35 Burst results for "Co-Creator"

A Review of 'Only Murders in the Building' -- Steve Martin’s Hit-and-Miss Whodunnit

Fresh Air

01:25 min | 2 weeks ago

A Review of 'Only Murders in the Building' -- Steve Martin’s Hit-and-Miss Whodunnit

"Murders in the building is set in an old fictional upper west side. New york apartment building called. the are konia. it's a place where aging rockstars and even more aging tv and theatre stars live side by side but in relative isolation until that is a murder in the building brings them closer together. Some as grieving neighbors others a suspects in three in particular as amateur investigators capitalizing on the murder to launch a literally homegrown. Crime series podcast. Those three are charles along ago. Crime show tv star. Played by steve martin. Oliver past his prime broadway director played by martin short and mabel a young new arrival to the building play by selena gomez as co-creator martin is very generous with his material he gives his co stars many of the best lines and scenes while he's largely content to play straight man or toss away. Droll one liners from the very start. Only murders is fun to watch because these two old friends. Steve martin and martin short so obviously enjoy playing off one another as evident from their recent stage show. Netflix special. Called steve martin and martin short and evening. You will forget for the rest of your life. There is fond of each other as they are of making fun of each other

Steve Martin Martin Short New York Mabel Martin Selena Gomez Oliver Charles Netflix
"co creator" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:00 min | 2 weeks ago

"co creator" Discussed on Fresh Air

"You'd expect a touching concert a suspenseful audition but the one that sticks with you is a simple exchange in which ruby and her father played by kotsar with a rough curmudgeonly. Grace come to a new understanding. It's a perfect tearjerker of a scene. Holy calculated and wholly effective kota strikes sheriff false notes but a note. That sweet is really all it needs. Justin chang film critic for the la times. He reviewed the new film. Kota coming up. Dr anna lemke. We'll talk about the interconnection of pleasure pain and how that connection helps explain addiction. She's the medical director of addiction medicine at stanford university and author of the new book dopamine nation. This is fresh air weekend. Fresh air is made possible by showtime with their new documentary series gossip from executive producers. Brian grazer and howard gossip is a juicy. Four docu series that goes behind the biggest headlines and scandals that reshaped journalism and set the cultural agenda. Get the inside scoop. On america's insatiable appetite for dirt candid interviews salacious stories and rare footage legendary page six columnist cindy adams and industry power players exposed the business. Where news travels but dirt sticks gossip is now streaming. Only on showtime. This message comes from npr sponsor total wireless which helps you stay connected and turn your experiences from two amazing with the best devices network and savings. When you move to total wireless you can get an unlimited plan. Starting at twenty five dollars a month that includes five g. Available twenty seven hundred plus cities capable device and sim required terms and conditions at total wireless dot com. We're going to talk about the interconnection of pleasure and pain and how that connection helps explain addiction not just addiction to alcohol and drugs like opioids but addictions to food sex gambling and social media. My guest dr. Anna lemke is the author of the new book. Dopamine nation dopamine is the neurotransmitter the chemical messenger most involved in processing rewards the more dopamine a drug or behaviour releases the more addictive at probably is. Dr lemke is a psychiatrist. Is the medical director of addiction. Medicine at stanford university and chief of the stanford addiction medicine dual diagnosis clinic. The clinic is for patients who have a mental health disorder like depression or bipolar syndrome. As well as a drug or alcohol addiction. She's also the author of the two thousand sixteen book drug dealer. Md about how opioids were marketed to doctors to prescribe for their patients which helped lead to the opioid epidemic. Dr lemke welcome back to fresh air. Let's start with the basics. What is dopamine. So dopamine is a neurotransmitter that send signals from one neuron to another and it's probably the most important neurotransmitter in our experience of pleasure motivation and reward so this is all stuff that's going on in the brain. Yes it's going on in the brain exactly so what role does dopamine play in addiction. Well dopamine is the final common pathway for all pleasurable intoxicating rewarding experiences So different drugs and behaviors Work on different and dodge or innate systems. There's the opioid system. There's the system there's the adrenaline system. But ultimately the final common pathway of all of those rewarding substances and experiences is dopamine. You're right that the more dopamine any experience or substance releases the more addictive it means that experience are substance is sore scientists measuring dopamine. Release now to figure out what. The most addictive drugs are or experiences. So that experiment has been done In rats for example Putting a probe in their brain measuring the amount of dopamine released in response to different types of substances now remember we all have a baseline release of dopamine that sort of always there and then when we ingest certain substances or engage in certain behaviors are dopamine either. Goes up or down in response to that substance or behavior so for example chocolate increases dopamine above baseline about fifty percent. Sex is about one hundred percent nicotine is about one hundred and fifty percent and amphetamines is about a thousand percent. Whoa and that explains. Why amphetamine is more addictive than chocolates or sex. Well yes no. I mean one of the reasons. That amphetamine i'm causes. Dopamine route to be released at such a high level initially is because the actual mechanism of amphetamine is to directly release dopamine in the synapse whereas for example alcohol works through our endogenous opioid system and so dopamine is more of a downstream result of alcohol. Ingestion the other thing to keep in mind is that there's this whole concept of drug of choice and what might be pleasurable and rewarding for. You might not be pleasurable rewarding for me so in addition to the common pathways that all substances exert on our brain we also have our inter individual differences. Let's talk about the interconnection of pleasure and pain. Pleasure and pain responses are located in overlapping parts of the brain. Can you describe the physiological overlap of pleasure and pain in the brain. Sure so to me. One of the most fascinating findings in neuroscience in the last seventy five years is that the same areas of the brain that process. Pleasure also process pain and that pleasure and pain work-life balance. So if you imagine that in your brain there's a teeter totter like something you would find in the kids playground and when that teeter totter is at its resting baseline it's level with ground when we do something. That's pleasurable for example. When i eat a piece chocolate then my pleasure pain balanced tilt just a little bit to the side of pleasure. And i experienced release of dopamine in my brain's reward pathway but one of the governing principles regulating this balance is that it wants to remain level. Which is what neuroscientists call home stasis. it doesn't want to be deviated for very long. Either to the side of pleasure or pain so that when i eat a piece of chocolate immediately what my brain will do is adapt to the presence of that pleasurable stimulus by tipping my balance and equal and opposite amount to the side of pain. And that's the after effect or the comedown or in my case that moment of wanting a second piece of chocolate. Now if i wait long enough that that feeling passes and homies stasis is restored so described the pain. I'm disappointed that this experience of eating their chocolate is now over. Or is it more like craving i want more. I want more of it. I want more of that pleasure and not having that pleasure. It increasing.

Dr lemke kotsar Justin chang Dr anna lemke howard gossip cindy adams stanford university Anna lemke stanford addiction medicine du bipolar syndrome Brian grazer Kota la times ruby npr Grace america
"co creator" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:44 min | 2 weeks ago

"co creator" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Over my whole. So what was it a comedy or is it. Serious was yeah. It was comedy which was sort of very different. Usually these Productions are pretty serious. You know in reverential but it was only a couple of performances but it was really well received in the biggest thing that happened in that was. That's where i met. My writing partner can dario. He auditioned and was in the show. He like me as someone who belongs on stage and we became friends. We formed a band and then at some point. I said let's try script together and that changed. Everything beginning back to the musical is that you did for the church of jesus christ latter day saints. What was the reaction in the church to the musical. Everybody really likes to got a bunch of last. Because i think people just weren't used to seen one of these productions and have it be really a comedy at its heart and so they actually like seven years later they revived it. So i've had a revival of a musical and they did it again. Seven years later but Haven't done it since then. It's just sort of been languishing. What are some of the movies and some of the cartoons that you grew up with the first cartoon i saw that really impacted me. I think was the jungle book. I loved that movie so much in the songs. That are so Ed and then i had to say the marx brothers have played a huge role in my life. I'm sure that's why. I ended up writing movies. I saw my first marx brothers movie. When i was ten on tv and i fell in love with the marx brothers and became obsessed and that really led to my love of movies and reading about movies and then starting to make my own with our family's super eight camera which we've gotten for home movies. You know on vacation and suddenly i. I used it to make movies with all the neighborhood. Kids you love movies and you and your writing partner ken. Dario have a podcast. Is still going on your podcast. Yeah it's called. Make him watch it and we make each other watch a movie. We've never seen before. Then you have a couple of episodes where your share your opinions of films of the eighties and films of the nineties but I wanna play the theme song from this. Because i think it's you and can actually singing the song it is. I wrote the song so in the spirit of turning your life into a musical. I just wanna play the opening theme from your podcast.

church of jesus christ latter dario Ed Dario ken
"co creator" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:52 min | 2 weeks ago

"co creator" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Did somebody say corn. That's believable with amazon. The music is kind of like a hoedown yes. It just reminded me too that. When i was in school we had learned some of that kind of dancing like square dancing. That was part of the curriculum learning. This we we live in brooklyn like what. What are you thinking. I guess it was more appropriate for me growing up in phoenix. I wonder if is square. Dancing still taught in some schools. I feel like when my kids were little. There were still teaching squared and seeing. There must be a lobby somewhere. It is making sure that that's still thought. Schools idea the square dancing lobby. My guest is cinco paul. He co created and co wrote the satirical musical series schmidt geduhn and wrote all the songs it streaming on apple. Tv plus will hear more of our conversation. After a break and justin. Chang will review the new film kota about a teenage child of deaf parents. Co-starring marlee matlin one of the parents. It won four awards at this year's virtual sundance film festival. I'm terry gross and this is fresh air weekend this message comes from. Npr sponsor the john templeton foundation. Harnessing the power of the sciences to explore the deepest and most perplexing questions facing humankind learn about the latest discoveries in the study of hope and optimism intellectual. Humility and free will templeton dot org. Let's get back to my interview with cinco paul. He co created the new series mega dune he also co wrote the animated films despicable me the secret life of pets and the dr seuss adaptations horton. Here's a who. And the laura acce how you first exposed to musicals. Where did you grow up. Did you see music theater. Was this all through movies. I grew up in phoenix arizona. So i didn't see a lot of shows live but my mom really loved musicals and she had cast recording for i specifically remember camelot. Pretty young kid and listening to it. I was a weird kid singing. I wonder what the king is doing tonight in my room memorizing the lyrics but i remember you know camelot in south pacific and guys and dolls and and that's where my love affair with musicals began but also i remember seeing singing in the rain for the first time as a kid and donald o'connor doing make him laugh and i thought that was the greatest thing i've ever seen in my life. It was so funny. And i just loved it so that's really where it began when i was a kid and then i think a real key moment was i think i was fourteen and was asked to play piano for my high school's musical and it was how to succeed in business without really trying and that really changed everything because then suddenly that became my tribe. You know the the theater kids and they embraced me. And i desperately wanted to be on stage but probably because i didn't really belong there. They kept saying no. But we need you on the piano. Please continue playing piano for us. But that's really where it deepened. Into something different. It became my community now. Did you one of continuing the musical community is not the direction you win and until now you know in college i always sort of you know. I wanted to be onstage and so in college tried out for several musicals and and didn't get in. And i did end up playing piano. A bunch of them. And so at some point i realized well. Maybe that's not my thing. And then i was really interested in being a pop musician had always written songs from pretty early age and and so i think there was maybe a sense that well musical theater isn't cool. And i wanna be elvis castello you know. And and so that's focused but people would continually tell me. Oh that sounds like something from a musical. I'd say like what are you talking about. This is rock and roll. And so i think life was telling me that that's where i belonged. And then i you know life is just weird get you make little choices and pulls you in different directions and and i got pulled into screenwriting and then ended up writing all these animated movies and my sort of set that part of me aside for a while. Can you sing a few bars. Of one of your elvis costello ish songs. Oh my g- goodness let's see of man's last mistake and woman's i heard to the final heartache. From afar to flirt are won't forgive and forget any more. Oh my gosh. i haven't song since nineteen. That's a single classic called forgiven. Forget you had a band. Yeah kind you know. I had a band in high school and it was kind of like neatest forcing them to accompany me for my songs. So it wasn't true band in the in the real sense. And then i just would do solo stuff. I learned to play a bunch of instruments and go into the recording studio and make albums and and really that was kind of my dream. I wanted to be randy. Newman paul mccartney. You know all my heroes. And there was a point where i realized i got married and we were expecting our first child and we were in north carolina. The time my wife was in med school and the plan was always after med school. We'll go to l. a. And i'll pursue my music career but with impending fatherhood upon me. Suddenly i started to really question like what is that going to be. Is that the life. I want so i got the idea to apply to film school and i always felt very safe in academic settings. So i thought. I'll play to film school and if i get into usc or ucla that'll mean that maybe that's the direction my career chicago go. And i got into usc and that kind of changed everything and got me on the screenwriting track as opposed to the pop musician track. We left something out of your music career early music career your member of the church of jesus christ of the latter day saints which most people i think no as the the mormon church. Your mother was a part of the church or father was catholic. But not practicing. And you got baptized. I think after right before or right after graduating from yale though right yeah right before. I headed off to college okay and there was a musical celebrating. The hundred fiftieth anniversary of the church. And i think you wrote the songs for that. I wrote everything i wrote. The book and the music and lyrics for that it was about a modern girl and her great grandmother who was a pioneer girl who switch places. Gosh that's almost a little bit. Lecture mega dune where the modern in the past or colliding. I now i feel like maybe. I've been writing the same thing over and.

cinco paul schmidt geduhn despicable me the secret life laura acce phoenix marlee matlin john templeton foundation terry gross elvis castello Chang brooklyn Npr horton amazon justin south pacific connor apple donald Newman paul mccartney
"co creator" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:10 min | 3 weeks ago

"co creator" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Let's music from schmidt dune loving satire of forties early nineteen fifty s musicals and my guest cinco. Paul co created the series co wrote it and wrote all the songs. Oh that's really it's a funny song but it's also it's a lovely song. It's a nice melody. Yeah that was the intention. I never wanted the songs to be too jokey if that makes sense and i really wanted them like oh that could genuinely have been asong son in an undiscovered rogers and hammerstein musical and and then it ends in a very you know and doesn't amazing job with a song and it ends in a really sweet spot right where she sort of wishes he could be who he really is. She suspects that he's not being his true self. She doesn't know what that actually means but she really wishes the best for him and loves him. Let's take another break here and we'll talk some more if you're just joining us. My guest is cinco. Paul and he co wrote co created and wrote all the songs for the loving satire of musicals called schmidt geduhn that's now streaming on apple. Tv plus and he also wrote the animated films. Despicable me. the secret life of pets horton hears who and the laura ax will be right back. I'm terry gross. And this is fresh air madison. by here. Host of shortwave. Daily science podcast from npr. Listen for new discoveries everyday mysteries and the science behind the headlines all in about ten minutes every weekday. It's a great addition to your daily listening whether you're a science nerd or you know just a little science curious. Subscribe now two shortwave from npr. Let's get back to my interview with cinco paul. He co created co wrote and wrote all the songs for the new series mega dune which is a loving satire of classic musicals from the nineteen forties and early fifties like oklahoma carousel. The music man. The sound of music south pacific and of course brune he also co wrote the animated films despicable me. The secret life of pets. Horton here's a. Who and the laura acce how you first exposed to musicals like where did you grow up. Did you see music theater. Was this all through movies. I grew up in phoenix arizona. So i didn't see a lot of shows live but my mom really loved musicals and she had cast according for i specifically remember camelot. Loving pretty young kid and listening to that was a weird kid singing. I wonder what the king is doing tonight. In my room memorizing the lyrics but i remember you know camelot and south pacific and guys and dolls and and hearing those a lot. And so that really. That's where my love affair with. Musicals began but also. I remember seeing singing in rain for the first time as a kid and donald o'connor doing make him laugh. And i thought that was the greatest thing i'd ever seen in my life. It was so funny. And i just loved it so that's really where it began when i was a kid and then i think a real key moment was i think was fourteen and was asked to play piano for my high school's musical and it was How to succeed in business without really trying and that really changed everything because then suddenly that became my tribe. You know the theater kids and they embraced me and you know i desperately wanted to be on stage but probably because i didn't really belong there. They kept saying nope single. We need you on. Please continue playing piano for us. But that's really where it deepened. Into something different. It became my community now. Did you want to continue in the musical community. This is not the direction you win. And until now you know in college i always sort of you know. I wanted to be on stage and so in college. I tried out for several musicals and and didn't get in. And i did end up playing piano for a bunch of and so at some point i realize well. Maybe that's not my thing and then i was really interested in being a pop musician. You know had always written songs from a pretty early age. And and so i think there was maybe a sense that well musical theater isn't cool. And i want to be elvis costello you know and and so that's what i focused but people would continually tell me. Oh that sounds like something from a musical. I was really offended. I'd say like what are you talking about. This is rock and roll. You know and so. I think life was telling me that that's where i belonged. But but and then you know life is weird you get you make choices and pulls you in different directions and and i got pulled into screenwriting and then ended up writing all these animated movies and and i sort of set that part of me aside for a while. Can you sing a few bars. Of one of your elvis costello ish songs. Oh my goodness. Let's see of man's last mistake and woman's i heard to the final heartache. From afar to flirt. I won't forgive and forget any more. Oh my gosh. I haven't song. Nineteen that's a single classic called. Forgive and forget you had a band yeah kind. I had a band in high school and it was kind of like needed forcing them to accompany me for my songs. So it wasn't a true band in a real sense and then i would do solo staff. I learned to play instruments. And then i'd go into the recording studio and make albums and and really that was kind of my dream. You know i wanted to be castillo. Randy newman paul mccartney. You know all my heroes. And there was a point where i realized i got married and we were expecting our first child and we were in north carolina at the time. My wife was in med school. And the plan was always after med school. We'll go to l. a. and pursue my music career but with impending fatherhood upon me. Suddenly i started to really question like what is that going to be. Is that the life. I want so i got the idea to apply to film school and i always felt very safe in academic settings. I'll play film school. And if i get into usc or ucla that'll mean that maybe that's the direction my career should go. And i got into usc and that kind of changed everything and got me on the screenwriting track as opposed to the pop musician. Track new we left something out of your music career early musical here. You're a member of the church of jesus christ of the latter day saints which most people i think no as the the mormon church. Your mother was a part of the church. Your father was catholic. But not practicing. And you got baptized. I think after right before or right after graduating from yale though right yeah right before i headed off to college okay and there was a musical celebrating hundred fiftieth anniversary of the church..

Paul co schmidt geduhn laura ax cinco paul npr south pacific terry gross hammerstein schmidt brune horton rogers elvis costello Horton madison connor oklahoma laura apple Paul
"co creator" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:36 min | 3 weeks ago

"co creator" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Cinco paul. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you so much for creating the series. Thank you for having me. How did you come up with the idea of musical about people trapped in a musical set in the early twentieth century. Well it's kind of crazy. I had the idea for this almost twenty five years ago and it was while i was watching the movie in american werewolf in london of all things one of my favorite movies and it opens with two friends hiking through the the wilderness and they're hiking over the countryside and i suddenly thought. Wow the opening to this is very much like the opening to brigadier and then i thought what if these two modern guys instead of stumbling on a town that has a werewolf stumbled on town. That was in a musical. And that was the germ of the idea. But i didn't really know what to do with it. So is one of those that i just filed away but what really cracked it for me was oh instead of two friends. It should be a couple. So there's more of a romantic comedy and it can be a more about what does love mean. What's true love really mean. I think that's why for twenty five years. Nothing happened with it because it was needed. That addition to really crack. So the sesame street character loves musicals keegan michael key. Character hates musicals. Why did you want him to hate. Musicals wall i thought it was really important. I mean first of all. It's really funny to have someone who hates musicals be stuck in a musical but also for him to be the eyes and ears of the people unlike me who don't love musicals and in many ways can and in many ways it's my wife you know the boy you're trapped I'll tell you we can. I you know played music all the time when we were writing and would ever musical theater songs somehow pop up in my mix. he would say skip. He was not a fan. he's become a little more of a fan. And i wouldn't say my wife hates musicals but she does not embrace them in the way that i do so it was really important for the show to have that perspective. One of things in some musical is the love affair. Some musicals i think would be considered pretty age inappropriate now like like for example the sound of music. Where like. She's a young nun. Who's just left the convent and She ends up falling in love with this kind. Of mean spirited older man who of course becomes a much better human being. She falls in love with her. This come like magical. Transformation and south pacific. There's a younger woman who ends up falling in love with an older man. I think you have a shout out to that Is that is that one of the things you wanted to play with And also the idea that like love can totally transform a person into you know a kind of stern rigid person into a much more loving lovely person you know when we were in early. On conceiving of of the show and the journeys that are characters would take. I really wanted sicily's character. Melissa to to be involved in what i think. Are the two big tropes in these old musicals. One is the bad boy you know. Which is the billy bigelow character and then one is this. The older sort of father figure love interests that you see king and i and sound of music and south pacific. Clearly it was a thing for rogers and hammerstein and it is. There is something weird about these old men you know sort of creating works of art in which there these may december romances and so we played with that into ways. Also keegan has this young farm girl pursuing him play by by of camera and and immediately he's concerned about the age difference especially because the actresses who play these roles were never actually t- natures and so we play with that trope as well. Some musicals have really corny scenes in them and The kind of scene that always bores me is the picnic scene like this was a real nice clam bake. I'm really glad we came. It's like can we skip that. Can we skip that and get to the good stuff and you know even like operas have like songs like that. Where there's you know like a festival or you know a picnic or something and like those are usually boring to and i. I never really the function that they serve. And you kind of have a song. Parodying that corn putin and so the reason why they're singing about coordin- pudding is it's their first morning in town and they're sitting on the porch and about to have breakfast and they're asked they want some corden pudding and they don't even know what corn pudding is and then the town just start singing about how great corn pudding is so. I'd like you to talk a little bit about what you think of those moments musicals. We have to sing about food or a picnicker klanbake. Yeah corn putin came out of initially was thinking. What is the song that is most going to annoy. What would be the worst possible song to subject him to you know. And it's just a song just about food and corn pudding. Sudden came to music that kind of the perfect representation of these sort of songs like it's a real nice clam bake like who cares like enough songs really should move the story forward in some way and and i think that the the worst example is shipped poopie from music. Man which is it brings everything to a grinding halt and then this marcellus characters just seeing this nonsense song. That has nothing to do with anything. And so. that's what cornpone potent is. It's an ode to those songs but the the fun thing is that ironically in our show it does move the story forward because this stupid song gets kicking. Say okay. we're leaving or we're not going to spend another minute in this town and the waitress delivering the corn pudding is the younger woman. Who's pursuing him. Yes why don't we hear cornpone and we'll also hear the sesame strong character kind of join in in verse much to the keegan michael key characters annoyance can't recall corn corn board. Think.

Cinco paul keegan michael key south pacific corn putin billy bigelow london hammerstein sicily keegan Melissa rogers keegan michael
How Are the Latinx Community Represented on TV

Latino USA

02:00 min | 3 weeks ago

How Are the Latinx Community Represented on TV

"Latino and latina representation in film and television is an age old conversation topic and despite some recent milestones. The numbers are still pretty disappointing. According to a recent study by the la times latinos and latinas are underrepresented across all aspects of television and film productions despite making up nearly twenty percent of the us population that dino's and latina's constitute only six percent of main cast members less than nine percent of writers seven percent of directors and six percent of senior executives. The presence of african and indigenous latinos in the industry is even smaller but statistics can only tell us so much how latino individuals and communities are portrayed. Onscreen is another part of the conversation. That's why today we're taking you behind the scenes with two award winning latino creators were breaking stereotypes about how our communities are depicted on television. Stephen canals and linda evatt charges. My name is steven canals. I am co-creator executive producer writer and director of the f. Extra series pose. The category is hosed centers. The black and latin queer and trans individuals who are part of the new york city. Underground ballroom community as they are navigating the difficulties of the hiv as and crack epidemic of the eighties and early nineties. Stephen was born and raised in the bronx to an afro. Puerto rican mother and an african american dad. He made history when posed premiered in twenty eighteen featuring the largest cast of transgender actors in tv history

La Times Stephen Canals Linda Evatt Dino Steven Canals United States New York City Bronx Puerto Rican Stephen
"co creator" Discussed on Around the Horn

Around the Horn

06:34 min | Last month

"co creator" Discussed on Around the Horn

"Now they just apologize because There was intention the room to keep things realistic but then a clear mission inside jason. That was that was about Yet does real real conversation in. Yeah can i think that is approved a richer plainfield long-run. I've seen a lot of shows that you can tell. The people at the helm have very progressive ideas about feminine and masculine roles about social issues. That are at the forefront of things and try as they might they either become excessively saccharin in their attempt to weave those morals and messages in or preachy to the point where you become disconnected from the characters and the plot. Because you're aware of the writing intending to do something. That will elicit a response or plata. Clapping and platitudes. For having put that in the script somehow the show avoids that despite touching on some and in second season no spoilers there are some real life hunt of sports social issue crossovers that are addressed and it does so in a way that is and i'm sure you've heard this over and over surprisingly effective like instead of judging the decency in the warmth and the joy and the messages people love that they're in there and that they're communicated in a way that doesn't feel like it kicks you in the head or the balls i don't know what metaphors going i think i meant knocks you over the head and then i went with anyway to. What do you ascribe that will. And that will find line. That you've managed to hit Yeah well you know too much way. It's just that there's partially started from. You know we love soccer and we want to without being a soccer show. We want to like communicate our love for the game but it would be disingenuous to not acknowledge that there are some There are some systemic problems in soccer as as as as in the world. So what you see in the show. happen ends up being a very like Analogize d- version of a really a a conference of stop. That's not just soccer but also you know the cabinet in there but What the clippers When donald sterling's You know real self kinda got broadcast out there. But there are some yeah. It's so hard to say without getting into but basically some some players there's always been like in some countries more than others Instill today. There's racial abuse getting shouted at players From so called fans And only in the last five years or so have have team started to actively while on the pitch take action against it. I mean even. I think just last week. The german olympic soccer team had had walk off the pitch Young because the power to be are not doing enough and each new more Anyway so that we because it's a comedy show and because we don't want to We don't wanna get too big for our breaches essentially Or speak where we where we don't know enough we. We don't delve into a well. No it's a real thing to happen but we don't quite get into a fully real of thing or fully hot button issue So it's a bit. It's a bit allegorical But the feedback. We're getting is that. Yeah it's been pretty pretty effective than and yeah. I'm glad we're not Glamour nextgen you in the ball. That would be appropriate and difficult to do. Because i don't have balls but show like you said is based on premises. That would never happen. So let's keep playing the game. I didn't just yes. And you on my balls i apologize. I said yes and my balls are enormous so missing them as actually tough started the ball they did did looking at hr on this podcast. But i would always be the one that gets in trouble. There are some lines in the script. That i imagine you read it occasionally and without the incredible acting of the people on the show which is another aspect of this that i could go on forever about just how perfect the lines have to be hit for them to be enjoyable and for you not to think about the writing but ones like you know. You're beating yourself up. Is something is like woody allen playing a violin. I don't want to hear it or you know something about riding a horse. And if you're doing it wrong know there's a bunch of them that are like these very colloquial fund things but if i were reading a script i might think that's over the top right and instead it hits are there moments when you guys are writing where you're like. We've gone too far like this. One is not going to work when it actually comes out of someone's mouth well. It's why you do else as there was there. Called industry term alternative lines. Because yeah there's there's a bunch on the in florida is like no. No that was that was just too many. But they're fun. they're fun to ride. And we ready to full of people and Who are more than joke writers and we really don't focus on joke writing but when we get to like meeting ted ism here than it's a fun. Whip around of of of spontaneous joke right in trying to speak in voice and jason of course has the highest banning of any any of us doing that But i think because there were so many those citizens that you can't quite picture is going to go yet in that first pilot. I think that might be why you know. If you're the big streamers were like. This is broad greasy and Initially well all right well you they liked vision and hearing are apple relations apple a couple more quick ones for you about the show and the creativity behind it. I've heard that there is a three season arc that that was always the plan. This makes me very sad The last time. I remember being like where was plenty of show left and i was so distraught was when i got to fleabag late and i was like three episodes. Wow how many seasons this arm so excited. I've only watched three episodes and google fleabag done after two seasons that i was like what i'm so sad i wanna to watch us for the rest of my life and that's how i was feeling watching like the first couple of episodes of season two like instead of just the joy that season one brought me there was also a deep dark anxiety that this would one day end and then where would i go for this feeling of joy other than of course making it can we. Can we work around the arc like does it have to be three.

soccer plata donald sterling jason clippers cabinet ted ism woody allen apple florida google
"co creator" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

05:25 min | Last month

"co creator" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"And mature and emotionally intelligent than i'm buying what it selling every twice on sunday and i'm guessing that my guest this week agrees. Brendan hunt to place coach. Beard on ted. Lasso is a co creator writer and actor on the show. He's also known for being in. We're the millers horrible bosses two also. Tv like he and peel community parks and rec. How much mother. He's an alum famed. Second city and boom chicago improv. Comedy groups chicago native and he is a delight. I had such a great time talking to him. And i know you're gonna love listening. That's what she said. I don't know that i've had more. Jealousy surrounding me pronouncing a guest would be forthcoming on this podcast than perhaps brendan hunt aka coach beard because the ted lasso insanity is real. And we're going to get to all the ted lasse. Oh goodness but i wanna go way back to you growing up in the chicago area Going to school downstate in the prairie land parts of illinois. That i've had people in california asked me how far away chicago is from illinois so i guess that tells you. The people aren't really Very well versed in the other parts of the state. Let's start with where you grew up. And what kind of kid were you Yes i sort of grew up all over the more side Near my parents divorced. When i was like to know my mom tried to take care of me. Misses by herself Would you know. I hear that other other psalms about home single mom is hard But this was before even though songs didn't have the cash That it enjoys today though. Yeah kind of all of the north side and So i was a kind of a hyperactive kid. If not clinically. At least you know spiritually In kind already. Angry young age. Like i remember. I remember a a report card from either first or third grade. The reason why. I don't know it's a school that. I know that i went to two times always gets. There was a member of postcard report card that said thirty seven and a half absences in like a quarter or semester. Like it was something insane i was. My mom didn't know she was going to work. And i was willfully at the age of like eight or nine. Willfully staying home and watching tom. Jerry brady bunch and greenacres all day. Wow okay so..

Brendan hunt chicago brendan hunt ted lasso ted lasse Lasso Beard illinois ted california Jerry brady tom
Interview With the Creators of 'Hacks'

The Watch

02:21 min | 3 months ago

Interview With the Creators of 'Hacks'

"I am so very pleased to welcome onto the watch podcasts. The co creators and show runners at one of the best shows of the year hacks. Hbo max please. Welcome lucia yellow paul downs. And gen statsky guys. Thanks for coming on the podcast. It's for having traffic also thrilled because this appears to be in celebration of june fifteenth california's everything opening day. The first covid unfriendly podcast. We've ever done because you guys are on three zoom boxes on my screen. But you are all in the same room which i applaud. S right although truth be told. We have been bubble for about a year and a half together for a long time. Basically wrote the show and shot and edited it all during the pandemic. we've been together in the whole. It was made during this really fun time i. It's it's an even more impressive achievement. Because of that. And i do want to ask. I also wanna say extend my apologies chris. My co host is not here for this podcast partly because he thinks five people is too many but also. Because i think he assumed correctly that i was gonna hijack this and turn it into a sitters club. Podcast which. I which. I still might do spending how much time we have because big fan big hit my household. I think here. It's my star. wars. Yeah i mean. We're on the graphic novels currently outstanding. So but anyway i digress. Let's talk about tax So the three of you. I believe i work together on broad city a show that i also love very much. Is that maybe accurate is. This is the right place to begin the origin story of this show or reset me completely. If i'm wrong. Well janet actually met when we were both in sketch group in new york at many moons ago. Only two girls in the group women. I suppose and girls time. Yeah we were yelling. Twenty two thousand and they stopped mailing us so we were just slowly kick divy group sketch. Comedians always the best. He liked each other. We found we worked all together. So yeah that was. That was kind of our first and then obviously she and hall had already been working together. We're together we all met and just kind of immediately started working together. We're working on stuff.

Lucia Yellow Paul Downs HBO California Chris Janet New York
Zero Trust: Fast Forward from 2010 to 2021

Cloud Security Podcast by Google

02:15 min | 6 months ago

Zero Trust: Fast Forward from 2010 to 2021

"Our guest today and greece pay attention. This is important is junkin the rug at onto it formerly at forrester fame and palo alto networks who was the first to define the concept of zero trust in two thousand ten. Think about it. Two thousand ten eleven years ago paper so we have a few questions mostly focuses their trust. And of course it's past and the future so let's start from a somewhat painful but necessary question. Let's defines zero. Trust perhaps contrast how you define it then and how you think about it today. So zero hasn't changed right. It was still a fight against the old trust model. Where we had trusted parts of the network and untrusted parts of the network as we would see implemented in say an old cisco pix and so you had to define policy based upon a trust level so the internal interface of a picks was trust level. One hundred the highest level and the external interface was trust level zero the lowest trust levels. So you could go from a high too low trust level without any policy and i thought having that variable is painful and it means that. There's no album rules and it's highly insecure and we allow people to have access because of this trust model and so trust is just a human emotion that we've injected into digital systems for no reason at all and people confuse all the time human trust digital trust. I mean going back to nineteen eighty-four can thompson who we all know is the co creator of unix in his turing award speech. That year talked about the problem trusting. Trust so trust is something that shouldn't be in digital systems and that was the main thesis of the report and then it led to. How do you build systems like that. But mostly it was about thinking that this concept of trust actually incentivized bad behavior because all data breaches and almost all negative security events. That have ever happened. The root cause is the trust model. You'd think it was a spam email but it exploited the trust me think it was ransomware it exploited the trust model snowden and manning were insider attacks who exploited the trust model. So that was my fight. And then it's led to a lot more stuff.

Junkin Forrester Fame Palo Alto Networks Greece Cisco Thompson Snowden Manning
"co creator" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

08:11 min | 6 months ago

"co creator" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"For my chat with erika in of waffles and macci. We have just been obsessed since the first second we heard about waffles and moltke. So it's such an honor to have you on the podcast. Oh gosh that is so exciting to hear. It's really fun. That people are finding out about it. So i read that back in two thousand and five. You had a puppet show called. What's cooking with waffles and moose meat. What was that show all about. So i'll have to correct you there. It's mouse neat house meet. I like meet me on my questions. I can't regulus meet. What about probably a more realistic cut a mass meet okay there. Yes a waffles. In what's cooking with offals in mouse meet was the sort of prototype for what is now going to be known as waffles emoji mouse meat was my childhood nickname. It's what my dad used to call me. And yet it was sort of the first footprint of this concept of getting puppets in a kitchen monotonous. What we food trips which is sort of a spin on field trips talking to shafts and people in the food space for kids to just engage more in the kitchen and get to know what was on their plate. What was the the see. The light bulb moment. Where you're like. I want to do this this. Show about puppets in these characters and have it centered around food. I really love like plush kind of creatures in that world of henson in sesame. Obviously an personally. It was sort of a personal dream. Because i was a really picky eater growing up. Dinner time was really stressful in our house. I was scared of a lotta things. I have been thinking back on this whole experience. And i think one of the desires was there. Were a few foods that i didn't join a child and they were all they were all meals that i was allowed to participate in either. My dad was a five fishermen. Because i grew up in oregon so i would go fishing with dad and i love fried trout like that is the thing that i was like. On the top of the menu request or for instance like we would go pick tomatoes in the summer. Southern oregon and tomatoes can be like a trip food for kids. 'cause they're a little slimy a little gelatinous in centers in that was another like It and then another example. I went to school on a farm. Kind of like hippy. Dippy oregon Style and we milked goats and goats. Milk was like a was like a thing. I love so there. Were these little weird. Blips of kind of you know. Stranger food so to speak. That were my favorites. And i think looking back it was because i was allowed to participate in have ownership over where the food came from or how the food is prepared. In other in other cases my mother was very much sort of locked in the kitchen. Didn't really anyone helping her. Fussing in that world was very mysterious to me. So i think at the heart of our show just for me. I know if i had had a show growing up as a child that talked to me about food. Showed me food up close where it came from this growing in how you cook it in and how you can adjust flavors for instance with something as simple assault. Maybe inner times would have been more joyful. You know less stressful so as i mentioned Waffles and mouse meet headed debut in two thousand and five so obviously there is sixteen years in between waffles and chee and waffles and mouse meet what happened in those sixteen years. It's fun to kinda run through the sixteen years at light speed because that is what happened. Waffles housemate didn't go anywhere We jeremy i joke you. Because jeremy was involved in that as well cure me. Connor may co-creator. You know because you use the debut. I don't know that that was actually really any kind of project that debuted to the world unless you mean a youtube link was created but but truly i don't think the world was ready to see kids in the kitchen. I briefly interned in and worked for sesame sesame street for a bit at their corporate offices. And i brought the show to my boss and and she very kindly sat me. Down is sort of a young. I intern and said yeah. I don't. I don't know that kids in the kitchen is going to work out in all of these issues liability and i'm going to walk you through some of the things that on sesame street we deal with on a daily basis in terms of our production and so truly i went off. I sort of put the stream in a drawer and bought well. This isn't going to happen in. That really made me sad. And i thought i would pursue children's media through another angle by going back to school getting my masters in education trying to sort of mind that territory through other people's ideas and projects and that just sort of took me spinning right. I was in a classroom teaching preschool. And then i got a hold of the school newsletter in discovered. I really liked kind of writing copy and ended up falling into branding and copywriting for fashion and beauty company. So there was a lot that occupied my time in those sixteen years but waffles. Mouse neat was kind of laid to rest. It was like r.i.p. Mass didn't realize that and you had been an actor previously. Why did you walk away from them. Acting as a funny thing i love. I love the set life. I love working with film and tv. People but especially in the early outs. When i was an actress. I didn't have a lot of control over my career. Also i i wanted to go back and get my degree and i had press pause on that so back to school and life took me to new york and a whole different sort of world headed. You connect with jeremy. Jeremy a longtime friend when i was going to school at. Ucla had this pod friends and everyone was very creative. Doing different things. What of musicians. I wanted desperately to learn how to play the drums. But i don't have any rooms. A lot of musicians bends that went on to be successful filmmakers. Obviously jeremy went on to co create and direct drunk history. in another period. We kept in touch. We see each other at weddings and various friend groupings and it was a serendipitous run in little arms. I was visiting new york and getting lunch. For the powell. Jeremy was in the booth behind us. And so we reno set a little high and then as he was leaving like literally the doors. Is you know. I've got a. I got a three year old now. That won't eat a tomato. I wish that show was on television. Can't get bored tomato and so that was the the animal i mean. I'm i'm such a dog. With a bone i went home and i emailed him. And i'm like let's do this. Let's do it now. And so we we got together and had dinner and and sort of hash out a new vision for the show and that was listened to your vegetables and eat your parents. Kids encounter foods in sort of two ways at least in my experience rights from fear based place for there being pulled to try new things or from the strictly nutritional place where you have a pyramid at school. and you've gotta eat x y and z in. There's not a lot of room to just be kind of wild and crazy and wacky and listened your vegetables. Your parents was like that was just sort of directives throughout creating the show in developing. It was like what is fun. What is unexpected. What is surprising what makes parents laugh. You know As well as can't so yeah that that was the original title of the show. And how did you get in front of michelle obama's production company jeremy meyer constantly pinching ourselves. Because it really is this like the tiniest needle head but we threaded on some ways by accident so so we went back and forth once we ran into each other and hashed out this sort of new visions of the show new characters and we sat on that we you know..

new york Jeremy jeremy meyer sixteen years youtube first second first footprint five fishermen three year old michelle obama jeremy sesame erika one Connor two thousand Ucla sesame street two ways five
'Columbo,' 'Murder, She Wrote' co-creator William Link dies

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:39 sec | 9 months ago

'Columbo,' 'Murder, She Wrote' co-creator William Link dies

"Television writer and producer. William Link who created the iconic shows murder, she wrote, and Colombo has died. Here's Michael Castor. One other thing. The Emmy and Golden Globe winner earned his first writing credit in 1959, and over the next 50 years, he wrote her produced more than 70. TV shows and movies. Links Big first success. Columbo star Peter Faulk is a rumpled, apologetic police detective who always conflict killer who always appeared much smarter until Columbo nailed him. William Links other hit series murder, she wrote Start. Angela Lansbury is a senior citizen mystery writer who solved murders. His knees confirmed a variety. That link died Sunday in Los Angeles at age

William Link Michael Castor Peter Faulk Colombo Golden Globe Emmy Columbo William Links Angela Lansbury Los Angeles
"co creator" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:57 min | 9 months ago

"co creator" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The queen's gambit. He worked for years to get the series made in the nineteen eighty four book of the same name. It's about an orphan named elizabeth harman. Who learns the child that. She's incredibly good at chess. The show follows her as she rises in the world of international chess during the nineteen sixties while dealing with self-doubt an addiction. Scott frank also created the series godless and has written many screenplays. He received oscar nominations for writing out of sight. And the x men film. Logan he spoke to guest. Interviewer aroon vinegar. Paul clearly put a lot of effort into the production design and the beautiful interiors and furnishings. Everything is just so lush. Is there a particular function that you see. The production design serving in the series aside from just being really gorgeous. Yeah it's character. And this was an amazing collaboration and early on asia's genius and i saw babylon berlin and flipped out over the production design. I just thought it was amazing. And so he was the first choice. I wanted to talk to even before. I knew we were going to shoot in berlin and bill warburg. The producer had worked with him before many years ago and so we sent him the novel and he loved the book and we had a conversation and he signed on and i tend to operate from a place of. I have a very specific. You know vision if you wanna call that. There's usually a photograph or painting or some image that i land on at some point where i say. Okay this is the show. This is the film. And you know this is our palate There's a photograph. That inspired me for the for the queen's gambit was a photograph we took though and then give it to really talented people and they they take it from there and it's a wonderful thing because it's a kind of one in one is three sort of collaboration and his idea and being from germany thinking about america from germany was a fascinating thing for me to see and what we really agreed on. Was that you would know where you were in other words. The wheatley house said a lot about the we lease and i kept thinking about douglas. Sirk and i loved those films. I love the way they look and we kept saying the wheatley houses really are kind of douglas. Sirk stuff and when you're in mexico that had to have a very specific field because we weren't really in mexico so we were gonna use production design to to kind of sleight of hand to make us feel like we're in mexico same with russia and so there's and the orphanage and we had kind of different color scheme and scheme for each of these things both the orphanage in russia for example. There's not a lot of color but when you're in mexico there's these bright oranges and things and and wheatley house. Obviously it's a riot of wallpaper and you know that blue everywhere And paris is the at another thing and then moscow..

elizabeth harman Scott frank aroon vinegar chess bill warburg berlin Sirk Logan oscar wheatley house Paul asia wheatley houses germany mexico douglas america russia wheatley paris
"co creator" Discussed on Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

06:44 min | 10 months ago

"co creator" Discussed on Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

"The book of secrets as app said his nothing. But our own true steph beyond the eagle beyond the mind beyond the secret passages in the dark alleys and the ghost filled ethics of your mind. His something very mysterious. And that is you orchestrating and go creating the universe so start to begin to see yourself as a co creator in everything that happens to you. of course. this takes time in prayer in the course of miracles. I don't know how many of you familiar. With the course americans but this is one of my favorite press that i used to read to my children when they were going growing up and goes somewhat like this. I am responsible for what i see. I choose the feelings experience and everything that seems to happen to me. I ask for and receive as i have asked now. Some people get very enraged when they hear this prayer. I am responsible for what i see. I choose the feelings that experience but he has the third part. Everything that seems to happen to me. I ask for and receive as high bust. We did ask for cancer. Did as for as i must ask for this disease and once again the key here is everything that seems to happen to me. Not everything that happens to me so seems to happen to me is a very important part of that phrase. I am for what i see. We already said we construct business expense. I choose the feelings. I experience right now. Think of someone you love and see what you feel. Now think of someone who irritates you and how you feel you're choosing feelings right now in choose to have. Resentment chose have grievances. Choose to be grateful. Choose to love. Choose to have compassion so we choose the feelings and everything that seems to happen to me because nothing happens to awareness. Awareness can never suffer awareness. Not personal only experiences persona- and experienced becomes personal will be take ownership of the expense but in the deep reality. Don't own anything you don't own your body your body's recycled items originally star stuff but recycling with everything on this planet. Your breath is the air. Your circulation is the river's waters. Stardust is the atoms in your body. Why do you call it. Your body is recycled stuff. Your thoughts home. New original tossed. You have every is recycling through these days through twitter through facebook through instagram through media. And so on in fact. The only what's are original are totally disruptive like the theory of relativity quantum mechanics of beethoven's fifth or original novel. Because they're disruptive most of your thoughts recycled everybody else's thoughts. Your body's recycled everybody else's body and started thing is process in you today. Let's go a little deeper. Are you seeing order or are you seeing disorder in the world. Some people see chaos but remember niches said. If you have gas with a new you'll give birth to a dancing star. People who don't see disorder also don't see creativity or order the two go together. Do i see my own uniqueness. You are the same awareness. Everyone else in the world because awareness cannot be divided on multiplied the same awareness exists in new as in a tree as an appliance as in any sentient being but the experience is different. The mind is different. The perception is different but they awareness. The same awareness cannot suffer. You have to choose the feelings. You want to experience and recognize that what you take ownership of is your choice. I have this practice these days anytime before i sleep. I close my eyes and feel my body now just by closing race and feeling your body you get rid of all visual expense. The only knowledge you have of your body sensations and the healthier you are the fewer sensations. You'll feel you just see. Feel nothing with a few islands and of sensation. That's existence for you right now with your eyes closed existence sensations period and the fear of pure. You have the more close. You're getting in touch with your body as a place of perfect harmony. Perfect peace and perfect order so order and disorder goes together. Oscar have see my own uniqueness. You might have the same awareness and as me but you have your own unique experiences. And how you have indicated them just like nobody else has the same fingerprint or the same. I prayed or the same tone of voice or the same exact facial expression or the face all the weekend see archetypal virgins in paces. Your soloist unique. There's no one else in the entire universe that's been exactly like you in the entire history of the universe. There's no one else like you are now and there will be doing else like you are put ever so i ask. How do i really feel am identifying with these. Transient ephemeral evanescent on grasp Catchable experienced that come and go in the twinkling of an eye or am i in touch with the source of all experience. It's not what you know. It's not what the expense it's what is the source of knowing an expense. That's why we wanted to go in this book of secrets and finally asks have. Am i seeing what i really want to see. And if not why not get night choose to see something.

disorder Oscar Catchable twitter beethoven instagram facebook
‘Friends’ Reunion Special at HBO Max to Shoot in March, Says Matthew Perry

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:43 sec | 10 months ago

‘Friends’ Reunion Special at HBO Max to Shoot in March, Says Matthew Perry

"Highly anticipated. Sitcom reunion gets pushed back. You're going to have to wait just a little bit longer to clap again. As the friends reunion has been postponed till next year. Matthew perry making the announcement on twitter that the highly anticipated friends. Reunion special has been pushed back to march of twenty twenty one on. Hbo max in august. The show taping was delayed after already being pushed back from april martha kaufman. The show's co creator had previously told entertainment tonight that she wanted a live audience to be able to attend the event. All the main cast characters are set to return for the friends reunion

Matthew Perry Martha Kaufman HBO Twitter
Scooby-Doo co-creator Ken Spears dies at 82

Radio From Hell

00:24 sec | 11 months ago

Scooby-Doo co-creator Ken Spears dies at 82

"After the death of his longtime creative partner, Joe Ruby. Ken Spears has died at the age of 82. Can Spears Spears, 00 Roll co creator of Scooby Doo, along with his longtime creative partner, Joe Ruby. The writer.

Joe Ruby Ken Spears Spears Spears
‘Green Lantern’ series headed to HBO Max

Double Toasted

02:56 min | 1 year ago

‘Green Lantern’ series headed to HBO Max

"How? Come. All right. So look I'm not GonNa, hold his movie against the character I just saying that I had to Kinda bad outside experiences without ever getting to the actual. Himself so. Maybe. Hopefully, this will all change when Hbo Max Pulls Over Green on Green Lantern Corps. which is coming to HBO. Max`ed some point I. Don't know when. But Christian news somebody sent a shed you did not look amusement. I you big Green Lantern Fan. I you know he's fine. I like the comics a lot. That's the weird thing like green lantern is one of my favorites, but it also depends on which green lanterns yours like the mythology is. So convoluted at this point that I think it's really hard to make an emotional entry point like if you're not into green lantern at this point in your life, you're probably not going to be into. But having said that I find interesting about this is HBO Max obviously sparing no expense they green lit that Gotham show a couple of weeks ago about the Gotham. PD. And now they're you know jumping into the HBO mce lantern of it all which is decidedly not grounded. Right? Like got them PD law and order in the Batman Universe. Shit. But but green lantern play that's space and you know what I mean like there's a lot of different things going on with that. So they're going to have to throw some real money at it. They Green Lit Marc Guggenheim who Here's an interesting caveat. Guggenheim is the CO creator of era but also one of the original writers on the two thousand eleven green lantern. So you talked about getting a fucking second chance. This guy's going to get a second chance that shouldn't inspire much confidence yet. Like I've been saying for weeks where we talk about these comic book properties that are being turned into television I, think this is the better version of these stories. Especially because they're not going to be telling stories about John Stewart or Hal Jordan like. Some people say Shit. Gum Out I don't WanNa hear that really yes. Some people have already been asking who's going to be how Jordan? WHO's GONNA be John Stewart everybody's got that casting ready and whatnot. So yeah, it looks like they're not going to be in there at all people appealing a fuck bet as all I know that's all I wanted. College some Guy Gardner fans out there I'm sure some some. What's his name Alan Scott Alan Scott fans out there. But I think the reason they're doing this by the way because my biggest question when they first announced this was like but what about the Green Lantern Corps film that they were supposed to be doing right the DC you I mean everything's in up. In the air but they were still planning on doing something like that, and I think they're trying to do a separation of church and state here by doing how Jordan Jon Stewart stories over there in the feature films, and then being able to focus on some of the expanded rosters from the Actual Lander Court. Yeah.

Green Lit Marc Guggenheim Green Lantern Corps HBO John Stewart Hal Jordan Jordan Jon Stewart Gotham Alan Scott Guy Gardner Actual Lander Court
How To Generate High-Value Leads On LinkedIn

Accelerate Your Business Growth

05:31 min | 1 year ago

How To Generate High-Value Leads On LinkedIn

"My guest today is Matt Kark. That is the founder of the virtual edge and CO creator of the rainmaker system. An online marketing system that helps coaches, advisers and consultants get two to five times. Hi I'm sorry. Let me start that over again. Two to five high value leads per day from Lincoln without paying for ads. and His business partner have helped over a thousand businesses in seventeen countries grow exponentially. There's three step approach places human connection at its core paving the way for a new wave of lead generation marketing. Virtual. Edge is a multimillion dollar company and they have helped their clients grow to six and seven figures without paid advertising. Which I find fascinating, which is why wanted out to be here today. So thanks for joining me today, Matt. Thank you for having me on. I'm excited to be here. I am thrilled to have you here and I saw this subject is so fascinating for me because I. Feel like I. See a lot of people doing things incorrectly unlinked in and like especially now that we're in the situation where people can't be face to face. Right. So this you know human connection at its core, it is interesting for me but. I want to start with if you would define what Yael believe is a high value lead. Yeah, brilliant. I love that question because most people Wayne, they say leads and especially on. Lincoln. They talk about connections and they talk about how many potential people you're going to reach out to. But that's not really elite. That's just the beginning part of the process. So for me hide that you lead is somebody that has gone unchecked profile. That has been specifically targeted. You've had a conversation with them and you shared with them. What results you can help people like them achieve they say, yes they're interested in talking and you get an email address himself a number that's what I consider lead. And at somebody that is going to be that's lead first of all but a high value lead is someone that you're selling something to fall. You know at least three thousand dollars. Okay, that's interesting. Okay. So that's sort of the benchmark then. Yeah clean okay. Sell. It fit based on that it feels to me like knowing your ideal client is really really important. So you could differentiate between high value lead someone who just might be a good connection for you yes. So. Will you talk some about I? Mean I'm all about defining your ideal client, but for the listeners, will you talk about why that is so important? Hundred percent and you know like you said I mean it's one of the most important things that you can actually do right and. Getting clear on your ideal client will determine a couple of things if it's like, maybe I can take a step back. If you're trying to target everybody, it's very difficult to create a compelling message to get out into the marketplace. Because you don't know what they want and what they're trying to achieve. So if you get laser focused on an ideal client and instead of Trying to use a shotgun from you know five hundred yards are a thousand yards, use a sniper rifle and you're going off to that one ideal client. You can dive deep into are as a person. Instead of just thinking of them as. A prospect potential clients you dive into who they are as a person. When you do that, it allows you to understand who they are and what they need and what the core things are that they're really excited. And the things that are actually going to be excited about buying and spending money intended conversations, and once you do that, you can then just go and find more people like that. You, see for a lot of people that we work with you know they don't need to have forty fifty clients a month. In fact, most of the people in order to get to six and seven and eight figures, they need three to four clients a month. Right, so it's not like you need a ton of clients to be able to generate massive results. Okay. So I love this idea of getting stuck with they are as a person. And I feel like there's people listening who are thinking. Okay. But. If I'm selling like beat be like consultants that that deal with businesses. Does that still told trial. Absolutely one hundred percent because if you're a consultant and you know mean that's what I do and that's a part of our business and a lot of. The companies that we work with our consultants as well. So even then the most specific, you get around few years targeting and what sort of results you can help them achieve the easier it is to reach these guys. Now the mistake that most people make is they go in and they say their business consultant they'll say I help businesses grow right. Number One. What. Kind of businesses who you talking in the business? What are the big problems they have? What sort of growth can they achieve and what sort of timeframe?

Matt Kark Lincoln Consultant Yael Founder Partner Wayne
Essential Oils and Consciousness

The Essential Oil Revolution

07:27 min | 1 year ago

Essential Oils and Consciousness

"I'm here with Alan David Reed, and Tony Wolf, who are the CO creators of the TIN terrains model and authors of the book introducing the ten trains of consciousness understand yourself other people and our world after years of research, they're bringing their new model to the world to lead the way for a more harmonious future. Welcome to the show Alan and Tony how're. You doing today. Thanks Samantha. Really really well, thank you and you guys are coming in from Australia that scree and yeah. How are things in the COVID situation? They're they're doing well here where we're at, we're we're pretty fortunate to be having life fairly normal, but in other states south of us that were in lockdown and having quite a problem at the moment. To crazy time. Well, the last part of your by there seems like just such a beautiful, yet lofty goal to lead the way for more harmonious future a love this idea and I love just the idea of empowering people to have greater peace of mind about what's playing out in our crazy world today rate. So you can feel it everyone can kind of feel in the air there's this higher tension. There's this sort of importance kind of looming over all of us and it can be really overwhelming for some people. So I'm curious the work that you're doing now did it start can have recently in light of everything happening in twenty twenty or did it start? In. Now, just sort of coming to fruition or has been an ongoing research project for Tonya night for good eight years and for me for my life, as well as Tani's lies we've been preparing I guess individually for this, but we find it. This time now is perfect for bringing his workout. It seems like we were being prepared to to share this with the world. It's it's absolutely Spot on for what's happening to explain how people are reacting in light of the situation going on now with Cova de and How they can find A way through all of this. Get Out of the fear that's being you know brought around. Everybody lives at a different train of consciousness, which basically means that entire relationship to reality is different. It's almost like good think of as ten different operating systems will ten different paradigms and so depending on which terrain you're at. You're actually gonNA see what's happening in terms of the coronavirus very differently from how someone at a different terrain will see it, and so even though book came out five years ago when Pedalo people read it and been using it at this particular point in time suddenly there's a huge amount of need. For this kind of information mainly so that people can understand the people that they're living with why they reacting differently to this situation, but also so that we can understand ourselves on what's coming up for us. You know what's being triggered in us what what kind of things what kind of lessons way facing this pointing out journey right now because of the terrain where during this virus crisis, right? It is an interesting point you brought up about when you're living with someone year all sort of in the same household seen each other's. Reactions and maybe it's your boyfriend or your husband or your wife or your teenager all GonNa react to what's going on completely different ways and so you're saying that this is partly due to them being at different terrains is that right? Well yet I mean obviously, there's a lot of differences like personality type differences and differences in experience and maturity, and also people's childhood wounding playing out all that stuff that kind of stuff everybody already knows about people fairly familiar with, but there is actually a second thing going along as well which. Is Wisdom that in spiritual evolutionary journey where they're out in their actual evolutionary development and that is the terrain of consciousness that there and often people in the same family will be at the same terrain weren't being issued but sometimes been not sometimes the parents are at a different train than the children or to spouses of different terrain from each other, and that can be some really deep fundamental core differences in what they need to feel safe and how they're interacting with the situation the on not explainable by things like personality type. That much So there's ten terrains total. Can you give a I know we can't cover them all can you give a few examples or kind of a brief overview of some of them? Yeah. That's a great question man. I'm I'll just quickly run through the basics of a few of the main. You not made people at the trains at both ends of the spectrum as less people those drains for. Those. But I'll pick out of the five main ones that you likely to meet people. APP. So the festival talk about is the Wheelbase Terrain Pyramid of there's not that many people that terrain, but it's the terrain that's coming mushroom scarcity consciousness fear and the survival strategy here is to amass. Much. Power and wealth so that you can control other people and it's the terrain with quite a lot of domination over others at its core, and then the next terrain which vast majority of people are GonNa make a probably GonNa be at is the older base terrain square, and that's where people actually really feel that the common go to the majority is more important than their own self interests trying to fit into a civilized society being upstanding member of that society and contribute to society and the sense of safety comes from being part of a will ordered system and so how can. I contribute talking I follow the rules. How can I believe thirty? How can I make a difference as a citizen and then the next train after that the reflection based terrain diamond, he's essentially terrain where people pushing over that system. A little bit that they sense of identity comes from their own mind that their own choices like rather than going to do what my parents told me Authority figures tradition tells me I'm going to lose my own path and I'm going to be an original thinker. I'm GONNA make choices about my identity. So he we see a lot of innovation originality. People living their own lives and deciding who they are and a lot of what we're seeing in current Western culture is coming from this terrain of diamond because as a collective at in the west at the moment particularly in the United States the prevailing terrain is actually at diamond. And then the terrain to that the connection based terrain circle that's terrain where people have actually shifted from the head into the hot and from doing into being, and at this point in someone's journey, the very much connected to the web life connected to the Hawk connected to their feelings attention working more deeply with. Based natural bites price processes and everybody listening deeply to each each other from vulnerable place and is very much an emphasis on community in connection the terrain, and then the terrain opted that one cold, the coherence based terrain spiral, and you may have some of your listeners being this terrain. This is terrain why someone sense of self goes from beyond connection to the web of life to actually connection to the multidimensional cosmos. So these people might be woken all different levels of there being and they're always trying to come into full residents on a levels being mind body. Too Hot the high end knowing that possl all of that kind of stuff always listening for what resonates with me in a moment how can come fully into coherence and they're at a point in their journey where they deeply understand in a really embodied why they create their unreality. So they're always wanting from inside out and look at what's coming up in them in how it's creating the reality around. So that's kind of just like the five that will most likely to encounter. There are three that are more expanded than that, and there are a couple of less expanded. But each of the Toronto, really different way of relating to the world and a very different religious to things like house and hells practices

Wheelbase Terrain Pyramid Alan David Reed Tony Wolf Covid Samantha Australia Tani Toronto United States
Eugene Levy receives lifetime achievement award at Newport Film Festival

Donna and Steve

02:44 min | 1 year ago

Eugene Levy receives lifetime achievement award at Newport Film Festival

"The Newport Beach Film Festival obviously could not be held in public this year, so The event. Organizers instead decided to do something kind of fun, and they did this with the help of that broadcast on pop TV, and they surprised Eugene Levy. They want to give him the lifetime achievement award. And so they thought, we'll do it like kind of via video conference, and then they said, Well, we've got a surprise. We're not the only ones who wanted to congratulate you. But there are a couple other friends who also wanted to say a few words. And then it goes into this 10 minutes. Essentially, ah, tribute video to him from various people now, too, that you will hear from including cast members from Bleeps Creek there on this is well, but the two that you'll hear from our his longtime pals. Steve Martin and Martin Short, who pop up probably four different times. In this tribute video keeps bouncing back, which is really cool for the video. It's not like you hear four minutes from Martin Short. It's 10 seconds here. 15 here eight seconds with this guy 30 seconds with that girl, Here's Steve Martin and Martin Short toasting. Eugene Levy. But you know, Eugene, you're special because You. Our person, You know, I see people on the streets, sometimes in crowd sometimes alone. I think Eugene could be down the street. He is a person and I happen to know At the Newport Beach Film Festival wanted to give this to a person he was becoming this absolute living legend. Eugene. I was telling everyone how you become a legend. It's just that it's his son, Isaac Daniel Daniel Levy, his son, a fellow co star and co creator of Bleeps Creek, hey is featured throughout Angela Harris, his former co star from SC TV. He Barton, short, Angela Martin and a few others, John Candy, I believe for a time. Over an SC TV. This Canadian improv sketch comedy group and television show Catherine O'Hara was Catherine O'Hara. Yes, yes, And, of course she opposite. She's upset him in Bleeps Creek as well, but it's really It's just sweet and it's fun. And so many people just talk about his kindness. In Ah, how sweet of a guy he is and how much of a professional he waas on set there and just really took the acting and I I think he said, Look, we don't want to play this for laughs, Bleeps Creek. He was like we'll play it as it's written, and he knew that it would result in laughs, but he didn't want extra Ham up everybody's lines all the time to try to hit you over the head with it. Chris Elliott, his Bleeps Creek Co star appears with the longest thickest white beard. You've ever seen. It puts David Letterman's to shame. It's really something.

Bleeps Creek Eugene Levy Martin Short Bleeps Creek Co Steve Martin Newport Beach Film Festival Catherine O'hara Eugene Isaac Daniel Daniel Levy Lifetime Achievement Award John Candy Angela Martin David Letterman Chris Elliott He Barton Angela Harris
The Series S may be a cheaper less powerful next-gen Xbox and Injustice 3 may be in development

Gaming Ride Home

05:46 min | 1 year ago

The Series S may be a cheaper less powerful next-gen Xbox and Injustice 3 may be in development

"A different next Gen xbox called the xbox series s has potentially been confirmed. Thanks to labelling on a controller. Microsoft has been teasing the existence of multiple next Gen X. boxes basically since the very first time they teased plans for next. Gen. Xbox they pointedly used the term consoles Klerl the first time they even mentioned Nexgen, and then when the xbox series x was officially announced, it was called the series x, which obviously implies that it is one of many but. Those teases there hasn't been much official word on what additional buying options will be available for the next generation of xbox but. Recently, we learned about something called the xbox series s from an unlikely source, the fine print on the packaging of an xbox one controller. Tom Warren reported on the xbox says asked for the verge and wrote the verge has obtained photos of Microsoft's new next Gen xbox controller in white complete with packaging that mentions the xbox series S. Twitter User Zach S was able to purchase the controller today and we've confirmed it is genuine. The new controller was sold on a resale site today, and the side of the packaging notes that the controller works with both xbox series x and xbox series s consoles Microsoft has not officially unveiled an xbox series s yet nor has the company even confirmed a white xbox series x controller a mysterious white xbox series x controller also appeared online last month complete with the new D pad texture triggers and new share button. This new league matches the previous. Controller League and retail packaging suggests that these could be appearing in stores. Soon, the XBOX series s will likely be Microsoft's second cheaper next Gen. xbox that's been code-named Lockhart a Microsoft document leaked back in. June. Shed some further light on the company's plans for to next Gen consoles. Microsoft's xbox series x Deaf Kit. code-named Dante allows game developers to enable a special lockhart mode that has a profile of the performance that Microsoft wants to hit with this second console. Then story is linked in the show notes. The rumors related to Lockhart which I think we are safe to rename the xbox series s at this point is that it is not as powerful as the xbox series x so it's probably going to be cheaper and it will probably focus on streaming using exe cloud. That's my assumption. Anyway I guess console manufacturers are now renewed value in multiple consoles skews working at game stop during the playstation three and xbox three sixty era I feel like people are generally just confused about the different buying options when it came to those consoles so. Then the playstation four and xbox one at launch. Basically each had one skew I. AM curious to see how people will react to the different playstation fives and different xbox series. Maybe, it won't confuse consumers at all especially since most purchasing as don online these days and it's just easier to do research in general or maybe it will create confusion again I don't know I. Guess we will find out at some point later this year you know it would really be nice to start saying an actual date soon I hope we learn about that. Injustice three may be on the way according to artist boss logic. This is firmly a rumor and far from a confirmation but artist boss logic who works in video games a lot. An recently did a live drawing the assassin's creed Valhalla cover art as a means of officially announcing the game for Yourself Sheridan image that just had the word injustice three stylized where the e at the end of justice is the number three and the dot on the second I was stylized to be Dr Manhattan symbol from watchmen, and it is all placed in front of a clock implying the potential game could feature watchmen characters. There's even the familiar watchmen smiley face floating around in the clock parts. Boss logic tagged Ed Boon in the tweet who is credited as the director of injustice to and is perhaps better known as one of the CO creators of mortal combat. It's really not clear what this is. Boss logic could have just mocked something up for fun as injustice fan he could just be sharing found image online and tagging ed boom to see what kind of reaction it creates or it could be totally legitimate. And tore you know maybe boss logic forgot how email works and. tweeted his to Ed Boon instead of sending it to him directly. It feels a little early to be talking about injustice three especially considering more combat eleven just came out last year and it's big DLC. Expansion was pretty recent to just a few months ago developer Nether Realm is a big team though capable of working on multiple projects at once. So it's not outside the realm of possibility that they would be ready to announce a new injustice game soon. It could be fully announced at the upcoming. DC. Fan Dome Event with maybe a plant twenty, twenty, one release that that would make sense.

Microsoft Lockhart Controller League Ed Boon Nexgen GEN Tom Warren Twitter DC Official Developer Zach S Dr Manhattan Director
With 'Star Trek: Lower Decks,' A Venerable Franchise Loosens Up

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

With 'Star Trek: Lower Decks,' A Venerable Franchise Loosens Up

"Today. As we hear from Tommy J. Powers, Star Trek fans are getting a new 10 episode. Siri's and this one's animated, Stardate 57436.2 1st Contact is a delicate, high stakes operation of diplomacy won must be ready for anything. Robert tends to do it. Captain's log. It's called Star Trick Lower Dicks with new episodes available weekly. The show was developed by Mike McMahon, co creator of Rick and Morty and focuses on the support crew on board A Starfleet starship. Stars lending their voices include Jack Quaid, Don Luis and Jerry O'Connell. Star Trek lower decks, a streaming now on CBS. All Access Sandiego

Siri Tommy J. Powers Jack Quaid Mike Mcmahon Jerry O'connell Don Luis CBS Morty Robert Rick
'The Wonder Years' is getting a reboot with a Black family

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

'The Wonder Years' is getting a reboot with a Black family

"Beloved TV classic is getting a reboot. Baby sees Christopher Watson with more on that What worked for 27 years after it aired its last episode, The Wonder Years, is returning to ABC. Like the original. The Reboot will be set in the 19 sixties. Except rather than following a white family in the suburbs. It'll follow a black middle class family in Montgomery, Alabama. During that turbulent time in America Empire Co creator Lee Daniels has the development reigns with Original Wonder Years star Fred Savage Go executive producing. Look for it late next year or early 2022.

Christopher Watson Fred Savage Lee Daniels America Empire Co ABC Montgomery Alabama Executive
Carmen Rita Wong, author, host, and financial expert

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:05 min | 1 year ago

Carmen Rita Wong, author, host, and financial expert

"Hey everyone. The show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches, the skin is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today we are very excited. Carmen reader Wong joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of Malakand productions. She's also an author and the former host and Co creator of on the money on CNBC she spent years as a personal finance expert for NBC CBS. And CNN and she's written for publications including Glamour. Latina essence and good housekeeping, and in a very big full circle moment she was also carly's boss. At one point Carmen, we are very excited to talk to you. Welcome your skin from the couch, also good to be with you guys. This is very full circle for me. My very first job right out of college was as a production assistant at CNBC for new show called on the money, and I was there for about two weeks when I think somebody jobs one day, somebody came to me in. They're like you actually your job titles changing. Carmen's personal assistant. Good luck. To check. Back and like go theater sheets, anything for lunch very quickly currently under her wing, and it's amazing that we are still in touch today. I'm so excited to have you here. I'm so excited to be here. Those were the days right. Oh my gosh of you sitting just off the camera when we're on the set. general. I still high. You take all your your hamburger, your water your coffee. I got down hot and it's. Certainly was not divis- at all because it was one of those things where I was working as we'll talk. I'm like jumping ahead like twenty. Our date I mean nonstop seven days a week so carleen literally keeping me alive. We're GONNA get into all of this, but I will say you are one of the hardest working people I have ever known so I. Am very excited to share your story, so we're going to start with the question. We like to ask everybody. Which is Skim your resume? Gone how about this I don't have a resume. Here really I mean not that I don't think I have one. State, but like you've had one at different times you. Working for myself fifteen year whatever many years it was, so I haven't had to pull one together in more than a decade. You become a bio Danielle you did. You did a great introduction in so many things I've been a magazine editor, a TV host and writer and producer and a faculty professor author I'm Working Fifth Book. I'm an investor in women led companies, and I am a board member for some big nonprofits, which I love that work to so all of it. What something that isn't in the bio and we can't Google about you that people should know oh girl. You think I'm GonNa tell you that. Google. Wade Carly anything you know you did not read I think one thing that people like maybe John. Know about us like you're I, mean. Maybe they're hearing now, but you are very funny like you're very good sense of humor, and you're very good under pressure. Thank you yeah I'm freaking rock under pressure, but that doesn't mean I mean. You may not see what's happening inside, but yeah, I'm a goofball can't google at I mean there's some pretty funny pictures of me. Still shots that people take if you google made them. That's the one thing that going forward. It'd be nice to show people more, but as people who do know me like. Carly knows me off camera. Yeah, I'm a goofball. You are all right. We're GONNA get into this. This which if we talk about people's Childhood in? Toss how you grew up, but I think you are very. Guests were like your childhood is really really important to get into and kind of the family dynamic. You grew up with and how that folded over time and you're somebody who learned a lot about your family. As you got older, so I want to let you can share your story. I will just start off by saying you were born in New, York and then West. Those uptown Manhattan. I was I, actually did a story on the moth. Right, which is on the podcast as well a bit about what you alluded to there about finding out only last year that I have no idea who my father is, so that's a whole thing, but I grew up with two fathers. Up with the father named after hoppy Wong, and then I grew up with my stepfather, had a very very strong mother Dominican mother, who emigrated when she was fifteen, and we lived in Uptown Manhattan, and my brother, and my older brother, and I were the walls, but she eventually divorced, and we moved to New Hampshire. And that was a real shock for us a very big culture shock

Founder And Ceo Carmen Google Wade Carly Cnbc Wong CNN Manhattan Malakand Productions NBC Production Assistant York New Hampshire Personal Assistant Danielle CBS Editor John Writer
Tina Fey requests "30 Rock" episodes with blackface be removed

Vicki McKenna

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Tina Fey requests "30 Rock" episodes with blackface be removed

"Tina fey revealing that the blackface episodes in thirty rock have been pulled from air NBC for the total of four episodes of the sitcom from streaming and syndication at the request of co creators Faye and Robert Carlock they issuing a statement apologizing for any pain the episodes have

Tina Fey NBC Faye Robert Carlock
Tina Fey requests "30 Rock" episodes with blackface be removed

Mark Mason

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Tina Fey requests "30 Rock" episodes with blackface be removed

"Tina fey revealing that the blackface episodes and thirty rock have been pulled from air NBC for the total of four episodes of the sitcom from streaming and syndication at the request of co creators Faye and Robert Carlock they issuing a statement apologizing for any pain the episodes have

Tina Fey NBC Faye Robert Carlock
'Friends' co-creator Marta Kauffman says she hasn't done enough for diversity

The KFBK Morning News

00:11 sec | 1 year ago

'Friends' co-creator Marta Kauffman says she hasn't done enough for diversity

"The co creator of friends marta Kauffman got emotional she says she regrets the lack of diversity in the show quote I wish I knew then what I know today sixty three years old Kaufman said that during an

Kaufman Marta Kauffman
"co creator" Discussed on Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina

08:47 min | 1 year ago

"co creator" Discussed on Latina to Latina

"Linda Chavez was hustling hard creating digital content and deeply secretly wanting to write for television and film which is funny because she went to film school she was ready to give up on that dream which was offered the chance to co write a digital series that show hint the fide. Got So much buzz. That she and her co-creator Marvin Lima's reworked for TV and sold it to. Netflix focuses on three cousins. Who Work together to keep their grandfather's boyle heights Taco shop afloat. It is heartbreaking and hilarious and like Linda so smart engaging that you'll want to watch it all in one sitting Linda this is our first interview during a pandemic. So thank you for being willing to do this remotely. This is a little strange for us so I appreciate you being willing to give it a whirl absolutely I mean like you know we have to keep going even in the midst of this. I've definitely done multiple interviews. During this Megan's it's been a very been really interesting to hop on. You know the first question everyone wants to ask is like hey you doing okay are you doing holding of. Yeah I am. I think those first few weeks where a little tough rally for all of us to kind of comprehend and wrap our head around what's happening it's A. It's a new normal that we're all adjusting to how about you. How are you doing I? I'm isolated with kids which is like a whole different thing and it gave me time to watch had defied which I loved a truly loved. Let's start at the beginning of defied. Marvin the show's creator pitches the idea to macro just this big production company. They like it. They tell him he needs to find someone to Co. Write it he finds you through the film independent where you had just finished a fellowship when the head the fellowship approached you with the opportunity. What was your reaction was a first time like pitch that he brought them. He had a small deck that he had presented to them and they were like awesome. Like your background's more in directing. Can you bring someone onto to co write with you and develop this and essentially created with you and I you know when he brought it to me? My first reaction was I. Yeah please I have been trying to tell the stories for so long enough finding a place for those stories that have been wanting to do it so desperately and I was ready to do something more meaningful on deep burns something that was true storytelling and I liked his vision for like what he wanted to be was like listen. I I want you here because the voice thing that I read the sample I had sent him like. That's the voice. I won't for this project. I wanted to feel like that. I wanted to work together to bring what we both have to this. Whatever I have whatever throw that out like we need to tell the best story possible and let's be artists and I hadn't had the freedom to be just an artist in years because I had been chasing numbers on the digital platforms. I was working with and also just like you know the gender vacation hit the vacation of it. All from me was like so true. My life in that moment like being a young professional having all my friends all of us are our children of immigrants. We all are first Gen. All a lot of our parents came here. Undocumented like we had grown up with that American dream being seated in a so strongly and so we were coming into the upward mobility but then finding ourselves wondering as we moved into neighborhoods where we felt most comfortable. I felt like home like I lived like in. West Adams is community in La That's predominantly Central American and Caribbean. And it was. It's pupil color and I felt comfortable there when I was going to Grad School. This is where I want to live. But How am I contributing to the vacation? Even though I'm a person of color does it. Does that include me? Am I also part of the problem and other questions those asking myself when he brought that to me so when he brought it? I was like ready to get into all of that. You and he did a lot of what you call trauma bonding what did that. Yeah Trauma Bond. Always say that a lot. He always says he's like I don't like to work so at the beginning of every session it was like let's do some cheese for like twenty minutes and I you know I will force myself to where like let's do some cheese like all right like because ultimately. I don't really want to work like I WANNA get into it so we would you know we do our cheese and a Lotta Times. I was therapy sessions for both of us. We're both very willing to be vulnerable. And I have a long history of doing therapy so I was very ready to do it. And talk and talk about our lives and in that process we got to the core of a lot of the themes and issues we want to explore with the series digital series that we then carried into the into the TV series when we created that but those court Dana started in that first coffee shop on first street in Boyle Heights coping with us. That's not there anymore. Because of gentrification it's all came from a lot of the things that we were experiencing a lot of the the issues that we had been confronting us I mean kids as like and professionals of children of immigrants everything that we were experiencing. We felt we want to the page and also just relationships like our relationships with our fathers or mothers or siblings. The way that love is it happens in our communities the way that that our mothers who work in factories are portrayed like all those things were things that we had never really seen the way that we've really experienced them and so we were so adamant about putting that complexity onto the page complexity. That I think a lot of people like about the series in drawn to that you laugh and then you get hit with this like Oh shit this is reality and this real and for us that that tone is is our lives and the lives of our communities like we're we're always faced with a lot of difficult structural institutional `ISMs right that are always obstacles. That were up against but at the end of the day. We got survive. We gotta laugh like this pandemic Raina like we're we're very well equipped for it because we grew up with like trauma after trauma after trauma and like learning how to cope with it and learning how to roll with the punches in a lot of times that included comedy. You know cracking jokes and Marvin always says isn't it? Grew with it like you know. We both work around like a ton of Comedians with the findings people. We know our own families like our own Mazar on cousins siblings. Who LIKE CRACK JOKES? Like you're just stop roasting me. You know all of that. It's coping mechanisms in anything. That was the tone that we were trying to capture the series as well where it's like yes. Life is hard but are we're not all these like really sad sepia toned like you know sad. Immigrants Rolling through the dirt roads in a desert in Mexico. Like where there's a complexity to who we are and that's why we try to achieve with the series at the point at which you to partnered up and this opportunity came your way you. It seems we're at a crossroads where you're sort of getting towards the end of your rope in terms of pursuing this specific dream. Yeah Dan you do your research on the Google's Um my history is long before that I went to film school went to USC for Grad School. I had been writing for many years and trying to tell these stories for a long time and I felt like every time I try to find a way to tell these types of stories. Things didn't really pan out there. Though with it. I had wanted to take me back one. Step the what happened between graduating from film school and like why not go directly into film. What led you into then pursuing all of these digital opportunities while the the steps gets his actually many years of work. I worked in different areas. I worked I dish short films as a director. I worked on documentary. I worked for these Emmy Award winning documentary filmmakers with them Got US on Rub. Who taught me so much about producing Inspiration for about that. He's Be that he's his character comes from the film called made in La which was about garment workers in Los Angeles. I'll be honest. Like writing is what I knew I wanted to do. I inform us in. It's the one thing that kept avoiding because I kept doing all the other in this is something I tell people like. If you find yourself in industry doing all the jobs around the job you really WanNa do like check in on that because that means something. It means like you're avoiding. There's some sort of fear around you not doing nothing you really WanNa do. What was the year for me? Not being good enough now being able to achieve The dream of nothing that I was good enough writer that I could do a revision. That could get it done that. It could deliver like all these.

Linda Chavez Marvin Lima Boyle Heights La That Grad School Netflix Los Angeles co-creator Megan Taco shop Emmy Award Co West Adams writer Mazar Mexico Dana Google director
"co creator" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

11:27 min | 1 year ago

"co creator" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Just like a real broad group of people from the place where you live and they're all pretty committed and hard-working incompetent and you're like this is a great place. I live in people have much more complicated feelings. Like there's this. There is a pretty simple story that you can say we're telling a story about government and how the people there are decent and certainly there are people who hate government and you had you know Ron Swanson on the show who who hated government. Despite working in aren't because he he worked in it because he hated it was the at least the original India but people have much more complicated feelings about officers And I wonder if that was something that you were thinking about right from the start or whether it was something that you sort of realized in the in the course of making the show. It's something we really realized in the course of making the show I think the black lives matter movement Obviously these problems have been around forever but the sort of national prominence and and place in the headlines really started around our season three or four two or three and so. It wasn't really a thing that we were thinking about. I mean we were thinking about aspects of the police and the way in which they deal with the public and we wanted to make we never wanted to glorify police violence in any way or make them bad. Cops was really important to us that they were good. Cops was important to us that they followed the rules. But we're smart and some of that was also Andy's really dufy and so we wanted to make sure we thought he was only believable as a cop if we made him a good cop if he's like bad as a cop and also a total do feel like there's no reality to this and in some ways of the show you know you're as much in dialogue with a history of police television shows as you are in dialogue with actual police officers right as as the show presented itself it at the very beginning right right and then so the other thing that happened was I think from the very beginning unintentionally we kind of created a group that models and also halt so halt as the dad was a tough kind of dad and he wanted he wanted them to be the best precinct in history because this was his shot so right away the directive from the top was. I want the best cops. They're want the best precinct ever and the director from the bottom from from Jake was I want to be the best cop effort so you know and their and their conflict was over method but never about an illegal methods and you know I actually ended up being one of the things I think people really like about the show because ultimately obviously it meant that everyone became what was on the same page but as writers. It was very difficult because very quickly. What's the conflict between person who wants their squad to be great and a squad that wants to be great and then you have to find sort of interpersonal conflicts and or circumstantial conflicts to to help Create stories so. We were really modeling. I think in some ways unintentionally. What good cops should be like. But then always showing. In our first seasons we often had them deal with bad cops or dirty cops and have to make moral decisions. I think our second episode was called the Tagger and in it and a deputy commissioner is asking for special privilege special favors for his son. Who IS Spray Painting penises on police cars and hold stands up to him and says we were not going to do the wrong thing. So it's a thing we were aware of on some level and we're we're trying to navigate on some level and then once it really came to prominence and was something we were reading about and carrying about a lot we really became committed to doing an episode that dealt with it head on and it just took us a while to figure out how to do that episode how to do that episode in a way that was meaningful but also still funny still felt like Brooklyn nine nine and then ultimately that led to the episode where Terry is racially profiled. Terry while wearing civilian clothing is racially profiled by NYPD. Officer were. You scared to do something like did you have ever have the The feeling like I don't want to do after school. Tell A- like after school or just like the. Let's just make this a world where only goofy things happen? Yeah Yeah but we begin to feel like it's going to seem like our heads are in the sand and one could certainly look at the fact that we don hundred forty three episodes and there are plenty of episodes where only goofy things happen. So maybe maybe our heads are partially in the sand still but it was a story we really wanted to tell and we felt like we couldn't avoid telling it we had to figure out how and once we figured it out. We were really happy with the outcome. How do you Check in that when you are writing storylines about such a diverse group of characters and You yourself are like a classic caricature of a guy who would be the boss of a Sitcom In a straight a straight white guy who went to Harvard and like got a job of college with his Improv Buddy. Yeah I thought you were going to say Stunningly handsome. Oh yeah most. Most television writers are known for their good luck. First and foremost I live in a bubble. How do you check in that when you have for example you know? Stephanie? Beatrice his character. coming out is by and she herself has. Bhai or Andre Brower. A big part of his character from the beginning has been His husband and the you know around the edges of his experience as a police officer and in wanting to be a good police officer has always been because he was the victim of discrimination within the Police Department for both race and orientation reasons how do you keep that ship on track in a way. That is both kind of like sees people for who they are and is not patronizing. I think the there are several things I think one Really striving towards having a lot of diversity on the staff in the crew is very helpful and being open to everyone's opinions and ideas and viewpoint and then to Really being in communication with the actors themselves so for Rosa Coming Out. I mean Stephanie. Herself was so integral to helping US break that story and talking about what she felt was really important for that character to say she wanted the character to say. I'm bisexual and to use those words because that's the thing that a character a main character on TV show who gets to live has almost never said before and she knew that and it was important to her that those words were said and similarly when we broke the story about Terry being racially profiled. We spend a lot of time talking to Terry about his own experiences with that. And then the thing that actually broke. That story open was a conversation with Andre. He said every time we've portrayed Captain Holt having to deal with racism or homophobia. He's taken it and he's taken it for a reason and the reason he's taken it is that he believes he will be more effective if he can make systemic change the way for him to make systemic change is to is to climb up the ranks and then eventually be commissioner makes his stomach change so we had this argument. And it's an argument. It's a legitimate argument on both sides and we have this. Argument between Holt and Terry is the only time we've really ever done this in an episode there sitting in two chairs opposite of each other having an argument over the course of entire act. Terry basically says I hear you but I think it's es. I'm going to hand in the complaint Consequences be damned and then at the end. Because I think the thing that we've really learned when we do. These episodes is not to sugarcoat. Anything at the end terriers made the report. The guy has been demoted but Terry was up for a promotion of his own and he doesn't get it and he says to halt. Do you think it's because I handed in that complaint and hold says I don't know maybe probably but I'm proud you did it and you see that the world isn't it's not all roses and UNICORNS and Candy Canes and I that there are consequences crappy consequences sometimes but they have each other's back. Well Dan. I'm so grateful you took this time to talk about Your Life in Brooklyn nine nine. I love the show so much like that. Show happy really really. Do Watch every episode. I'm really grateful you came in. I'm so flattered that you asked me and thank you so much I love your show. And this has been a blast. Dan Gore Brooklyn nine nine airs. Thursday nights on NBC. You can stream all seven seasons including the new episodes right now on Hulu. That's the end of another episode of Bullseye. Bullseye is currently produced out of the homes of me and the staff of maximum fund in and around Los Angeles California. Now normally we would give you an update on what's happening outside our office in Macarthur Park but instead Here at my house. My wife overheard this exchange between my six year old son and eight year old daughter after my daughter noticed that there was some whipped cream in the fridge. She said to him. Hey I noticed. We have a little something. That goes on top of hot cocoa in a blue spray bottle in the fridge. Son Oscar said Gatorade shows produced by speaking into microphones. Our producer is Kevin Ferguson. Hey Soussan Brosio is our associate producer. We get help from Casey O'Brien production fellows Jordan. Cowling are interstitial. Music is by Dan. Wally also known as Dj w our theme song is by the go team. Thanks TO THEM AND THEIR LABEL MEMPHIS industries for letting US use it and we have decades of interviews in the can if your home and board or doing important work and WanNa less important distraction. Check out our back catalog like if you like Brooklyn nine nine. We had on Stephanie Batteries. Who Plays Rosa di as she was absolutely wonderful. She's a actress and I really cool funny lady who actually was the inspiration for her character being by because she herself is Bisexual and we also had terry crews perhaps the most magnetic human being on earth Certainly one of the top ten most defined sets of pectoral muscles on earth. He talked about all kinds of things including but not limited to his love of mini vans. Frying those on our website the Bullseye page at maximum fund dot Org. We're also on facebook twitter and Youtube search for Bullseye. With Jesse Thorn you can keep up with the show there and I think that's about it. Just remember all great. Radio hosts have signature. Sign off Bullseye. With Jesse Thorn is a production of maximum fun dot org and distributed by NPR..

Terry Brooklyn Dan Gore Officer Rosa di US Jesse Thorn Andre Brower India Ron Swanson Bullseye Stephanie Police Department deputy commissioner Captain Holt Stephanie Batteries officer NYPD Andy
"co creator" Discussed on Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"co creator" Discussed on Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

"You have to choose the feelings. You want to experience Vince and recognize that. What you take ownership of is your choice. I have this practice these days anytime before. I sleep leap. I closed my eyes and feel my body now just by closing race and feeling your body you get rid of all visual experience. The only knowledge you have of your body then the sensations and the healthier you are the furor sensations. You'll feel you just see. Feel nothing with a few islands and and of sensation. That's existence for you right now with your eyes close existences sensations period and the fear of fewer. You have the more close. You're getting in touch with your body as a place of perfect harmony. Perfect peace and perfect order so order and disorder go together. Ask US have do. I see my own uniqueness. You might have the same awareness and as being but you have your your own unique experiences and how you have interpreted them just like nobody else has the same fingerprint or the same. I prayed or the same tone of voice or the same exact facial expression or the face although we could see archetypal bygones and faces. Your soul is totally unique. There's no one else in the entire universe that's been exactly like you in the entire history of the universe this. There's no one else like you are now and there will be doing else like you are forever. So ask yourself. How do I really feel am identifying. Define these transient ephemeral. EVANESCENT ungraceful uncatchable experience. That come and go in the twinkling double and I or am I in touch with the source of all experience. It's not what you know. It's not what the expense it's what is the source of knowing an experience. That's where we WANNA go in this book of secrets and find the Oscars of am I seeing. Would I really want to see. And if not why not gonNA choose to see. Something has now now. We can take this further and we'll do it in our next. I stalled bent of the book of favorites. Join me tomorrow for Friday Meditation..

US Vince
"co creator" Discussed on Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"co creator" Discussed on Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

"Welcome to today's daily breath as we continue our journey to the book of secrets. The book of secrets as APP said his nothing but higher own truce Assaf beyond the ego beyond the mind beyond the secret passages in the dark alleys and the ghost attics of your mind. It is something very mysterious. and that is you orchestrating and go creating the universe so start to you begin to see yourself as a co creator in everything that happens to you now. Of course this takes time in prayer in the course the miracles. I don't know how many of you familiar with the course Americans but this is one of my favorite press that I used to read to my children when they were going growing up and it goes somewhat like this. I'm responsible for what I see. I choose the feelings I experience and everything that seems to happen to me. I ask for and receive as I have ost now. Some people get very enraged when they hear this prayer. I am responsible award. I see I choose the feelings experience but he has the third part everything that seems to happen to me. I ask for and receive as hi of US did is for cancer. Did us as I must ask for this disease and once again the key here is everything anything that seems to happen to me. Not Everything that happens to me seems to happen to me is a very important part of that praise. I am responsible for what I see. We already said we construct visual expense. I choose the feelings feelings. I experienced right now. Think of someone you love and see what you feel now think of someone who irritates you and see how you feel choosing feelings right now in our choose to have. Resentment chose to have grievances. Choose to be grateful. Choose to love. Choose to have compassion so we choose the feelings and everything that seems to happen to me because nothing happens to awareness. Awareness can never suffer. Awareness is not personal only experiences Bush and experience becomes personnel will be take ownership of the experience but in the deeper reality. Don't own anything you don't own your body. Your body's recycle items originally star stuff tough but recycling with everything on this planet your breath the air your circulation. The rivers and waters stardust. Stardust is the items in your body. What do you call it. Your body is just recycled stuff. Your thoughts how many regional tossed you have. Every thought is recycling through these days through twitter through facebook through instagram through media And so on in fact. The only what's that. Our original are totally disruptive like the theory of relativity or quantum mechanics of Beethoven's fifth original novel because they're disruptive most of your thoughts are recycled. Everybody else's thoughts your body's recycled everybody. Dell's his body. It's not a thing. It's a process in you today. Let's go a little deeper. Are you seeing order or are are you seeing disorder in the world. Some people see chaos but remember niches said if you have chaos within new you'll give birth to a dancing dancing star people who don't see disorder also don't see creativity or order the two go together. Do I see my own uniqueness. You're the same awareness. Everyone else in the world because awareness cannot be divided on multiplied the same awareness. This exists in you as in a tree as an appliance as in any sentient being but the experience is different. The mind is different sprint. The perception is different but they weren't necessarily awareness cannot suffer..

"co creator" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"co creator" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"The before we dive in. I have a quick request were eager to know more about our audience so we created a short listener survey to help us learn more about Kaplan my favorite sister and co-creator Talk to you tomorrow

co-creator
"co creator" Discussed on What If World

What If World

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"co creator" Discussed on What If World

"O'Keefe my co-creator Greg Martinson for our theme song grammy-winning Musical Artists Secret Agent twenty-three Skidoo for coming on our show and all you kids at home who try to have full active days so you can get a good night's sleep and maybe some adventurous dreams secret agent twenty-three Skidoo gave us permission to play you out his song broken dreams. I hope you enjoy it until we meet again. Keep wondering <music> so we stopped it can seem much disappeared if you find bring them back here but and when I saw that commercial we specialize in Green Repairman nightmare reversal okay a copy down to address. Maybe my sadness I had but then vanished leaving an empty campus. I walked to do this out. They said Columbus Avenue Status was painted blue smelled like maybe open dreams like the next to me as going strong being forty three and more than a crocodile. It happened nightmares. Every night must be worse. Trust me underwear with my class for them. They call my number twenty three. I got eh talked on the.

Skidoo Greg Martinson co-creator O'Keefe
"co creator" Discussed on The Watch

The Watch

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"co creator" Discussed on The Watch

"All right. Now we're gonna talk to damper all Dan Luganda Antonia send a the shore owners of American vandal season. Two is out on Friday and it's well worth your time. Let's check out this conversation with those guys. If you guys could just for the sake of the listeners because we've got four people here to say your names and what you do on the show, and we'll take it from there on twentieth Santa co-creator, and I direct all the episodes. I'm Dan Peralta another co-creator and Dan Lagaan on the Showrunner. I finished season two last night at it's again, completely delightful, and it is a testament to how much I like this show that I'm not a big shit. Joke guy like it's like acceptable, but like you guys definitely like start out without a safety net and the first episode and I even be my wife were sitting there watching just like, man. This is like, what's the is going to be about one hundred? How many times we're gonna have to see this like exact moment in the broom or whatever you guys decided what the inciting incident of season two is going to be. Was there any heat check moment where you really or we could do this, like, or what was this thing was about pushing it beyond dick drawings or. Was it about what was the idea behind the actual event that incites this whole season will that that visceral reaction you have when you're watching it with your wife is probably not too dissimilar to a visceral reaction. You have watching certain true crime documentaries where you see these brutal murders and blood all over the place in these like completely destroyed body's used to destroy by this. This really gives you like that and like to us, the funniest version of that fascinating, horrific scene is high school hallways covered in poop. Yeah, so made us laugh, but that wasn't lost on us that people might like want to look away right green and there was something deeply hilarious about that to me and we didn't hold back in production. Like if anything we we had to pull back in post because we had shit like almost like there's like a waterfall against the wall of shit coming down. And there were so many should gags that would take up minutes of time in the deleted scenes sort of thing on the DVD which will probably never happen, but there was there was we, we pulled back a bit and even so it's still getting this reaction from people which is great. And also all the people that asked if we were going to go vaginas in season two decks, we threw them a curve ball. That's right. That's right. But that's the thing that's so funny about the like, what you guys pull off with this show is that it's this incredibly heartfelt incredibly humanistic show. That's essentially about this disastrous prank that involves into actually like a felony. You know what I mean? By the end of it, you can tell it's that we will have to get to specific and despoilers. I don't wanna do who did what on it, but I wanna talk a little bit about how you guys balance scowl humor, usual highschool, bullshit humor. And then also like having this incredibly warm center of the show, dislike heart to it. Think it's fun in the writer's room, talking about our high school experiences and different people, we know, and, oh, you had that person your high school. I had that same exact person in my high school and that being a lot of the conversations in the room that always like helps bring levity and make it. I think personal to two high schools. And then the second part of the equation is just being a student on all of these documentaries. And that's a medium that's I think, really involving like ten years ago, twenty years ago, documentaries where really niche thing where it was kind of pretentious. Now it's like everybody in the country is going home with the wife, and we're just gonna watch a documentary on Netflix is such a common broad thing and because of that documentaries or evolving getting really, really good..

co-creator Dan Luganda Antonia Dan Peralta Dan Lagaan Netflix Santa Showrunner writer twenty years ten years