28 Burst results for "Cognitive Processing"

"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Restaurant Coach Podcast

The Restaurant Coach Podcast

04:01 min | 6 months ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Restaurant Coach Podcast

"You gotta have, you gotta have a plan for all this. You wanna have a written plan. I love written plans. I usually write stuff out first, and then I transfer it to my digital format, which is my phone. Having written plans is the best way to stay on track and on folk and focused. Some people, I mean, I still love the old school pen and paper method. You know, you can actually, there's tons of there's tons of stuff you can do tons of apps you can do to write stuff down, but you gotta have a place to put all. There's a great great gentleman out there, David Allen. He wrote a book called getting things done, and he kind of preaches this, getting things done methodology. And he tells us, and this one of the reasons I like doing kind of brain dump exercises, you gotta get this stuff out of your head. All that minutiae that consumes all your cognitive processing, and you gotta get it out where you can process it. That's why I like doing a brain dump on paper. Then I liked using color coded markers, highlight the different people product process, and then I like to put them in the columns where I can get it kind of organized and then I start taking action on it. You gotta get it out of your head if not, it forms what's known as a mental loop. The issue with loops is that they bounce around your head until they get solved. You gotta have a place to park all those random thoughts that pop up in your head. Neuroscientists will say that, you know, we have like 60,000 random thoughts a day. Sadly, most of them repeat themselves because we never solved the loop. A great way to get those things out of your head is get them on a piece of paper where you can organize them, sort them into action and then decide is this something I need to take on, something I can delegate or something I just got to say no to. And that goes to the next part, what I want to talk about is if you can delegate. This one kind of ties into that learning to say no. Many restaurant owners do tasks and I go crazy every week. There's always one of my clients who does something that could have easily handed off to someone else. Something like scheduling, recording invoices, receiving orders from vendors. All these things can be trained. And here's the bonus. When you train your team to take on more

David Allen
"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Restaurant Coach Podcast

The Restaurant Coach Podcast

04:01 min | 6 months ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Restaurant Coach Podcast

"You gotta have, you gotta have a plan for all this. You wanna have a written plan. I love written plans. I usually write stuff out first, and then I transfer it to my digital format, which is my phone. Having written plans is the best way to stay on track and on folk and focused. Some people, I mean, I still love the old school pen and paper method. You know, you can actually, there's tons of there's tons of stuff you can do tons of apps you can do to write stuff down, but you gotta have a place to put all. There's a great great gentleman out there, David Allen. He wrote a book called getting things done, and he kind of preaches this, getting things done methodology. And he tells us, and this one of the reasons I like doing kind of brain dump exercises, you gotta get this stuff out of your head. All that minutiae that consumes all your cognitive processing, and you gotta get it out where you can process it. That's why I like doing a brain dump on paper. Then I liked using color coded markers, highlight the different people product process, and then I like to put them in the columns where I can get it kind of organized and then I start taking action on it. You gotta get it out of your head if not, it forms what's known as a mental loop. The issue with loops is that they bounce around your head until they get solved. You gotta have a place to park all those random thoughts that pop up in your head. Neuroscientists will say that, you know, we have like 60,000 random thoughts a day. Sadly, most of them repeat themselves because we never solved the loop. A great way to get those things out of your head is get them on a piece of paper where you can organize them, sort them into action and then decide is this something I need to take on, something I can delegate or something I just got to say no to. And that goes to the next part, what I want to talk about is if you can delegate. This one kind of ties into that learning to say no. Many restaurant owners do tasks and I go crazy every week. There's always one of my clients who does something that could have easily handed off to someone else. Something like scheduling, recording invoices, receiving orders from vendors. All these things can be trained. And here's the bonus. When you train your team to take on more

David Allen
"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Life Stylist

The Life Stylist

04:52 min | 10 months ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Life Stylist

"So I'm just personally I'm curious, but maybe as a framework so people just kind of have a. Scaffolding on which we can build this kind of body of knowledge that you've amassed. Is the different neurotransmitters. You mentioned acetylcholine and I'd like to explore gaba and serotonin and dopamine. If you could kind of give us an overview of the different brain states that are created by these different neurotransmitters and then maybe that'll lead us more into specifics on how we can actually dial those in. So have you ever seen a linear EQ meter? Yes. Of course you have, right? Yeah. Right, dial them up and down. That's the same with your neurotransmitters. And there's a cascade of neurotransmitters. Those four are the primary. Outside of noradrenaline and adrenaline. Or norepinephrine and adrenaline, which is adrenaline. So those primary neurotransmitters are the things that get you into state. You're never going to have a 100% of one because you need a balance to a certain extent. But you don't want to bring all of the levels up at once. Because then it sounds flat, right? That's not a good mix. So if you have dopamine, which is drive motivation, and reward, that's a very key concept, especially for most of us that are in this. And it's also, when I say reward, it's like that's the goal when you do something that's meaningful. I get my dopamine hit. I have a get together with Matt, every Friday we get together for an hour and we have a thing called Xander ours. Xander is one of the, it's the spray right there. Yeah. Yeah, I did, I did a few blasts of this before we started. Perfect. You know, and I don't want to interrupt. No, no. You actually managed to make this one taste really good. Thanks. Kind of a problem, because I keep it on my desk and I'll just be like, I'm like, Luke, you just did ten squares, 30 minutes ago. Or maybe overdoing it. It's that old addict behavior. But anyway, it's great, yeah. So you get to the dopamine side of it, which is super important for your motivation and drive and reward. You have acetylcholine, which is thinking and processing and memory and those things. And then you'll have gaba, which is your chill, your chill mood, like it takes the anxiety off. It takes the edge off. And it can actually be really effective in cognitive processing because when you have a lack of anxiety, you have an increase in cognitive performance, because you're not multitasking, you're not trying to protect yourself from the bears and the Lions. So yeah, and then serotonin, which is more of a mood stabilizer. A lot of people think of serotonin as the happy drug. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors SSRIs are antidepressants. Are one but in reality, it's a mood stabilizer. And then you go to dopamine and some of the others to actually increase your mood. So those are primary, and then noradrenaline, adrenaline, which is the fight or flight. Anything. Yeah, I know that one. I hate that one because it activates when you don't want it to. I mean, you need it, right? Right. If we were just parasympathetic all the time, we'd step in front of a bus.

Xander Matt Luke Lions bears
"cognitive processing" Discussed on Brain Inspired

Brain Inspired

06:41 min | 1 year ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on Brain Inspired

"Think there has to be some. Let me ask you about so the way that these landscapes are calculated these days is using spiking rates from neurons. And you actually talk about in the paper how this is one scale. One temporal and spatial scale to view this, but how it may be it's enough. But you know that there are other processes, neuromodulator processes. Et cetera, et cetera. And I was I've been in conversations recently with a few people who are excited about astrocytes and cognition. And they do these calcium signaling, but then it's so then you wonder about, are there a tractor landscape among the glia and how would you cross levels with neural activity and glial activity and slow neuromodulators like is there a way to form dynamical landscapes across levels like that? Or do you think that we're going to be always contained in one level? I think there's got to be an interaction between levels. I think that most of them are mathematical models. Typically have a they usually assume that this one biophysical timescale, and then to extend it, you get these circuits that have positive feedback and prolong and cancel out decay and prolong the state by recurrence and reverberation. And that's what. I think that I don't see why they may not seem like there could be major benefits of having some interaction with different skills in time, and one of the problems with the tracker networks is that they tend not to be very fast responding, right? If you're creating this long scale, timescale, it also sluggish. They have to give a huge input and you have to give, you have to hit them hard to change their state. And I think it's a bit of an open question how much like if you have multiple timescales and multiple processes, whether you could have a bit of both, like some rapid responses, as well as slows and stability, and so yeah, I think there's so much to do on the mathematical side. We haven't touched on the questions of how, I mean, I think you made the point that you can think about attractors is going to do this middle level of description and thinking about function cognition. And so I think I just want to mention for sure that this is beautiful and the work from that buffalo game tank Tim Barrett's colleagues showing that some of these same representations for space. So we talked about how the hippocampus is involved in general memory, but then but then it's also one of the spatial memory. And then now we're going back the other way, which is that they're showing that the same spatial circuit actually modulate the firing in the same ways that they do with animals navigating real space. But now when the animals are actually navigating in some conceptual task space. And we talked about stretching birds and fantastic. That's it. Exactly. Yeah. That's right. So that's another one. Are the here's what I want to ask you is, do you think that the, that this approach, the dynamical systems approach, will give us insights into our subject subjective experience, and I want to pair that with the question whether the manifolds are always going to be low dimensional enough or enough in air quotes for us to understand them, right? Or will it be, will there will there be a cognitive process that are too high dimensional for the dynamical systems approach to be useful if that makes sense? Yeah, I know, I mean, brilliant, yeah. Well, on the first one, I think that yes, I think we can even understand pretty high level of cognitive processing in terms of some of these attractive landscapes and attractive dynamics. I think already things like attention, we can think about attention as being a winner take all dynamics between multiple different potential targets of our attention and focus on one. There's a lot of perceptual effects like conscious perception of binocular rivalry, where you have two stimuli and your retinas in both of them, but you only consciously able to perceive one at a time. So I think that even low level bi stability to manifest very quickly at the high consciousness vehicle kind of perceptual report levels. So I definitely think so. And I think those examples are all around us. I think that I think that right, I think that or maybe I guess the essay the reasonable effectiveness of mathematics says that we've got only one language to describe the natural world, which is mathematics. So maybe it shouldn't be a surprise that we translate everything in terms of mathematics that we know. So I don't know. But I feel like philosophically, yes, the dynamical system attract your perspective. We can explain a lot of pretty high level conscious percepts. I don't know. The answer to the second one, whether the manifolds that exist in our brain are sufficiently low dimensional for us to understand them. I mean, I think that mathematically we don't have ways to understand higher dimensional manifolds. Like once we get into 6, 7 dimension, 8 dimensions, we can do things like topological data analysis. We can characterize things like how many cycles and how many rings and how many loops and how many voids of higher dimension are in this manifold. But putting it all together to construct the whole manifold, it's more like it's like we would be doing the piecewise characterization like of an elephant. We've got four legs and it's got a tail and it's got a head, but how do we put all of those together? Do we put them together in the right order to understand that it's an elephant or is it more like a Picasso Cuba's perspective on an elephant? Would you just join together? And what are our prospects of the brain 15 power dimensional manifolds of the fundamental units of representation? New math. Open question. New math. Always new math. Always new math. Thanks. Thanks for doing this. I know that you have to go, but we didn't even talk about how you guys mentioned that this same approach is already being used more and more in AI to understand neural networks, artificial neural networks, et cetera. So we'll have to leave that for next time and the host of other questions I wanted to ask you. But I very much.

Tim Barrett buffalo Cuba
"cognitive processing" Discussed on Building Psychological Strength

Building Psychological Strength

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on Building Psychological Strength

"When we have a lot of choices she also gives some really good practical tips in that blog. Post so i'm not going to dive into it here but if you're curious about that topic scroll down on your mobile device or visit this show notes page. You can find a link to that podcast or to that blog post in this episode description. The second thing i want to talk about is a ted talk by patrick mcguinness. It's called how to make faster decisions. And he highlights a similar Situation he has a really cool name for it though. we've all heard about foam o or fear of missing out i think he's the guy who actually coined that term he actually coined another term called fogo so f. o. b. o. or the fear of better options so you can see how this links to the paradox choice right the more options we have the more we start to worry. If we've picked the right one quote right one or quote best one because there are so many other options out there and what if one is better than what we chose. Were trying to optimize now. I bring all this up because if you think about what all of that extra processing to sort through all of those options and to try to make sure that we're choosing the best one think about how much cognitive processing goes into that and we talked to dr buyers about how you know already were inundated with information already. We are gassed at the end of the day. And we're finding ourselves having a hard time making decisions toward the end of the day years. Just another factor that plays into it with some really good tips in these resources about what you can do from there and the last thing that i want to highlight is dr buyers was talking about what she does sort of that buffer point in between when you finish up your professional day if you're somebody who works in a typical job or so when you finish up your professional day and you're gonna come home that buffer time and what you can do. I want to offer up one. Other example of something that i found to be extremely helpful for myself as i am one of those people who will sit and ruminate and go through the list of things that needs to be done and it'll end up ruining my evening so one of the things that i do during that buffer time is i get out myself journal again. Bell south dot co has amazing journal called the self journal. I use it every morning to plan out my day. But what i've started doing is what i've found is in that buffer time at the end of my day. They're always loose ends. That just couldn't be tied up during the day. There are things. I wanna not forget to do the next day or you know ideas that i don't want to forget because i want to work on them. The next day that self journal has become sort of the brain dump repository for everything that tomorrow's april needs to know from me right now so that i can get it out of my mind. I can make sure. It's in a safe place. And i know that the april of the future april tomorrow has a good solid jumping off point for what i wanted her to know as i finish up day-to-day being able to sort of psychologically set that load down.

patrick mcguinness Bell south dot co amazing journal the self journal
"cognitive processing" Discussed on P.S.A Podcast

P.S.A Podcast

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on P.S.A Podcast

"Never had nobody asking us questions you broke that virginity. No i've never. I've never had to experience that to be honest which you never had smears. I've you know there were times where i felt like i wasn't wasn't that you know intellectual because of the fact that Okay so you got some kids out there who who are just and that's why never another thing you know when it came with being a teacher or do i wanted to be a chef. It was like every other year. I fell math every year. It is why we tried hooked on fox. I was hooked on stupid right. I would sneak waiting for me on a slow bus. It was dusty every year. Have my name. And i know my mom was so tired of showing up at the. Pta meetings with a new wigs at miss cropper shock. A calm and there are some kids out there. Like i was on i was in. There's some kids out there. Who can be like i gray. Green on a fifth grade reading level where i was in first grade reading on a pre k. Level it just was bad. Okay and i still to this day. Don't understand how kids and college or just kids period. They don't have to study. they can party all night. B be gone off the whatever drug choice and they make a hundred. I sit here. I study appropriately Take some breaks in between. And i still don't remember at all and chana understand. Why is that. You know behave Yeah that answer that question nutshell you know. It's funny that you said it. Because something else that i got another article got a dark sense of humor. You're not deprive just smart and this is according to science by joe stikes. He says in a study published in cognitive processing journal researchers at the medical university of vienna revealed correlation between being smart and having a dark system he say the research is defined documents that kind of humor that treats sinister stubs like death disease deformity handicap or warford with bitter amusement amp presents. Such tragic distressing or more topics in humorous terms shows like south park always sunny philadelphia. The comedians of comedy. The family guy and comey's like jim jefferies have mind the most deprived of scenarios for laughs. And while this might not be for everyone is positively associated with higher verbal and nonverbal intelligence as well as education level so. I don't know you might be smarter than you think. There's some things you know. I'm really good with some things. i'm not. You know what it's okay it's.

joe stikes medical university of vienna fox comey jim jefferies south park philadelphia
"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Redesign Your Body Podcast

The Redesign Your Body Podcast

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Redesign Your Body Podcast

"Which is just kinda normal. You know everyday waking waking state so you know with this technology with the g. Were basically assessing the different brainwaves and were able to see if someone's producing too little too much or healthy quantities of the different brainwaves and in what region of the brain that activities occurring in. So there's there's there can be certain signatures for you. Know what you mentioned. Say with with anxiety. We often see a lot of over activity kind of break down the mid line of the brain and the beta brainwave frequency. So what. I just mentioned with beta being really important for like cognitive processing and thinking you know paying attention but for people who are prone to like anxiety. Ocd ptsd. We often see kind of this over activation of the nervous system reflected by you know greatly. Increased production of these is very fast high frequency beta waves. That are kind of putting someone into this constantly. Vigilant nervous you know trying to detect any threats in the environment. Sure to stay. That is kind of pretty detrimental to the body. Long term. you know that when people talk about chronic stress often canada brain get stuck in this this production of these beta brainwaves these these higher frequency waves and they just can't can't get out of it bring kind of gets stuck in in overdrive so that's sort of a signature. We often see for anxiety. Depression can often show up as as the opposite in some ways production overproduction of some the slower brainwaves. Say if someone's producing way too much like alpha and beta there can kind of just be in this sort of foggy. Foggy depressed kind of low energy state so yet certain signatures for a can't say for sure just looking at the data electrical data. I can't say you have zayed here. You have you know this specific condition but it can aid in diagnosis Just based off like talking to people and getting their what. They're actually reporting as far as their symptoms and then correlating that you know with the electrical data can be super powerful yet. And that's that was gonna be my next question how it correlates to the actual symptoms of a diagnosis these big lot. Since professional who therapists psychologists through many therapists psychologists in the. Us use this kind of technology. Neuro feedback is more common Is of most common technologies. And that's basically where you're training Training the brain to produce healthier quantities of the different brainwaves. Kind of with with sort of this brain training game. Where you're you're wearing in eeg cap the same cap that we used to collect the the brain maps and the person is basically like watching a video and say if the if the stream gets larger. Were it's audio. If the tones get louder that's positive feedback telling the brain that good job. You're doing it right and then if you hear the tones get quieter or the screen shrinks in size. That's the negative feedback telling your brain. No nope go back to what you were doing before to to make the screen bigger. Get louder tones. That's that neuro feedback is kind of the most commonly seen neuro technology. I would say Nurit neuro stimulation is a bit rarer to find at least at this point but i think it packs much more of a punch just working with people. I've seen people get much faster and more significant than results using neuro stimulation. So it is all of these. Technologies are still. You know your your average therapist..

Ocd ptsd Depression canada Nurit Us
"cognitive processing" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"The forecast and shuttle AIDS. Kyle Roberts calls for sunny skies Today It'll be hot, hazy blown nineties, but the humidity will be loved to clear overnight with a low in the upper sixties, and we're back to the low nineties under sunny skies again on Sunday change coming into whether radiant Coover sometime next week it is now 71. At DFW Airport and Addison based Veterans Mental Health Clinic is helping veterans make that transition from military life to civilian life. W B A. P S CAT BONES. I spoke with Dr Chelsea Fiduciary, a psychiatrist that attitude and based coin's veteran network who says the anniversary of 9 11 may be more difficult for vets because of what has happened in Afghanistan recently. The Coen Veterans Network was founded to help served post 9 11 veterans specifically with the aim of helping facilitate that transition from military life back to civilian life. Our clinic has been dealing with this for as long as we've been open with people in different, um At different points in their service credit folks coming back from Afghanistan right now, or even people who served previously in an act in Afghanistan and are struggling now with what's happening there. Were able to provide, um, therapy. Specifically, we do a lot of trauma focused therapy working on and PTSD and issues related to what they may have seen in Afghanistan have been dealing with over there. We also provide couples therapy and family therapy because they know their family is also often impacted or relationships between the service members, veterans and their family. Great. And so what does some of the therapies look like? What is some of the process that you know? Helps them get through that traumatic experience. PTSD. We've got a few particular trauma focused therapies that are really beneficial. There had a gold standard in PTSD treatment, and we've got people trained in cognitive processing therapy, or CPT. As well as prolonged exposure of PE. These are a form of time behavioral therapy. And so what That means is we're looking at dealing with people's thoughts, feelings and behaviors and this contact specifically as they relate to the traumatic event or events that they've experienced. The cognitive processing therapy is Treatment that looks at how your your view of the world where your view of yourself your view of other people may have changed as a result of the trauma, So we go in brilliant depth and look at How your thoughts have changed how they've been impacted by what you've experienced and see if we can move those to a place that is more functional, more helpful for you living forward with everything that Has gone on in Afghanistan and just everything in the world right now. Would you say that you've seen an influx in patients coming in seeking help? To be honest, Katrina? Our numbers have been increasing since coded started last year, So those initial couple of months there was a little bit of a dip when everybody went on lockdown, but I think with I'm Afghanistan with 9 11 anniversaries and then piled on top of what we've already been experiencing with Covid. There's definitely been a high need for mental health services. Yeah, I can imagine that being really, really hard. Do you have any advice for families who are wanting to honor their loved ones or just ways coping mechanisms for them? Anything that y'all due in particular to help them on days like this? Anniversaries of traumatic events are often difficult, bringing back painful memories, painful emotions, Um, with the 20th anniversary of 9 11 the new layer on top of that. What's happening in Afghanistan and other things happening both nationally and internationally. Right now, there's no question that this year may be more difficult than it has been for some people in the past. And some of the ways that we may deal with painful anniversaries. It's Reaching out to your support system and engaging with people with friends and family to help me honor the so to them lost, um on 9 11 or In the wars afterwards, finding things that are meaningful for you. And then also, if you find that you're really struggling, reaching out for professional help, I think it's important to provide space for somebody who's struggling with it difficult anniversary areas in difficult emotions, letting them know that you're there and willing and able to talk when they want to, but also protecting if they're not ready to talk. If a family member sees someone struggling, what are some of the main signs that you can identify to where A family member could reach out to you guys or anything like that, to make sure their loved ones are getting the help that they need a lot of things you can look forward. It would be good indicators, and it's time to ask for help and neither yourself reaching out or a family member on your behalf. I think one would be if your normal coping strategies aren't working for you. Or if you're maybe turning to send problematic coping strategies thinking here about like increased use of alcohol or tried, maybe completely avoiding everybody and shutting yourself off from Friends, family, etcetera, so We may also look for your level of functioning if you're not able to function that your typical level, Uh, if your distress is really intense or unrelenting or both. If your relationships are being impacted if your work is being impacted, these are all signs that it might be time to reach out and ask for help. Or ask for help for your loved one. If you're seeing that in them. And we've also got I mentioned our outrage staff before we've got workshops that we're putting on in partnership with some of our local organizations, including military veterans here Network and stop one. We're putting them on this month and next, including mental health, First aid. I'm and.

Kyle Roberts Afghanistan Today Katrina Coen Veterans Network last year Chelsea Fiduciary next week Sunday Veterans Mental Health Clinic Addison 9 11 71 20th anniversary DFW Airport both nineties CAT BONES this month 9 11 anniversaries
"cognitive processing" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Just under $4 a gallon. Daria All binary ABC News Your next news update Saves money by siphoning gas out of Toni Kroos car. It comes at eight. That explains him. Will Clark news radio 8 40 w H A s. That's fake news right there for more. Clark, who thinks that's funny somehow, you know you think it's fake chicken? Ask a judge. Oh, no, I'm getting pretty good mileage. Uh so I'll just go ahead and bring since you're the doctor Evil of the show. I'm the doctor Evil, a new study published in the journal Cognitive Processing. They're on your side says your reaction to dark humor could indicate your intelligence proceed. Oh, you like this one, huh? I'm intrigued. Well, you probably should. Because this is almost making you a genius. Do the paper. You didn't period in the paper. Well, that was vindictive. A team of psychologists include That people who appreciate dark humor defined issuer that treats sinister subjects like death disease, deformity, handicapper warfare with bitter amusement and presents Such tragic, distressing or morbid topics in humorous terms may have Higher IQ's show lower aggression well, that would take you out of the equation and resist negative feelings from more of more effectively than people who turn up their noses at it. So The question begs. Since I know you and your kind of like you laugh at mortgage humor. Are you more sensitive than any of us? Get the vibe that you are? Willie. I don't know that I'm Sensitive or not, I don't know about sits right now. That's per se, Will. I I I suggest has a front. He really is a very loving person. Regularly to is wife and kids, obviously well, Yeah, if you're in the inner circle, otherwise, you know. Yeah, well, I have no issues handing out face taste is what happened here, Willie. Is that the dark humor jokes of for people who laugh at such things showed higher IQ's and reported less aggressive tendencies. As I was mentioning, Uh, according to the researchers, processing dark humor jokes takes a bit more mental gymnastics. Then processing a Knick. Knock or not knock down a knickknack a doctor. What is a knock? Knock joke? Well, of course, it takes a little bit more weight. That's six. So, like, say, I see someone fall down the stairs and I laugh. Is that fall in the same category? I don't know if to make sure genius certain. No, don't careful. Well, it's I mean, I spent that's what I'm saying. I watch those videos on YouTube a lot. I mean, they make me well, you do do that. You watch those probably. Well, I don't know. Maybe us got both. Sometimes I watch those videos were the Russian Drivers are Goering things with their cars. Yeah, they do that a lot. Yeah. I mean, I find that pretty entertaining comes Russians have it Seems like they have more people that video accidents than anybody on the plan for that. We're grateful the.

Clark Daria Willie six Toni Kroos both Evil YouTube ABC News Cognitive Processing Will eight Will Clark under $4 a gallon Russian news Russians 8 40 w
"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"So how much decision did you have. Decision criteria well. Which i would was there a process you said. Hey you know we should think about whether we're just gonna be tools company or we're going to be an applications company or does it just naturally evolved that now i mean when we were you know we were early in candidate the wars and when we first launched we only have the platform we only had tool based api access We struggle we could not get any of our meeting. Entertain customers to to really buy on in primarily is. They didn't have the team on the other side to do anything right. They weren't thinking about budgets of investing in cognitive processing right eccentric center so almost out of necessity we had to go build some use case specific applications on top of that and ultimately you know that's how we got alava groups hooked right so what they were really buying is buying what we say. Nobody really cares about two scoops of ai. They wanted the application right that they. Ai machine learning right improved upon. And so that's how we watched is the majority of our clients. Almost all of them were licensing. Our applications are sas based apps. They weren't just paying right as a bit blower for for cognitive processing. That's right exactly. He's changed over. Time as appreciate reminds me like the webmaster days right. Nobody did squad now. People spend a fortune trying to understand how they internally used google analytics design in your website. Maximize seo blah blah blah blah blah so. Yeah we wanted to be twi- leo from day one. It was too early so added so now. That's it's it makes it a little bit harder to manage since we're an application company. Anna platform company but ironic. I think it's put us in a very unique situation in in certain verticals. We're not going to do this for all verticals to be clear but the verticals that were in today meaning entertainment Government legal compliance in more recently energy. We absolutely will be in application businesses. Well not just the buffer business. Got an so your view. Is that certain business segments. You're going to go in and you're going to have the full application stack because that's the best way to penetrate. That's the way to do. You're crossing the chasm. They might not have big internal teams. That are just ready to take your raw code and exploit it And then in other markets you're just going to give them tools and because they do have those teams are ready to do that type of work and then they can take it to the next level. Good a good parallel. Tonight is the relationship of in in timeline of tableau all tricks. You're familiar with them in blow. I'm not familiar with all tracks. So off your ultra has been. They've been around for a long time You know they're they're pretty good size company their data etl platform and it. You know they struggled really selling their bought from tools for very long time intel. A system integration sl shops consulting shops who were primarily representing domo and tableau. They needed all tricks to get more value out of his platforms. And so which is interesting. Almost like a trojan horse through right tableau. Domo that alternates. I'll say the underlying workflow system became a thing that's right and then obviously you know. They brought him mark. Anderson powell nets networks in company's grown significantly. It's hard to predict whether you can sell the platforming grow it or it's going to be created organically behind in. Aws was never an idea out of the gates right. It was an exhaust of this massive platform that amazon bill and then over time obviously it became a platform unto itself. So we we were talking.

Anna google Anderson powell intel amazon
"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"Some of these traumatic memories with less shame and anger and without being overwhelmed by the symptoms or underwhelmed by the symptoms so at amplifies this emotional state and then you can have these feelings of self compassion and you start to process in the absence of fear so so this is one piece. That's going on now. In the brain you'll see that with p. tst your amid della is really activated. And this is your your fear center and in your prefrontal. Cortex your last activated. Your this is kind of where your cognitive processing is taking place in like your baljic unreasoning so this area is damaged. And when you take the empty mates exactly the opposite. You dampen that fear response. You increases cognitive processing area. So that's happening in the brain along with these other these feelings that you're having and then there's these neuro hormones neurotransmitters that are also happening. So you have an increase in. Serotonin you have an increase in dopamine and other Neuro this so those neurotransmitters. And then you have an increase in euro hormones like oxytocin wishes is like a bonding hormone and these all come together to create a sense of wellbeing and heightened empathy. And so that you can kind of go into these memories with the less fear in judgment that makes sense. And i've heard people talk about that when they've experienced this that they i've heard people say like for instance i i understood gratitude but i felt it for the first time where i understood importance of loving myself but i felt it for the first time and it seems like the very much able to connect those things in a way that is definitely not as easy and sometimes not even seems possible in other areas of therapy. Yeah you know. A lot of the people that we worked with had The on average for the phase three study people had had ptsd symptoms for fourteen years and our phase two studies. It was nineteen years so people have been struggling with this for a long time. Also gets really ingrained right in your brain that this is your experience and this is this is how you're gonna react to the world and it gets rigid. You're thinking gets really rigid around this. And you learn all these coping mechanisms so this is another kind of Thing that's happening in the brain is that you're potentially opening up these kind of critical periods That are allowing some brain plasticity and allow that rigidity to loosen up a little bit Another really important piece of ptsd is sleep so people with ptsd besides all these other things that are going on. They also don't sleep. Well in sleep is really important for For coping right if you just even just lack of sleep can create a lot of the symptoms that people would have in the Related to ptsd but it also prevents. The memory reconsolidation so a lot of times. We would hear from people after their first. Ma may session. They had finally had a good night's sleep. This is really important piece of the treatment. I think is that they have experienced with md mba. They have good sleep. They start to have a memory reconsolidation. And then you have integrative sessions that allow you to create kind of new roadmaps in your brain yet. And i think it's you can't understate the importance or overstate the importance of that. Integration and therapy side. And i think maybe that's where a lot of these misconceptions or stigmas around some of these substances. Come because like you mentioned in the beginning some of these have been used in party culture or in other ways and you're not obviously going to get the same effect using them there that you would in therapeutic settings so i think it's really important just to say again that we're talking about a very specific like you just explained the intensive protocol then evolves therapy and integration and follow up and that you're quantifying that over a period of time and making shirts lasting But i think that's really important thing to kind of deconstruct. What are some of the remaining. Stigmas that you guys run into. 'cause i'm sure any kind of the researcher doing any kind of psychedelic research. Certainly tends to trigger some of that in certain areas of society. So what kind of stigmas are you guys. Still running into well. I think there's like let's just even go outside of the. Md may hurt. Let's just talk about mental health right. There's stigma against talking about mental health or about trauma or there's there's guilt associated with you being traumatized especially when it's when it's childhood traumas or sexual abuse type traumas. There's a lot of guilt. So so let's try to get over those stigmas. I talking about mental health and that and getting the support that's needed and talking openly and then so you add to the stigma of mental health. A drug that has been demonized and people are taught that there's holes in your brain or you know that it's going to completely mess up your search honan or you're just all all of these types of misinformation that have been propagated about the safety of the drug so these are still things that we run into and then there's also just our medical system which doesn't allow for it's very unevenly applied people in underserved communities do not have the same access to mental health. And all of these other stigmas. I mean they don't have the same access to the medical system in general and definitely for mental health and then there's even more stigma around a drug. That's that's been considered an illegal drug so neither all still existing and it's going to be a lot of education to change people's minds not just in the medical system about this but also just in society in general so the work that you're doing to kind of bring it to people and have the education be out there and accessible to people is re- really important part of dealing with stigma. And then we we do the work of getting this published creating the data and talking to people that are in the you know in the field and in the medical field about the results. And so you know we have to all do our job. I think to change minds across the ecosystem in order for this to become really available. Yeah when certainly it was scary for me to start really talking about these topics publicly. And one of the reasons i finally did was that when i shared about my own trauma in a s episode because processing that was so impactful my health resolving because i was operating in nervous system state for over a decade and i heard personal stories from literally thousands of women who had been through similar traumas and i realized not only. They're huge need for this with so many people suffering and there's this incredible tool that's misunderstood And that people are missing out on something that could be absolutely life changing because of these stigmas. I also realized looking throughout history when anytime we see especially in the us a big societal change. Its win kind of the average mom population shifts perception. I take that responsibility very seriously to have this incredible community of moms and the importance of educating about topics like this Because i think the potential is huge and for our kids as they get older become adult. Hopefully we're able to kind of shield them from some of the more severe traumas but many of them will enter adulthood with something they need to process. And this is the thing. I want to be available for my kids for other moms. Who are listening. What do you think we will see. What is the future of this research and access. Look like yeah. I just all of what you just said is so important and i really appreciate how much sure that you're willing to talk about your trauma and to bring this out there because like you said it does open the doors for other people to feel comfortable about it and that is how we see change. So it's it's great. Thank you for what you're.

ptsd della honan Ma trauma us
"cognitive processing" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

10:17 min | 1 year ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"The time you die. You're learning things. You're always learning things and some things you just seem to absorb some things come very easily to you and some things that you try to learn are very difficult to grasp since we're constantly learning getting an understanding of how we learn is important and as you're about to find out really interesting. Barbara oakley is a professor of engineering at oakland university in michigan and she's author of a book called learn like a pro science based tools to become better at anything. I barbara welcome. It's a pleasure to be here. Might so when people learn things or when people have trouble learning things what generally is. The reason people have trouble. I've sensed that you know it's it's a lot easier to learn something if you're actually interested in it which is why so many school subjects are hard because people don't aren't kids aren't interested in the subject makes it a lot harder. I imagine that's one thing but what what else what makes what makes it hard to learn. Well one thing that makes it hard is simply not realizing how hard learning can be We often just want learning to be really easy and one company course hero did a study and they tried to determine learners biggest challenge at what they found was their biggest challenge was the learning is really really hard. And the issue is real. Learning involves creating links between neurons in long term memory. And what we often do. Is we look at something. And for example a list of vocabulary words in a foreign language and we look at that and go. Oh hey it's right in front of me. I've got it in mind but it's only in your working memory. You haven't created those sets of links in long term memory that that can help you actually remember that list of vocabulary words. So what does that mean. It means that you look at the words on the page. They seem really easy. Like you should remember them. But you if you don't actually do the work to practice with them repeatedly test yourself. Try to retrieve those words from your own memory. You actually won't learn them. That's a really interesting and important point. I guess because not all learning is difficult in the sense that we all have aptitudes and interests that so some things are fairly easy to learn. And maybe we then think well then everything should be fairly easy to see. I picked this up pretty quick. Why is this so hard. There are two types of learning if you look at learning from an evolutionary perspective. There's the easy stuff for what i called the easy stuff There's actually a technical term for it. Which is biologically primary Cognitive processing and that really means things like learning to recognize a person's face or learning a Your native language. These are actually easy things to learn. Our our brains are wired to learn these kinds of things. We don't need to do anything special. It just automatically back. We see some one. We recognize their face. We may not remember their name but we'll recognize their face again or we can very easily pick up are native language like a sponge. But didn't there's more difficult material. That's biologically secondary cognitive processes and these involve things like learning to read learn to write learning advanced learning. Matic's these are things that are brain is not really wired to do very well and it it horder for us right and when it gets hard some people quit walk away and other people dive in and learn it. So so. what's the difference between those. Two types of people. I mean learning is a lot like riding a bicycle. He who in their right mind would ever want to learn to ride a bicycle. If all you ever see is those first few days of falling off the bike and getting bruised and maybe even breaking a bone or something but we learnt ride the bicycle because we can see other people doing really cool stuff with it and it's really fun so you have to get through a An initial hurdle where. It's like the learning to ride a bike stage but it's harder to get past that stage mentally because you know to where it gets fun and interesting so you just kind of work through. It can get more exciting if for whatever reason either your teachers or some Motivation either internally to yourself or extra money from the world can help you become motivated for this and is there a way at parents. I think would love to know the answer to this. Is there a way to generate that motivation in yourself or in your child or something where. It doesn't seem to be there to to get them to do their work in and to get into it without the struggle. The the hassle that often happens everyone would love that magic bullet and i think an important facet of learning. That should be acknowledged. Is you know. Learning is not always fun and just doing little bits of practice every day to get over that initial hurdle can be quite beneficial. I mean nobody's said we get a kind of a bad set of information from the educational system because they they say well you know to make learning in science technology engineering and math We need more students in this. So we're always gonna make fun for students will. That's a little like saying we're going to get you all excited about playing the guitar by teaching you how to play air guitar and i mean it just you get excited about playing the guitar in you appreciate blend the guitar when you start having some actual successes through practice. It's the tiny bit of building blocks of practice. That actually lead eventually to a love of what you know you can get past that initial hurdle and then you begin to fall in love with it one of the things. I think people struggled with her. At least i've i struggle with is in school people say well we have to. We have to learn this. And i never knew what that meant. Does that mean memorize it. Does that mean just know it off the top of your head. Does that mean nowhere to go. Look for it when you need to know. What does it mean. Oh what a great question i think. One of the real challenges is that we will throw students twelve to sixteen years of education at them and we never ever give them a course on how you learn effectively. I mean this is. It's like you've got to be kidding me. Because we know so much about what learning actually means now and that it's coming from not only cognitive psychology but also from neuroscience. It's very clear that to really learn something. You need to be able to access it in long term memory so if you ever hear a cognitive psychologist or educators saying well you know you could just always look it up. Don't bother to To remember any of these things. That's true for trivial factoid. 's but you could never learn to speak french if you had to go to google translate you must build a structure of the key ideas called a skimmer in in your own brain but even when you learn something well and this is one of the criticisms of learning things in school is that we learn a lot of things that we don't ever really need to know or or use later on in life and you don't use it then what was then. Why learn it the challenge is we never know what we're going to need when we go out into the broader world. So when i was young. I was quite naive and i was like i would never use math. Don't even bother to teach me math. Because i'm never ever going to use it well as it turns out if you do. They've done controlled studies and people who don't even understand the math enough to understand mortgages and and interest rates are far more likely to default on their mortgages so it it's almost like you have an exercise program and you you you have a general exercise program because you know you just never know what you're going to be doing out in real life and you don't want to pull a muscle or or get a sprain or something because you're completely out of shape kinda wanna be generally in good shape. That's what an exercise program does. And in continuing to learn. New things and broaden your learning is actually a good thing for you to keep mentally flexible so keeping yourself..

Barbara oakley oakland university Matic barbara michigan google
"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Flow Artists Podcast

The Flow Artists Podcast

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Flow Artists Podcast

"I guess any kind is the clouding or clearing out perception or is that actually i just the core of the practice. Because i do feel that. Mindfulness is quite useful for helping us navigate. Different mental states definitely. Yes so mindfulness. Is he ends. So with regards to using cannabis or other plans or substances that change our consciousness weather. Some examples might be a cow. Sugar wine some people feel green tea. They feel like a consciousness shift from caffeine of green tea. Obviously cannabis is much more potent than the things. I just said but i always like to remind people like cook. How can really change your state. No and ends of cannabis is sort of on a spectrum with cacao. it's closer to the cow than it is to like. You know unlike the egg commercials the frying in commercials from the eighty s. You know the truth is cannabis is a plant medicine. Ryan it has superfood properties. You know anticancer properties inflammation properties so numerous in a substantially research health properties. Which again doesn't mean it can't be addictive. Can't be done mindlessly. Camp cloud our awareness definitely can do all of those things but it is a superfood. We wanna remember that and so when using it people ask me often. You know what strains are best for yoga in you know. That's that's the fun part strains really hit people differently even ones that have like a reported benefit like. Oh this one's going to bring clarity well for you. Maybe based on your bio chemistry or what you happen to eat that day that straight might make you tired right. It might not do what it was supposed to do. You know so. It's a real opportunity to get to know. Different strains because cannabis isn't like one medicine right. It's it's hundreds if not thousands of mid mattis medical medicinal parts so part of the clouding of awareness. Piece could be that the strain you're using is really suited for sleepiness. It's great you know kind of muscle relax in its but it might be. Yeah like a little too. They call it couch. Lock where you don't really want to get up and do yoga. And so that wouldn't really be good street for you for yoga and then the other question would be dose. And i think that's an even bigger consideration than strain. It's like if you do too much cannabis. It's going to be hard to be mine. Oh it's going to be hard to have that of awareness. So i think really starting with a low dose you to one vape hit or two one joint hit a five milligram edible at most and you know edibles take up to an hour to hit really starting low and then just seeing like is this enhancing my awareness of my feeling kind of more people report and i myself feel that cannabis brings a deeper connection to the body. Were so in our heads. Even daily life is we call cannabis and altered state. A daily life is that ordinary state. We call daily. It has a lot of stressful is not our natural state. Like it's very fast pays is a lot of cognitive processing and so in my daily life sober..

mattis Ryan
"cognitive processing" Discussed on Strength To Be Human --Global Arts & Affairs Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

Strength To Be Human --Global Arts & Affairs Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on Strength To Be Human --Global Arts & Affairs Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

"It did have a happy ending she winds up marionette man and she wanted to becoming an advocate to help people in this situation. And just dangle she met him was a blessing and he literally saved to life and she wants to have a master's degree and go on to have a great marriage of with children and go on to help the world is. That's literally what she did. But i mean she. I think she dealt with a couple of years that just hell. That's how these things can happen. Did she deserve this. Of course not no. So that's why. I never understand that the stigma that's out there. What are you afraid of on. What would you be afraid of. Someone like tat girl roof no falls grown. So that's that's how we view these things and now only fair. You know an honest way. But also i feel in a direct way so that they can be handled now. There are a couple of real therapies. That can work out there for people in this situation. Okay we're gonna talk about those Right now okay. The i called on him evergreen down there. We go okay. Cognitive processing therapy okay. It's when you learn skills to understand how the trauma had change your thoughts and feelings just you start like internally understanding how you've changed because if you remember we talked about the fact that this traumatic event changes you and i'm not suggesting here at all anyone that you can't change back emma's happens but i do know that the sooner you recognize what the problem is sorta you figure out ways to stop it to manage it. Maybe even in some ways. And i mean isn't a positive way down. I mean. isn't that denial way to avoid it. You know it's with. Its with john on ashdod when he got a psychotic break this. The mathematician that won the nobel peace prize. I mean he literally was seen visions talking to him and all kinds of stuff because of all the intense mathematics he was doing and i guess he had a genetic disposition for this. He hadn't totally into entire psychotic break and he'd had them on a regular basis emmy when many he's teaching mathematics or doing some incredible calculations for some important project in nazi. No you know. He's talking like to go some people and having conversations with nobody that's there but they're they're in his head that was part of his turvy so it's very similar to that instead of going into nile just hasn't happened to me no instead of. Oh that with that. No your mind is isn't a stupid device k. You mind is a super intelligent device. Even your mind will figure out ways to screw with you further if you ignore with. It's trying to say to you. So his therapy was yeah. I i see the. I acknowledge that you're there but we're not going to have a conversation because i'm in this life. I got things i wanted to do right now. I know you're there. I know you never going to go away. But i'm gonna deal with. This stuff was way to almost acknowledge it and then i decided at the same time. Not a denial but not giving into the stuff either. That's how they to bring himself back to sanity so he didn't have as many are incredibly enough. The brain didn't give him as many psychotic breaks because it was almost like at saint. Oh we can't get this guy anymore..

emma john
"cognitive processing" Discussed on Truth Be Told

Truth Be Told

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on Truth Be Told

"Happy happy gentlemen told me. How are you both very good. Thank you well. We're excited to have you here all the way from the uk. So thank you for staying up and doing the show with this. That's no problem. Thanks for having his own. Well we're or we're going to do today is like i've told you before the the show that I've had many people talking about curses on the show before psychics wicca does and and Shamans and all kinds of different stuff. But we've never talked with psychologist about curses and what it really is. And what you know. 'cause i mean. How many of us have i feel cursed. My life feels cursed. Everything i touch goes to crap and and i've heard you know curses going through the bloodline and have to sage your house and sage yourself to get rid of the curses. First of all how did you both get involved in curses itself. Whoever wants to start going off one of the things is tony's that's part of the paranormal. So obviously we've gone interested. We do research looks up. Cognitive abilities cognitive processing that relates to belief in the paranormal. And i think that curse is just one of those extensions that we can consider so. It's a bit about what's the scientific perspective here you know. Why why do kersee's half sort of rational explanations so it's it seemed like a natural thing to move into so we start to cova things related to belief in the paranormal and things like the anomalous and so on but then believe in curses can arise from various various ways various means so it might just be that people have different personalities they might have different thinking styles so and these are things that we've looked in our cognitive research. Or how have you. How did you get started doing this. Field because going into psychology and seeing you know people's behavior how did you get started in this actual field was there like was there like a Significant situation that happened. That led you in this direction. I'll on well actually totally eat dancing quiet day.

kersee uk tony
What the Human Brain Can Tell Us About NLP Models

The TWIML AI Podcast

01:22 min | 2 years ago

What the Human Brain Can Tell Us About NLP Models

"Are everyone. I am here with allison. Injure allison is an assistant professor at the university of chicago. Alison welcome to the tuomo. Podcasts thank you hi. I'm looking forward to digging into our conversation. We'll be talking a little. Bit about your research and computational linguistics and nlp at a bunch of cool things but before we dig into those topics i love to have you share a little bit about your background and how you came to work in the field. Great yeah so i Originally came from a background in linguistics and psychology interested in language in humans. And how language works in the brain. So i Worked in a a cognitive neuroscience lab looking at processing of language in the brain for awhile began a phd in linguistics with a bit of a focus on psycholinguistics. But fairly early on. I took a strong interest. In the promise of computational linguistics as a way both to use methods to continue exploring questions about the brain but also to ask interesting questions about how to apply puzzles in language to engineering applications and to design of artificial intelligence. And so this was what sent me in this direction of being what i am today which is simultaneously someone who works on natural language processing and artificial intelligence and also someone who continues to work on modeling of cognitive processes pretentious language.

Allison University Of Chicago Alison
"cognitive processing" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"Beat the best go player in the world. Which isn't quantum by the way and then how that might become quantum and how it could lead to even really whipping the guys but even quicker and then as you throw in the book. Yeah and by the way. Google totally realizes this and they're building their only on their own quantum computer and they're like what thirty eight cubit or something you said when we get to three hundred like game over for any encryption there at thirty eight and then break that down for us to in terms of what that means. Because that's like already bigger than like if you put all the super computers in the world in a room you'd be bigger than that at solving some problems. So there's a lot unravel their please. Yeah absolutely so the point. I was making about the three hundred. Is that tutor. The three hundred. It's hard for people. Magin how big the the power of exponential to the three hundred is more particles in the known universe. Okay so even if you had every particle the universe to be a computer that was working on solving the problem they would all have to work together. Even though there's you know thirty three billion light years away from each other working together to solve it wrong. So quantum computing cheats. It has two to three hundred states. Sort of like a doctor who's time machine. You know where it's got this much bigger space behind it then. It looks like from looking at the phone booth right. So quantum computing his like that essentially. It's using all of these states out there and we would say physicists would say well those mathematical no they're real because they can come huge and one if humans tap into that state space and do things that we didn't expect them to do right. So that's how it connects those two things. Well and i think you know the main thrust of your book is that humans already do connect and that are miss understanding has been that we don't connect and that we've adopted a model for how human consciousness works that is conveniently or intentionally dumbed down in order to kind of push certain ideas but i want a return to the alpha. Go thing because. I think it's a great a great example. It's like i. If you're like me. I i like to play Online chess occasionally. And i'm really not very good at it at all but one of the things that always gives me is a reminder as one as a kid in pakistan who's twelve years old kicked my butt or as the computer if i ever turned it on full speed just destroys me that you know my level of kind of cognitive processing of that level you know. It's kind of narrow but is just. It's humbling right. It's okay i get it..

pakistan Google two three hundred states thirty eight cubit thirty three billion light yea thirty eight two things three hundred twelve years old each things one
"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Good People Effect

The Good People Effect

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"cognitive processing" Discussed on The Good People Effect

"If we die. Okay fine along. Do you talk michael as long as you have. I usually allow things to run the natural course. But if you've got time restrictions. I realized that seven o'clock pants You'd probably want to have some dina certain. Sorry it's it's up to you. Yeah well let's we go up to an hour up to fifty minutes or something like that. So let's let's just begin and dive in and i'll follow your lead. Yeah yeah let's let's start on this point of meaning and i guess the first question would be you know what what happens if we don't if we don't find a sense of meaning in our lives and why's that Kind of a focus of union work. We're well you know. We're miserable if we don't find meaning in life and throughout the history of humankind as you well know so much of humanities life has been constructed by extreme impoverishment at the struggle for survival totalitarian regimes and so forth the but there's something inside of each of us will call it the human psyche loses after all the greek word for soul. There's something inside of each of us that suffers when we're disconnected from what is meaningful to us and You can't impose meeting on someone else. It's sort of like saying to someone well. My favorite food has to be more favorite food. We would think that's kind of ridiculous assumption but there's something inside of each of us that knows what is right for us and when it gets violated as so often happens it is and that word pathology mean comes from the greek word for suffering. Toss it's a solidarity psychopathology. When i spent a lot of time working with folks in states of psychopathology means simply the suffering of the soul. And when you think about where so much therapists today you know. We are behaviors. That's true and that's important when we are cognitive processes that's true that's important we are biological processes as well. That's true and that's important but there's something else beyond all that if you add all that together you don't.

dina michael
Havent I been here before

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:42 min | 2 years ago

Havent I been here before

"Welcome to kiss myths and mystery. Siamese your host kit crumb. I've got to mention that if you're hearing a little background noise there's nothing wrong with your computing device or however you're listening to this podcast is my neighbor dominate away. Who's drilling well while that said. Today's topic is a deja vu. When you go to a new place me someone that you've never met before and had the feeling that you knew that person or to that place. Well you're not alone. But i deviate a little bit when i was researching this story a french carver. Not a real name said. She grew up in las vegas but eventually moved to shasta city california. She told me it wasn't uncommon for her to have the name of a friend that she grew up with pop into her head. And within minutes would run into that person at shasta. Although janice experiences nada deja vu. I felt it was in the same league and i just couldn't help explain it to my listeners. Okay onward we go. Wikipedia says deja vu feeling that one has lived through the present situation before the phrase translates literally as already seen although some interpret deja vu in a paranormal context mainstream science approaches reject of dacia who is pre cognition or prophecy. So how does science explain deja-vu they the world of science has four possible causes of what is referred to as vu. First attention explanations of deja vu involve an initial perception that is made under degraded attention which is then followed by a second. Take under full attention for example. If you're about to unlock the front door of your house and you momentarily are distracted by a noise in the distance when you return to the task locking the door the first perception may seem further off in the past the distraction that separates these two perceptions could be est fleeting. I said i blink. Their second explanation is memory explanations. They make the assumption that some detail of the do experiences familiar but the source of this familiarity has been forgotten. The premise of this explanation is that people encounter countless things during the course of the day. But don't pay attention to all of the information later. Processing of information may occasionally induce. The million era at deja vu. Then there is the next explanation dual processing explanation so vu suggested to usually synchronous cognitive processes become momentarily as synchronous for example familiarity and retrieval could become out of sync alternate league perception and memory could become a synchronous and finally neurological explanations for deja vu attributed the phenomenon to either a small temporal lobe seizure in a person without epilepsy to a delay in neural transmission between the eyes ears or other perceptual organs in higher order processing centers in the brain. Wow do processing. Explanations have received a lot of attention. They are much more philosophical and theoretical and less mechanistic but do processing explanations can be tested in the lab. Similarly neurological explanations are appealing in their neurological basis and seem logical but again we lack the advanced technology to test them. Thus dual processing explanations are less germane to researchers instead attentional memory explanations are best supported by what we know about cognition and could be tested vertically. Well it sounds to me like the scientific explanations can't be tested and repeated in a generally scientific method. Wow that takes the fun out of experiencing deja vu on monday. I'll provide explanations for deja vu from a pseudoscience or paranormal point of view. And we'll see what stands out

Shasta City Shasta Janice Las Vegas California Epilepsy
How Our Brain Develops and Addiction.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

07:47 min | 2 years ago

How Our Brain Develops and Addiction.

"High Sober Solar 's it's Lynn from Peachtree City Georgia. Soon to. Be. Lynn from Pinewood Forrest Georgia. Oh my gosh I'm deep in the throes of moving. I. Have this coming Friday, which will be Friday the ninth of October. Three weeks until I moved into a new joint. So I'm really excited I'm not getting much sleep I'm so excited. I think part of that is also because of God bless America what's going on in America? How are you all doing? Yea. Isn't this fun? Two Thousand Twenty is so much fun. Right Oh. My goodness. I. Have to share with you. One of my new coping skills in this is a beauty I am subscribing to burn doodle facebook pages, Labrador doodle facebook pages I've already been subscribed. Two hundred gazillion King. Charles. Cavalier. FACEBOOK pages. That's the kind of dog that I have and what else? Oh, Yeah Mimi, what does she? Again? You know I just said to Google. Mimi is how ridiculous is that? She is a Reykdal. It's just so nice because my facebook feed now has all of these super cute puppies and kittens in them. Yeah, you gotTa do to you gotTa do in the Year Two thousand twenty. Alrighty then I talked to my move. What I'm doing to cope animal wise this week and what else can I share with you? Oh, yeah. Part of what I'm doing. I may have mentioned this before, but if I didn't I am really minimizing. What I'm taking with me on this move and it's really hard to do. Oh my gosh, I am trying to. Only take the stuff that I. Love. Really love with me. And I'm just laughing at the process I. Don't know if any of you have tried to do this. You know you set up these boxes in your house and you're like throw away giveaway and keep and do any of you take things out of one box and put it in another repeatedly this is what I'm finding myself doing an eventually. It goes in one of the giveaway or throw away boxes but God. That's hard. It's a struggle as always trying to keep it light and bright before I dive into some Super Neuro nerdy stuff and wanted to share with you in a slightly different format. What I use in my perspective with my clients and a huge part of that perspective is neurobiology. In addiction and recovery but also something called life span development psychology L. DP how's that life span developmental psychology and how it affects addiction and recovery so are you ready cause here we go i. Let me define what L. D. P. is life span developmental psychology it is the scientific study of growth and Change Yeah throughout our human development it examines thoughts feelings behaviors in how they change during a person's life and how this change over the span of our life encompasses takes in biology social emotional and cognitive processes process the eased. Although there are typical pathways of development that most individuals follow no two people are exactly alike in the way that they change immature time. This is why cut and paste kind of treatment. Doesn't work for the most part. As an aside I don't know if any of you are watching the documentary on what is it on? Hbo I think called the vow and it's about this group called nexium that was delivering what they called quote Unquote Tech around personal development and what their tech was was trying to outline a step by step process at how to get what you. You're supposed to get personal development in insight into your own behavior and your inner life. When you work with a counselor, they were trying to do it sequentially and Nice little package and boy Oh, boy does this happen a lot that's reproducible that can be given to anybody. So you go through these courses and that the end you've gotten some remarkable insight into yourself. However. The problem with that is that you are all individuals over time your. Stuff. That comes into your system is going to be different at and happen at different times than your siblings even. So when people attempt to apply like programming if you will to the human psyche. It must be individualized and that comes only through discussion individual discussion over time with an individual. When I'm working with a client, I am going to look to help them you explain your life to make sense of your past in the present by looking at your environment and things that have precipitated or prevented growth and changes across your lifespan. Looking at things that optimize development in order to optimize or clarify or give you good outcomes what must be done is to apply appropriate theories to help you develop missing skills and navigate these situations that you navigated all by yourself way back when with no modeling healthy modeling and no real intervention terrible word. But that's the word we use intervention by somebody who knew what they were doing in, for instance, the realm of communication or the realm of dealing with. Emotions all that kind of stuff. So if you pull back and look at the stages of human development, there are predictable stages, but any number of circumstances can interrupt that normal development at any stage or age, and then lead to arrange of problems which might include substance use ongoing addiction issues or a multitude of other mental health illnesses. Let's briefly go through those stages. The first one is prenatal development development in the womb has an important impact on early psychological

Facebook Lynn America Pinewood Forrest Georgia Peachtree City Georgia Google Mimi Reykdal Charles L. D. P.
Using Your Brain Without Thinking

Developer Tea

07:38 min | 3 years ago

Using Your Brain Without Thinking

"What does it mean to use your brain? And how is that different than just thinking? As developers engage in thinking all the time but here's a entirely separate part of our brains that we might be missing out on using. That could be better at solving some of the problems that we face on a day-to-day basis. My Name is Jonathan trailer listening to develop for T and my goal on the show helped driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. One of the amazing things about the. Human. Brain. Is Its ability to process complex topics. This is why we can write code that is abstracted so many levels. Away, from a physical reality that we have to tangibly think about. We can imagine entire. Kind of universes where we can create stories and. keep track of those stories while we read a book. A book that was written with a bunch of characters that are enough themselves abstractions. These are characters that we may not have ever even seen that specific character that specific size before. But somehow we are able to process all of this information and create meaning out of it. This is an incredible feat and part of our kind of intellectual superiority that we are aware of the domination that we have over the world around us. Has Given us. A somewhat distorted picture of what the brain is actually capable of more importantly where the limits are. And it's very simple to see the limits of your brain and specifically limits that we're gonNA talk about today. If you want to test these limits you can. Try to brute force memorize the first twenty digits of Pi. This isn't a lot of information. It's just twenty digits in after all we can process a lot more. Information than just twenty digits, we can read entire books with thousands of pages and understand them. So what is it about remembering twenty digits? Makes it difficult? Here's another exercising might want to try. that. You've probably faced already in your career, go and look at the features of what say three or four different libraries, popular libraries or three or four different languages and try to decide which one is best. This kind of information that you have to process. It's really difficult to do because the number of variables and that's the critical factor for today's episode, the number of variables that you have to weigh against each other. Can Be really large temper variables. You can imagine for example. That you're trying to deduce which which language should you learn next let's say you're a beginner programmer and maybe you're trying to decide which language to learn. You can use variables like the market size. You can try to quantify how much you enjoy that language or. Even how much you expect to enjoy it in the future, you can imagine you would use measures like the number of available repositories on get hub or get hubs own report of the trends for a given language. How do you decide what trend to use or how far back to look? These are all different questions they you would have to try to answer and then compare between the different languages. And so now you have this very large list of pros and cons and. You sit down and try to look over that information, but this is. Where we hit our limit. Our ability to cognitively process or think about something on purpose. We only have so much capacity to think in parallel. This is critical factor remember again, the number of variables were very good about thinking about one thing. At a time. In fact, most of the advice that you receive on this podcast is an attempt to get you to think about fewer things at any given point in time and reduce the things that you are working on to the simplest form. So you don't have to keep a lot of information in your head. But if you are trying to make a decision complex decision with a lot of variables. There is another part of our brains we can tap into what's interesting is that as knowledge workers, we are paid for using this one specific part of our brain, this prefrontal CORTEX. The part that's responsible for thinking very deeply and thinking very focused manner. But. There's another part of our brains that can help us think more abstractly. And without the same limits of the cognitive processing limits, the would find in the prefrontal CORTEX. Lots of studies. For example, one from Carnegie Mellon support the idea that the rest of our brain is working on the problem. In parallel to us focusing on other things. For example. If you expose yourself to all of the information about the various programming languages that you're considering let's say you have four of them. Then you can go and do something totally unrelated to that. Your going to keep on working on that decision problem. Now, we're not really consciously aware of this and there's no way to become aware of it but once we return to that problem at a later point in time we may have a different sense of clarity and we might even have. We might feel is a gut intuition, but actually it's an intuition that was given to us by that unconscious processing that's happening in the rest of our brain. So. Here's the critical thing to to take away I. We said the the most critical thing is to remember that this has to do with the number of variable. So if you can reduce the number of variables that you're thinking about, then you can actually process those entirely in that prefrontal. CORTEX. For example, if you're working on a math problem, this is a perfect example of processing in the prefrontal. CORTEX. But if you're working on something that requires much more evaluation much further a can of discussion about multiple variables or a comparison between multiple things, and that's not something that you're going to be able to hold in your prefrontal Cortex, the working memory for of a better explanations too small. So the prescription to fix this problem is to expose yourself to the information all the relevant information for making a given decision and then go and do something else. Maybe take a walk give yourself something that's totally unrelated that won't allow your mind drift backing and try to process that information again, on purpose in that intentional and conscious way.

Cortex Carnegie Mellon Programmer
Understanding the Buddhas Teachings for Ourselves

The Wisdom Podcast

05:14 min | 3 years ago

Understanding the Buddhas Teachings for Ourselves

"To the huge whether I'm traveling in an aeroplane among place, so cancel the airplanes cost, but I'm still doing the teaching artists three feet into the computer, so it's quite handy, and it's been very nice. It's been very good I mean pulled in Oregon some very kind of giving their apartment, not very much cheaper, and sometimes they're an I'm sitting here doing my job. This very good I'm quite content and how you finding teaching over the Internet. Yeah, I mean really released prized by. Having the people on the screen you know because you can get twenty five people so first of all. Because it's people, the welcome coming, he would never go to a teaching considering Timbuktu somewhere. They can join so it's been very moving against experienced. I was really surprised by that having people's faith and win of course, a President I mean twenty five people on the computer screen, and then you fix, patient pays and see who's there and those who don't won't faced on habits. Once you start asking questions. They come up strong, and it's been very moving and people to said that, but it's really quite preston quite direct and quite intense. Intense, so I, really really really enjoying it I have to say it's kind of a an odd thing to say straight. Curious. Yeah, do you think you'll do more of it? When you can travel you get back on the planes and travel around the world I think eventually when I'm very very old. When I'm very old now my probably do that, but I don't mind driving around and don't have a home right now, so I can't keep in the other. People's. I mean this is a flash. Some sleep around is okay very well. Traveling on airplanes, sweeping around seats means gave up running the prison. Project is based in California. State, sort of fully since ninety, four, ninety, five, ninety, five, ninety, four, then rush out of the prison. We started the prison project about ninety six, and then again that up. Two thousand nine so since I've been teaching full time. So I'll go knowle's cinches. You know people invite me not Dubai schedule go so the last ten years I haven't had a hundred. I had one small bag. One St of robes, companies, a shoes by a few things ultra. Six me really I must have been. What do you call one of those nine really suit. My nature I have to say that I really does and I always think. Lewis people that go your houses when I die. Nothing no to team. Up because. You've got an easy exit. One of the things one of the questions I. wanted to ask you is that you know you travel around? The World Teaching Dhamma around the world I'm wondering what it is that you find about the Dhamma that resonates with people. What is what are some of the things that you go to? You know no matter where you land was gonNA engage able. Well, you know this is where. I mean it just seems to me clearly, we want to summarize what Buddha is a bad. It's not a joke starting to be a clever, he has issued. Say you need to learn to be around Serapis? I think we're really do on pack. We get beyond the. Indian amazing culture for centuries enough and the frame welcome to mention framework of things and like. Really with it, you start to get to the essence, and clearly the essence has to be the mind, so you're not putting Greek for God's sake, but it is not a psychologist on anything. That's exactly I mean. Everything comes down to the mind, even the fuel. It's it's amazing. Sufficient. Brilliant worldview of the Buddha's is observed to be true. That is a law natural law that runs a unit us. And what does it run is law within which minds and lives of sentient beings run, so there's Buddhist psychology which is a how the mind works and that trump's from is genius. Indians are with. His Holiness. He says it was amazing Indians more than three thousand years ago. Who wants to begin the investigation tonight? Yourself I mean we clip Judeo Christian. European SORTA was Mr Freud didn't do. It was arrogance so physical Buddha commanders incredible system. What do they do? They met the mind they met. The mind to yield is four thousand distinct mental illnesses, which summarize into three is an incredibly sophisticated map of the mind I mean they only mapping them on now. You know the Brian. What does match the on the cognitive process? So it's not all about the mind, then. What else is Buddhism so you get right down to? The big sort of Llamas Alpacas issues, doors. Lama from the very beginning I could see ask entities teachings that he he was lucky his born Hippie, he just knew how to talk to in the sixties and seventies, so he it down to this fundamental way where Ron fine, because we're so full of resolve, his overwhelming lethal of dissatisfaction in culture and which. Could see were willing. These soap piteous hippies full of misery. He stopped trying to tell us about Amman. Potential so to me. This is the the bottom line almost like a fraud I was talking about the same thing. The Whitewater presents mind and this incredible potential. We've got this. Is everybody no matter whether the communist with people psychologist with university students meet outside the Buddhist Woods in super amazing way to see the mind understand, everybody recognizes everybody can recognize though I told you know want us his terminology. This distinction between delusions virtues. This is a radical idea for the wasting recognizes is just start moving to me. You can never tired of the more you can let your mind. This is what gives people. Courage is what gives us optimism, and we don't have that in our culture I mean. Where is there in? In any psychology on Euroscience, dare suggest that you can read the multiple. The rubbish grow the goodness, which is the meaning of the word Buddha only. Buddhas that's very stock terms. Is

President Trump Buddha Oregon Dubai Preston Serapis Donald Trump Buddhist Woods Mr Freud Lewis California Whitewater Fraud Amman Lama Ron Fine
BrainStuff Classics: Does 'Power Dressing' Actually Work?

BrainStuff

03:49 min | 3 years ago

BrainStuff Classics: Does 'Power Dressing' Actually Work?

"Brain stuff learn bomb here with a classic episode from our archives and from former host Christian savior this. This one was inspired by a book. Christian ran across about how to dress for success. It got him wondering can power dressing really make a difference socially or psychologically below their brain stuff. I'm Christian Sager and I've got a question for you. Do I look powerful. Well I I know you can't see me right now but I feel powerful. Some people even think that what you wear can produce this kind of confidence and who doesn't want to feel good about themselves. So what is this power dressing? And does it actually work well to answer that question? We have to take a trip to the smooth nineteen seventies when a guy named John Malloy came out with a series of books about dressing for success. He prescribed a uniform of sorts for both men and women. That would help them. Achieve Greatness in business professions for men Malloy recommended conservative business attire. That was high quality and fit well essentially a business suit in dark hue with a modest white shirt and a tie. Think Don Draper for women. He adapted this uniform. To include a skirted suit and a soft blouse with floppy or bowed. Neck pieces think Margaret Thatcher in order to achieve the kind of authority of the Iron Lady Malloy recommended. Women do two things. Don't look like a secretary and don't look too sexy. You couldn't wear waistcoats or contour jackets. Because they drew attention to the bust. Scarves were popular because they drew attention to the face and away from the breasts and floral prints and feminine colors like Salmon. Pink were out. But you didn't want to look to masculine either. Hence the skirt instead of trousers. This was the birth of power dressing and by the nineteen eighties. It became the way enterprising. Women learned to manage or limit the potential sexuality of their bodies and leave all that gross girl stuff like cooties at home but as they entered the corporate workforce in ever greater numbers. Some women wanted to modify this uniform while maintaining their professional appearance. One alternative model for breaking out of these fashion limitations was Princess Diana with her more glamorous outfits others were on TV and shows like dynasty designing women and Moonlighting enter broad shoulder pads wide lapels and a wider range of textures colors and accessories. Cut to the present day now. Most of these fashion fads have come and gone but you can still see their influence on politicians. For Example Take Hillary Clinton or Donald trump many of the tenets of power dressing are still employed. Today we just don't call it that anymore. But a twenty fifteen study reexamined the principles behind power dressing. It found that putting on formal clothing does indeed make us feel powerful and even makes us think differently. The authors of this study tested student participants in a series of experiments by rating their outfits and taking cognitive tests when the students switched out of sweat pants and into the kind of clothing. They thought they should wear to a job interview. The tests showed their cognitive processing became more abstract broader and holistic the authors. Also say that how often you actually wear. Formal clothes doesn't matter regardless of when you wear. These uniforms have become a symbol of power. There have been other studies into how clothing affects our cognition to for instance. When people wear white doctors coats

John Malloy Don Draper Christian Sager Christian Princess Diana Margaret Thatcher Secretary Hillary Clinton Donald Trump
Patterns of AI  Predictive Analytics / Decision Support

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:31 min | 3 years ago

Patterns of AI Predictive Analytics / Decision Support

"Hello and welcome to the AI today. PODCAST I'm your host Ronald Schmeltzer and I'm your host. Kathleen Walsh. If you've been following the research search content that we've been producing Cog Melissa and on this day today podcast then you know that we spend a considerable amount of time on use cases and how various industries and governments are are applying. Ai In cognitive technologies and we think that this is really important to do a lot of organizations come to us. They're like we WANNA START DOING AI. We've heard about this. We WanNa try and implement something but we're really not sure where to start and they wanna see how other people have done it other use cases that they've done problems that they've tackled with this and that you know they find these these use cases really valuable and so we do a lot of research. We spent a lot of our time looking at and spending time with end users of all sorts. Andre I projects. We've seen literally hundreds if not thousands of projects many successful and many not and we despite all of those different applications of Ai from education and mining in law enforcement and finance and retail and automotive we find that they tend to group into these seven patterns and that these patterns are basically these categories categories of applications that all share similarities in the way that people go about approaching them and even though they may be applied to very different domains and very different industries. They share a lot of commonalities in the reasons why people are doing them the way they go about doing them. And so we've spoken about and written about these seven patterns of many times. We have a podcast linked to in the show notes as well some of our writing on the subject and we encourage you to listen to that but of course to quickly summarize those and this this podcast e seven patterns of Ai. In no particular order are hyper personalization autonomous systems predictive analytics and decision support conversational slash human interaction patterns patterns and anomalies pattern. Ah Recognition Systems and goal driven systems of an any project or implementation can fall into one or more of these seven patterns. Each pattern requires its own machine learning and cognitive process but you can combine them together into a project and so today we want to spend some time going over the predictive analytics and Decision Support Pattern. So this pattern is where you use machine learning and other cognitive approaches to understand how to take past or existing behavior and then predict predict future outcomes or help humans make better decisions about future outcomes using insight that you've learned from past behavior interactions and data and the objective of this pattern is to help humans. Make better decisions right so you might think that you know if a machine learning system can learn from data which is basically really at the end of the day. That's the best summer ization of what machine learning is it's just lying at data especially trying to find his generalizations and say what am I supposed to. What are you trying to get me to learn from this? Data recognizing academies from images. Or what am I doing. I may recognizing some numerical pattern. Well the thing about it is that machine learning systems can learn anything from data and if you give it like some sort of trying to find some sort of trend and then I want to use that to say hey machine. Can you give me insights as to how do you think this trend will change in the future. That's what the purpose of this particular pattern is. Now you have other patterns of systems that you're just trying to find the pattern you're not doing any prediction and all just like find the thing that goes with these other things like product recommendations or fraud and find the things that don't match you know those patterns but in this woman trying to tell the computer say can you predict for me. Can you you give me some insight as to where this will be going now of course for those of you who are statisticians and numbers people you might be thinking in terms of linear regression which is basically finding the line and like some sort of trend line and trying to having the machine find. This could be a very complicated wavy line but just new computer find this line for me and therefore when I have a new data the point I can sort of project where things will be but also it's not just about lines we can use this systems to to help us make decisions about where view no. I'm trying to navigate around factory. Where should I go? We'll I run out. A Win. will run out of product in this inventory. You know my various parts fail on my machine and and wind. Do you think they will fail on machines. Lots of applications of trying to predict the future based on data right. Some example use cases for this pattern is assisted. Search Retrieval Trigo intelligent knowledge base predicting a number or value dynamic him. Predictive pricing trying to predict behavior. Predicting failure like round Ed especially with equipment machinery for trying to predict when it will fail.

AI Kathleen Walsh Ah Recognition Systems Ronald Schmeltzer Andre I Fraud
Patterns of AI  Autonomous Systems

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:13 min | 3 years ago

Patterns of AI Autonomous Systems

"Think this is important because many organizations want to implement AI technologies but they're not quite sure where to start and they wanna see what others have done sometimes they look to other our companies and industries as guides to see what they've done so that they're not starting from scratch and we've seen hundreds of thousands of implementations of projects through all the stuff that we've done here at Cog Melinda and you've heard US talk about many of them through the use cases in our use case podcasts and a lot of the writing that we do for tech targeted for Forbes and also our training and a lot of our customers put us into contact with a lot of implementations and despite all that diversity of all the many different varied ways that people are using AI machine we found that generally they fall into roughly seven patterns at the beginning densify these patterns and say Oh that's interesting this application this implementation is this individual pattern a combination of patterns that helps to make that system work and so we've identified these seven patterns and we talked about that are seven patterns of Ai podcast and much of writing and for those of you that have not heard that before basically in no particular order these seven patterns are hyper personalization autonomous systems predictive analytics and decision support conversational slash human interaction systems patterns and anomalies recognition systems and of course goal driven systems and any AI project or implemented nations can have one or more of these seven patterns as part of their solution so each pattern requires its own machine learning and cognitive process but they can be combined and together to form an AI project and so we wanted to spend some time on this podcast taking a deeper dive into the autonomous systems pattern yes so one of the seven patterns that we see come up repeatedly idea of machines that are able to do things on their own with little if any human action basically he kind of set it in forget it right and of course you might be thinking about autonomous vehicles and robots but there's really lots of situations when you might want have a machine in self control of its decisions and aware of its surroundings and all of the applications that basically hinge on this pattern is what we call the autonomous systems category of AI application right so the objective of this pattern is to minimize human labor now that means that this system needs to be pretty darn good if we're not having a human in their examples of this are autonomous documentation and knowledge generation autonomous processes and cognitive automation autonomous business process where you're able to navigate through a system autonomously find bottlenecks optimal paths for documents to flow things like that this idea of collaborative robots are co bots where they're robots that are able to work in conjunction with and next a to humans autonomous vehicles of course and then proactive decisions as well right so we I should probably define what I mean by autonomous because autonomous doesn't mean something and generally it means in a physical or virtual systems software systems or hardware systems that are able to accomplish some task or achieve a goal for interaction surroundings and performed objective with minimal or any human involvement and so when we think about autonomous obviously we think about these things systems that are self trolling and of course this is where we need machine learning and intelligence because in order for a system to act on its own has to be very much aware of surroundings it has to be able to predict what will happen next and a half to plan for how to actually deal with the reality of the universe and that's what makes us autonomous systems pattern so interesting so of course you know one of the first things you might think about with autonomous systems are autonomous vehicles right right and so they're six levels of autonomous vehicles and we'll talk through them very quickly so level zero just is a car that has no autonomous features and that's actually more cars on the road than you would think today they're just you know your basic car that gets you from point. A. TO POINT B. in human needs to be in control the entire time level one is where the car can start to handle one task at a time like automatic breaking so it's useful it's Safety feature more than anything else but human still needs to be in control

Patterns of AI Conversation & Human Interaction

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:24 min | 4 years ago

Patterns of AI Conversation & Human Interaction

"You've been following are researching ching content that we're producing a cog militia and that we've talked about on today podcast then you know that we spend a considerable amount of time going over various use cases and how all different industries are using a._i. And cognitive technologies and we think it's important to share this because many organizations want to implement a <unk> technologies but they're. I'm not quite sure where to start. We've seen hundreds maybe even thousands of implementations and despite the variation and all the different ways in which people are applying a._i. Two different kinds of systems and different kinds of applications. We find that all of these tend to fall into seven discrete patterns that are either implemented individually or in conjunction action to achieve an a._i. Project and so we've written about this and we have a podcast linked to that talks about the seven patterns at a high level but for those of you that haven't yet listened podcast the seven patterns of a._i. And no particular order are hyper personalization autonomous systems predictive analytics and decision support conversational conversational slash human interaction patterns and anomalies recognition and goal driven systems and as ron mentioned any a._i. Project or implementation tation can have one or more of these seven patterns as part of their solution each pattern requires its own machine learning and cognitive process but they can be combined together rather for a project so we wanted to spend some time today on this podcast doing a deep dive into the conversational and human interaction pattern right so as we mentioned you know one of the common repeated patterns that we see is that people are trying to get machines and computers to basically understand the language of humans right when humans talk to each other. We don't don't talk in computer language talking human language but of course the thing about human language is that it's not particularly precise and you know we have everything from understanding whether the person is saying in terms of the words but also connecting it to understand their meaning so this pattern encompasses a variety of things that have to do with understanding the machine understanding what the humans are communicating and then providing away for the machine to communicate back to the human in the way that humans would like to be communicated right so this can be machine to human in human to machine or back and forth human machine interactions and the objective of this pattern is machines interacting with humans the way that humans interact with each other so some use cases you know examples are chat bots voice assistant content generation sentiment mood or intent analysis and machine translation right and each one of these things. Why would you do this. Remember always trying to remember the reason why we're doing a pattern and also the other thing that differentiates one pattern from another is basically the reason is an even though fundamentally if you look at it it's all just machine learning and it's all applications of machine learning and looking at the data but the reason why we're doing this pattern is because typing i being or swiping or clicking does not give us any sort of advantage in this situation because people can ask any question. Maybe things like f._a._q.'s and knowledge bases are just not that useful swoon so just giving people away to interact with the system like as if you'd like walk up to a window or taylor or a customer service desk they don't go. Please press one to talk to me now. They're like what would you like right and then you initiate a conversation. That's what we want from our systems as well and so that involves a lot of things actually that pattern encompasses a lot of things because there's a lot of things that people do when we're interacting with each other you know a lot of this idea of conversation is embodied in this idea of natural language processing so maybe we should talk a little bit about that. Even the conversational pattern is not only natural language processing. This is a real big part of what the conversational pattern is so natural language processing has been around for a while. Oh and it's about humans communicating with each other so natural language processing or n._l._p. Consists of two major sub parts there's natural language understanding and natural language generation so natural language understanding is about giving the machines the ability to understand what people all are saying invoice in text form so that's understanding the natural language generation is about giving machines the ability to generate and create text audio audio and images for human consumption. No you might think that text to speech which was basically typed text generated speech which means you could hear it so the computer shooters sharing in the speech. You might think that's natural language generation but

RON F._A._Q. Taylor
A brief look at Game Transfer Phenomena

Curiosity Daily

06:02 min | 4 years ago

A brief look at Game Transfer Phenomena

"Research is helping us understand just how differently video. Games can affect us than other media a few months ago, we talked about the tetris effect, which is when things you focus on for a long time show up in your dreams, like tetris or another video game. The tetris effect is a visual phenomenon but there are other effects video games can have on your brain. They kind of blur the line between what you see on screen, and what you see in the real world, the overarching term. For what I'm talking about is game transfer phenomenon and today's guest is a pioneering researcher on the subject. Anjelica Ortiz's dig, or Tari is a post doctoral researcher, who literally coined the term in two thousand ten and she's been working on this subject ever since she told us the game transfer phenomenon covers a wide variety of sensory modalities from gamers hearing sound effects, and voices to making involuntary movements with their fingers in real life. But when she told us exactly how deeply these effects are felt it blew our minds. Well, one of the most remarkable experience is with. Gamer seeing EMU with open video game menus when you're having a conversation with someone or seeing power, bars and health bars above people's heads when you're playing sports with your friends pretty intense, whether you've experienced this type of thing or not. Anjelica Ortiz day Gortari could use your help with a new study on game transfer phenomena. If you're eighteen to fifty years old, and you play video games for at least six hours a week on any platform than you're invited to participate in her study on game transfer phenomena online right now. Just visit game transfer phenomena dot com and look for the recent blog post titled gamers needed for web experiment on game transfer phenomena. The study aims to examine the relationship between game transfer phenomena and cognitive processes all you need to do to participate as answer a short questionnaire then complete three short tasks online. I did it myself and it was pretty fun. And by participating you get to play an active role in advancing research in a brand new field of study. Remember, you need to take it in the next few days while participation is still open. So what are you waiting for go? Take it right away. Or at least please share with your gamer friends in the name of science one more time. The website is game transfer phenomenon dot com.

Researcher Anjelica Ortiz Tari Involuntary Movements EMU Gortari Fifty Years Six Hours
Todd Herman: The Alter Ego Effect | Peak Performance On-Demand.

Good Life Project

03:22 min | 4 years ago

Todd Herman: The Alter Ego Effect | Peak Performance On-Demand.

"Of the things that you offer earlier was that so often the magic happens when you just when you get out of your head when you stop the cognitive process, and you allow yourself to surly drop into this blissful barrier, obliterating state of flow when you're in the zone, how do you balance the idea of being in that space where everything feels like it's just the theory, and you're completely out of a cognitive process with this too much more deliberate conversation between parts of yourself. Well, the one thing that it isn't doing to you that is going to pull you into a conscious trap is trying to think your way out of it consciously where I'm going to like when you're not using something like this, and you're kind of defining your field of play where you know this. This particular performer, alter egos to you, whatever you wanna call it, a persona is gonna go and exist, if you don't have that kind of great delineation between it now, you're gonna try out think you're away from an unconscious process. 'cause you don't even realize that this hidden force is there like when I when I shared with many sports communities that fairness is is is actually typically one of the core enemies of performance. I've had. You know, I was on a panel once with a former pro athlete, I bet they didn't go over. Well, it went like, no, they started to cry. Right. The grid here. They're like. Oh, my where were you? Right. It's like, wow. That is exactly now I get myself. And so having that conversation because there is so much passion and energy typically behind it of like, no enemy. You get to the silent. Is that talking like it's that you're taking complete ownership of the space that you're standing that alone is such a powerful mindset to be in. Because what you're actually doing the intent of it is that you are trying to protect also that ability to get into that zone flow state. And it's that, you know, classic guardian at the gate that alter ego is doing to protect the core self the core self, which is this complete place of unlimited possib. Ability for you from creative expression standpoint. Again, like I said at the very beginning that one of the things that makes us truly unique on this planet is our creative imagination and what is possible from it. But we just put so many limiters on it. Because of who in how we define ourselves. What were what we're capable of? And you know, who am I'd like just all these different things. But when you truly honor that there is something that's brewing up inside of you. And the alter ego can be guardian at the gate that protects that pure source of energy. I just get chills thinking about it. 'cause I just seen it so many times where people are shocked at what they're able to do. Now. Okay. So we are a few weeks into twenty nineteen now translation about the time. Most people don't even remember what the resolution was turns out starting health routine