taking for granted. I don't know that for a fact. And I think that he he used that dog whistle on race. That's one hell of a way to try to get back Those votes. And Michigan and Wisconsin accused them of B was being closet Racists. AAA racist that voted for me and Obama there. Ah! Yeah, they bought into the dog whistle. That's a home strategy. Bolt. What is a bold strategy? Cotton now as bad as Joe Biden is on camera His campaign press secretary is worse. No way. T J Duck Low Just this little weaselly looking dude, he made the mistake of going on with Bret Bear on Fox News yesterday. And listen. Bright bears, not a got your questions kind of guy. He's pretty straight up. As a matter of fact, he was asking some easy yes or no questions. And it didn't really go well for Biden's press secretary. What specifically would the former vice president have done? Well, let's get a few things straight. The vice president was not against the travel ban. First of all, second of all, let's let's remember, and he wasn't Brett. Let's remember an important distinction. Donald Trump was the president of the United States. It was on Donald. I'm asking you, Joe Budden. It was on the was Donald action toe actually protect the PT closed the travel that show Biden wrote an op ed in USA Today in January, warning that the threat was coming. Joe Biden said in February that Donald Trump should get people on the ground in China. What did what did Donald Trump do? Donald Trump was praising China. Donald Trump was praising President. She's response, saying that they had it under control. When clearly he knew, as we now know, from Bob Woodward. They did not have it under control. He should have been protecting the American people. He should have been putting real plans in place. So let me just confront in clinically dangerous. Understand. Let me just clarify your saying that Joe Biden was for closing down travel from China when the president did it. Joe Biden has been cleared. I continue the fact checks if they're helpful, Brett Joe Biden has been clear that he was not against that travel ban that he was for Joe Biden has been clear about how I can continue the fact checks if they're helpful. This has been fact checked into oblivion. Okay, I'm just asking the question. You're saying yes. He was for the shit. China travel ban when the president implemented it. 2 48 hours after receiving that briefing, the important thing about the travel babe, But I know that you will like to cite the travel ran. I know that. You know the president does. That's why I'm bringing it up are obviously it's going to be in the debate. Hold on. The important thing to know about the travel ban is that even after the president implemented that travel ban, tens of thousands of people came in and out, Take it. Then what was the question? You're going to send me some back goes on like this for, like, five minutes. This poor dude. TJ Duck Low, the campaign press secretary. He's worse on camera than Biden. Now, Here's Brett Baer asking a very simple question. Does Joe Biden have the questions coming to him in a teleprompter? Does he have his responses in a TelePrompTer because that's one of the allegations of the Trump campaign is saying Let's see how this question goes. Nobody ever used to teleprompter during local interviews or to answer Q and a with supporters were not goingto get this is this is straight from the Trump campaign they're using and what it does, and what it does is it's trying to distract the American just from there using and they talk about it every day. When you say yes or no, That's what they talk about it every day break because they don't have a coherent you answer Yes or no, Brett. They talked about it every day because they don't have a coherent argument for why Donald Trump. Deserves reelection deserves four more years. We know that he lied to the American people. We know that he has not shown leadership during this crisis, and they are desperate to throw anything they can against the wall to try to distract from the fact I understand, But you can't answer the question, but I am not going to allow. Okay, Trump campaign toe, funnel their questions through Fox News and get me to respond to that. So that's a no. Or yes, I don't even know why I got the question, wouldn't you? If you say no. If that was the case does Joe Biden use a teleprompter? When the answering questions to the press If the answer was no, wouldn't you? Would there be a problem saying? No. I understand the problem saying Yes, right. Why would you just lie? No, Not at all. Yeah, And then and then the other one. Well, well, You know what? I'm actually gonna have the E mail you the answer the memories. He's gonna email brown bear the fact checks right? I'll email you The fact checkers. Google Google? Yeah, That's not a good answer you You know it's bad when Joe Biden's coming up to you saying Listen, Kenny, you're pretty bad on camera, sir. My name's not Kenny. It doesn't matter. You're not allowed to speak on camera anymore. And this is coming from me. Joe Biden

Joe Biden President Trump Press Secretary Joe Budden Barack Obama China Vice President Brett Baer Michigan Donald Trump Fox News Democratic Party Bob Woodward Google Bret Bear Wisconsin United States
A Curious Way to Improve Outcomes in Substance Use Disorder Space

Outcomes Rocket

04:47 min | 8 months ago

A Curious Way to Improve Outcomes in Substance Use Disorder Space

"Welcome, back to the outcome rocket podcasts for re chat with today's most successful and inspiring healthcare leaders really wish that you could visit us at outcomes rockets dot health slash reviews where you can rate and review today's episode. We have an amazing guest. His name is Jacob Levinson he's the CEO at map help management. Jacobs. Extensive career is focused on being very dialed into the healthcare center. He's member of board of Directors Levinson. Foundation privately funded Philanthropic Organization Charter to really develop, manage, and fund diverse portfolio and humanitarian activities around the world. He's a member try private capital. He's just done so many things in realm of just contributing to this humanitarian. Capacity that his fit in health care makes so much sense and you guys all hear the passionate voice when we dive deeper. But what I WANNA do is open up the microphone to Jacob. So he could fill in the gaps in the introduction Jacob Welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me excited to be on with you know get good job introduction nothing to add looking forward to next forty five minutes or so of of hitting some of these were topics absolutely in so Jacob why did you decide to get into the medical sector? You could have done so many things, but you decided to land here. Why asked myself that often? It's like a Greek tragedy. For your run from it, the more you run into it. So I grew up around a lot of active substance use disorder in my house it. Oh, child of the late eighties nineties KINDA GROPE UNSEEN KINDA staff and Watch family members struggle, and the last thing I ever wanted to do was a line my professional career with anything that had to do with addiction or substance use disorder. So of course, that's exactly what happened. It wasn't by choice it was I I don't know some sort of gravitational pull maybe back to what I knew. So I it's no I don't think it's any secret that you grow up kind of around substance use disorder, and then someone like me ends up involved in writing algorithms to detect active substance use I. Mean I've been doing it too right. So I don't know if there's a coherent explanation but I was born. Into the addiction world in that sense. Yeah. It was woven into your fiber as as kid and it was sorta like something you've been doing. So why not continue to do it? There's a lot of work that needs to be done in this space out there and I felt like that we had an opportunity to make some change and we need to put our best foot forward go do something. So yeah, it's exciting time and really pivotal Kinda critical juncture in history we're watching so many things transformed are going to drive this for the next generation to generation. So kind of having a a front seat of somebody that's really exciting. Yeah that's super exciting and so for the listeners, maybe you could dive in a little bit on what some of the work that you guys do and how it's relevant to the space shirt. So I'll try to keep it simple. We focus predominantly on individuals who have a substance use disorder diagnosis. What we call addiction is to kind of put that some staggering terms twenty two and a half twenty, three, million Americans fit the criteria for substance use disorder, which is a big number of that high. High, and this year to bigger number mind blowing than national economic impact of substance abuse a little bit different than substance use disorder but substance abuse is about seven hundred, forty, billion dollars annually. So that's almost in line with our national defense budget. But that's things work lost productivity. That's every dollar that is extended. If you will as a result of substance abuse sweeping up glass after you I rex everything. So and trump a couple of weeks ago declared this a public health emergency, a public emergency. We have a public health crisis opioid crisis, which is grabbing headlines Yes, but it's by far not the number one cost driver, nor is it the number one kind of killer in Dash Ud world if you will out well, let's set tobacco aside but alcohol far kills more people than opiates still to this day just doesn't do it in a headline grabbing away like a fictional overdose but to jump to question quickly, we managed people who have a sense use disorder diagnosis using peers, I mean people. Who are in successful recovery but what we do the truly interesting we tech enable them and we date enable them. So we put a lot of tech and other tools at their fingertips that help them identify people who are struggling, make better decisions and helping them ultimately, the whole game here is to improve outcomes for people, substance use disorder, and chip away at that seven hundred, forty billion dollars that were emerging as a nation.

Jacob Levinson Disorder Directors Levinson Philanthropic Organization Cha Foundation Jacobs
"coherent" Discussed on Advent of Computing

Advent of Computing

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"coherent" Discussed on Advent of Computing

"Versions re compiled for the IBM. Since everything wasn't see moving to a new platform was relatively easy I can't find an exact year for the PC release, but it was somewhere between late eighty one and early eighty three. Initially user couldn't by coherent instead of computer manufacturer with licensed coherent ship alongside their new computers. This was similar to the arrangement that companies like my soft had regarding their early releases of basic. They didn't sell direct to consumers but workable this is a pretty limiting sales model. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, three went fully. And for the first time, users could bring home their own copy of the UNIX clone for their existing computer. The first public release of coherent was for the IBM at or the Bevy of one hundred percent compatible clones that came with hard drives. License would set you back about five hundred dollars or in today's money hundred. That's not exactly cheap. But let's try to see that in context competition such as Microsoft's Z Knicks came in and I watering one, thousand, three, hundred, fifty dollars. That's just under thirty five, hundred dollars today. A license from at and T. also wasn't cheap. So actual ports of UNIX were priced accordingly. We also have to keep in mind that neither Mark Williams or Microsoft were targeting their UNIX like software at everyday consumers. These were somewhat niche products. So what exactly did you get for five hundred dollars? The package deal is friendly in the realm of other personal computing software coherent came on set of seven floppy disks and had a comprehensive user manual. All software was already compiled for the PC. So you didn't get any source code. Installing. It was just as easy as installing more traditional operating systems like Microsoft dos just. I and disk and follow onscreen prompts with a little bit of help from the manual. Anyone who had used a computer before could have been up and running with UNIX in under an hour. Coherent wasn't exactly myth for any computer user just like X. Y. Basic. It had a very specific niche. PC magazine ran an article called a good. Bye on UNIX that gives us some insight into coherent. Quote. Those who already have a stockpile of UNIX. Applications rate compiling go are in good shape with coherent however for the rest of us, the question of how much application software is available arises in quote sure a new user could jump right into coherent, but that wasn't really the best fit. Was a much better option for existing UNIX users. Say you needed to use UNIX at work or school, or you were running business that used Unix for just five hundred dollars. You could be up and running with coherent, which for the most part would look and feel similar but it was accessible for smaller computers and it was a lot cheaper than the competition on the base level. That's a pretty good offering. But the PC magazine article brings up another big plus coherent didn't just look and feel like UNIX it could run. UNIX software or we secured with a little bit of coaxing. This is where I think some of the Strangeness Incoherent Really Comes Out a big part of any UNIX installation comes down to the programming tools and the coherent build is no different. It comes packaged with C compiler, Assembler, and everything you need to build your own software. Just, as an aside like a coherent, this new c compiler it was built totally in house that's nothing to sneeze. That's also a massive feet of programming in and of itself. Normally, you don't really by Eunuch soffer this comes down to the tradition of source offer that I mentioned earlier. In this episode, it's vastly more common to either find repast some source code for the program you want instead of running an installer, you end up needing to compile that code into something you can run on your own computer. But here's the thing. All of coherent software was distributed precompiling. Was a commercial product after all. So it was totally closed source. At the same time you could easily compile existing open source software for use with coherent. This type of compatibility was definitely a big draw for users can use all the same programs us with Unix at the same time I think this really shows the strange split brain nature that we see. Incoherent. One other important feature. The coherent brock to smaller computers was the idea of a shared multi user system. Like any other variety of UNIX coherent had time sharing its core. It, was able to run multiple programs simultaneously even unlimited PC hardware that consumers had access to. Complete the package coherent could run with multiple users simultaneously, this was mainly done using serial terminals with a reasonably specked out. Up to three users of months to over terminals in one local. Some practical limits imposed by Ram size. But in general this, let you get much more use out of your hardware investment. This type of operation was common on mainframes. So once again, it's a feature being reduced and revamped for smaller systems. Coherent. Made for a compelling product for those interested in UNIX who didn't have access to expensive hardware or software as coherent was catching the attention of the press and computer users. They were also catching a little bit of unwanted attention. Really, it was only a matter of time before the wolves would come knocking at the door. Now, we don't have an exact date at has been guests of eighty, three, eighty four. But sometime around that time, a delegation from bell labs would make their way to Chicago. At, the head of this party was none other than Dennis Ritchie, one of the original programmers behind UNIX. Now. Eighteen hundred was concerned that Mark Williams company was their software and they had good reason to be suspicious. COMPATIBLE UNIX like system gets released and the company producing it doesn't have an agreement with eighteen t it looked like an open and shut case of intellectual property theft from eighteen perspective at least after some back and forth behind the scenes it was agreed the bell labs could come to mark Williams for a demo but it wouldn't have access to coherence source code without a court order. So at and T. went for the next best thing, Ritchie was extremely familiar with UNIX that maybe a little bit of an understatement he and Ken Thomson had written the majority of the code for the operating system they knew it. Out, and then some if anyone could sniff out stolen code without seeing the source, it would have to be one of the two. But that's not to say that richie was a very eager participant. He recalls the visit like this quote from their point of view we like the IRS auditors coming in from my point of view I felt the same except the playing that role was a new and not particularly welcome experience. But I actually did was play around with coherent and look for peculiarities, bugs, etc that I knew about in the UNIX distributions of the time. It was undoubtedly a stressful and uncomfortable situation for all parties. swertz knew that he was in the right coherent was as clean from at code is he could make but a lawsuit from at and T. win or lose would mean disaster as for Richie, it's clear. He wanted no part of this. He definitely didn't like the prospect of being a software sheriff. Luckily situation was diffused according from Ritchie Again A. I concluded two things. First is very hard to believe that coherent and it's basic applications were not treated with considerable study of the code and details of its applications. Second that look at various corners convinced me that I couldn't find anything that was copied. It might have been the some parts were written with our source nearby. But at least the effort had been made to rewrite if it.

PC magazine Microsoft Dennis Ritchie IBM Mark Williams IRS bell labs richie Ken Thomson brock Chicago
"coherent" Discussed on Advent of Computing

Advent of Computing

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"coherent" Discussed on Advent of Computing

"But the fact remains that these systems weren't all that capable for that reason, UNIX would stay in the realm of academics research and business for most of its first decade of life. It happened designed for mainframe computers and consumer grade hardware didn't come close to that level of sophistication. UNIX was made for systems. There were shared between many multiple users at once it was built to run more than one program at once simply put there was no need for something like UNIX for personal computers at least not yet as the eighty started things would change considerably, computers would find the ring to homes and every day more businesses adopted computers. The market for smaller computers had existed before don't get me wrong, but it expanded considerably in the nineteen eighties. Besides just plain more computers in the wild these newer systems were a whole lot more powerful. Now on this podcast, we've talked a lot about the IBM PC and with good reason, it's a really important part of the heritage of modern computing. But as with all things, there is a much larger context play here the PC was part of a line of computers manufactured by IBM in fact, it was the lowest end model of that line on the higher end of the family was the IBM PC. And I think bat system is a much better example for our purposes today. Most home systems in the seventies rebuilt around eight processors. Now, the bitterness of a processor has a lot of implications, but one big one is the memory address space. An eight bit processor can only operate on eight bit numbers, and since each location in memory has to have an address, the result is that an eight bit processor can only access a small amount of Ram. There are some tricks to deal with larger amounts of memory doesn't really help a whole lot the IBM. At came with a thirty two bit processor the Intel Eighty two, eighty, six older systems may have had kilobytes ram to work with a t could top out at sixteen megabytes. That's not just numbers more memory more space for running programs. The other factor at play was the radio ability of hard drives. Earlier systems relied heavily on floppy drives for all their storage needs. You could get hard drives as add ons for machines in the seventies, but it was expensive and pretty limiting technology. Batee. Twenty megabyte hard drive instead of shopping discs to load new programs. Everything could just live inside the computer available for use at any time better storage more memory and a larger market Mathu lot of opportunities to innovate at wouldn't be released until nineteen eighty-four but it's emblematic of the direction that things were going in the eighties more powerful machines with capabilities much more in line to those of mainframes were making their way out into the wild. So, we can get to the main course. This has been a lot of work to set the stage, but the main character is finally arriving. One of the many groups that was writing the tides into the nineteen eighty s was the mark Williams company. They weren't one of the usual suspects as far as computing goes they weren't an apple or an IBM or a Microsoft. In Chicago in Nineteen Forty Nine by William Marks swertz original name was the Mark Williams Chemical Company and they weren't initially offered company. In fact, the original product was a drink called doctor enough a quote dietary supplement contained in a delicious lime and lemon flavor. Yeah. It's not really the bona feed as the most computer companies tout. It wouldn't be until nineteen, seventy seven, the Mark Williams company would transform itself into a software house. By this point company had largely passed onto. William's son Robert Schwartz. But it seemed like the younger man wasn't so much interested in soft drinks and chemistry as he was in computers, he had recently graduated from the University of Waterloo Computer Science Department where he had been one of the many students exposed to UNIX. But that wasn't the extent of is in. The younger Schwartz was an early convert to the wonders of the personal computer and Hollywood have had a background with larger systems from college. He saw the promising future of smaller in-home systems. With the reforming of the Mark Williams Company swertz brought along a group of college colleagues. Also, CS grads shared a similar vision they knew personal computing was where they want it to be but the time period they were in was a little bit of a strange limited space. The real explosion of personal computing systems was just on the horizon for the time being the market for software in the home wasn't all that huge while businesses would have either had no computers at all or it they'd be on mainframes. So on the smaller end, you have simple machines like the al-Tair Eighty, eight, hundred in the hands of mainly hobbyists on the exact opposite end you have large companies and institutions they're rocking expensive deck or IBM behemoths. There was some early crossover of personal computing in smaller businesses, but in general, the market for software was broken into two large categories. This is all to say it's Watson. Company found themselves in a very interesting time Mark Williams would be soundly on the personal computing side of the fence, but they didn't totally ignore big iron I think one of the first products X. Y. Basic can shed some light on the space that they were working in. This program would hit shelves in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety seven targeted at the Intel eighty eighty based computers such as the altar hundred. At first glance, it be easy to discount this as a clone of existing software. I mean, just two years prior Microsoft became an overnight success in the hobbyist community with the release of all basic sure Mark Williams did right version of basic for the same system but there's a little bit more at play here just below the surface me quick passage from the manual for X. Y. Basic. Congratulations you're about to discover the unique -em powerful properties of x y basic. The only basic interpreters specifically designed for process control data acquisition and real time applications with eighty eighty based microcomputer systems in quote. It's basic but with a twist Microsoft's early version was targeted squarely at the hobbyist or user but X. Y. Basic was a slightly different beast. It was designed for process control systems. In other words, we're looking at a more industrial product. So you get all the standard basic instructions for math printing to the screen taking input some flow control alongside more advanced niche code blows me away is the fact that X. Y. Basic has software interrupts and events. These are two key features for any industrial control system or any computer system that. With other. Physical. Harper. Essentially, a software interrupt tells your computer to wait for a certain signal. Say a reading comes in over a sensor and then once received a pre specified chunk of code. Usually interrupts are handled on the lowest level of computers. Hardware. Even today it's common write interrupt handling code in Assembly language. But here in nine hundred, seventy, seven, x y basic can handle a very similar type of functionality in a clear and concise basic program suffer interrupts plus a bevy of other features put ex white basic in this interesting space where it's able to handle more direct control, the underlying hardware than its competition could. The other interesting factor is the most process control systems used specialized computer hardware. Normally, a factory would have something akin to a mainframe tricked out with expanded interface hardware. Obviously that kind of harbor come cheap. So computerization had only really reached larger factories and industry or some larger research.

IBM Mark Williams company Microsoft Intel Mark Williams William Marks University of Waterloo Compute Mark Williams Chemical Company Robert Schwartz Chicago Mathu apple
"coherent" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Far from the view of most modern scientists especially about the nature of cautiousness where buddhism says you know the d matter it's cannot come x knee he loathed the idea of creating something from nothing and becoming something is not the logical arguments against that it cannot also disappear into nothingness so that's the primary phenomena but he said the same is true for consciousness because we see a perth eastern of my consciousness immediately preceding instant as to be of the same nature and we can have a unconscious moment next immediate moment is conscious so this will be a chain of conscious moment continuing because the caused us to be the reserves as to be some are coherent in nature with the scores and so that means also there is a beginning less dream of cautiousness i knew so cannot come to complete and american the disappear into nothingness so that aspect is quite far from what must neuroscientist believe vegetation east approach should physical east approach of consciousness being just a property of matter of the complexity of the neurons and so forth but still you know no hardly any neuroscientist will be pretend that we know really what cautiousness is five very good reason is that is a matter of experience and exteriors is experience as the first person you cannot nor what experiences by describing everything from the outside no what kind of narrows had been activated wasn't of area of the brain evil you new though the function and the activity of billion of neuron when you are angry or see the colorado free love that will tell you absolutely zero so why did fees to experienced laval anchor so this cure explayers you cannot get out of feet to studied so that sees sweaty scored in the size of the size of punchers had two heart porblems saw more.

perth coherent colorado laval
"coherent" Discussed on Congratulations with Chris D'Elia

Congratulations with Chris D'Elia

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on Congratulations with Chris D'Elia

"Um but i watched the it in its about modernart and it's about and i and i and i watch it because i love knowing about art don't know much about it but i love like look learning about would artists are good and what are so bad and what people think in shit like that and our basil or whatever the fuck you know all the pretentious fox that go to art basil with your with their fucking tinted sunglasses at night and silverhair how artist is it to be fucking 50 and have tinted blue sunglasses artist anyway um they were talking about the difference between on the difference between artists that are recognised in in history and then the flashinthe pan con artists that are just like recognised during their generation you know uh and there's this there are these like i mean there were showing saw a lot they showed a lotta art in this documentary and i think i i think it comes down to this okay look there are movies that are made in this art and and buildings that are created that if you make a building your you're you're skew have skill okay if you create a building have skill if you make a coherent film you have skill all right if you make a beautiful piece argue have skill now that's why it's easy to tell if like in the renaissance like if the art was good or not because there was some sort of realism to it you know modern art took it all and people started smearing feces on walls ms like this is art now i think it comes down to yes to have some level of fuck and skill obviously it doesn't mean you're aren't needs to be pretty at all i mean beauty is subjective of course but if there's some level of skill to it then okay if there's zero level of skill to it.

coherent
"coherent" Discussed on The Talk Show

The Talk Show

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on The Talk Show

"I keep did this serves a tremendous role that does a little bit of damage to it in terms of being a coherent movie but serves the greater whole i dunno vote i know what you're saying but i don't think we're through things need to be connected right like i don't i don't think is necessary to like if you're gonna you know because this last i'd just changed things up and i get where you going from that you like that but doesn't mean that you have to sacrifice being clear narrative to do that you don't have to like that at maybe it's a higher degree of difficulty but honestly i think the degree of difficulty of the force awakens coming off the prequels and trying to balance all these different factors and introduce new character of all like it was a huge like the degree of difficulty with force awakens was tremendous this mou was perhaps more ambitious but i i think the degree of difficulty at best as a tie between them let's so i i agree and there's flaws with it to be honest i walked out being happy that we had stores worth talking about again madam middle item in a you know in a wheel childish weighed in in you know it did tickled that section of my brain that came up on this step here's here's here's my question and it's why i started by including a question of how you like to compared to the force awakens is is to me the more important question is does this feel like the second part of a trilogy which i think is important to a star wars a and and i do feel that one of the strengths of the prequel trilogy is that those three movies all feel like they are of a peace whether you like them or don't like them or feel mad about them those three movies fuel like three parts of one long story that is meant to be told three in three movies and the first trilogy the beloved original trilogy i think does a great job of it with the exception of the fact the ecsc totally excusable exception of the fact that the first movie originally star wars than.

coherent
"coherent" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"When you can imagine some alternative form of freedom that others enjoy or that is easily attainable but i'm presenting that case you because you need to think about a story where you can think about the alternatives and think about them quite vividly yet but i'm just saying that again it doesn't do so much work for me because i you know i think our current circumstance is is slavery by by some other metric right clearly human life could be reliably bad enough so that we would say there's really no point in it the character of of experience is what really matters to me i and and i would argue is really the only thing that can matter to anyone who exists to have things matter at all all we have is consciousness and its contents as a place in which to locate the value so that is another assumption ended be below people who disagree with that assumption i hesitate to go down there half but i've never heard a coherent utterance that pretended to be a disagreement to that assumption amelia release did never seem coherent to me the if you're if you're going to tell me that there's something that's extraordinarily important and valuable and it would be a moral wrong to destroy this thing but this thing has no experience in and of itself it's not a mind and there is no conscious mind actual or potential they will ever experienced this thing by this the corner of the universe that is dark and will be forever unexplored and has no effect on anything else in the universe so it's completely isolated but it is nevertheless incredibly important and we should care about it that's like a you know a square circle that is a a logically impossible thing given the way i defined these terms the only reservoir value is the actual or potential change.

coherent amelia
"coherent" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"Care options thanks and i probably will sound a little bit like a antibusiness here because i worry i am worried about the state of mergers in our country and i'm worried about the federal trade commission i'm worried that the trump administration is using it to settle scores instead it to develop a new coherent policy guided approach where you trivino are the word coherent in relationship to the trump administration it's it's a struggle for me i i think we need as a country to have a serious discussion about corporate power even though i believe in business and i believe in the private sector and think there's anything evil about millionaires and billionaires i still think that we are coming up to levels of consolidation that make competition impossible so like you sarah i applaud everybody who's trying to be innovative in the healthcare space i think this is particularly fascinating given the instability in the healthcare space this is a big gamble on the parts of these companies about what the future of healthcare looks like in so i wanna think more about what that means and may be what they know or what they're thinking about her what they'll be lobbying for and maybe this maybe this works in it's fine but overall i am worried about all of the merger activity in our country hurry moving on reagan would be so disappointed i know he's rolling in his grave so we are going to move on to talk about the chip expiration and other ways in which we value or don't value children a public policy.

coherent reagan sarah
"coherent" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Four lasting and um and coherent decisionmaking structures okay and so now so let's move on what this uh what this idea of organizing uh power i guess is is meant to address and then i'd like to circle back to two two um and uh to two social movement unionism because i think that's the but but let's let's talk about what what this what this form of organizing an organization is meant to address in and sort of uh the your ideas of of where we are in terms of the the the development of capitalism that specifically i'm talking about the sort of the digital cognitive a capitalism that y you you write about are you the the one things it's meant to address is um the critics of the recent socalled leaderless movements who insist that because of their defeats we have to retreat to older organizing models you know the ones who would say uh to occupy or to black lives matter you'll never be successful until you find your new x uh martin luther king or uh you know named your historic charismatic leader and so the ah i mean the first response to such to such claims i think is that it say that that is the most unrealistic uh proposal because the movement's themselves have made it uh no longer an option to return to such centralized structures behind charismatic meal leaders i mean that's one thing that black lives matter has made um clear from its inception and so you could say.

coherent
"coherent" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on TechStuff

"Um that type of light really depends upon the amount of energy that the electrons are releasing during the leising process that in turn is dependent upon the material you're using in order to have your leising medium so you choose your leising medium that will do that will determine exactly how much energy you have to pour into the medium to excite the electrons when the electrons emit that excess energy when they want to return to their ground state which will talk about just a second that will end up taking the form of photons and the photons will be of the wave length though the actual light will be of the wave link that is dependent upon that leising medium right so it all comes down to your choice of materials that tells you how much power you have to put into it in order to stimulate the electrons and thus what colour of light you're going to get out of it at the end of it uh uh all the light waves that come out of a laser are in phase with one another that means they all crest and descend in their wave patterns the same way which also means you can pack a whole bunch of light waves together really tightly think about like uh putting together psalm curved pieces of track from a railroad set and you have a whole bunch of curves that are the same grade so they're all of the of the same same gentle curve to the right let's say and you've got a stack of them while they stack together really nicely because they all take the same shape this is the same idea because you have all of these light waves in phased with one another you could pack them together very tightly they don't jumble up and that's how you get coherence sets how you get a coherent laser as what we call that.

coherent
"coherent" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Wrong stop pretending don't be too nice you're really making a great point i will do that anyway so if you look at an organism you know the the it has certain property you then and you know just what insists that explained the sun and you know the the the notion of is that you cannot have an oregon most coherent math of flowing atoms and energy and so forth without that organism having some idea of what it wants to be and how to organize the world so that it can be that in other words it has purpose send has in an analogy ended dyer and of course the modern mechanistic interpretation of biology totally falls flat on his face when it tries to explain these kinds of things y hit it puts scare quotes around design and scare quotes about it about intelligence and scare quote the rounder intention now at any because these are all very squishy on that the you know people don't like to talk about if they're committed to the strictly materialised worldview but what what is it specifically about their materials worldview that militates against the view of organisms and purpose i just want to be clear on that what it what is it and those are they saying that the it's random and there can be no purpose in others wouldn't they simply say the purpose is to perpetuate the species wouldn they say that's the purpose they they could yes but then how do they outer these organisms do that you know precisely how did they do that and you know even though life is very very complex hang complex phenomena and we understand a lot more about it than we did you know even fifty years ago nevertheless you have to ask what is that that organizing all of this complexity to to to produce a coherent um you know to me the you know to me they're miraculous thing is that.

oregon dyer coherent fifty years
"coherent" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Produces estate that's in distinguishable from illness and that there's no reason to assume that the phenomena that are associated with a illness have any utility whatsoever although it's interesting to me that a disrupted consciousness can produce coherent experiences it's not exactly what do you expect if it was just an illness you know if you develop say a high fever your experience isn't transcendent and coherent it is fragmented and pathologist and and that this difference i think is quite distinct although we don't only we don't have to only speculate about that because there's been enough experimental work done now with with a looseknit and psychedelic st indicate that the notion that what they produce is something that's only akin to pathology is wrong it's not a matter of opinion at this point in the sequence of scientific and historical investigation fact there was a largescale study done 10 years ago five years ago of two hundred thousand people who had experimented with psychedelic and they were mentally and physically healthier than people who hadn't on virtually every parameter they examined in fact the rate of flashbacks you heard of lst flashbacks mostly a hypothetical phenomena but the rate of self reported flashbacks was higher among the non psychedelic users that among the psychedelic users so that was very interesting it was a huge studied now it might be you could say that those who had experimented with psychedelic were prone to be healthier to begin with but he that still contradicts the path all aji argument so it doesn't matter either way the pathology argument is contradicted.

coherent five years
"coherent" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on Fresh Air

"And this passionately ultimately yes the idea is to get in some sense a kind of detachment from these things but there is an irony here which is that the way you get the detachment is by getting close to them in the first place you experience them uh with a care and in the case of negative feelings kind of fearlessness that gives you the detachment so with something like anxiety i have some times i don't always have such wild success but i have sometimes uh sat up in bed when i was just besieged by anxiety about something i had to do next say and observed the feeling of anxiety in till it really came to look like a piece of modern sculpture something that i was looking at in a museum i mean there was that much detachment it just it just was causing me no pain but it hadn't gone away then it tends to go away once you reach that point actually but but that is the kind of thing that is in principle possible with might once meditation you said that you've had attention deficit disorder and it was unsure whether you being funny or just honest believe me it's not funny i never ever in college succeeded in emerging from a lecture with anything like a coherent set of notes and i really tried from a very a reader because of my distracted nece but one thing i became more aware of after meditating and this is another thing that comes out of meditation that's very consistent with modern psychology.

coherent
"coherent" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on Double Toasted

"I'll add action or more actionoriented lupus own bill and again you know there are a dozen make four coherent film but neither did the fidelin which at the time when it was released it was considered to be that big of a successful film but somehow became a cult classics i'll i'll even noticed with the tell people with this except that the bill and even to me uh yeah i mean all the stuff you this shit talking you do of the fifth element of i'm right there with you i did not care for it when i saw it i was like while you've taken all the visuals i from heavy metal magazine but it is completely childlike story that i guess he he break i wrote fourteen of like a bit yeah and it's pretty obvious you've forty now you taking on his face opera just so that love can be the fifth element the fuck out of here yeah and the gets hannabarbera shit times but i'm also i agree with you i watch it and i go like hey man the sorry proven is not my thing but if you love the fifth element i guess you would like this on i don't know for sure but what about how about how you feel how i feel i i do think you know it mean it being overly cgi like these things have to be it's super colorful i love the design of almost everything all i think it was like manning's designers work their answers off yet it took was in his graphic novel they got inspired by an and really ran with it and uh i wish there was a better story and better actors to go with it.

heavy metal magazine coherent manning
"coherent" Discussed on Is It Transphobic Podcast

Is It Transphobic Podcast

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on Is It Transphobic Podcast

"I don't want to say stumble but that's how would always these when you're an actor as you're reading something in you know what you think they're trying to say on paper but it's it's very different when it actually vomits out of your mouth and so like kind of like stumbling around in the words and then like especially the moments where they find it and they figure out exactly what i was trying to say we've certain aspects in certain things it's like yeah i know it's really satisfying but for this piece because normally my pieces are alum more like our at i know the story i know how it's going to be told the it might take a little a detour here and there but with this one it was more about a visceral feeling yeah and it's just that much more like okay once i got the viscera on page now i have to make the story make some coherent sense totally and so that process has been fascinating for me just the idea of like our aid here is something that i feel now let's notches leave it at feeling let's make it a store comparing with funny you say that because youth through in a twist ending lake right before we had and i love this standing by the way i think brilliantly ties everything together so has that for a little la teaser franca thereby you're like so this might not be what you is signed up for but i changed some things at the end and then i reread the oettinger's like whoa that changes everything but in a great way i think it really beautifully serves the but i think that speaks to the process you're describing of like you had the visceral feeling and then you're shape the shaping comes after so.

coherent
"coherent" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

Post Show Recaps

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

"Yeah i think there were moments thermometer the first episode that bugs me a lot but i think that the right off the off the bat i really do feel like it's it's immediately a more coherent thing which is weird to say about a sequence that involves siphoning gas with a man's intestine but i hit but i think that they were there is there is something a little bit more streamlined about the episode right away or at least more recognizably preacher is kind of what i've been thinking about it where you've got the road trip aspects right off the off the jump you have that title card that comes in the first words that you see all serey all season long are the search for god day one so really gives you a sense of what are we doing this season were looking for god god has abandoned his post and we're going to go find him and ask him why he left so you know immediately what's going on there and then the first spoken words of the season are about the ns w alert so in the case this is to to to opt for your for your daytime listening pleasure it is talking about like what happens to circumcised for skains and how they are all being turned into skin cream in these as episode to really continues this out perhaps more than just skin cream it makes you wear leg what's going on as i i don't want to really like i don't want to be a foreskin truth you're like this is have like this something i really want any part of season one was oil viewer skin yours one man that's pandering.

coherent
"coherent" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"Yeah i wasn't taking taking it seriously enough but that's a good you know that's i mean that's a good point rate lake screwball comedies traffic and cruelty family stories don't write in that's the it's it's day it's part of the kind of the whole in coherent picture the the whole sense it like everything's going on and so nothing is going on like when you think about movies where the characters engage in a lowers our sufferers are subjected to a lot of cruelty but still have heart sorry think of say like superbat right like in the movie super bad characters are have a bunch of different humiliations that are foisted on them and yet the film still has heart and still is kind of about their relationships in a way that is that is sincere and earnest there are there are aspects of tone in style and also of content in the movie that let you know that these people are going to be okay rated they're going to be fine part of that is there is there so young and there's this expectation that nothing bad is going to happen to like really young people in this kind of movie like that sort of the default expectation of one of them had been brought up behind the route by the building and shots right at the beginning of the movie that all of a sudden whenever any of that was humiliated it would change the tone of things like the cops the two cops and superbat are like uh like we're gonna get a little antisocial like but we're not going to really get antisocial because like the cops the cops are like it into their internal cops they're like keeping going super bed reveals the real cruelty is you know is like work by time on you and it's like it's the show the final shot with the escalator kind of separating the two friends as one like a sends beyond or descends right like away from the other in and out of a stationary frame that that.

coherent
"coherent" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

02:19 min | 4 years ago

"coherent" Discussed on Think Again

"Everything that's going on completely we organizers into something else right the universe their parents were forces previously manifesting under one umbrella which split and we are assigning these weird things right to happen at these occasions where the forces split i is because there's not fair because they thought otherwise a sensible place to do that a splint is what recalling phased transition in this context so so gravity so if i would be electromagnetism yes we assume that all forces were one at some point in the early universe have been yes gravity would have been the first to split prevailing philosophical bias tells us that early enough in the universe there's only one force right one coherent force and then as universe expanded cool this force splits and that would be phased transition so gravity splits off i can now we have this other force that contains forces that would still later split so what happens next the strong nuclear force splits away and now we have the what we call the electra week that remains and then electromagnetism splits from the week nuclear force okay that gives us the four familiar forces we have today gravity the strong force electromagnetism and the week i see so and all that happens quickly in the early universe i would have assumed that the first one would be electromagnetism because i would have thought it's like light would be the first you know like lying electromagnetic communicates electromagnetism right for the electromagnetic force but nothing is sticking together electromagnetic lee at the time is not right lutchman mandates is this is what's holding your adam together in your molecules and arnaud adams darnell molecule gotcha so there's a whole other regime of matter and energy so i and the other thing that i i simply do not understand and i wonder like read the book i now shortness interview you know he added way i only half joke with people by telling them i write books so that i never have to speak on campaign.

coherent arnaud adams