35 Burst results for "Co-Chair"

Vax Live Concert Raises $302 Million, Exceeds Vaccine Goal

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 2 months ago

Vax Live Concert Raises $302 Million, Exceeds Vaccine Goal

"The backside fundraising concert advocating the importance of vaccine equity has pulled in three hundred and two million dollars exceeding its goal Jennifer Lopez was one of many that wowed the crowd of vaccinated frontline workers global citizen which put on the concert since bonds raised help appear more than twenty six million doses prince Harry and wife Megan were co chairs the pregnant royal taped her message if we work together to bring vaccines to every country and continent insists that vaccines are equitably distributed and fairly priced and ensure that governments around the world are donating their additional vaccines to countries in need then we can begin to fully rebuild we must tackle each of these issues head on Boxing accuracy and misinformation how to faxing distribution moved off as quickly as misinformation just imagine how many lives could be saved the prince appearing in person and thanking the frontline workers I'm Julie Walker

Jennifer Lopez Prince Harry Megan Boxing Julie Walker
Private Undisclosed Emails Leaked From the Mueller Investigation

The Daily Beans

01:56 min | 2 months ago

Private Undisclosed Emails Leaked From the Mueller Investigation

"Got another three hundred pages or so of underlying mueller investigation emails and texts and memos and in them we learned that don jr. vodka and kushner way more involved in russia talks than previously known at least to the public. I mean we knew Ivanka reportedly informed a co co-chair of her father campaign that her brother don jr. could make recommendations for military advisers while kushner offered details about his private meetings with henry kissinger We also learned that in january. Twenty seventeen manafort. Send an email to katy mcfarland. That's flynn's number two Saying i have some important information. I wanna share with you that i picked up my travels over the last month. Well she manafort was already you know knee deep in shit by this point she immediately fired off an email to flint. Saying hey given all. That's going on. Meet with them. And flynn said i would not be with him until we're in the hot seats unknown who he is working for and perception would not be good especially now they even knew it. They even knew it the record show. Flynn soliciting trump strategist bannon as far back as september twenty fifteen before bannon officially joined the campaign steve. He wrote just reaching back out. Let me know if mr trump needs any help with national security intel an intel community issues of foreign policy. So that's i think flynn's i reach out that december. He wrote corey lewandowski. And said i wanted to send this to you this past week but had forgotten shared a link to an article from russia state run sputnik news quoted. Flynn saying the. Us must work with russia and arab countries to defeat isis. He said this is an f. y. But something trump should at least be aware of. I have been very outspoken. On the issue at this point in the conflict with our current administration has run out of good options. also i met with president putin last thursday in moscow. We actually sat at dinner together. Merry christmas

Don Jr Manafort Kushner Flynn Katy Mcfarland Ivanka Bannon Mueller Russia Henry Kissinger Vodka Mr Trump Corey Lewandowski Flint Intel Steve President Putin United States Moscow
Facebook's Oversight Board Orders Review of Trump Ban

WSJ What's News

01:10 min | 3 months ago

Facebook's Oversight Board Orders Review of Trump Ban

"Facebook's independent oversight board has ruled that the company was justified in banning then president donald trump for his part in the january sixth riots on capitol hill but the board criticized facebook over how would enforce its rules for example in keeping trump off its platform indefinitely with no criteria for when or if his account would be restored. Here's oversight board. Co-chair michael mcconnell we're not cops ranging over the realm of social media and solving the world's ills. Our sole job is to hold this extremely powerful corporation facebook accountable for making clear consistent and transparent decisions showing neither fear or favor toward persons of political influence. The board is holding today. That facebook's treatment of mr trump's future posting privileges did not meet these standards and cannot continue without a sober and comprehensive review applying the same rules to mr trump neither better nor worse as applied everyone else. We are giving facebook six months to conduct. This review

Facebook Michael Mcconnell Donald Trump Capitol Hill Mr Trump
Professor Tom Eisman: The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now

The Small Business Radio Show

02:11 min | 4 months ago

Professor Tom Eisman: The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now

"One of the eternal questions in entrepreneurship is why do so many startups fail here with some answers. Is tom eisman. Who's the howard h stevenson professor of business administration the harvard business school and faculty co chair of the arthur rock center for entrepreneurship thomas. Authored more than one hundred s case studies and his writing has appeared in the wall street journal. Harvard business review in forbes. He's the author of a new book called. Why startups failed tom. Welcome to the show area. Thanks for having me well. How have you been surviving through the pandemic. just great it's A great time to write a book and it turns out. I know i'm ready to yeah plenty of quiet time. So why do startups fail. That's the first question we gotta start with sure Startups fail because they run out of money and they can't raise more Which i guess isn't very helpful. It's like the coroner saying This this person died from loss of blood and so it is because i always say that every business fails because they run out of money and i think that's important because so many entrepreneurs don't value cash flow. They keep looking at sales. So i think it is instructive especially protect startups. Where where there's a tolerance for For losing money under the expectation that if you can big enough you're to make some money but but boy If you get in trouble along the way and you can't raise the next round when you when you're burning through cash you you're on the way failure or you don't listen to customers actually help fund your business in those smaller things that perhaps just a service oriented company exactly so do starts fail also because not. Everyone is meant to be an entrepreneur. I think that over the last. I guess since the internet bubble of the early two thousands. We've kind of romanticized. Starting a business as a get rich. Quick scheme i mean we know we think of mark zuckerberg and elon. Musk is it because sometimes the wrong people start businesses yeah. I don't think there's there's no doubt about that. I think some some sizable fraction of of new businesses fail. Because people aren't cut out for it.

Tom Eisman Howard H Stevenson Arthur Rock Center For Entrepr Professor Of Business Administ Harvard Business School The Wall Street Journal TOM Mark Zuckerberg Elon Musk
The Real Reason Why Startups Fail

The Small Business Radio Show

01:41 min | 4 months ago

The Real Reason Why Startups Fail

"Well one of the eternal questions in entrepreneurship is why do so many startups fail here with some answers. Is tom eisman. Who's the howard h stevenson professor of business administration the harvard business school and faculty co chair of the arthur rock center for entrepreneurship thomas. Authored more than one hundred s case studies and his writing has appeared in the wall street journal. Harvard business review in forbes. He's the author of a new book called. Why startups failed tom. Welcome to the show area. Thanks for having me well. How have you been surviving through the pandemic. just great it's A great time to write a book and it turns out. I know i'm ready to yeah plenty of quiet time. So why do startups fail. That's the first question we gotta start with sure Startups fail because they run out of money and they can't raise more Which i guess isn't very helpful. It's like the coroner saying This this person died from loss of blood and so it is because i always say that every business fails because they run out of money and i think that's important because so many entrepreneurs don't value cash flow. They keep looking at sales. So i think it is instructive especially protect startups. Where where there's a tolerance for For losing money under the expectation that if you can big enough you're to make some money but but boy If you get in trouble along the way and you can't raise the next round when you when you're burning through cash you you're on the way failure or you don't listen to customers actually help fund your business in those smaller things that perhaps just a service oriented company exactly

Tom Eisman Howard H Stevenson Arthur Rock Center For Entrepr Professor Of Business Administ Harvard Business School The Wall Street Journal TOM
As COVID-19 vaccine efforts expand, states begin to loosen restrictions

WBEZ Chicago Programming

01:01 min | 4 months ago

As COVID-19 vaccine efforts expand, states begin to loosen restrictions

"Almost 136 million doses of covert 19 vaccines have been delivered with close to 37 million people in the US having been fully vaccinated against the coronavirus as of this weekend in Connecticut, where the pace of vaccinations is strong people of color are falling behind. Cole Leonard of Connecticut public radio reports on efforts to change that more than 200 volunteers set out on foot to knock on doors throughout Fair Haven. It's a low income neighborhood in the city of New Haven with a majority black and Latino population. Kika Matos is a local community organizer and activist. We come to you, we give you an appointment. We will offer you a free ride. If you need a ride. If you are homebound, we will come to you. Dr. Marcella Noona. Smith is co chair of President Joe Biden's Coronavirus Task Force, She says the door to door campaign could be a national model for achieving more equity in the vaccine rollout. Connecticut residents 55 years and older are currently eligible for

Cole Leonard Connecticut Kika Matos Dr. Marcella Noona New Haven Coronavirus Task Force United States Joe Biden Smith
South Africa suspends use of AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine after it fails to clearly stop virus variant

1A

00:31 sec | 5 months ago

South Africa suspends use of AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine after it fails to clearly stop virus variant

"South Africa announced it was suspending its rollout of the AstraZeneca Corona virus vaccine. A small clinical trial revealed the shot provided on Lee minimal protection from the virus variant that's widely circulating in the country. Professor Salim Abdul Karim, co chair South Africa's Ministerial Advisory Committee on covert 19. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated Million people are too many people with a vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease.

South Africa Professor Salim Abdul Karim Ministerial Advisory Committee LEE Severe Disease
South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:57 min | 6 months ago

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

"South africa has halted its rollout of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine just a week after the country received. Its first million doses. It seems the vaccine offers limited protection against a new variant of the corona virus. That's now dominant in the country. Salim abdul karim co-chair of south africa's ministerial advisory committee on covid nineteen spoke to a world health organization briefing yesterday. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people too. Many people would have vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease in total more than one point. Two billion corona virus doses have been allocated for the continent. But it's not clear when all those jobs will arrive. The longer any region remains unvaccinated. The greater the chance that more variants arise vaccines though can be tweaked in a formulation of the oxford vaccine targeted at the south african variant could be going into arms by autumn. What scientists cannot address is the long run damage to africa both in human and economic terms so far continent to have been spared from the worst case scenarios predicted early on in the pandemic but the longer term picture remains bleak many ways the impact of the pandemic and africa is worse than it appears on the surface around the official numbers. Kenley salmon is one of our africa correspondent based in dakar. It is the case that having a young population has to some extent protected the continent from the virus africans and died from it that americans europeans but the true scott of infection. Death is really hard to gauge. Studying sudan recently showed the perhaps only two percent of all the covid desk for a quoted in the official tally and the economic impact is worse than it looks last year. The region's economy shrank for the first time. In twenty five years tourism has been badly hit as have commodity exporters things like oil in nigeria and taken together. Gdp per capita fell below twenty ten levels last year so things are perhaps not quite as bad as some other parts the world but certainly still very tough and things may get tougher house. What are the particular challenges to africa. Africa faces quite a number of challenges in the next few years as it tries to recover from the pandemic but the biggest i of the really is vaccines. Some african governments have perhaps failed to grasp the urgency of the situation in tanzania for example the populace president john food even casually cast out with a vaccine work but i do forgive aside claiming the postman precautions such as steaming nation were better than vaccines and even added that if the white man was able to come up with next nations then. Vaccinations for aids. Malaria and cancer would have already been found. So it's not so much a question than of supply. I mean given that quite a few vaccines have been essentially booked at the stage. A number of vaccines have been booked but the big question is when will they arrive because right now there aren't anywhere near the number of axes required forever on in the world and rich countries are of course the front of the queue for those vaccines have been produced africa's going to need perhaps two point six billion doses to vaccinate everyone and those are not being made locally so they have to rely on supplies elsewhere for the moment so that means joining the queue. All this means that whereas rich countries aim to vaccinate most of their people by the middle of this year the african. cdc a public health. Bali in africa's aiming for sixty percent of africans to vaccinated by the end of next year. But even that may be too optimistic. For the poorest countries. The economist intelligence unit sister organization estimates that in most african countries most people will not be inoculated until mid twenty twenty three or even early twenty twenty four and there must be serious consequences of it being that long until the continent is on average vaccinated. Africa is likely. It doesn't get those vaccinations into suffer. Further waves of the infection while after the disease may have amped in the rich world. And that of course will cause more death and more suffering. Doesn't risk that. Having the virus transmitting between people frequently africa could allow new variance to evolve. We've already got the south. African variant and these new variants could endanger people even in rich countries if they prove to be resistant to vaccines and then finally of course not having vaccines could force. African policymakers to continue with these very difficult economic lockdowns curfews even after many other countries around the world set free of those kinds of restrictions and if the public health concern lasts that long then surely the economic concerns will last at least that long. That's right in many african countries facing pretty severe crises at the moment just getting finance to pay their bills. Africa has very limited fiscal space on average countries in sub saharan africa. Spending more than thirty cents on every dollar. They raise and text revenue paying their debts. And that's up from twenty cents on the dollar before the pandemic on the debt side to over half of low income sub saharan african countries are now classed as in distress or at high risk of distress. According to the imf and what about countries with bigger economies the two biggest economies in africa nigeria and south ever both in pretty deep trouble nigeria for example was described by the world. Bank is being an unprecedented crisis. Recently the bank is not normally quite so blunt in nigeria. There has been a legacy of management for a number of years and pandemics really accessible that quite badly. Now focused suggested by twenty twenty three. Gdp per capita may go back as low as it was in one thousand nine hundred eighty time when the oil price was some high on so africa too is in trouble that have been in recession twice in the last three years before the pandemic hit of course now is dribbling itself with a particularly heavy toll from the pandemic so both countries in fact are facing a difficult road out of the crisis. And what about outside help in terms of financing has been quite a bit of outside help although the crisis of course is very big but in twenty twenty the imf for example provided sixteen billion dollars in loans most of that came with relatively few strings attached and this help frigging countries to respond to the pandemic to avoid some of the liquidity crises that were looming the world bank also dispersed another ten billion but many countries got that funding to if the imf under emergency allocations that came quickly and relatively easily and those allocations for many countries will soon be exhausted. The rich world has been trying to help when it comes to debt. They've provided liquidity to countries through some bits of suspension initiative that basically allows poor countries to put off debt repayments until july. Twenty twenty one. This is of course helpful but the trouble is that those payments just suspended and they have to be paid back with interest in about five years time so as the chief economist for africa the world bank put it to us. It may just be kicking the can down the road to. How do you see this playing out. Then how high could the human cost of all this be while the stakes are pretty high. The pandemic has already done lower damage to people's health and africa. it's hitting their economic prospects and they wealth and it's also affecting education of course. Hundreds of millions of students in africa have been affected by school closures. This increases the risk of dropouts and reduces the prospects for africa's largest every generation so overall the costs here really quite significant. There are some reasons for optimism. We may see vaccine rollouts accelerate. There's also hopes that commodity price rises could give africa real boost as the global economy recovers been on balance. The evidence probably points to at pretty difficult road ahead with several more waves of the virus hitting already struggling health systems and perhaps a form of economic long covert in africa. So you know africans have come through this showing remarkable resilience but it may be toughest years are still to come in. Thank you very much for joining us. thank you

Africa Salim Abdul Karim Co Ministerial Advisory Committee Kenley Salmon Nigeria Oxford South Africa John Food Astrazeneca Dakar Saharan Africa IMF Sudan Tanzania Malaria CDC
Building a Grassroots Movement From Scratch

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

05:44 min | 6 months ago

Building a Grassroots Movement From Scratch

"Two thousand and four memoir guidebook called looking for a few good mom's how one mom rallied a million others against the gun lobby earned her the could spoil award from oprah. The book was also cited by the atlantic in two thousand eight as one of the best books on female leadership in two thousand fifteen her daily beast essay. How to organize. The mother of all protests led to a nationwide grassroots effort. The following year called the concert across america to end gun violence in which she served as co chair also in two thousand sixteen co produced and co directed the award winning documentary five a week about the women of louisiana who reform the state's domestic violence laws by getting the nra to stand down over the years. She's promoted gun violence prevention and grassroots activism in hundreds of media outlets including meet the press face the nation the today show and the nbc nightly news in addition to her activism. Donna has spent most of her professional career in new york city at the cbs network. On its communications team. She has represented numerous high profile talent. Including dan rather david letterman and bob schieffer. I'm also joined by sheikha hamilton. She is currently the national organizing and chapter development manager for the brady campaign to prevent gun by violence. She's been working on the issue of gun violence prevention since the year. Two thousand one while living in detroit at the time she helped organize million mom march the largest protests against gun violence in the us history until two thousand eighteen in the march for our lives. She's worked on this issue every day. Since then held various roles from chapter leader the state chapter president to the first elected million mom march leader elected to the brady campaign board of trustees to the national spokesperson for the million mom march. Rally to renew the assault weapons ban. She has also appeared on cnn msnbc and a host of media outlets. She is a licensed attorney in california and michigan. Her boots are on the ground and she has worked for decades to pass gun control legislation in her home. State worth noting all of those credentials. Both of you donna. And she thank you for having to stone who anka joan. So we've all sat in front of tv news and seeing the horrors of gun violence. We can rattle off the names. Columbine sandy ok- oklahoma city. Pulse las vegas and those literally just came off the top of my head in a hot second. Some of us gas cry others write checks. Many don't do much of anything. I'd really like to hear what you believe. It takes to get off the couch and do something can start with donna. And then she got great well. I didn't really have foot. Spur right off the bat. It took me about a week to actually hall cap without police to get an application to march on washington i. I tried to volunteer of one of the many noble and fabulous gun violence prevention nonprofits in our existed. But what. I didn't realize at the time that they get death. Threats constantly get harassing phone calls and so there are a lot of. It's very hard to reach our back. Then you know one of these nonprofits. So i tried for about a week to volunteer and i got very frustrated or mike okay. Here's a problem. I know there must be lots of people just like me who wanna volunteer and they have nowhere to go. I did what i think. A lotta women. Do i picked up the phone. And i called women friends and i said i applied for permit to march on washington and i need of your help and get it was on a seven day says from being outraged by that shooting to actually plans to the permanent. So i i wanna put a pin in and come back to something. You said that. I want my listeners to really attend to. Which is that. Donna tried to reach out to nonprofit organization. Say hey i'm here. I'm outraged and i'm available and i wanna help and i'm not sure. The donna is the only person that has had an experience like that she got. What did it take for you to say. I've had enough. I want to do something about this. Well i i know i feel like it's a build up I grew up in california where there were a lot of shootings right back in the eighties and early nineties. And i didn't do anything about i. Stockton schoolyard shooting. There was a law firm shooting right across from where i worked. I didn't do anything. I was a young mom holding my baby when columbine happened at endure anything but then that mother instinct kicked in when i saw little blip on the news saying million moms are marching in dc. I called up my friend who worked for my congresswoman and said what are you going to do about it. And then i went to the million mom march website in. This is the key thing i went there. It was very simple. It said the problem and the solutions and how to get involved. I emailed the purse. I it just email. I emailed and would i don't know maybe in an hour i got a response and they asked me to come to a meeting. Me was like that i was

Cbs Network Sheikha Hamilton Anka Joan Columbine Sandy Donna Bob Schieffer NRA Oprah David Letterman Atlantic Mike Okay NBC Louisiana America New York City Msnbc DAN Detroit CNN
Nearly 3 million U.S. women have dropped out the labor force

Morning Edition

04:33 min | 6 months ago

Nearly 3 million U.S. women have dropped out the labor force

"Not long after Donald Trump arrived at the White House, he disbanded and office that focused on challenges affecting women. President Biden is now resurrecting it. Women's rights groups hope this will help them make progress on things like paid family leave and affordable child care. Here's NPR's Melissa Block. The wish list on Biden's agenda for women is long restoring an expanding reproductive rights, combating gender based violence, reducing maternal mortality, and he's pitched a slew of economic proposals. Major structural disruption requires major structural change. And I feel like thinking big right now is exactly what we need to do. So now is the time That's the co chair of the Biden administration's new gender Policy Council. Jennifer Klein. You know we're seeing because of the health pandemic because of the economic crisis, and, in fact, take care giving crisis that's been layered on top of it. These are core issues core issues, Klein points out that air hitting women hard and especially women of color. Just look at the most recent jobs numbers. In December, women accounted for all 140,000 of the country's net lost jobs. One factor behind that, with so many schools and day care centers closed because of the coronavirus. Many women have had to drop out of the labor force. That's been disastrous, says Joan Williams, director of the Center for Work Life Law at the University of California, Hastings. Mother's already We're at the breaking point in the United States. I mean, we already had a choc your system that was basically a Rube Goldberg machine and the coronavirus brought that machine crashing down. Williams says. What she wants the Biden administration to do is to recognize that Just as we don't expect workers to get to work without physical infrastructure like bridges and roads. We can't expect workers to get to work without a care infrastructure. What would that care Infrastructure look like for Williams? That would mean subsidized neighborhood based child care, paid family leave Universal, pre K and $15 an hour minimum wage, especially during the pandemic. Single moms have had to choose between putting food on the table and leaving young Children home alone. Now. Part of the reason is because the minimum wages so low that there is no way on God's green Earth that those moms can pay for childcare. The paid caregivers are also reeling from the crunch. President Biden highlighted this when he announced his covert 19 relief plan last month. Let's make sure caregivers mostly women, women of color immigrants. Have the same pay indignity that they deserve. Advocates like I Jen poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, are heartened by what they're hearing from Biden. Her group represents workers, including nannies, home care workers and housekeepers, actually focusing on how we're going to make Thies jobs, good jobs for the 21st century. That you can take pride in and earn a living wage with benefits. That is a really big breakthrough. Conservatives, though, are leery of an agenda that carries a hefty price tag and they warn, will lead to crushing government regulations. Charmaine Yost is vice president of the Institute for Family Community and Opportunity at the Heritage Foundation. My biggest concern is that all of the proposals that I'm hearing coming from their side of things inevitably seem to come back to big government intervention in government programs. As for raising the minimum wage in the midst of a pandemic, when many businesses are suffering so badly if there were a time that you could create, that would be the perfect time to not Raise the minimum wage. This would be it with such a slim Democratic majority in Congress. Biden's agenda could have a tough time gaining traction. But Fatima Goss Graves, who heads the National Women's Law Center, is undaunted. Her group has issued an ambitious list of 100 demands for Biden's 1st 100 days. Basically, what we're asking this administration and Congress to do is effectively walk into gum. We need them to both undo things that have been harmful and have been Holding this country back and launch us forward in a way that we're stronger for it, Graves adds. This president doesn't have the luxury of coasting in Melissa Block NPR news

Biden Administration President Biden Melissa Block New Gender Policy Council Jennifer Klein Biden Joan Williams Center For Work Life Law Donald Trump NPR Williams Jen Poo Rube Goldberg White House National Domestic Workers Alli Klein Hastings University Of California Charmaine Yost
Prayer breakfast gives Biden fresh chance to call for unity

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 6 months ago

Prayer breakfast gives Biden fresh chance to call for unity

"President fighting will get another chance to call for unity at this morning's national prayer breakfast Wyden campaign for the White House is someone who could unify Americans the breakfast will give him the chance to talk about his vision of faith the shares breakfast will be virtual because of the corona virus Delaware senator Chris Coons an honorary co chair of the event suggests that Biden will appear via tape remarks South Carolina senator Tim Scott a G. O. P. co chair of the breakfast says he hopes Biden emphasizes the nation status as a place for diversity and tolerance that allows for respectful disagreement my camp in Washington

Wyden Senator Chris Coons White House G. O. P. Biden Delaware Tim Scott South Carolina Washington
Biden signs 30 executive orders first few days in office

New Yorker Radio Hour

04:40 min | 6 months ago

Biden signs 30 executive orders first few days in office

"So Joe Biden walks into the Oval Office for the first time and sits down and, in essence, signs 17 executive orders with more to come, and they range from everything to rejoining the Paris climate agreement. Extending the moratorium on evictions and foreclosures. This is all about undoing the trump presidency. To what extent can that be accomplished by executive order? Well, there are things you really can do. I mean, it's it's quite remarkable. The degree to which he is able. This is the nature of our system to walk in. And with the stroke of a pen, you really can undo the Muslim ban. Now you can't undo the damage it has caused of the last four years. But there's a reason why he believes this. What some people are calling shock and awe approach to doing it is important. It's sending a message. To the public. That these things are not permanent. But what I think is interesting is when you talk to You talk to the people who are sort of plotting the legislative approach. What they say is there's basically two steps. There's the rescue. And then there's the recovery. The rescue is what you have to do immediately like getting vaccines out like imposing a mandatory mask policy on federal property and interstate travel. And then there's the hard thing. That's exactly the hard thing is big legislation, isn't it? And that demands encountering someone named Mitch McConnell? We've heard for years about Joe Biden's belief in In politics in the way that Barack Obama found distasteful. Remember Barack Obama saying? You go get a drink with Mitch McConnell. Joe Biden seems to thrive on that stuff. Is he deluded? How far going to get Well, he and Mitch McConnell have a relationship in that you know, it is. It is worth both identifying and then identifying the limits of it. It's worth mentioning that Mitch McConnell was the only Republican senator after all, who attended Funeral for Beau Biden in 2015. These two have a very long history. And one thing I'm hearing is that they are in fact, talking quite a bit. They have been in recent weeks now. None of that means that Mitch McConnell is gonna wake up tomorrow and suddenly be a compliant, enthusiastic Promoter of the Democratic Party's interests, But what it means is that there is a basis for communication and a basis for some calculation of the interests of both sides. And that is the core of what Biden basically believes about politics in 18 61. Abraham Lincoln comes forth. It gives his first inaugural address and it's addressed largely to the South, and it's an appeal for unity for the country to stay together the union to stay together. It's an amazing piece of rhetoric. But it failed. Who does Biden have to reach to keep this country from going mad from from becoming so disunited that it becomes non functional. Well, I have to tell you, David, you know that 18 61 address was very much on my mind as I was listening. Abiding. I mean, he summoned as you remember the words of ST Augustine, he said. People are defined as a multitude defined by the common objects of their love. And when I heard that I thought of Lincoln saying, of course, that he was appealing to Americans Bonds of affection as he put it there mystic chords of memory. And six weeks later, the civil War began. So this this fragile notion of coherence of national unity is It's a risky bet, and there's I think the temptation is to assume. Well, well. Biden needs to Somehow reach the people who have been lost to politics. You know, folks who have the kinds of people who are drifting further and further from From, I mean reality to be blunt about it. I think there's another view of this question of the pursuit of unity. And I had a really interesting interview in the days before the inauguration with Reverend William Barber, who is Civil rights leader. He's the co chair of the poor People's campaign. And he's been talking to Biden often on for months, actually, because They both believe in this idea of unity. But Barber is is fairly hard boiled about it. And what he said was look, the Constitution does not call for domestic tranquility. It calls for justice and what that means is that in order to achieve real unity That means you have to attack some of the underlying problems in society, and that may cause you more political disunity in the short

Mitch Mcconnell Joe Biden Biden Oval Office Barack Obama Beau Biden Paris Democratic Party Abraham Lincoln St Augustine Reverend William Barber Lincoln David Barber
Biden announces new science team, elevates office to Cabinet

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 6 months ago

Biden announces new science team, elevates office to Cabinet

"Elect says science will always be at the forefront of his administration. And so he is elevating the post of science advisor to Cabinet level. Eric Lander, a pioneer and mapping the human genome is in line to direct the Office of Science and Technology Policy and service Science Advisor. Biden's also retaining Dr Francis Collins is director of the National Institutes of Health. And he's naming two prominent female scientists to co chair the President's Council of Advisers on Science and Technology. Caltex Frances Arnold, who won the 2018 Nobel Prize in chemistry. And M I. T vice President for research Maria Zuber. Biden says the team will ensure everything his administration does is grounded in science, fax and the truth.

Eric Lander Office Of Science And Technolo Dr Francis Collins President's Council Of Adviser Biden Cabinet Caltex Frances Arnold National Institutes Of Health Maria Zuber
Biden: Science will be at `forefront' of his administration

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 6 months ago

Biden: Science will be at `forefront' of his administration

"President elect Joe Biden says signs will always be at the forefront of his administration so he's elevating the post of science adviser to cabinet level Eric lander a pioneer in mapping the human genome is in line to direct the office of science and technology policy and service science adviser he would be the first to life scientists to hold the job Biden's also retaining Dr Francis Collins is director of the national institutes of health and he's naming two prominent female scientists to co chair the president's council of advisors on science and technology Caltex Francis Arnold who won the two thousand eighteen Nobel Prize in chemistry and M. I. T. vice president for research Maria's stupor Biden says the team will ensure everything his administration does is grounded in science facts and the truth Ben Thomas Washington

President Elect Joe Biden Eric Lander Office Of Science And Technolo Dr Francis Collins Council Of Advisors On Science Biden Cabinet Francis Arnold National Institutes Of Health M. I. T. Maria Ben Thomas Washington
DLCC Calls on Representative Matt Maddock to Resign for Participating in Washington, DC Protests

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:32 sec | 7 months ago

DLCC Calls on Representative Matt Maddock to Resign for Participating in Washington, DC Protests

"Democrats are urging the michigan. Gop to oust co-chair candidate mishaan matic as well as for the resignation of officials who supported efforts. to overturn the election. state representative darren. Hillary says that includes michelle and her husband. State rep mathematics who joined the dc protests. He should be censored and removed from office because we should not be serving with people in our government who do not believe in our government in the first place in a statement on matic said. The rally was intended to be peaceful and agree that those who broke the law should be held accountable.

Mishaan Matic State Representative Darren GOP Michigan Hillary Michelle DC Matic
5 charts show what the global economy looks like heading into 2021

The Tel Aviv Review

03:07 min | 7 months ago

5 charts show what the global economy looks like heading into 2021

"Our yesterday's professor fluke. She's vice president of research. And the william davidson senior fellow for economic policy at israel democracy institute. She's the former governor of the bank of israel and professor at department of economics at the hebrew university of jerusalem earlier this month Professor flog served as the co chair of the idea is l. e. horovitz conference where the most pressing issues relating to israel's economy and society where discussed professor conflict. Hello and welcome back to the tel aviv review. Good morning. so. When corona virus hit it seemed like we were heading for an economic downturn that would rival the great depression but according to the bank of israel and always estimates israeli economy in terms of gdp per capita on employment growth and other measurements seems to be bouncing back and within a few years to return more or less to the levels prior to the crisis and it seems also that this crisis if everything goes according to plan will even less devastating than the two thousand nine hundred thousand nine downturn. So where the initial estimates and overreaction altogether anything wrong. I think we're still in the middle of a very serious crisis. It's true that recently we've seen some oppo revisions both today. A growth estimates of the global economy and also for the the projections for the israeli economy. But still we're talking about a very deep recession globally. Were talking about according to the most recent projections of the cd. We're talking about a contraction of over four percent this year and hopefully a rebound of about four percent next year. This is just in comparison to the global financial crisis the global economy contracted by only zero point one percent so we're still talking about a very deep recession and that's true also for the israeli economy If we are on the path as described by damore to mystic scenario that was a published by the bank of israel it means to the economy will contract this year by about five percent. And we'll rebound by about six percent next year. If we are on the less optimistic scenario where the corrina is not contained the pandemic is not contain then we will have a somewhat more severe contraction this year but much slower recovery by next year so i would say Were still talking about two very serious crisis. A very severe recession however it's true the israeli economy is doing somewhat better relative to other economists. I

William Davidson Israel Democracy Institute Bank Of Israel Hebrew University Of Jerusalem Department Of Economics Israel Depression Damore
Down Time Doesn't Exist for Tommy Amaker

Bob Ryan & Jeff Goodman NBA Podcast

03:19 min | 7 months ago

Down Time Doesn't Exist for Tommy Amaker

"I mean, you're you're super involved now with the NBC and I love that Craig Robinson's done a phenomenal phenomenal job taking over being active. Like I feel like that organization was dormant for years and he's done a great job. And I know you you're involved in that you've been involved in some other things because otherwise your wife's going to I mean, like like there's no way if you're not doing something. What do you get going to be annoying her? Well, she know what first of all she's really busy and and everybody with with the zoom meetings and everything where you know, I mean one party email. She's another you know, we got the we have to find out what when I can walk in and out of the kitchen, you know, because she's there in that area. So we gotta get our schedules coordinated, but but you're right just you know, as far as the dog See, you know, the National Association of Basketball Coaches is our governing body, you know for all of our divisions all divisions of college basketball and we're very proud of the association and I'm I'm very proud to be on the board of directors of that. I've been on that now for for a while and and now that you mentioned Craig being on new executive director and he's doing as you said so well a tremendous job of like us and supporting us, you know, we have great leadership and you know take anything away from Jim Haney, you know, but Craig is jumping in now and Baton has been passed to him and and we're proud to be a part of it together and I want a few committees. Actually. I'm on I'm co-chair myself and Frank Martin from South Carolina. We co-chair the racial reconciliation committee, which is a very important job that was created after the George Floyd murder and I was asked to share that and I was wow, you know, it was really blown away that I was asked to do it and but we've taken initiatives, you know, we've been fighting for certain things with them. Organization to help you know us to you know, bring about change to make a difference, you know in our society and through basketball, you know, whether that's the elimination of trying to take on elimination of old SAT and ACT test standardized test, you know, we're doing things when we were heavily involved with other coaches as well with voter registration, you know, some different things that have come up, you know come down and I have been a part of you know, something as anchor coaches for another initiative. That was his his baby in his brainchild is called a John McLendon minority leadership under the name that you guys, you know know who and and Bob you probably you probably knew, you know, coach McLendon. I wish I did know I didn't yeah. Oh totally well aware of. Yes, just the legendary faith. And and so we're we're you know, we have that's a coach driven initiative. You know, we're all coaches. We have Patrick Ewing. We have Coach K. We have Dabo swinney's Nick Saban football basketball. What channel is the one he and I have kind of been the anchor coaches, but it's been he's driven. It has been his idea. And that's something that we're bringing about having minorities more minorities women and men wage being having exposure and access and opportunity on athletic campuses to become Future Leaders, you know, we've talked about how do we get more? You know black people African Americans minorities in leadership positions. Well, this is one of the ways that we can try to do that to help diversify athletic departments.

National Association Of Basket Basketball Tommy Amaker Harvard Ncaa Nabc Diversity Inclusion Race Craig Robinson Jim Haney George Floyd Craig NBC Frank Martin John Mclendon Baton Coach Mclendon South Carolina Coach K. Dabo Swinney Patrick Ewing Nick Saban BOB Football
Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines arrive in Los Angeles

All Things Considered

03:24 min | 8 months ago

Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines arrive in Los Angeles

"Cherry Gwai. Oh, so, yeah, the first doses of a covert vaccine of finally arrived in Los Angeles, and there's been a lot of talk about who should get them first. And, of course, the fear that some people have of getting vaccinated at all. One of the folks who has been helping to make the rules for vaccine distribution is Dr Oliver Brooks, He's co chair of California's vaccine drafting guidelines Work group, and he's also the chief medical officer over Watts. Health care, Dr Brooks. Nice to have you back on. Good to be back in here with you to the first shipments of vaccines will be given to front line health care workers. It's already happened. Other health care workers are next in line, but but from what we just heard, even some health care workers air wring their hands and saying, Well, maybe I'll wait a bit to see if it's safe. I mean, Do you have workers at Watts, who were hesitant to get vaccinated? I'd say that I've had conversations with people everywhere. Health care workers and not that do have some hesitation. Yes, Health care workers are human, just like everyone else. Those those human patients who are hesitant about the vaccine. We know there are a lot of folks who are we just heard numbers from one poll that found only just about a third of Latinos trust the vaccine to be safe and only 14% of black Americans that that's a national poll. But those numbers Must give you pause. What do you telling patients to try to overcome? That kind of Ah, I mean, my gosh. What a barrier That is. Well, the approach that I take, which has been studied in his A reasonable approach is first and foremost acknowledge their concerns. Don't just blow them off and say, what do you What do you doing? You know it's the vaccine is safe, effective need to get it. Have to understand where people are coming from. There is a mistrust of the medical community in the African American community. There, it's there's some grounds for that. I mean, Slaves were experimented upon. They were sold for experimentation and to turn of the 20th century, there was sterilization of African American women. There is the infamous Tuskegee study where 600 black men were allowed to have syphilis progress to see what the complications were. So I mean, it's not like this is coming from nowhere. However, I have not known any first of all this. What else I'll tell them. I've known no bias. Or concern, as relates to experimentation issue with any vaccine. The second thing I do is I give them knowledge, so I will tell you this. It is an emotional psychological response that they're having and not One that can be solved by numbers and data. So it's important. But you still need to have him and then a circle back and say so, you know, have I addressed everything you're concerned about? That works. Some don't work for everyone, but it does work. Have you been vaccinated yet? Yourself? No, it hasn't come to my clinic yet. But I will be first in line assuming that's not considered selfish. S O I I am eager and willing. I do not want Cove in 19. So another thing I do tell people it's the vaccine truly is safe and effective. It's been scrutinized. So have the window. We heard a vaccine so well scrutinized in the public eye, so there has been clear

Cherry Gwai Dr Oliver Brooks Dr Brooks Watts Los Angeles California Syphilis
"co chair" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

RIGHT NOW Podcast

05:39 min | 8 months ago

"co chair" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

"Smokey and the bandit as any indication as the how the industry is smoking in. The band is probably. The best industry was heyday. It's a little bit more complicated now. A lot more complex actually not not questions here. That are kind of linked. So i'm just ahead in lincoln do you hear of any stories on stings to catch human traffickers cartels Do truckers and please please themselves or is there any type of silence. There's always people looking for you know traffickers and cartel shipments all trucks. That go over. The border are literally. There's an x ray machine that x rays all. The trucks are coming from mexico and from from canada so they could see in those trucks nonstop in texas. Texas rangers are pulling trucks over and even if we have a sealed low with food. They'll break he'll bring the dogs in the czech double check it and then reseal it with their ceo and give paperwork saying look we were. This truck was inspected it pass inspection. Nothing was compromised. We revealed it. You know you must accept this load that it was just a random. That was that was chosen. Okay and then with this one Do you have you experienced or do you have any stories involving vhs. Seabourn detection Like any anything moving anything department of energy and if so has it been active more so than normal D your knowledge. I would not know that because we transported is just food product so that would be You we've transferred as a medical supplies for for female but other than that no that we don't haul that that's a different type of carrier as a specialty carrier are almost okay Alternative energy with trucking Not necessarily battle the batteries. But biofuel natural gas have you seen any of those options come available and if so do you see that as possible in the future. So they've come out with the natural gas it has some flaws. it's not working as well as they suspected. And the real big thing that they're talking about right now is the hydrogen and using a hydrogen generator. I don't know if he has. No what i generally works. You know. hydrogen trickles through this kind of system. water vapors like leak out through the bottom of the truck and it makes energy. Sounds like amazing right That's what they're working on like. Mobile companies actually are working on that right now Like for example tesla is a completely electric truck. But nicola is a hydrogen generator. Recharges the batteries on the truck and use the energy for the for the morris due to keep it going. Yeah i think. Hydrogen is going to be the next best thing because The natural gas started off real hard. But it it it..

Texas rangers lincoln mexico department of energy texas canada tesla nicola morris
"co chair" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

RIGHT NOW Podcast

03:26 min | 8 months ago

"co chair" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

"Mike qatar ski is the co owner of j casey trucking and he's here to discuss the trucker strike and the trucking industry's response To the cities that are funding. The police mike tells a little bit more about yourself. Are there. thank you very mu show. So we are family business We run a ltl from the midwest the whole west coast ltl means a less than truckload. We haul refrigerated and frozen food anything's be temperature controlled between the whole midwest west coast and back We have a little bit over. Two hundred drivers we have three terminals. Were located in south side of chicago is our main terminal and we have terminals in california. I want to northern california southern california and we kind of Just go back and forth the feeding american families. Well as some of a truck driver. I definitely know a lot of the areas that you're talking about an unfamiliar with a lot of issues that you experience so You know as you talk tonight. I just know that you won't need layman's terms for me. I may describe some things for some of the audience So i'm just to go ahead. And i'm going to get us started off with some more questions What is your goal for this strike. You know the biggest goal right now is so. The independent drivers the owner operators. They are the ones that are you know organizing and going on strike us as a company. We have signed contracts. And you know it's been a very bad year. We don't have the luxury and our overhead is way way more than an oba owner operators. We don't have the luxury to to go on. Strike a what. The drivers are fed. Up about is no number couple reasons. You know the ski obviously The presidential election and a driver morales dow. In the driver is trevor's the frontline workers have been working through the pandemic delivering essential goods food and medical supplies etc. You know these truck driving is is as you said. You're a truck driver. A truck driving is not a job. It's a way of life and drivers love what they do you know. Just just the audience idea around. Seventy two percent of all phrase move by long distance truck drivers. You know it's a total. I think there is like one point. Eight million big drivers if i remember correctly and You know drunk driving is one of the top most dangerous topmost ten dangerous jobs and one of the most important in industry in america in my my opinion. But it's but it's also one of the most hated by the motoring public. That is very true. A lot of people you know. I think it's misunderstanding than anything else. But when on the road they just don't know how to how to deal with truckers. Don't know how to give them space things along those lines right. They gave a little bit frustrated because most of the monitoring public under they only know how to drive a car so they really don't understand how the dynamex an how trucks you know. accelerate decelerate. You know they're thinking the same thing and we're all in the same Plainfield but it's not you know. Drivers are all you know pulling something heavy and when they hit the brakes. Something's actually pushing on them so it's not like a car. It takes a lot more time to to stop. You know one of the things. I wish..

Mike qatar ski j casey california midwest west coast southern california mike chicago trevor america
"co chair" Discussed on Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

07:01 min | 10 months ago

"co chair" Discussed on Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

"Hello and welcome to comment home conversations today. We are joined by doctor Isabella to Shara co-chair of the United Nations environment programs International resource panel and bumper Minister for the environment of Brazil. Thank you for joining us today, Isabella. Thank you for inviting me to join you my pleasure. So you have dedicated your life to protecting nature. What was the driving force for this passion? So how question because I have been working the last thirty-five years of environmental issues not only pursue but also at the global level I'm a biologist. Okay, and I thought that how fascinating the life is the diversity of life is I was born less less Century for catering sixties and it was momentum the world that took two years and ages and out nine inches that we preparing how you live in this Century the new century. So environmental issues were emerging strategic Global issues. And I was really fascinated to have the opportunity to join not only to move forward consider the developing issues in my country and how can bring development together with environmental preservation and conservation. But more also how it can happen plenty of approach consider the diversity of societies and those in my country also and also the inequalities of social equality I used to big things together since my early evenings, so I think that environmental agenda of sustainability channel that it was doing my career that the decisions our marriage and also page you're able to join the global multilateral agreements and also the global Summits, etc. Etc. But always trying to manage better than actual realities in 2 0 on the how we can bring people together. So for me, it's science beyond the politics means that we can be together and this fascinates me. I love the diversity dead. Of the planet not only the biological ones. Okay, and this the possibilities to discover to ReDiscover the world and to be closer to other. This is something that still today makes sense for me to move forward. So it's how how to be part of the world in a way that you can contribute our best to a better quality of life and they knew on the to improve the relationship between humankind and the nature as a biologist make sense for me. Absolutely sick and you're from one of the most biodiverse places on the planet. So I imagine that definitely had an influence on your career decisions to protect nature. Yes, fantastic because I thought working and 9 day before after my graduation. Also, I was food dedicated to scientific research and I was provoked to join dead. Environmentalism Brazil that was charged to create the new institutional Arrangements situation governments in Brazil to manage environmental issues. Not the natural resource officers want no biology as in traditional wedding that used to be approved and it was a big Challenge and this man changed my life. His name is Paula Dean Martin's famous song. Also Bastion used around the world. And also I was absolutely introduced to this political world the environmental politics indeed how the multilateral institutions will bring us together. The big channels that we will face and has two faces today considering climate change the global issue like my diverse reservation. And also how country like Brazil is a hybrid of assets not only in Amazonia, but Amazon forest, but also truck profiles like Atlanta virus and also did I vessel by Anonymous how we can bring this together? How a dog? You can use his in a better way to promote the development that you need. Well, you've certainly had a very impressive career and I know that you have achieved an incredible 84% reduction in a station of the Amazon the lowest historical deforestation rate. It has been called the largest-ever global contribution for emissions reduction. Can you tell me more about this? Yeah what I want to change the numbers today and I I look back to the past. Just remember my professional career and indeed when being Brazil were fully engaged to a different station Amazon. Okay, and do we establish the first national program to go against the first station and do learn a lot with this crisis and I was off of the enforce environmental enforcement team in the Brazilian institution that you called, environmental pollution, and I was part of this staff wage. That went into them as wanted to tackle the first station and it was very nice because it was not only the environmental stack students. But also the science you can came to get us and the so you bring together different station and also fires the needs to develop the scientific knowledge. Maybe they need to have an alliance and and I was charged the first number and of understanding between Brazil United States should learn more how can manage the type of forest fires and did how we can move on considered as a gym pass along my career. I have the opportunity to manage important International programs like the National Environmental program together. The first one was rolled back and also the famous PPG 7. So when I was Minister you have this experience to Brazil, you know that Brazil we have been proven our knowledge in the last twenty years exactly how to manage better the forcing of the invite. For some of the individual not really no Masonic and unfortunately, the first session was Raina is around 95% Basically legality. This is a environmental crime have a powerful legal framework in Brazil to tackle these problems and this is Cindy do have the full capacity scientist go on but also institutional wants to bring this month is probably sufficient together and to go against the first station. They go against environmental crime and those you entertained with my 2010 did they launch all of us another try and change policy that that support us to address better outcomes. So what I'd like to highlight is that we have I have a huge opportunity to connect the novelty of public policy life about various conservation the most important protect areas program in the world around six millions of hectares underbite of this reservation in protection in Amazon Vision together, this is Bob. Of a legacy and also we promote the.

Brazil Amazon Isabella doctor Isabella United Nations co-chair Paula Dean Martin Raina Bob Cindy scientist Amazonia United States Anonymous Atlanta
"co chair" Discussed on 1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"co chair" Discussed on 1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

"Let's work together in raising awareness of the value and putting others at the center of what we do. In your short career so far as you say you've been involved in the number of projects for a number of different people. What do you think has been your most memorable project so far? Yeah, to be honest, I'd like to look back at my career and say that was my golden time. And that was the read that was the project today. I'm actually quite pleased to say this, you know, there's quite it's been quite a lot lots of memorable moments really and I think one of the joys of this this discipline I think is you do find yourself and perhaps maybe it's also a feature working in defense, which is very broad. You find yourself not doing quite different things from from month to month and that keeps the job very interesting. So when I look back over my career and you know, I've enjoyed many of the programs when I first thought I was working on was thrown in at the deep end, you know ended up being the lead leader got my best for the sea Harrier FRS to st. Grand but I think at the time there were three of us in the group so someone had to lead it off. Um, you know, but that you know led me to be immediately be dealing with royal Navy pilots and I'm working in simulators and I flew with the Navy I flew in a hunting dog to see Hunter, you know Loop in the loop and barrel rolls and things and this isn't this isn't typical stuff. Really I think you know this yeah be quite interesting stuff to get involved with and and I move from that worked on PS3 and then a hawk and cross most of the British Aerospace of BAE Systems military aircraft programs at the time. It did some fairly lengthy trial but RAF kinloss that was very memorable. It was quite challenging but a fantastic time and a lovely part of the world is just enjoy enjoy the sort of winter up in kinloss lots of breweries and the office lots of distilleries around there as well. Lots of distance. Yeah. I did visit some of them when I was at nice I helped I was going to say help make it memorable in some cases not so much wage. I spent a summer in in one more in the summer really for about eight months or so over in Texas working on us Hercules C-130 avionics modernization program. So that was that was nice. It's a very good I think and I say it's good not just me because of the various other people involved but some research work with Westlands long as they were at a time Leonardo. Now, it's supposed Western helicopters on future and Elites future links links Wildcat looking at integration of some new Weapons Systems in such a fusion Technologies..

royal Navy Westlands BAE Systems Leonardo Wildcat Texas British Aerospace Hunter fusion Technologies
"co chair" Discussed on This Is Why You're Single

This Is Why You're Single

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"co chair" Discussed on This Is Why You're Single

"I'm originally from Los Angeles California. So you know I moved to New York for college when turned eighteen and Went home for a little bit came back permanently in started, started working at a tech start up and moved on to a little bit of with a little bit of time. Finance financing then landed his dream role. at linked in and. I started leading the black inclusion group. It's it's an additional role that I have their leading the black inclusion group. Company, which is our employee resource group. For Black people in their allies and our goal is to help. engage our community. You know, get black. Go Higher Keep them at our company in insure that they that they grow as professional so It's been a journey. Whole life has taken a lot of twists and turns in you know. It's made me who I am today and I'm super happy about it. You Know I. Talk about it I tried to candidates awesome about in the united have the the easiest life growing up in terms of you know The environment in which I grew up in from south La. you know my dad did you know? Time prison a pretty significant amount of time, so he's gone for the majority of my childhood. Grow with my mother so I mean all of that stuff I say because it really shapes you in in. You know that's why think of things like this and I. I like service oriented roles like this I i WanNa give back as much as I can on a lot of people played a role in. Helping me get to where I am so yeah, you actually you wrote a little bit for linked in about how you've come to see your story as an important part of your journey, but there was a time when you were embarrassed to share with people. What has what has your experience been like sharing that story? Specifically with white colleagues like how has been received? I mean I, I, it's been, it's been liberated from me on a personal level, because the fact that I'm not spending so much time suppressing such a not such a big part, the entirety of myself all with the intended purpose of fitting in these primarily white spaces and I. Don't know if anybody's ever had to deal with you know. Not being true to themselves, but it's it's it's tax. It's mentally taxing physically taxing and it. It does not make you Does Not make you better, but I mean You know so I like I said it's been liberating for me, but in terms of my colleagues I. Think a lot of them. are usually surprise. And I think they're surprised. Because of the fact that they have their own preconceived notions about what somebody from my background is supposed to look like Act, light sound like an dispel all those notions when I walk into a room and That's not because it, but this is just everybody in my neighborhood. We're all intelligent. People were all well-spoken people. We all have thoughts in fears and everything like everybody else I just have been able to to end up in some of these spaces where some of my people like me have been able to sell its bid jarring for some people when they hear, meet celebrate story, but it's. It's the truth I think that anytime. I can help bring lights that I'll definitely do it. At what point did you start to share your story and realize that it might help other people? So I think for me. It was probably when I moved back to New York from L.. A. Around Twenty twelve. So you know Angela, new me, you know. She and I met in college. And you know. I was still trying to figure out just like anybody in college or any young person. You still trying to figure themselves out. You know you're trying to fit in once again in these environments that are not. Native to you if you will in your in your in who you are, so the journey really started after I left collared in twenty eleven when I came back, some York I found. A bunch of friends that looked like me in that had similar upbringings to me and being around them really gave me license to be myself to what I really was so then. That's when I start really opening up until the truth, like Hey, I'm the son of an ex felon who did twenty years a look I, grew up in south La look. My House got shot up like you know all this stuff. That might not be the same kid who grew up in. You know in Connecticut, you know in a two parent household and you know upper to middle class. but my friends and having people who share similar backgrounds to you definitely makes you more comfortable euro skit so then. That's when I started telling that story. And I know that part of your job or part of being part of the black inclusion group. Now you bring in students from underserved communities because you work with my friend Ashley. Who you guys have a little networking thing going on. Have? You shared your story with those students. Do you find that that's something that helps? Yeah I mean. When I see kids that look like me. And they got the same fears like me because they're not sure which way their life might go, because we don't have the same state does the ones I especially gravitate toward not so much when my story, but try to comforting you try to answer questions you know because I think it's more important for them to tell their story and just the fact that natural related related not. Not with everybody before a lot of people, you see yourself these kids you know when you see a young, black or brown kid from you know the Bronx or something like that now. That's a story you know seeing them. That resonates with me so of course I told him the story, but I always like to hear their stories because I learned a lot from. Those people sounds like. Therapy, yeah yeah! And I guess like showing people that like as you've learned. Your story is important to who you are, and you should share it, not not be embarrassed. Yeah it's it because it's a part of your identity. I mean it's your story, but your story is so intertwined to who you ultimately end up becoming as a person, so the more you choose to try to intentionally or unintentionally suppressed.

New York Los Angeles California York south La. Angela Ashley Connecticut
"co chair" Discussed on This Is Why You're Single

This Is Why You're Single

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"co chair" Discussed on This Is Why You're Single

"Tell us a bit about your background, and then how you wound up in your role, Lincoln. Yes, so <hes>. I'm originally from Los Angeles California. So you know I moved to New York <hes> for college when turned eighteen and <hes>. Went home for a little bit came back permanently in started, <hes> started working at a tech start up and moved on to a little bit of <hes> with a little bit of time. Finance financing then landed his dream role. <hes> <hes> at linked in and. I started leading the black inclusion group. It's it's an additional role that I have their leading the black inclusion group. Company, which is our employee resource group. For Black people in their allies and our goal is to help. <hes> engage our community. You know, get black. Go Higher <hes>. Keep them at our company in insure that they that they grow as professional so <hes>. It's been a journey. Whole life has taken a lot of twists and turns in you know. It's made me who I am today and I'm super happy about it. You Know I. Talk about it I tried to candidates awesome about in the united have the the easiest life growing up in terms of you know <hes>. The environment in which I grew up in from south La. <hes> you know my dad did <hes> you know? Time prison a pretty significant amount of time, so he's gone for the majority of my childhood. Grow with my mother so I mean all of that stuff I say because it really shapes you in in. You know that's why think of things like this and I. I like <hes> service oriented roles like this I i WanNa give back as much as I can on a lot of people played a role in. Helping me get to where I am so yeah, you actually you wrote a little bit for linked in about how you've come to see your story as an important part of your journey, but there was a time when you were embarrassed to share with people. What has what has your experience been like sharing that story? Specifically with white colleagues like how has been received? I mean I, I, it's been, it's been liberated from me on a personal level, because the fact that I'm not spending so much time suppressing such a not such a big part, the entirety of myself <hes> all with the intended purpose of fitting in these primarily white spaces and I. Don't know if anybody's ever had to deal with you know. Not being true to themselves, but it's it's it's tax. It's mentally taxing physically taxing and it. It does not make you <hes>. Does Not make you better, but I mean <unk>. You know so I like I said it's been liberating for me, but in terms of my colleagues I. Think a lot of them. <hes> are usually surprise. And I think they're surprised. Because of the fact that they have their own preconceived notions about what somebody from my background is supposed to look like Act, light sound like an dispel all those notions when I walk into a room and That's not because it, but this is just everybody in my neighborhood. We're all intelligent. People were all well-spoken people. We all have thoughts in fears and everything like everybody else I just have been able to to end up in some of these spaces where some of my people like me have been able to sell its bid jarring for some people when they hear, meet celebrate story, but <hes> it's. It's the truth I think that anytime. I can help bring lights that I'll definitely do it.

Eric Abrego chairman Black Inclusion Group Rodrigo Lincoln
"co chair" Discussed on This Is Why You're Single

This Is Why You're Single

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"co chair" Discussed on This Is Why You're Single

"We will be answering your listener questions including one from a woman. Woman of Color, who's boyfriend's family are trump supporters and another listener who wants to know if it's okay to check in on her black coworkers right now, but I wanNA welcome this week's guest. He works linked end where he is the CO chairman of the Black Inclusion Group A program, which utilizes data, resources and employees to close the opportunity gap for black people in the technology industry. He is also angeles. College Buddy please welcome to the podcast Eric Abrego. Hello. Low, thank you for having me. I appreciate it. It's an honor to be here with both. Eric it's an honor to have you. You are our first guest post. rebrand your first remote guests. This is a very big deal. If I had known back in college, that I would be I would be having you as a guest on my podcast remotely because of a global pandemic, I would have been so confused by some. It up. Make it up Eric, did you? Did you know that was always going to have a podcast in college? What was she like I? Don't think we knew what podcast where when we were in college. That's that's also true, but I mean a lot of what you do in terms of giving advices exactly what it was like because. Now it makes sense more people. Get your, so that's good. Stuff is always going round unsolicited advice that people exactly I took eric a lot of dating advice, which would have been great for the old show, but this time this time around. You're actually going to be advising us at. It is an honor to have you on my friend. Because Rodrigo episode about ally ship and I'm really excited to get your perspective because first of all, you've always been one of the most politically engaged people that I've known and one of the like like the night of two thousand sixteen election I wanted to call you really. Happening bidding is this really happening so and and you now have this amazing role linked in? Where you are the CO chair for their Black Inclusion Group, and you've published articles for them on ally ship from your perspective as an ally to other people and giving advice people being an alley so. You're like you're the perfect guy to chat with us today because I think a perspective like yours is really essential, were two white women and we. We don't want to leave. We don't want to presume to lead the conversation here like we do the work to educate ourselves, but we also wouldn't want our voices in this conversation. So feels good to have you. Appreciate the thank you. Tables have certainly have certainly turned. You could tell told me ten years ago, or however long that was that one daddy giving be giving you advice so I'm happy to be here. Me And so many other people that are listening. You're going to help so many. But so I want to have everybody gets no you a bit, so tell us a bit about your background, and then how you wound up in your role, Lincoln. Yes, so.

Eric Abrego chairman Black Inclusion Group Rodrigo Lincoln
"co chair" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

Swing Left - How We Win

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"co chair" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

"That's pretty straightforward approach fans own just as being going going. That's going to be if you're going to be so I. I don't know if they'll be invited me on anytime soon. But thank you for Gwen into the Valley of the visa and speaking truth. Appreciate all your bill hemmer and Tekere Tucker Carlson. They came from CNN. And like what what happened. Money money there we go. What are you doing I am I? I hope that I will not be the only who will be willing to go there because I think twenty twenty is going to be so divisive across the country. You're going to have to appeal away. Some of the people that watch Fox to speak the truth there. We already know their whole narrative is going to be. The economy is Great. Don't worry about anything going on right. No you gotTA break it down. Like is a great for black communities. Latino community are women entrepreneurs getting access. Yeah probably not so. Let's let less you have to be willing to do that. And you have to be willing into call out that. They promoted a lot of this. And if we're unable to do that and we shouldn't be here well hopefully more people will will come. Make those statements you you know. Take the opportunity when they're on Fox to call that out and I would love for everyone that goes on Fox to ask the question why Tucker Carson Carson still have a job here. Why the hell talk about all this? Do you have any advice for people who moving no. Maybe I might like to volunteer. Tearing Twenty Twenty get in the game. There is no feeling like being part of a campaign that you believe in when I joined you know I'm a son of Jamaican immigrants. My Dad was a union guy. Eleven nine nine. He was a janitor and my mom was a manufacturer. You're the baby of four was born a heart murmur and when I went to Iowa I march two thousand seven. You know people thought we had no chance whatsoever when you around those volunteers and you see that something is bigger than an election happening. Um It fuels you and I really do believe for everyone. You know knocking on doors matters. You know making phone calls matters You have no idea when when you show up at a campaign office and you bring pizza for the staff. That's been hauling ass for weeks and then just someone just is is like hey I just WanNa make sure you're okay. It changes things it really does. And I'm not saying this coming here. You know you you saw swing left. Did in two thousand eighteen right. And and descending this swing left I think it's for indivisible things for flippable that people just said enough is enough and I think all of this will be in vain. If if we don't defeat trump and had victories across the board next year and the only way that's going to happen is through volunteers because while we are talking about impeachment trump and the Republicans are flooding with digital ads And they're flooding these targeted states. And they're giving this messaging up they're just trying to vied you don't worry about this. Let's just stay focused on the economy. Economy's great things we find. The people are GonNa have to win this thing and you will feel that great sense sense of validation. I I was telling people that in the Oh nine inauguration. I was on the bus with the King family. And you're pretty any watch silent when you're going up because you don't really know what what do you say to the king family when a black man might become president and an Mlk to turn to us and said thank you. And I I started tearing up 'cause just like your family allowed for this moment to happen but you get to DC when you get to the capital and you see the sea of Humanity Eddie A lot of that volunteers of people who just pour their heart and soul into something bigger and so if you not not just you believe in the country. I think we all should do that if you believe in the promise. Whatever that promise may be We need you to volunteer. It cannot just be staff alone when when you you make that phone call and when you have that dear neighbour letter when you knock on that door. There's a woman in our district named Trudy pogue who still to this day reminds us that when we got elected the first term and they simply that that it was cold in her senior center and we got our heat and she says Michael we are warm truly will make any phone call for anything and now now we just did it because the right thing to do. I'll take trudy making a phone call for us any day because she can tell the story and that's why we need people to get into game. Well Michael Blake.

twenty twenty Trudy pogue Fox Tekere Tucker Carlson CNN Tucker Carson Carson King family Gwen Michael Blake trump DC Iowa president Mlk
"co chair" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

Swing Left - How We Win

12:49 min | 1 year ago

"co chair" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

"We've been very clear saying this has to be not just about trump. It has to be from the State House at the White House. Right has to be city councilor too congress. You know. It's got to be all these different positions if we do that. Then more people get excited about that and what we've been talking about a lot more lately. Democrats are fighting for all trump and Republicans vying for the one percent. You keep driving at home people feel like you know. I'm kind of feeling that right now because you know it doesn't matter if you're a Democrat Republican independent whatever when you see a cruel rule of work requirements being harder to get food stamps. Saint people just like that's just wrong plain and simple as is wrong and so our vision has to be an are thinking. How do we build all the infrastructure? And how do we build trust and in the messaging in the branding of we are Democrats. We are Americans we are patriots. We are one right that that framing because you know this is going to go fast. You know February third when everything has gone in Iowa Through April twenty eighth. WE MOVED UP OUR NEW YORK. Primary since we called the seller primer or if you will ninety percent of delegates are going to be decided between that span. We're going to have a pretty good gauge. Who's going to be our nominee by the end of April April? Give her Senate drink and so it's our job to be ready for that and I think when people keep saying us while we need one message we need one message. We're always going to push back on that MHM because what happens in Connor. Lambs district is very different than what Doug Jones needed. It's very different than what happened. When we flip the Senate in New York ORC is very different? What goes on in Florida? You know. People don't want they don't want you to come in and tell them what makes sense for me. They want their candidate. That at our job needs to be to help the candidates to drive home a message that works for them. You mentioned State House to the White House absolutely more city council Congress or for City Council in Congress. Right exactly I would agree with you. You knock on wood. I do think any of these candidates are capable of beating Donald trump but I also look at the Senate and that's a much more uphill push and we really need lots of volunteers to get out and do the work knocking on doors. Making those phone calls especially in those important Senate states so I feel like it's really important like you guys were both just talking about Having a candidate that has a message. That's going to inspire people to show up and vote but activists to get out in volunteer and take care of these crucial elections absolutely absolutely and I'll use my own raises a small microcosm I'm also going to talk about Doug Jones because I think that can convey both points Doug Jones was the lawyer that decided to go after the bombers when it came to what happened to Birmingham Church so it was easy for us to go into black communities like Doug Jones gets it. I I remember when we did a fundraiser for Doug at the DNC a Labor fundraiser and we had him come speak at a CBC event and room was packed. And when you have someone that's able to get up and say it wasn't my staff. It was team it was him who said this is wrong right now. He's GonNa they have a really tough tough. But I'm bringing that up because when you have someone like him when you have what happened Kentucky just now when you have the reelection Louisiana the Anna we keep being told that you have these tough fights and we want all three right. We can't be afraid of a tough fight. That's fine if you have a candidate that can articulate that turn your point of you know aspirational if you get people to have something that's aspirational. They'll rockwood shoot right dell understand you know what I may not understand all the mechanics annex of it but I wanna feel good about this and I don't want to be an environment just around fear and so in that same vein anyone that you think about these candidates they will. I'll have to articulate that and I think you're starting to see that from these presidential candidates right now I think they are understanding. It is not enough just to say why you don't like trump right. You have to be able to show people that you believe in something bigger and I think the impeachment process. We shouldn't ignore the magnitude at the moment. This is going to divide the country again but I do think it was the right thing to do. You can't let someone just reckless but you gotta then come back and say okay. How do we rise up from this as Americans right you have to give people an an aspirational vision? Beyond is the division politics and I suppose we can put pressure on these senators around impeachment in these swing states as well. Oh absolutely should I mean if and when the Senate Republicans Act as the cowards because I think they are. I think other than Romney I see anyone else. At this point they will directly be saying yes we know he broke the law. And we're fine with it and to me. That's GonNa be a pretty damning argument to make in some of these races. You're willing to say yeah. You know what national security because Republicans always talking about their the one in a values insecurity or he literally doesn't care about that. I was willing to help my own purpose over the country. I actually actually thing is going to help with some of these places and but I think we can't as Democrats and I think we do too often let process get in the way of the principal. Senator Chris Murphy says he's talked to somebody who who is getting swayed in the Senate that's what he said. So you know who I don't know if it was Romney or who. Maybe there might be fingers crossed that there are people who are considering cowards. This is I mean it's pretty next level level right when when you're in that kind of space for the Republicans I mean. Some of them are just clowns right. Senator Kennedy Louisiana's Ukraine Right L.. Lindsey Graham kind of lost spine longtime ago right..

Senate Doug Jones Donald trump Senate Republicans State House Romney White House Lindsey Graham YORK Senator Kennedy Louisiana Senator Chris Murphy principal Connor Iowa Florida City Council Congress Ukraine dell
"co chair" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

Swing Left - How We Win

13:13 min | 1 year ago

"co chair" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

"You can make phone calls. You can organize your own fundraiser. Yeah exactly so. And of course we have a Senate Fund witch goes to all of our targeted Senate seats and will be split between them. Whoever makes it through the primaries? That's a great place to to organize around around and donate money right now or start your fundraiser. All right adopt a state. It could be to be three whatever you have the ban with four but we need to plan we need to get into action action. Now imagine where we would be without Mitch. McConnell lockstep with the president's legal counsel on these impeachment commit proceedings refusing to see any witnesses for the Senate impeachment trial useless. Let's get rid of him gotTA ditchmitch match and we've got to take back the Senate all right Michael Go. Blake represents the South Bronx in the New York state assembly and is a vice chair with the Democratic National Committee. He worked on both. The president. Obama's campaigns served in the Obama Administration Simpler Than Blake. Thank you so much for joining US automobile. which very fortuitous to have you here in Hollywood to do this set say so? Sometimes you get lucky you know. Well let's get right into it first of all. I don't think a lot of people really understand exactly what the role of the DNC is in these elections because people talk about the DNC in different ways and thumb on the scale hands off. All that stuff Can can you describe what makes up the DNC and what you really do. I also appreciated the hand motions. You were doing.

Senate Democratic National Committee Senate Fund Blake president McConnell Obama Obama Administration Mitch vice chair US Michael Go legal counsel Hollywood New York TA
"co chair" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

Swing Left - How We Win

14:44 min | 1 year ago

"co chair" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

"While we may not agree I hope you believe me when I tell you that I made this decision out of principle and how van Dan Constitution ideal. My and I listen to me. This is episode seventeen of how we went all over the country ordinary people doing extraordinary things. We're giving you the tools that you need to jump in and make a difference right now. The Best Antidote to anxiety is action. The clock is ticking. And we want you to get twenty twenty ready. I'll write today. We're going to go inside the Democratic National Committee with Dnc co-chair an assembly member from the Bronx Michael Blake you talk about the DNC strategy to win in twenty twenty where and who we need to engage with. And we'll hear about the viral moment. When Michael Blake asked the question? We all really want to know the answer to why the Hell Hell does Tucker. Carlson still have the challenge. Fox loved the question. Then we're going to hear from a group of resisters in Connecticut who are making a big difference in Pennsylvania Vigna and around the country I'm Steve Pearson and Mariah Craven and this is how we win Elissa slack. Ken Speaking Truth her constituents in Michigan she is representing wanting these freshmen congress. People who we elected in purple districts were standing by their principles. Doing what we elected them to do. Regardless of any I WANNA even say perceived political fallout Everybody this is why we flipped the house in two thousand eighteen for this moment right here at the moment is here and it's a solemn moment. I'll be honest with you. I've been kinda down this last week. Oh No yeah yeah well. This is very interesting. I bet a lot of people are feeling this way. Talk about talk about why you're down. I think so I you know first of all. There's been so much lead up to impeachment impeachment impeachment. I mean I've got a sticker on my laptop that says impeach impeach trump. It says impeach trump to move on sticker and I have been supporting impeachment for a longtime but human nature dictates that we strive for hope in some way and even if our minds know that the chances are none of these Republicans are going to stand up and be actual Patriots Patriots and bringing human beings and ethical. This still part of me that wanted to see that happen. That was hoping that that would happen when I see them. In such lockstep step it's been disheartening. It has been But you know at the top of the episode. We heard from Lis- Lokken who is in a moderate moderate district in Michigan so purple district and a lot of her constituents is is people heard were angry and she represents what a lot of Democrats in the house. You have helped move. The impeachment inquiry forward is that this is not about partisan politics is not about Donald Trump himself. This is about violating the constitution and protecting the presidency moving forward and setting a standard. Even if he's not removed move from office we've put our foot down and said hey all you can't just go to foreign powers and get them to interfere in our elections. We need to show up for her again in twenty twenty definitely definitely show up for her and then also you know this is one of our action items are on our to do list for the week is call members of Congress and talk to them about impeachment right now l. polling shows that forty nine percent of the country is in favor of impeachment. Forty six percent are not people need to hear from us. The legislators need to hear hear from us so whether or not you. They're they're voting for impeachment. It helps to reinforce the idea that there is a significant chunk of the public like that is in favor of impeachment and supporting those members of Congress who are going to vote for impeachment that's absolutely right and trump in the Republicans right now are investing a a lot of money in Robo Calls New Republican supporters. So we have to counter that and it's going to be difficult because they're spending a lot of money doing it so we've got. We got got a flood. These offices with calls of support for impeachment. We've got a call these vulnerable Republican senators who are up for reelection on November third twenty twenty and let them know that their votes now will have consequences on November third. All right so added to the to do list for the week. And of course I there's GonNa be mad like as Tuesday as we record this and I can't wait to see all the footage from the impeach rallies all over the country I'M GONNA go on and say they're going to be huge. I know people are gonNA show up in a big way. That's going to be a big moment and again it adds to that public perception that yes. We are going to hold people accountable for their actions in office. It's really really important. I mean it's not the only thing we have to show up. We have to make our voices her and then we've got to follow that up with volunteering with sustained action getting involved as we've talked about and we're GONNA keep talking about in the Senate races but this this is the first step is is making our voices heard and letting these Republicans know that we are out in force that America supports this fascist president being removed from office. All right. Well I can't wait to hear what you have to say at tonight's impeachment rally in Los Angeles it's going to be inspiring is what I just said. Okay also coming up this week that we're looking forward to is the last Democratic Democratic presidential debate of the year. It's happening aid. It's happening almost didn't happen. I know we came close. I why did why did and it happened. Tell people why. We almost didn't have debate. Well we've had some organizing going on by the unions year in Los Angeles which is where this last debate will be held so it was a it was moved from one location because of a strike there and it was moved to loyal marymount university where there was another strike happening and to their credit. These candidates for president said. Hey we're not going to cross the picket get line. That's right to debate each other. So these presidential candidates are already doing more for workers and workers rights than the current occupant of the White House. yeah this is so important so unite here negotiated with cer- dex. Oh and now these food service workers workers on campus will earn more money and have more job security and I you know. I don't know that that would have happened without all of the attention from this debate. Debate and putting pressure on LMU potentially losing the debate. If if an negotiation wasn't reached. It seems to me that Democrats. It's really are working for the people bringing back that more. WOMP that now-defunt campaign. Oh well that's okay that that's true that that was the Kamla Harris slogan it's also like our democratic slogan in general although that's true that's true for the people for the workers we never since we're talking about the debate and calm was not going to be there. We never got your reaction to her dropping dropping out because as many made no you were her digital director on her Senate Campaign Right just ten twenty sixteen so no her a bit and the campaign pretty well. Yeah I was. I was devastated and I it. I know a lot of her campaign staff and I know that they were as dedicated to people and the processes as she is she continues to be. I think she's going to do an amazing things. Things as a senator continuing on moving forward. I think that you know I the day that she announced that she was ending her campaign. I thought about The video that she used to launch her campaign. And I gotTa Brag a little bit because some of the footage that I took in the in the Senate race was used in that in that campaign video and there was this moment where we were in San Diego and sixteen and and we were at a like a little campaign event and there was this woman there with this is just adorable little girl and Kamla loves loves children and just lights up when she's around them and I think that we've seen that in the videos that the campaign is since put out but I always would tell these events. If somebody had a kid I'd be like hold your head up. common-law will come over and that's how they would get to meet her so so the mom brings the little girls about six years old in front of the crowd and of course Then Attorney General Harris me to be line and for her and this little girl looked up at this woman with so much all in in hope and it was a little black girl. And I've never seen anybody look at someone like that and Carmela at that for so many kids in so many women so many people where you know they look at her and see something really hopeful and and it was really hard to lose that And I think that this This race is going to be a little bit worse off for. We've got great candidates but she was a fantastic one that just by virtue being that she had you know really great policies as well. And that's that's really important Horton but it's also important to have somebody who kids look out like that and we don't have anybody in the White House like that anymore so we'll l.. Look how about we replace. Bill Barr with in comal Harris's channel. That would be thank you for sharing that. That was really powerful and get another debate to finally get to hear how they differ. We're on healthcare policy. Few been waiting for that discussion smallest to me yet. So we might actually hear a lot of substance. Well we we have a great interview coming up with Michael Blake who's going to really take us inside the DNC and what they do and and his thoughts on organizing for twenty twenty. It was an amazing person to talk to you about that. Yeah really hopeful interview. Yea really hopeful and before we do that speaking of hope. What's what's your quick reason for hope? Oh man this feels like a Y- like the year of the Union and so just as the debate is actually happening because because of contract negotiations like no there was a historic auto workers. Strike this year. It's felt like unions unions have really just been killing it and we owe them so much. They're really even if you're not in a union currently They are making things better for people. We are going to see wages. Go up because of them and better healthcare and better safety as as usual so oh. I'm like feeling great about unions this week I love that. And what's your reason for hope and excitement this week. I'M GONNA go with Time magazine Gene Putting Greta thornburgh on the on the cover and making her the person of the year. Love it and you know we won't even go down the road of this this idiot Donald Trump and his asinine twitter comments about a sixteen year old autistic girl who is literally changing the conversation around on climate change. We're not going to go down that road and talk about that ass hat and his comments way. Do you got to mature to address that you hear that. Ah Sound Malania and her be best. Kim Really Tackling cyberbullying. Yeah Yeah AH literally cyberbullying sixteen year old autistic activist but Malania is the expert on on it. So you know. But she's he's amazing we've talked about her on podcast before many times and and I'm so grateful for her influence on this movement on my own own daughter. It's it's well. Well deserved she is in my heart and on Time Magazine's cover the person of the year. Oh that's so nice. His that made me feel good. Okay now I'm feeling good. What do I do with this good energy okay? Well here's your to do list is for the week and right before the holidays here. We have some stuff to do. Community talked about our actions around impeachment. Also call your representative. Call Your senator call other senators if they support impeachment. Say Thank you. It's important that they hear did that. We've got their back on supporting specially. If you're in one of these purple states make your calls. That's number one number two. Everyone should adopt a Senate race and start thinking and planning about how. You're going to do that over. The holidays isn't get into action in the New Year. We gotTa Get Twenty Twenty Ready People. That's right you can pick a state or senate race that you want to adopt and then swing swing. Laughed will give you will help you make a plan for how you're going to get involved so you don't necessarily have to be able to go to the state right which is great. Not everyone can go if you can if you have the means to do that. Please please do that because we need boots on the ground. That's really really powerful. That's the most effective thing we can do. But there's lots of ways to be effective go.

Senate Michael Blake Donald Trump DNC Congress senator Michigan president Los Angeles Democratic National Committee Twenty Twenty Carlson Tucker Fox Elissa slack Connecticut Kamla Harris
"co chair" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"co chair" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"You're on the left. I trump was. Mike is done on both sides. He's just gotTA gotta coming from both sides so many campaigns about threaten the needle right. There's no question uh-huh that but when you talk about population health what he's done against cigarettes and saving people's lives what he's done to fight the opioid gorge as people learn about Mike. They're going to say this is a fascinating fascinating guy. That has helped a lot of people. I'm going to take a harder. He'd take on this economy when the economy is is the best economy we've had in fifty years. What what is my Wall Street perspective? There you come into the on low income. It's it's about. It's about wage earners in this country. The wage age increase about doing great. Why am struggling? They've all mine so the economy is three and a half percent unemployment swarming in the lowest minority unemployment in history. Wise that a Wall Street you guys need to get out of this bubble that you're in right here and talk listen street three and a half percent and good or not you ask the low income. How her life is improved in the last years and she says she's fallen further behind you? Ask The middle income worker in America. They say I'm struggling. The president in for two and a half years further behind the wage gains are happening now. Three percent whatever. It is Middle Income Main Street for eight years. You could've talked the main street and they got nothing with. Obama explains why the Democratic Party has gone further left and why trump in the first place issues that have to be answered and have to is. Is he coming at this from the perspective of thinking all he wants to do is when the presidency or is he thinking if he can drag the Democratic Party further to the center that that's a success that south. Well I think the issue is winning the presidency. Our country is fractured right now. There's no question about that. We have to get somebody here in these next four years it's GonNa pull our our country together restore the alliances that we've had around this world so we can get our country back on track again so many different ways so that's the objective and you've got to win the primary obviously to do that and I know enough enough. Primary voters are interested in that that they're going to give Mike a real hard. Look you see Elizabeth Warren. Talking yesterday about I just listen having been then through as buying the election. I'm going out and talking to people. This guy thinks he comes in at Bernie Sanders talking about. I mean he's going to get hammered. They're going to say Elizabeth reports still in the way that she has pitches a lot of supporters. What's wrong with a guy from a middle talked about? How do you do it legitimate? How if you don't get any of the sixty three million deplorables florals and then you split Hillary Sixty five million with half of them going to Bernie Sanders? That's your stick on this stick. Yeah well where's the other sixty million there. They talk to the voters. I and let's get the deplorables or are you going to get the Elizabeth Warren. Look it's an interesting an interesting tact or Joe physician tactic if if you look at the way. The Democratic primary works because it's proportional allocation of delegates assume that that's a strategy to try and get through the primaries because unlike in sixteen when my party went and had basically winner-take-all even for those with the plurality maybe that's what it is. I just think you got the never trumpers I yeah I think you would also get appeal to people. Republicans who don't like some of the those are the main once. I think you'd get more than Democrats about the other Mary. You don't think the other mirrors mirrors pizza great guy obviously has a very different life experience in Mike. But Mike's ready to go from day. One in terms of business experience city eighty these the all the other candidates are a lot of them are good people all of them you know pounding. The streets setting up organizations talking to taking eighty-five thousand selfies three debates that they've already been to have someone a billionaire from New York City. Come and say none of you are good enough. I'm going to let me handle this is is is not. It doesn't look good and it's not gonNA. I don't think it's GonNa work all it takes all. This is what mom and races all about putting different points or the real fracture on the democratic outside. Okay I mean he's talking about Catholic or Elizabeth Warren. And Not your choice. Do you vote for them over the president trump about yes absolutely I mean our our country is in a very difficult spot right now. I don't think we're going to get to that point But America needs to pull itself elf-backed together the way the Americas tearing itself apart from within other rising each other is not a sustainable path. The reason I ask is because clearly you are a much more moderate. I mean to support Mayor Bloomberg you have to be a sort of moderate moderate Democrat guy that happens to be mayor right now right.

Elizabeth Warren Mike Bernie Sanders America Democratic Party Mayor Bloomberg TA Obama New York City Hillary
"co chair" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"co chair" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"That Download Service Hulu we just know we did the straight Disney plus we did the free I mean free they credit card I don't know we went. We went all in twelve ninety nine. I didn't pay for the one who paid for this year's. Oh you did you went in for three years. Yeah okay so what are the. What are the the quick family? Think of this whole thing because because the Sorkin boys we're very excited about the man delorean but we went through like the films and the boys like that I've seen that has deja it. Just tell this whole story. Yeah okay all right. We talked on Air. I think we did this. Yeah Yeah I think we're going. Yeah near the family. That didn't find anything. They wanted. That Gobert getting some bad news yesterday. In the city of London's stripped its operating license. The shares tumbled on that news before recovering somewhat during the day. Uber has said it will appeal and can't continue to operate while that appeal is pending joining us. Right now for more on this. Is Dan Primax Axios as business editor and Dan. How big of a deal is this for Uber? Does this spread beyond London. I mean it's a big deal. Were they to actually lose London right as you said they can continue being on the roads. You know London estimates are two three percent of overall revenue. Certainly one of its five biggest global cities. I'm I'm not sure it's a huge deal. Remember they were. I supposed to be suspended over a year ago. They were able to appeal. They got an extension etc.. When you look at what's happening in other cities it's it's usually more about ride? Hail as a category whether even in the US right you know issues of whether these people are really drivers are independent contractors or and other places broader licensing. London is a real auber specific thing so I don't think that necessarily kind of has has waves the carried other cities. I wrote it off myself at first but I what I didn't realize before reading some details yesterday is that there is this problem. Where unlicensed drivers can upload their photos onto this so they can be posing as somebody? They're not and that's a little concerning if that's what the technology actually allows if that's what their system actually allows that could be a problem if the other regulars regulators start looking at that too. You have the problem more. I think they said fourteen thousand rides with unlicensed insured drivers. I should say Because they weren't they said they were going to be an and then just from General Security Kirti perspective overall. Why have a system that you can't protect no look? You're absolutely right about that. I'm not I shouldn't downplay the I don't even want to call it a glitch because it's not that it's an exploit if if you will it's a real problem but it's again it's a specific one. That Uber should be able to solve. They say they're gonNA add some sort of facial recognition software. I'm not sure whether that a worker. Not but again. It does seem to be a specific technology problem as opposed to what we've seen with Uber and other right held companies in the past. which has been more of this kind of fundamental? Should these companies generally be allowed to operate great on our streets. And this isn't that so what do you think about the stock which At one point I looked at it. It was down about four and a half percent yesterday before it stabilized. Well it makes sense so people would freak out about this as I said if you look at Uber I believe it's five largest global cities comprise about twenty five percent of its Ryedale revenue. So it's a very big deal if it was to come off the market there's also a kind of I saw this in some. I think maybe the F. T. suggested well loses money on lots of things so if it has fewer drivers maybe it actually loses less money but it it doesn't it. It makes sense that the stock would actually go down off of this because it is a threat as you said if other cities whether they be in the US or globally if they realize and I'm sure they're looking being now if this exploit we've seen in London if this has happened in other cities Uber at the very least is gonNA face penalties Dan. It's good to see you back traveling. Okay thanks the possible. Foods reportedly in talks with investors about a new round of fundraising one. I still trying to figure this out. According to Reuters companies looking to capitalize capitalize on growing consumer demand for meat alternatives given the success of rival beyond me the report says impossible is looking rates between three and four hundred million dollars which would lift its valuation listen to between three and five billion the report cautions that plans may change best based on investor feedback. And I guess I assumed Jumping ahead that when this replaces all meet across the entire planet that evaluation will be more than three billion dollars and long way to go. I know it's a long way to go. I know it's a long way to go. But the market there is terminal pricing and people. If it's going going to happen we just gotTa Watch remember gene therapy gene therapy gene therapy gene therapy join the entire universe of gene therapy companies ten years ago when it was the the other one. What was the other one stem cells the entire stem so industry the market cap of all the companies combined? It was like four hundred million dollars and it's like we read about it the way until so you show it and they weren't there beyond beyond meat has been as high as two hundred thirty nine dollars so at that point was sick with four times higher than it is right now so so one point it had almost a twenty billion dollar mark. Here's the question. What do they do with that money? Today's to pay off early investors or do they use it to to increase their production. That's right that's the big question with it if you think there's more demand for it and you need to be able to ward if you've got five percent investment where if you have five percent of meat he replaced with this. Seems like it'd be a hundred billion dollar company if you ever got to that point but I think that tells you about. WHO's eating this stuff right now? And how but it king. KFC everybody's looking at it. It's you know it's just it's not necessarily in the stratosphere right now in terms of valuation if it's a real thing there there's been talk for a long time that if you're going to bring up China into our standards on those meat you gotta find another way or meat substitute right that you've got to find another way to supply it and that might be this but I don't think they've made as many inroads there at this point that would justify some of those I just think if I were If I could own stocks that I think if you even the story you don't don't believe they don't believe in this story but if you do if I could buy stocks because so many people like you do believe in it I would buy. You would buy it based on your really you you because based on the misinformed belief that you have the investor is being like a psychologist right psychoanalyzing psychoanalyzing and and crowds. So the question is whether there's a big enough crowd exactly well. I think eventually that you know these are very very reasonable valuations if if I say if it becomes a true alternative to to get protein too large masses of people around the world they make Turkey yet. Yeah there's a name for it. Oh tofurkey. Is the donor net. I mean impossible meat Turkey. Meat Turkey now but I think purdue who is working on some of those lines for the problem with okay if you do a ground meat. It's a lot easier way too much about this to try and actually give the density of a steak you cut into or Turkey breast or a chicken breast or something. That's a lot harder because you can mush it up and do it but to be able to layer it ribs again so you could the poor pouring it. It's this into something that looks like Turkey leg old the texture right on that. That's that's the trickier part of doing any in ground beef as an easier fake let someone else handle Turkey Dinner but also like flaming on. There's a lot of things that can't do yet. Yeah no oh believe me. I know I've seen what they can do and taste it and then had the after effects of it.

London Dan Primax Axios Turkey US Disney Hulu Sorkin purdue deja Reuters Gobert General Security Kirti Foods F. T. China
"co chair" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"co chair" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Problems it's human nature to hate problems. But why is that after all problems inspire us to mend things. Ben Things make things things better. That's why so many people work with IBM.

"co chair" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"co chair" Discussed on KTOK

"Committee is it. No, I'm co-chair. It's it's just a caucus on co-chair of it. What the heat what we the acronym for, you know, everything in DC military has had an acronym. It's called the heat team. And we got two things one. Respond to ridiculous proposals that the left put out there like the green new deal when they try to disguise it as a as a climate change Bill, but really it has zero to do with energy because it has one line at talked about eliminating all dependency on fossil fuels. And then it talks about really how to move us to government controlled society toward socialism by taking over buildings number universities takeover healthcare. And and eliminating air travel and making us all use high speed rail and eleven eight all combustible engines, I mean, literally eliminating all combustible ages. And and all that does is restrict the ability for individuals and move without the government controlled assistance and responding to socialist programs disguised in a in a nice package. This allows us the heat team to not just be proactive and responding, but then it also allows us to put a true all of the above energy proposal today. I was doing an interview. And and I pointed out the fact that if you went to just went and solar farms to power the need today. The United States needs today of energy for like Christie, just by wind and solar who would take out take up land mass. That's literally the size of Texas. The problem with the wind in in in solar is the wind doesn't always blow not isn't always shining, and we have to build a point that stuff out. And that's what the team is going to do. We're going to have.

co-chair United States Texas Christie
"co chair" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"co chair" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Are bringing down the cost of healthcare and prescription drug prices that we rebuild our country. We bring up wages, and now we clean up the mess in Washington DC that's been the mandate that we've been given. And that is what I will work toward on the political arm of the House Democrats and heading into the twenty twenty elections. The new d- triple C chair Sherry boost does that every single congressional district in the country will be contested and protected. Here's more. That over the last two cycles. I was the vice chair recruitment. I was the co-chair red to blue. I was the co-chair of women lead. And I was the chair of heartland engagement. So I've had four official rolls over the d triple c I know that building inside and out while I was the heartland engagement chair. I also had a very important role on the governmental side offense. I was one of the three co chairs of policy communications juggling those things at the same time. I raised and gave away contributed three million dollars more than one hundred candidates. All of the people come almost all of the members elect store here. I help them. Either went to their district story contributed to them. And I think the other thing that was very very important. Look, I'm a I'm a former college athletes. I love sports still love sports, still play sports and anybody who has any kind of. Athletic background knows that it's a team and you have to take a look at you. Don't put you kill O'Neill in as a point guard. You gotta have the right people and the right place. But when you look at that team,.

co-chair vice chair House Democrats Washington O'Neill official three million dollars
"co chair" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"co chair" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"But then this happened. It was as one media expert told a reporter one of the great promotional stunts in the history of television. That's your look back at this week in history and Ken Starr could add nothing to the proceedings. The astronaut to bring it up because there's nothing you can add to it because he has great respect for Brad Kavanagh, as I do how do you defend against a thirty five year old allegation that involves allege misconduct when you're sixteen or seventeen years old without specificity without definition Christine. Could not say where it happened or how it happened specifically or who was involved she gave different versions to the therapists, then she gave to the Washington Post. And so I don't know how you defend against something. And that character any man may I use the term Republican man is going to have exactly the same problem. Because if the democrat like Keith Allison. Who is co chair of the Democratic National Committee, six months ago, beat the hell out of some woman. He's a US congressman and Minnesota, and he's just select to be the next attorney general in the state of Minnesota, nobody seems to care if it's a Republican. Democrat Keith Ellison. There's there's no there's no inquisition whatsoever. Bill Clinton, John F Kennedy. No matter who it is. And doesn't make any difference. Ted Kennedy kill Mary, Jo Kopechne, e Keith Ellison beat up women. No problem co-chair, the Democratic National Committee. The media's not inquisitive at all. But if he's smear somebody on something probably false thirty five years ago. Then the media goes into overdrive, let's continue.

Keith Ellison Democratic National Committee congressman Christine Keith Allison Brad Kavanagh Ken Starr Minnesota Ted Kennedy reporter Bill Clinton Washington Post John F Kennedy co-chair US attorney Jo Kopechne Mary thirty five years thirty five year